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Respect: A Process of Universal Humanity
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: David Rutledge, Raul Nakasone
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent or 24 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will examine what it means to live in a pluralistic society at the beginning of the 21st century. We will look at a variety of cultural and historical perspectives and use them to help us address the program theme. We will pay special attention to the value of human relationships to the land, to work, to others and to the unknown. We will concentrate our work in cultural studies, human resource development and cross-cultural communication. This program is part of the Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies area. While the program is not a study specifically of Native Americans, we shall explore Native American perspectives and look at issues that are particularly relevant to Native Americans.
We will ask students to take a very personal stake in their educational development. Within the program's themes and subjects, students will pay special attention to how they plan to learn, what individual and group work they plan on doing, and what difference the work will make in their lives and within their communities. Students will be encouraged to assume responsibility for their choices. The faculty and students will work to develop habits of worthwhile community interaction in the context of the education process and liberation. The faculty are interested in providing an environment of collaboration in which faculty and students identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics.
Students will use and explore Bloom's Taxonomy, the theory of multiple intelligences, the relationship between curriculum, assessment and instruction, quantitative reasoning, self- and group-motivation communication, e-mail, resources on the Web and Web crossing, and skills in interactive Web pages and independent research.
Books by the following authors may be read: Howard Zinn, Paul Freire, M. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Howard Gardener, William Irwin Thompson and Ciro Alegria.
Credit awarded in: history, philosophy, cultural competency, communication, writing, political science, cultural anthropology, literature, indigenous arts, technology, indigenous studies, Native American studies, education and individual project work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change; and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, anthropology, the arts, multicultural studies, human services and the humanities.
Program Web Site
Program Updates:   (2/19/03) Might take new students in Spring. Speak with faculty for individual assessment.

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Resurrection and Revenge
Cancelled. See The Secret Garden as an alternative.
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Helen Cullyer, Charles Pailthorp
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

We are complex beings, confronted daily by fundamental dualities in our natures. Always conscious of life's flow, we imagine that it has permanence. Yet we know that we must die. We apprehend both good and evil in the world and within ourselves. Faced with evil, we waver between the demand for retribution and the demand for forgiveness. In this program, we will investigate a variety of attempts to resolve, or to live with, these dualities, by focusing on old versions and modern retellings of the stories of Electra, Orpheus and Christ. We hope to come to a greater understanding of life/death, good/evil and revenge/forgiveness, by considering not only the intellectual issues involved in, but also the emotional aspects of these dualities. Readings will include, Aeschylus' Oresteia, Sophocles' Electra, The Gospels, the poetry of Ovid, Virgil and Rilke, Freud's Civilization and its Discontent, C.S. Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia and selected essays by Hannah Arendt and C.S. Lewis. We will also consider music and films, such as Bach's St. Matthew Passion, Strauss's Elektra and the film Black Orpheus.
Credit awarded in: mythology, religion, writing and literature.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities.
Program Updates:   (11/20/02) Cancelled. See The Secret Garden as an alternative.

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Revolutions for a Global World
Fall, Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Dan Leahy, Jeanne Hahn
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; Political Economy and Social Movements and/or upper-division history or political science.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This is an advanced investigation of social revolutions in the 20th century and the possible shape of social revolutions in the 21st century. The program will begin with an intensive look at the structure of the world as it enters the 21st century. Within this discussion, we'll look at the changing nature of the nation-state at the end of the 20th century and its interaction with global institutions both public and private. Once we have a clear understanding of the contemporary global order, we will examine the experience of social revolutions in the 20th century such as those in the Russia, Mexico, China, Cuba, Iran and South Africa. Once we have understood the interaction between historical conditions and the way in which these revolutions gained state power, we'll begin our discussion of the possibility and shape of social revolutions in the 21st century, acknowledging that the historical conditions have changed fundamentally. Throughout this program we will be asking central questions regarding the conditions under which states lose their legitimacy, the way revolutionary movements develop in relation to the resistance they meet, and finally, when successful, how revolutions restructure the society in relation to the global world. Students will complete a substantive, collaborative research project.
Credit awarded in: history, political science, comparative revolutions, social science research and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in history, political economy and law.
Program Updates:   (11/19/02) Faculty Signature added

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Rules of Nature/Rules of Life
Fall quarter
Faculty: Nalini Nadkarni
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. One year in college, one year of college-level writing preferred. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 6 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

We will examine rules that pertain to a subset of disciplines and subjects within nature science, art, and the humanities. At the beginning and at the end of the program, students will describe the rules by which they live to better understand themselves and changes they can make in their own lives. We will emphasize the natural sciences, and also explore issues related to rules about ethnicity, incarceration, poetry, and sports. Seminar books will include works by Leo Tolstoy, Stephen Jay Gould, Karl Popper, and Mary Oliver. A natural history project will involve the collection, analysis, and storage of data from campus field sites on canopy-dwelling plants.
Students will participate in weekly seminars, and will write critical essays, journal work, and creative pieces. Students will have a variety of experiences that highlight the prevalence, arbitrariness, and commonality of rules in our lives, e.g., visiting religious activities, attending sports events, becoming differently abled, putting themselves in an ethnic or gender minority. Small groups of students will carry out an in-depth study of a single object-a store, a tree, a penal institution-and decide what rules apply to it. Group projects will be presented in written, oral, and Web site formats.
Credit awarded in: natural science, critical thinking, and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the liberal arts, arts, natural science, and writing.
Program Updates:    

