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Feminine and Masculine: Representation of Gender in Art, Film and Literature
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Lucia Harrison, Harumi Moruzzi
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $125 for art supplies, museum and/or theater tickets.
Internship Possibilities: No

In recent years, we have witnessed a proliferation of controversies surrounding gender issues. The goal of our study is not a justification of any particular gender-based stance, but rather to create the ground for a peaceful and productive coexistence of the sexes. As Nietzsche says, concepts are merely human creations for the "purpose of designation and communication." Humans are apt to create new concepts when old concepts cease to work. The time has come for us to create new concepts of the feminine and masculine.
This program includes theoretical and expressive components. Students will learn critical methods to analyze visual art, film and literature. We will use these skills to examine concepts of the feminine and masculine in different cultural traditions throughout human history. Students will gain beginning skills in life drawing and the artist book form of expression. Students will create artwork that expresses their own concepts of gender.
Credit awarded in: art history, art appreciation, cultural studies, gender studies, literature, film, criticism, life drawing, artist books and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, cultural studies, film studies, literature, gender studies and psychology.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) The program has worked a lot on writing in Fall quarter and the faculty would like to assess the writing skills of prospective students before signing them into the program. New students should bring a writing example (e.g., a seminar paper) to the academic fair. 

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A Few Good Managers Wanted
Cancelled, refer to the Evening and Weekend Class Listing of Introductory Management Topics: A Few Good Managers Wanted and Advanced Management Topics: A few Good Managers Wanted
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: John Filmer
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; recommended successful completion of one quarter of microeconomics and basic accounting or business mathematics or the equivalent. Students must have demonstrated competency with numbers.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

As an effective manager your services will be in demand. Organizations, be they governments, businesses or nonprofits, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid economic, legal, cultural, political and economic realities. Strong, competent management leads to strong, successful organizations. In this program, you will be introduced to the management tools, skills and concepts you need to develop effective strategies for managing these transitions resulting in organizational success.
Tools and skills, though, are not enough. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. As an effective manager you must develop the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting your organization. You will learn communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material that separates the far-thinking and effective organizational manager from the administrator. Program work will include lectures, book seminars, discussions, individual and team projects, case studies and workshops.
This program will prepare you for an understanding of what leadership/management is and its importance to the success of an organization. You will also gain a strong background for advanced studies in the management field. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often.
Credit awarded in: organizational theory, organizational development, finance, international business, marketing, communication, case studies, economic development, entrepreneurship, managing nonprofits, strategic planning, contemporary issues in economics, business and politics, management issues and ethics.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in nonprofit or business management, public administration or further study in business or public administration.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (1/10/03) One faculty - enrollment lowered to 25.
(5/7/03) Cancelled

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Fiction and Nonfiction
New, not in printed catalog
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Tom Foote, Evan Shopper
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For information contact Tom Foote, (360) 867-6118.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program intensely examines the fundamentals of writing both nonfiction and fiction during the winter quarter. In the spring, students will intensify their writing within these genres. A central focus of both quarters is the writing workshop, in which students and faculty offer constructive, critical feedback on student writing.
This program assumes that students cannot write description about something they are unable to see clearly. To that end, we begin by studying field research methodology in preparation for observational studies in the field designed to teach the difference between truly seeing and simply looking. Along with the field observations, students will read and discuss selected works of fiction as well as creative nonfiction, an exciting genre that allows and encourages the use of fiction writing techniques to report on factual events. We then move into fiction writing, focusing on elements such as character, action, point of view and structure. Students will also view and discuss films to enhance their understanding of storytelling and literary techniques.
In order to receive credit, students must submit their writing to literary journals in winter and spring quarters.
Credit awarded in: reading contemporary prose, field research, writing fiction and writing creative nonfiction.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in journalism and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (9/12/03) New, not in printed catalog
(2/18/04) Faculty signature added. The faculty will consider new students in spring quarter. Faculty want to assess a writing sample from each prospective student. Students can make an appointment or see the faculty at the Academic Fair on March 3, 2004. For information contact Tom Foote, (360) 867-6118.