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Russia: Empires and Enduring Legacies
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Patricia Krafcik, Robert Smurr
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 12 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Join us on an extraordinary journey as we explore the diverse peoples, cultures and histories of the region that was once demarcated by the borders of the Russian and Soviet empires. While we focus on the Russians, we will take a comprehensive, multicultural approach in our examination of other peoples who, from ancient times, have populated the vast expanses of Eurasian and Siberian steppes and forests.
In fall quarter, we will investigate Slavic, Turkic and Scandinavian contributions to early Russian society up to Russian imperial expansion in its 19th century zenith and the rise of the Russian Empire's radical revolutionary intelligentsia. Winter quarter emphasizes the great transformations of 20th-century Russiathe Bolshevik Revolution, the Stalin terror and the unanticipated collapse of the Soviet Union. Readings will include historical texts, epics and the literature of Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, Akhmatova, Pasternak, Rasputin, Petrushevskaya and others.
Spring quarter provides an opportunity to explore in greater depth selected topics from Russia's Eurasian culture and to pursue individual research. A series of workshops may include a study of the following: the cultures of distinctive ethnic groups, such as the Vikings, Mongols, Tatars, Cossacks, Caucasian and Siberian peoples, all of whom profoundly transformed Eurasia's culture and political landscape; Russian folklore and folk belief; the Cold War and its consequences for the East and the West; Soviet environmental practices and environmental degradation; Russian and Soviet painting and visual arts; or the literature of Dostoevsky.
Intensive Beginning Russian may be offered during summer 2002. Beginning and Intermediate Russian will be offered under separate registration in Evening and Weekend Studies as four-credit course sequences through the three quarters of the academic year. Students are strongly urged, but not required, to take advantage of these language learning opportunities.
Given sufficient interest, the faculty will arrange, or direct students to, study programs in Russia during summer 2003.
Credit awarded in: writing, Russian history, Russian literature and Russian culture. Students who complete advanced work will earn upper-division credit.
Total: 12 credits each quarter. Students may enroll in a separate four-credit course in Beginning or Intermediate Russian through Evening and Weekend Studies.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004­05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the diplomatic service, international business and trading corporations, graduate studies in international affairs and in Russian and Slavic studies.
Program Updates:   (3/25/03) Will accept new students in Spring. Call Pat Krafcik at 867-6491 for more information.

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Science Seminar: History and Mastery
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: E.J. Zita
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, good writing ability. Refer to details about this seminar at http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/physys2002/seminar.htm.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No
Meeting Times: Tuesday and/or Thursday, 5-7 p.m.
Email E.J. Zita for location, zita@evergreen.edu

This program consists of two sections, one focusing on physics readings and the other on math readings. Students can take either section for 4 credits or both for 8 credits. The learning goals for both sections include improved critical thinking and writing skills. In the fall physics section, we will focus on the history of electromagnetism and ideas in classical and modern physics, reading Hidden Attraction and The Physics of Star Trek, plus occasional articles. We will explore how hunches and fantasies can develop into scientific ideas, and how scientific ideas can be tested and improved. In the fall math section, we will focus on the history of mathematics, including set theory (the mastery of the aleph) and chaos. We will explore new understandings of the nonlinearity of nature, and how mathematical ideas are developed. Winter seminars will continue these themes, with the addition of quantum mechanics in the physics section and mathematics and humor in the math section. Weekly assignments will include pre-seminar meetings in small groups, one page essays, attendance at seminar, and online posts such as responses to classmates' essays. Students will also be asked to work with Writing Center tutors and attend occasional writing workshops.
Credit awarded in: history and philosophy of science and math.
Total: 4 or 8 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (1/30/03) Spring Quarter added.

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The Secret Garden
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Susan Aurand
Enrollment: 23
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Students must provide their own art materials, approximately $100­$150, and materials for a garden project.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is a one-quarter interdisciplinary study of the garden in art, mythology and science. Students will learn studio art skills in drawing and/or painting, and introductory botany and horticulture. They will make images exploring their individual visions of a "secret garden," and will develop small gardens of their own design. Together we will study the mythology and symbolism of the "secret garden," beginning with the universal myth of the lost paradise, and the passion to recreate a personal paradise on Earth through gardens, to the social impact of gardens, the garden as a symbol of sexuality and the garden as a symbol of an emerging ecological spirituality.
Activities in the program will include weekly lectures, seminar, studio workshops and journal writing. Each student will complete short essays on the seminar readings, be assigned studio and horticulture work and a major project expressing his/her vision of the "secret garden."
Students who may wish to have a garden space on campus at Evergreen's Organic Farm Community Gardens should contact the Director of the Community Gardens during winter quarter to make arrangements.
Credit awarded in: drawing, literature, humanities (art history, mythology), introduction to botany, writing and horticulture.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, art history, the humanities, ecology and botany.
Program Updates:   (3/7/03) Bill Ransom no longer on faculty team. Enrollment dropped to 23.

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Seeking Justice: Reclamation, Equality and Restitution
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Kristina Ackley, Peter Bohmer (FW), Steve Niva, Lori Blewett (S)
Enrollment: 72 (FW) 60 (S)
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 18 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $60 for field trips.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, spring quarter only.

The term justice conjures up many images and goals: the principle of moral rightness, to be honorable and fair in one's dealing with others, to redress historical wrongs and the pursuit of economic and social equality. It also raises issues of timeliness and social transformation. When and how can justice be delivered to those demanding it and whose privileges must be challenged?
While the concept of justice is often associated with the individual, this program will pay particular attention to collective and social struggles for justice both historically and in the contemporary period. We will examine how nations, societies, races, genders, classes and other social groupings have defined justice and to what extent their definitions cohere or conflict. In this context, the program will explore the connection between justice and conflict. Is conflict inevitable if we define justice as a redistribution of power and privilege? How can societies heal after periods of intense injustice?
This program will pursue these themes through theoretical readings and case studies. We will explore, for example, the struggles for justice by Native Americans and indigenous peoples around the world. We will also examine demands for reparations for slavery in the United States, the aims and impact of truth and reconciliation commissions in post-Apartheid South Africa, post-Pinochet Chile and contemporary Guatemala, and efforts to provide redress for victims of genocide. Attention will be given to struggles for environmental and economic justice, particularly in the context of contemporary globalization. Students will have an opportunity to pursue significant research projects. The faculty envision an opportunity for students to closely engage topics relevant to faculty backgrounds in Native American studies, community development and political economy.
Credit awarded in: globalization in the international system, contemporary issues in Native American studies, expository writing, federal Indian law and policy, introduction to comparative politics and social movement theory.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change; and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, politics, law, human rights work, tribal government and international solidarity work.
Program web site
Program Updates:   (11/19/02) Faculty Signature added.
(2/26/03) Will accept new students in Spring. Please note that the program is now divided into two separate focus areas. Steve Niva is leading a study of Palestine and Isreal. Kristina Ackley is leading a study of Native American studies. Speak with the faculty about entering either section.
(4/1/03) Lori Blewett has been added to the faculty team for spring quarter.

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Seven Continents, Eleven Blocks, One Community
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Willie Parson, Eddy Brown, Joye Hardiman, Lowell Kuehn, Larry Mosqueda, Gilda Sheppard, Artee Young, Tyrus Smith, Barbara Laners
Enrollment: 225
Prerequisites: Junior/Senior standing required for admission to Evergreen Tacoma.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: None
Internship Possibilities: Internships are not required. Students may elect to do an internship during spring quarter.

The Evergreen State College Tacoma Campus has historically been an active participant in the revitalization and maintenance of a vital, diverse inner-city core in the "Hilltop." What has been, several times before, a commercially prosperous thoroughfare has become, in recent years, a sluggish and variable marketplace. What was once several blocks of mixed businesses catering to a wide variety of consumer needs is today a random scattering of small businesses, neither comprehensive nor cohesive as a place of business and commerce.
This yearlong program will focus its studies on the economic vitalization of K Street, through its interdisciplinary offering. In fall quarter, students will learn the basic social scientific theories and concepts necessary to understand the social, cultural, economic, historical, environmental, demographic and political forces that shape the rise, decline and revitalization of markets in urban communities. They will study the strategies and initiatives that have succeeded or failed as community economic development initiatives. Through the use of art, literature, visual imagery and ethnography students will learn to record, document and represent the social forces that have and will influence economic development in urban communities. These substantive areas of study will be supplemented by the program's traditional emphases on autobiographical writing, quantitative reasoning, research methodology and technological competency.
Students will, over the course of the next two quarters, act as researchers, documenters and facilitators of the process to develop a vision of K Street for the next 25 years. The year will be an intensive practicum where students will immediately convert theories and concepts into practical applications in the businesses, community centers and neighborhoods of the Hilltop.
The program format will consist of large group lectures and dialogues, small group book seminars, workshops and collaborative projects. Data collection, analysis and oral, written and multimedia skills development will supplement the program's broader focus on acquiring and applying theories and concepts.
Credit awarded in: community studies*, urban studies*, economics and community development*, public policy*, writing*, literature*, statistics*, research methodology*, scientific inquiry*, ethnography*, urban sociology*, history*, computer studies* and multimedia*.
Total: 16 credits each quarter. Students may elect to do internships during spring quarter for variable credits up to 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Tacoma Campus
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in community development, cultural advocacy, organizational leadership, law and public policy, education, social and human service administration, environmental studies and public health, media and other creative arts.
Program Updates:   (2/28/03) New students who are already admitted to Evergreen Tacoma are welcome, no signature or advanced preparation is required.

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A Silver Sky: Poetry and Place in the Pacific Northwest
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Bill Ransom, Matthew Smith(FW)
Enrollment: 48(FW), 24(S)
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 12 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes -To interview for admission spring quarter, new students should bring a few recent poems and essays to the Academic Fair for faculty review. Students may also e-mail their work to ransom@evergreen.edu
Special Expenses: Up to $200 for field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

What is our experience of place? How does place form our experience? How do our rhythm, our sense of time, our feeling for beauty, our words emerge from our individual and collective engagement with the world of our experience? How do these expressions of our experience shape us and call us to further engagement with our place? We will address these questions as we examine our own experience in and with the Pacific Northwest. As we come to see how the mist over the valley bottoms has been engaged in a dialogue with the people who live along the banks of the river, we can begin to see what conversations surround us and what stories await discovery and voice.
We will investigate the stories of the Pacific Northwest, including the stories that the natural history tells, and we will come here primarily through poetry. Reading and writing, observation and expression, the making of place and the embedment of our lives in this place will invest our process and our products. We will explore history, legend, natural history, story and the rich poetic tradition of the Pacific Northwest. By attaching ourselves to the particular we will reflect upon the larger world. We will write constantly; as William Stafford said, "If you're not writing a poem a day, your standards are too high." We will perform our work aloud. We will listen. And we will go through the process of writing, rewriting and preparing something for publication while learning the basics of copy editing and manuscript preparation. Students will select a publication (audience) that fits their work and submit to that publication at the end of each quarter. Publication itself is not required, only the process toward publication. We imagine this work as demanding, deliberate and a great deal of pleasure. Guest speakers and field trips will further enrich our place-based work.
Spring quarter we will investigate the role of place in the poetry of the Pacific Northwest. Students will conclude our major project from fall and winter quarters-a digital anthology of Northwest poetry complete with critical essays and biographies of the poets. We received an EFFI grant to collect, assemble and distribute this anthology free to participating poets, regional libraries and area colleges. Other discussions will identify relationships and distinctions between the concepts of home and of place. We return to the natural history studies that we began in fall quarter with a poetic transect of The Evergreen State College. Publication work will continue in digital formats, and students will receive some basic instruction in letterpress operation. We will experience Eastern Washington when we camp for a week at Sun Lakes State Park. Finally, we will compile an anthology of our own poetry of place, some of which already hangs in our website gallery. Texts include, but are not limited to, the following: Northwest Passage, Dietrich; Hole in the Sky, Kitteridge; Housekeeping, Robinson; The Natural History of Puget Sound Country, Kruckeberg; Space and Place, Tuan; Homeground, Trueblood & Stovall; Whole Houses Shaking, Bodeen; others TBA.
Credit awarded in: literature, art, history, poetry, regional studies, writing poetry, writing essays, publishing and natural history of Washington state.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in writing, editing, history, regional studies, teaching, law and environmental studies.
Program Updates:   (2/24/03) Spring Quarter added.
(3/3/03) Faculty Signature added.
(3/7/03) Matt has left the program. The enrollment limit has been reduced to 24 students; 6 freshmen; 18 sophomore to seniors. Matt Smith will be in the contract pool.