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Fishes, Frogs and Forests
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Bill Bruner, Amy Cook, Heather Heying
Enrollment: 69
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Some of society’s most vexing problems involve conflicts between human activities and the health of natural ecosystems. For example, should fishing be allowed to increase, risking the collapse of marine ecosystems? Is it fair to forest workers if society limits timber production to protect wildlife? Does the decline in frog populations mean that we should curtail use of pesticides that are important to food production?
This program will examine how society makes these important decisions. Our focus will be on public policy and how political processes might weigh biological and human impacts in the crafting of legislation.
We will introduce the basic concepts of population and community ecology, evolutionary biology and microeconomics to gain an understanding of interactions between human society and natural ecosystems. In winter, we will focus on how information from the biological and social sciences is used in making important public policy decisions.
The faculty will develop examples from their fields of interest—fish, frogs and forests—in presenting theory and practice in ecology and economics. Students will engage in research to deepen their understanding of these and related topics.
The program will stress skill development in writing, reading, seminar and group work.
Credit awarded in: population and community ecology, microeconomics, environmental and natural resource economics, introduction to public policy, public policy and the environment, expository writing and evolutionary biology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in ecology, environmental studies, fisheries science, conservation biology, economics, public service, politics, law and evolutionary biology.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:    

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The Folk: Power of an Image
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Michael Pfeifer, Patricia Krafcik, Babacar M’Baye
Enrollment: 69
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $25 for art supplies each quarter.
Internship Possibilities: No

Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, numerous writers, artists, composers and government regimes drew on the image and culture of the common folk to represent the "soul" of the nation, to express the national creative genius, to encourage patriotism, to expose social wrongs, to preserve and hand down wisdom and to celebrate the national spirit. How was folk material appropriated to accomplish these goals? What is the tension between the reality of folk life—including periods of serfdom, slavery and colonial subjugation—and the transformation of this reality into formal art, music, literature and government propaganda? Do such transformations accurately convey the experience of the folk and folk culture or do they manipulate and distort that experience? Our interdisciplinary and cross-cultural exploration of these questions will take us to Russia, the United States and West Africa as we read social history and literature, listen to music and examine Russian, American, African American and West African art and folklore, seeking the roots of the folk image and the source of its power.
Credit awarded in: social history, cultural history, music history, folklore and folk art, and literature: American, African American, African and Russian.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences, world literature and culture, history, music, folklore and art.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language.
Program Updates:   (6/17/03) This all-level program now accepts up to 50 percent first-year students.
(11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should read Dundes article, "Who are the Folk?" (available from the faculty); Mbiti, Introduction to African Religion (at the bookstore); Levine, Black Culture, Black Consciousness, Preface, Chs 1 and 2 (at the bookstore); Pipes, The Peasantry and Kolchin chapter on Russian serfdom and American slavery (available from the faculty) Also, start the reading for the first week of winter: Jean Toomer, Cane; Willa Cather, My Antonia; Edgar Lee Masters, Spoon River Anthology.

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Forensics: The Science of Crime Scene Investigation
New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Nancy Murray, Nancy Cordell
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent first-year students. Although there are no prerequisites for this program, general high school biology and chemistry will be helpful and is strongly recommended. Students should expect a heavy science focus.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $50 per student for fieldtrips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Crime scene investigation (CSI) involves the recovery and analysis of chemical, biological, geological and physical forensic evidence. This kind of investigation requires solid scientific skills in biology, chemistry, osteology, geology, pathology, odontology and even physics. Crime scenes can include evidence that is extremely diverse, including man-made fibers, soil, hair, teeth and bones (to name a few) that help investigators to ascertain such things as time of death, cause and manner of death, identity of the victim, clues to the identity of the assailant and more.
This program will utilize hands-on laboratory and field approaches to the scientific methods used in crime scene investigation. Crime scene investigation involves the recovery and analysis of chemical, biological, geological and physical forensic evidence. Through this ten-week program, students will learn to apply analytical, quantitative and qualitative skills to collect and interpret this evidence. The major goal of this program is to demystify the process of doing science. Each student will learn how to define scientific questions, critically evaluate data, and make interpretations; in other words, to think as a scientist. Students will explicitly consider how each methodological approach (e.g. criminalistics and forensic anthropology) relies on a distinct set of assumptions, which ultimately shapes how crime scene investigators apply a scientific process.
Credit awarded in: biology, anthropology, chemistry and quantitative reasoning.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in biology, chemistry, physical anthropology, forensics and criminology.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students, Scientific Inquiry, Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (12/5/03) New, not in printed catalog.