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So You Want to Be a Teacher? Exploring Issues of Development, Learning and Schooling
Fall, Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Sherry Walton, Terry Ford
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is for people interested in pursuing teaching as a career choice or who are interested in schooling and equity. An introduction to theories of learning, language acquisition and child development is the focus of fall quarter. The guiding question for the quarter is: What is the role of development in the learning process?
During winter quarter, we will investigate the relationships of learning, schooling and diversity. Students will select a particular model of schooling (e.g., home-school, public school, Waldorf, Sudbury), research its origins, beliefs about learning, development and teaching practices, and then complete an analysis of which groups of learners these structures serve and why. Students in this program can expect to use writing as a tool for learning, develop a research-based understanding of child development, investigate the historical, sociocultural and organizational contexts of schools, and develop skills in formulating and pursuing a research question, analyzing schooling practices and making public presentations.
Program activities will include interactive lectures and workshops, seminars, weekly writing, small-group investigations and a long-term project exploring and critiquing a particular approach to schooling. Participants' work in the program will be assessed through written papers, participation in all activities, projects and a final portfolio.
Credit awarded in: learning theory, language development, developmental psychology, historical and social foundations of education and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education and counseling.
Program Updates:    

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Student Originated Studies: American Studies
Cancelled. Students who are interested in American Studies should contact David Marr and/or Matt Smith.
Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: David Marr
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and for sophomores prepared to carry out advanced study.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Interested students who have a project in mind should arrange an appointment to meet with David Marr, from January 6 to March 5, 2003, to discuss their plans. Students may contact David at (360) 867-6751, or The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505, or marrd@evergreen.edu.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for students to create their own course of study and research. Working with the faculty sponsor, students (two or more) devise projects and then meet, usually weekly, in a small seminar to present their work. The sponsor will support students to do research in American literature, American history and American philosophy, as well as other areas of the humanities.
Previous student-originated projects by Evergreen students have been centered on such topics as Utopia, trends in literary theory, skepticism and belief in American philosophy, comedy, contradictions in the American Reform Tradition, identity in African American thought, literary selves, and pseudo-events in American culture and politics.
Credit awarded will reflect the type of work done by each student and may vary depending on individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, teaching, law, business and the arts.
Program Updates:   (3/7/03) Cancelled - Students who are interested in American Studies should contact David Marr and/or Matt Smith.

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Student Originated Studies: Media
Fall, Winter, Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Sally Cloninger, Brian Alves (W)
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; Mediaworks (the entry-level program in media studies at Evergreen) or its equivalent (i.e., approximately a year of media skill training, media history and media theory).
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must submit a project proposal and portfolio containing copies of recent faculty evaluations, a sample of your writing and a VHS tape that contains two examples of your best work in film or video to Sally Cloninger, The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505. Sally will review applications during May 2002. Applications and portfolio requirements will be available from Academic Advising by May 1, 2002. Students will be informed of acceptance by May 17, 2002.
Special Expenses: Depends on the nature of student projects.
Internship Possibilities: Yes

Students are invited to design their own small, group contracts in aspects of media production, design, writing, history or theory and to collaborate with media faculty. SOS groups could be organized around a collaborative production, a theme, a critique group, etc. Successful SOS: Media groups in the past have involved an experimental television production group, an animation critique group, a senior film collective, a work-in-progress critique group and a screenwriting group.
This is not the place to do beginning studies in media. It should be seen as an opportunity for students who share similar skills and common interests to do advanced work that may have grown out of previous academic projects and programs. Remember this is not a class that you just sign up for (although you will register in SOS with the faculty member's signature), you must gather a group of like-minded students and design the class yourselves with help from the faculty sponsor. Students will work with faculty before and during the first few weeks of the program to design small, group contracts that will be supported by this year's SOS program.
Credit awarded in: media studies and production.
Total: 8, 12 or 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in media, film, video and communications.
Program Updates:   (2/19/03) Not accepting new students in Spring.

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A Study of Violence
Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Justino Balderrama
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. In order to be considered for enrollment, prospective students must submit a two-page typed statement of interest. The statement should express clearly: (1) the degree of interest in the program, (2) an assessment of reading and writing skills, and (3) evidence of the ability to work independently. Continuing Evergreen students also should attach a copy of a previous "Faculty Evaluation of Student Achievement." Send the statement to Justino Balderrama, The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505, any time up to or during the Academic Fair, March 6, 2003. Students will be notified of acceptance into the program by March 7, 2003. If any questions exist, contact the faculty who is happy to respond, (360) 867-6051.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

In this upper-division, group contract we will explore the socio-cultural meaning of violence: we will address the critical question, what is the social reality of violence in the United States? Thus, we will examine how the institutions, symbols, beliefs, attitudes and everyday social practices found within the United States create and sustain violent behavior. We will critically investigate the cultural connections between violent crime, youth violence, media, literature, art and the U.S. "culture of violence." Our approach will be interdisciplinary using sources from both the social sciences and the humanities that inform our study of violence. We will also explore the social work and human services intervention models that inform successful violence prevention programs.
Credit awarded in: social psychology, cultural studies, criminology, social work and human services.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences.
Program Updates:    

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Taking the Pulse: Business, Society and Ethics
Fall, Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Cynthia Kennedy, Dean Olson, Toska Olson
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Overnight field trip during week two of fall quarter. Approximately $75 to be paid at the Cashier's Office by October 4, 2002.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, winter quarter as part of the program.

Every day businesses are faced with ethical dilemmas. In the late 1990s, Levi Strauss was under pressure from human rights activists to stop allowing contractors to use underage workers. But the company discovered that if the children lost their jobs, they would be impoverished and maybe driven into prostitution. Their innovative response drew on a number of skills: financial, managerial, ethical and creative. Taking the Pulse will develop these same skills, helping students identify right, just and fair decisions made by both the private and public sectors.
Throughout the program, we will examine the role that business plays in society and the ethical problems that can arise in a capitalist system. Students will use a number of different lensesfinancial, sociological, ethical, sustainableto critique businesses using case studies. Working individually or in small groups, students will balance financial and ethical skills to resolve moral dilemmas and communicate them in written and oral formats. This program is intended for students with little business background who are interested in learning to exercise moral reasoning and to better understand how economics, finance and social forces interact to shape the world around us. We will admit students from all disciplines with the goal of creating a close-knit learning community.
Credit awarded in: financial management*, sociology, economics, business, statistics and ethics.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2003­04.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in public administration, nonprofit organizational management and business management.
Program Updates:   (11/19/02) Faculty Signature added

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Trees and Humans: Ecology, Art and Culture
Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Nalini Nadkarni
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; one year of college-level science (ecology, field studies, natural history), one year of college-level writing.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Faculty will assess student's ability to meet the prerequisites. Students must submit a letter describing their academic experience to Nalini Nadkarni, The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505 or to nadkarnn@evergreen.edu by December 4, 2002. Students will be notified by December 6, 2002.
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 for one, two- to three-night, field trip to the Olympics or Cascades.
Internship Possibilities: No

Trees are Earth's endless effort to speak to the listening heaven. Rabindranath Tagore, Indian poet Stories and fortunes of trees and humans are as intricately linked as the complex branching systems that link tree root to tree crown. The products derived from trees used by humans are diverse, ranging from such functional objects as paper, lumber and boats to aesthetic objects such as sculpture and jewelry to spiritual objects such as masks and amulets. Trees create sacred places in many communities and cultures. Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest used their wood, bark, roots and foliage to create objects needed for nearly all aspects of their lives. They also mitigate negative impacts of concentrated human dwellings, and the growing field of urban forestry is documenting the physical benefits of having trees in urban areas.
We will explore the connections between trees and humans in many cultures and time periods, drawing upon our own experiences on campus and in the Pacific Northwest region. We will study the features of treestheir ecology, physiology and anatomywith the intent to better understand their connection with humans.
This program will engage in a variety of experiences designed to highlight the multiplicity of ways in which trees are used: the making of a functional or aesthetic/spiritual object in the Evergreen Wood Shop; field trips to studios of wood sculptors; inventory and analysis of objects that come from trees in stores and markets. A wood anatomist will guide us in a lab to make thin sections of a variety of native woods to better understand the microscopic components of wood that make different species distinctive. Each of these experiences will constitute the kernel of a written essay that will be exchanged among seminar groups and discussed.
We anticipate one extended field trip to the Olympic Peninsula to view wooden art and functional objects created by the Makah Indians, hike in the old-growth forests in the Hoh Valley, visit an industrial lumber mill, and stay with families that are supported by the timber industry.
Students will carry out an in-depth study of a single tree on campus. This may take the form of an ecological, physiological or artistic study of the tree. Students will also be required to find expression in some aspect of the creative artsdrawing, painting, carving, photography, dance or music.
Credit awarded in: forest ecology, tree physiology, art and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the liberal arts, arts, natural science, writing, anthropology and Native American studies.
Program Updates:    

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Tribal: Reservation-Based/ Community-Determined
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Yvonne Peterson, Michelle Aguilar-Wells, Jeff Antonelis-Lapp, Frances Rains
Enrollment: 100
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For information consult the Director, Yvonne Peterson, The Evergreen State College, Lab I, Olympia, WA 98505, (360) 867-6485.
Special Expenses: Travel expenses related to at least three weekend visits to the Olympia campus and one visit to one of the reservation sites each quarter.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is primarily designed for upper-division students seeking a liberal arts degree. Program themes change yearly on a rotating basis. The theme is American Indians and The Law. This community-based and community-determined program seeks tribal members and other students who work or live on a reservation.
The program emphasizes community-building within the Native American communities. Classes focus on computer technology, writing, quantitative reasoning, research skills and critical thinking. Students and tribal officials design the curriculum by asking what an educated member of an Indian nation needs to know to contribute to the community. The interdisciplinary approach allows students to participate in seminars while also studying in their individual academic interest areas.
Curriculum development for the academic year begins with community involvement the previous spring. Students and tribal representatives identify educational goals and curriculum topics. A primary goal of this process is the development of students' ability to be effective inside and outside the Native community. Using suggestions received, the faculty develop an interdisciplinary curriculum and texts, methods and resources to assist the learning process. Students make the learning appropriate to their community.
Within the framework of the identified curriculum, the premise is that an "educated person" needs to have skills in research, critical thinking, analysis and communication. Material is taught using a tribal perspective and issues related to tribal communities are often the topics of discussion. Scholarship, academic gain and critical thinking skills are assessed as part of student evaluations.
Credit awarded will depend upon topics adopted in the program.
Total: 16 credits each quarter. Students may enroll in a four-credit course each quarter with faculty signature.
Planning Unit(s): Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2003­04.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in human services, tribal government and management, law, natural resources, community development, Native American studies, cultural studies and K-12 teaching.
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) Allen Jenkins and Frances Rains join the faculty team. The enrollment limit is now 112.

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Turning Eastward: Explorations in East/West Psychology
Cancelled. See the new program entitled Liberation Theology: East and West as an alternative.
Fall, Winter/Group Contract
Faculty: Ryo Imamura
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must have interest in the subject and college-level expository writing ability. Students must submit a portfolio including an essay questionnaire. For information and to obtain the questionnaire, contact Ryo Imamura at imamura@evergreen.edu or the program secretary at The Evergreen State College, Lab I, Olympia, WA 98505, (360) 867-6600. Submissions will be accepted beginning May 6, 2002, until the class is filled.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Western psychology has so far failed to provide us with a satisfactory understanding of the full range of human experience. It has largely overlooked the core of human understandingour everyday mind, our immediate awareness of being with all of its felt complexity and sensitive attunement to the vast network of interconnectedness with the universe around us. Instead, it has chosen to analyze the mind as though it were an object independent of the analyzer, consisting of hypothetical structures and mechanisms that cannot be directly experienced. Western psychology's neglect of the living mindboth in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilitieshas led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of the East, particularly Buddhism, which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.
Eastern psychology shuns any impersonal attempt to objectify human life from the viewpoint of an external observer, instead studying consciousness as a living reality that shapes individual and collective perception and action. The primary tool for directly exploring the mind is meditation or mindfulness, an experiential process in which one becomes an attentive participant-observer in the unfolding of moment-to-moment consciousness.
In this program, we will take a critical look at the basic assumptions and tenets of the major currents in traditional western psychology, the concept of mental illness and the distinctions drawn between normal and abnormal thought and behavior. We will then investigate the eastern study of mind that has developed within spiritual traditions, particularly within the Buddhist tradition. In doing so, we will take special care to avoid the common pitfall of most western interpretations of eastern thoughtthe attempt to fit eastern ideas and practices into unexamined western assumptions and traditional intellectual categories. Lastly, we will address the encounter between eastern and western psychology as possibly having important ramifications for the human sciences in the future, potentially leading to new perspectives on the whole range of human experience and life concerns.
Credit awarded in: personality theory, abnormal psychology, Buddhist thought and practice, Taoism, communication skills and social psychology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
This Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in psychology, counseling, social work and religious studies.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (11/20/02) Cancelled.
See the new program entitled Liberation Theology: East and West as an alternative.

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Undergraduate Research in Scientific Inquiry
Fall, Winter, Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Clyde Barlow, Dharshi Bopegedera, Andrew Brabban, Judith Cushing, Jeff Kelly, Rob Knapp, Betty Kutter, Stu Matz, Jim Neitzel, Neal Nelson, Janet Ott, Paula Schofield, E.J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Negotiated individually with faculty.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

A number of the faculty in this planning unit are engaged in research projects that offer collaborative research opportunities for advanced students. These provide an important mode of advanced work in the sciences, taking advantage of faculty expertise, Evergreen's flexible structure and excellent equipment. In general, students begin by working in apprenticeship mode with more senior personnel and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific program. These projects generally run 12 months a year; a signature is required from the faculty with whom students will be working.

Clyde Barlow and Jeff Kelly work with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment.

Dharshi Bopegedera is interested in studying vibration-rotation spectra of unstable molecules. Students with a solid background in chemistry can get experience in synthesizing unstable gaseous molecules and recording infrared spectra with the FTIR spectrophotometer.

Andrew Brabban (biotechnology) is interested in developing biological technologies for agriculture, industry and health care that improve the efficiency of a modern process, or generally improve the quality of life for society. Current student projects include technologies to produce pharmaceutical synthons, reduce the incidence of E. coli 0157:H7 in the human food chain (in collaboration with Betty Kutter and Dr. Callaway, University of Texas) and the role of DNA as an environmental pollutant (in collaboration with LOTT sewage treatment plant). Student projects utilize techniques and receive credit in molecular biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry and microbiology.

Judith Bayard Cushing studies how scientists use distributed computing and data to conduct research. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or molecular biology, forest ecology, chemistry or physics and a strong motivation to explore new computing paradigms, such as object-oriented systems and multiplatform computing.

Rob Knapp studies thermal and electric energy flows in buildings, as a contribution to ecologically conscious design of homes and workplaces. A National Science Foundation grant has provided instrumentation to measure heat loss, air flows, solar gains and related aspects of conventional and alternative buildings by which to compare different approaches to energy conservation and renewable resource use. Students with backgrounds in physics, electronics or computer modeling can help with these explorations.

Betty Kutter (molecular biology) and Jim Neitzel (biochemistry) study Bacteriophage T4, which has been a key model organism in molecular genetics for more than 50 years. Its infection of E. coli leads to rapid cessation of host DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. These faculty members are working to clone and overexpress the many host-lethal genes that are responsible, purify and characterize their protein products, determine their specific functions, look at ways in which they can be used to better understand bacterial metabolism, and examine the infection process under a variety of environmental conditions. Evergreen is the center for genomic analysis and database development for these phages, and work with phage ecology and potential uses as antibiotics.

Stu Matz (biology) uses a variety of anatomical, molecular and developmental techniques to analyze the organization of various regions of the brain in order to understand the behavior of aquatic organisms. Currently, he is investigating the Pacific salmon brain. In the past he has worked with zebra fish, cichlid fish and aquatic salamanders.

Neal Nelson (computer science) oversees the Network Systems Lab. It is a small hands-on research lab for advanced computing students who are interested in studying new developments in computer networking. The curriculum is organized as a three-quarter contract with credits in assigned topics recommended by the faculty. Students are expected to affiliate with their regular program of study. Prospective students must be seniors, have taken Data to Information, Computability and Cognition or Student Originated Software and be recommended by a faculty member. Selection of three to five students will be made by the computing faculty together with current networking lab staff and the advanced computing support staff.

Janet Ott studies alternative healing methods, especially the mechanisms involved in acupuncture and acupressure, by measuring changes in such physiological processes as EEG, ECG, EMG and respiration during treatments. Students with strong backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics or statistics can obtain laboratory experience applying their expertise to this growing field. Students with an interest in alternative medicine may also find this laboratory experience of use to their training.

Paula Schofield (polymer chemistry, organic chemistry) is interested in the field of biodegradable polymers. Efforts to use biodegradable materials have been initiated to reduce the environmental impact of plastic wastes. Several of these biodegradable materials are polyesters and they have attracted much industrial attention as "green thermoplastics" for a wide range of agricultural, marine and medical applications. Today, research and development on microbial polyesters are expanding in both polymer and biological sciences. Students with a background in organic chemistry will gain experience in the preparation and characterization of suitable biodegradable polymer systems, and will monitor degradation of these polymers by a variety of microorganisms. Techniques students will use include SEM, DSC, GPC and enzyme isolation and purification.

E.J. Zita (physics) studies the structure and dynamics of magnetic stars such as the Sun. Like plasmas (ionized gases) in fusion energy research labs, stars can create and respond to electromagnetic fields. For example, the changing magnetic fields near the surface of the Sun can heat the solar atmosphere and increase the Sun's luminosity. One would expect the Sun's gas to cool as it moves away from the surface; however, the solar corona can be millions of degrees hotter than the photosphere. A NASA grant funds investigations into this puzzle and for collaborations with scientists in Boulder, Colo. and abroad. Students can help Zita do analytic calculations of magnetic dynamics or compare numerical models with extensive datasets from ground-based and space-based observations.

Credit will be awarded in areas of student work, e.g., lab biology* and chemistry,* computer science*, health sciences*, teaching and environmental sciences*, physics* and astronomy lab biology*.
Total: 4 to 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2003­04.
This Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in chemistry, biology, computer science, health science, environmental sciences, physics, astronomy and teaching.
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) This program involves work that is individually arranged with faculty. Faculty approval is required prior to registering.
(2/28/03) New students are accepted on a case-by-case basis. Speak with individual faculty for details.

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Weird and Wondrous
Fall, Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Jean Mandeberg, Thad Curtz
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This program accepts first-year students only.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Up to $150 per quarter for studio supplies, depending on your project.
Internship Possibilities: No

Some things are weird. Some fill us with wonder. In our world, it sometimes seems that it's much rarer to be filled with wonder than to call things weird. In this program we will be both creating and thinking together about some special situations in which experiences are simultaneously weird and wonderful. The program's activities will include studying, discussing and writing about literature, art and theory from psychology, philosophy and other social sciences. We'll also spend a considerable amount of our time creating collaborative projects about the program's themes, sharing them with each other and reflecting on them. For example, in studying the theme of travel, we might work on a contemporary anthropologist's book about encountering a new culture; Greenblatt's Marvelous Possessions, a history of the ambiguous functioning of wonder in the Europeans' conquest of the New World; and a biography of Joseph Cornell, who made mysterious art in tiny boxes while voyaging nowhere but up and down a few streets in New York. At the same time, studio assignments in metal or mixed media might ask students to make their own passports, their own maps, then their own amulets as another way of exploring ideas and feelings about travel. Throughout, we'll be using the issue of the weird and wondrous as a way to explore some enduring questions about convention and creativity in the arts, the interactions between language and experience, cross-cultural illuminations and misunderstandings, normal and extraordinary experience, pity, disgust, the uncanny and the sublime.
We plan to work slowly and thoughtfully. We hope to increase our own capacities for wonder as well as developing, together, some categories for understanding this special kind of experience and its relations to other aspects of our lives and our historical situation.
Credit awarded in: literary and social theory, studio art, art history, film, writing and literature.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language and Expressive Arts.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the arts and humanities, and for any careers involving encounters with a wide range of people and experiences, like medicine, social work or teaching.
Program web site.
Program Updates:   (11/19/02) Faculty Signature added
(11/20/02) This program is now first-year (freshmen) only, rather than all-level.

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What Are Children For?
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Bill Arney, Nancy Koppelman
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 12 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Childhood has a history. Until roughly 200 years ago, most children were necessary: They contributed labor to the maintenance of the family home, dressed in the fashion of adults and were expected to reproduce the circumstances of their birth.
The American Revolution disrupted virtually all social hierarchies, including those within the family. Inspired by Locke and Rousseau, educated people began to view childhood as a stage in life qualitatively unique. Eventually, children no longer participated directly in the adult world. Children became children and these new beings were supervised by paid workers and furnished with consumer goods to entertain and enrich them. Rather than contributors to maintenance of the home, children became, almost exclusively, consumers in the home. Childhood became, for many moderns, the most "authentic" time of life, and people worked to recapture it in order to live more fulfilling lives. In our own time, it is not at all clear just what children are for, unless they are screens for the projected desires of adults whose own purposes are unclear.
Students will read about childhood and spend a significant amount of time watching children in places like playgrounds, schools, backyards, dinner tables, TV rooms, malls, woods, or pediatricians' waiting rooms.
Credit awarded in: history, sociology and education.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in history, sociology, education, parenting.
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) New, not in printed catalog

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What's Love Got to Do with It? Men, Women, Marriage and Families
Fall, Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Charles Pailthorp, Stephanie Coontz
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This class will analyze contemporary debates about what's happening to marriage, family life and youth, using historical data and social science methodology to critically evaluate conflicting claims. First quarter, we will trace the evolution of marriage laws, values and relations in America, along with the different experiences and expectations of men and women within marriage. We will then examine contemporary data on changing gender roles and marital behaviors, including discussion of cohabitation, divorce and same-sex unions. Second quarter we will discuss how changes in family systems and larger social institutions have affected children and youth, paying particular attention to the widespread belief that the education system is in decline.
This class will require students to lay aside preconceived notions and rigorously examine evidence and argumentation. Reading and writing demands will be challenging, and faculty will conduct workshops on critical reasoning and effective writing.
Credit awarded in: history, sociology, critical thinking (including quantitative reasoning), expository writing and public policy.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences, history, law, social work, education and public policy.
Program Updates:   (11/20/02) Stephanie Coontz will leave the program Winter Quarter. Added: Maya Parson for winter quarter.

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What's Your Question?
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Terry Ford, Sherry Walton
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: An existing question you wish to explore.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Depending on research question. If travel is involved or special equipment is needed, the student is responsible for the cost.
Internship Possibilities: No

Konrad Lorenz filled his home with animals to explore the relationship between animal and human behavior. Beverly Taytum interviewed and observed students to develop an understanding of race relations and the developmental stages of African American children's identity formation. Daran Kravan relived his years in the Cambodian Killing Fields to make meaning of those experiences. Terry Tempest Williams immersed herself in nature to search for an understanding of the challenges her family faced.
These people all sought answers to questions that consumed them, that demanded answers. This program is for first-year and transfer students who also have compelling questions they want to begin to answer. Because each person's question requires a different focus, a substantial amount of time will be devoted to individual projects. We will read and discuss a variety of books by and about people who sought answers to complex questions. We will formulate clear questions, develop approaches for seeking answers, and create multiple ways of demonstrating knowledge. Research methods may include traditional library-oriented and Internet research as well as documentation of anecdotal information through oral histories, surveys and interviews. Methods of data gathering, analysis, reporting and presentation will be explored. Students will have options of demonstrating their learning through oral presentations, photographic essays, written essays, video or multimedia.
Credit awarded in: writing, introduction to qualitative research, introduction to statistics and content-specific knowledge developed as a result of the individual inquiry.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program is preparatory for: future studies in any upper-division program or careers that require the ability to formulate a research question, determine appropriate approaches for seeking and evaluating answers and making public presentations.
Program Updates:    

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Women and Violence: Meaning to Survive
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Grace Chang
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. To apply, students are required to write a typed statement of interest. In addition, continuing Evergreen students should attach a copy of a previous “Faculty Evaluation of Student Achievement.” Application materials are available at my office, Seminar 4168. Application materials must be received by March 5, 2003, by mail or in person at the Academic Fair. I will also conduct brief interviews at the Fair. Please e-mail me at changg@evergreen.edu to schedule an interview appointment. You will be notified of admission to the program by March 19, 2003.
Special Expenses: $15 per student for field trips/ guest speakers
Internship Possibilities: No

“For to survive in the mouth of the dragon we call America, we have had to learn this first and most vital lesson—that we were never meant to survive.” --Audre Lorde
What does it mean to survive as a woman in this world, in the face of psychological, sexual, physical, social, economic and legal violence? How do we address this violence in our intimate relationships and in a broader society? We will explore and build on personal and collective responses to these forms of violence, including organizing against domestic violence, rape, racist and homophobic hate crimes, welfare reform, the prison industry, border violence and sex trafficking of women and girls. We will examine how these experiences and responses are different for queer women, low-income women, women of color and Third World women.
Credit awarded in: women’s studies, ethnic studies, sociology and public policy.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social services, advocacy, public policy, community organizing, women’s studies, ethnic studies and sociology.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:     (1/31/03) New, not in printed catalog.

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Working in Development
New, not in printed catalog
Fall Quarter
Faculty: Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior and senior standing; previous academic work in environmental studies and/or political economy.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: None

An upper-division program for students interested in working for development, either at home or abroad. The program will have both a theoretical and practical focus. In lectures and seminars, we will explore the meanings and history of "development," examine the forces that shape relationships between the North and South and the rich and poor, and consider prospects for sustainability and progressive change in the 21st century. We will make extensive use of case studies material, as well as fiction and nonfiction narratives. Case studies will reflect faculty interest in rural development, agricultural improvement and grassroots social change movements.
Workshops will develop skills to help students function with sensitivity in culturally diverse settings and to assist in self-directed community development. Student work will involved critical reading, expository writing and collaborative research projects.
Credit awarded in: sustainable development, colonial and neo-colonial history, agriculture and rural development, participatory research methods, group skills and group dynamics.
Total: 16 credits. Students may enroll in a four-credit language course with faculty signature.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in development work, international studies or community planning.
Program Updates:     (11/20/02) New, not in printed catalog.

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Working Towards a Sustainable Future
New, not in printed catalog
Winter quarter
Faculty: Michael Beug
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This advanced group contract will engage in an in-depth analysis of global energy policy. We will analyze in detail the most comprehensive and far-reaching single volume on energy policy ever published - World Energy Assessment: Energy and the Challenge of Sustainability, Josť Goldemberg, Ed., United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, and World Energy Council, New York, 2001 (ISBN 92-1-126126-0, $65). In the first part of the quarter we will place energy in the context of major global issues (poverty, population, gender, health and environment). We will then spend the bulk of the quarter examining both current and prospective world energy resources and technology. At the end of the quarter we will examine six scenarios for the future-three disastrous (including business as usual) and three successful, finally asking where do we go from here?
Credit awarded in: energy systems. Up to eight upper-division credits will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, energy systems and science policy.
Program Updates:     New, not in printed catalog.

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