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Foundations of Performing Arts
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Rose Jang, Andrew Buchman, Meg Hunt, Sandie Nisbet
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For information contact Rose Jang, (360) 867-6705.
Special Expenses: $30 for performance tickets each quarter.
Internship Possibilities: No

This is the study of the basic concepts, skills and aesthetics of the performing arts in Western and non-Western cultures. We will study select forms of music, dance and theater in various historical contexts in Western tradition, including contemporary American culture.
By sampling the historical progression of theater, music and dance in the West, we will attempt to pose, answer and challenge the fundamental questions about the definitions and functions of the performing arts. We will then broaden our perspectives to non-Western performing styles and traditions, such as Chinese theater and Indian dance, to re-examine our established assumptions of the meanings and parameters of the performing arts. In this way, we will explore both the universal and unique characteristics in the reciprocal interaction between arts and culture and come to understand performance as both a mark of human history and a reflection of the issues and concerns of contemporary society.
Students will study introductory music, theater and dance, in separate as well as integrative program activities. Workshops will emphasize the aesthetic principles and skill development of each discipline. The readings and group meetings, including lectures and seminars, will constantly stress the interdisciplinary, cross-boundary and cross-cultural nature of the performing arts. Spring quarter will offer students opportunities to combine all the learning and training together into group performance projects for public presentation at the end of the year.
Credit awarded in: history, theory and performance of theater, music and dance.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in theater, dance, music, cultural studies and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (1/15/03) Sandie Nisbet added to faculty team.
(11/17/03) READ CHAPTERS 1-4, 11, 15, 22 AND 23 IN "LISTEN" BY KERMAN AND TOMLINSON. READ "THE BACCHAE" BY EURIPIDES AND "OTHELLO" BY SHAKESPEARE. BRING A PAPER YOU ARE PROUD OF TO FIRST CLASS SESSION. THE TEAM WOULD BE WILLING TO ACCEPT FRESHMEN WITH AT LEAST ONE QUARTER OF COLLEGE UNDER THEIR BELTS, WHO CAN DO THE PREPARATORY READING.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring. The only possible exception is if a student who was in the program in fall quarter wants to return. For information contact Rose Jang, (360) 867-6705.

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Foundations of Visual Art
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Bob Haft, Paul Sparks, Joe Feddersen, Gail Tremblay, TBA
Enrollment: 40
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $250–$300 per quarter for art supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

This is a yearlong program offering an intensive introduction to making two- and three-dimensional art forms, while studying art history and aesthetics. Primary program goals are to develop visual literacy, learn to use art materials to express one’s ideas, and learn to make a sustained visual investigation of ideas or topics through work in series.
The program is designed for students who are passionate about art, willing to take risks, have the patience to work for extended periods, open to new ideas, and are willing to share their work and support others’ learning. The program functions as a community of working artists, learning together and sharing ideas through intensive in-studio work, on campus, and art history study.
In fall and winter, students will build skills in working both two- and three-dimensionally. Students will learn drawing and design skills, beginning black-and-white photography and basic color theory, and will develop a visual vocabulary through their own work and by studying art history.
In spring, students will continue their study of art history and will work in mixed media, using fiber, metal and wood. There is also a possibility of working collaboratively to create installation pieces.
Credit awarded in: drawing, sculpture, 2-D and 3-D design, printmaking, photography and art history.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, education and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (6/3/03) Mario will be on leave. For now, he will be replaced by TBA
(11/18/03) New students should have some verifiable drawing skills; these could come about either from having taken a drawing course, or by some inherent abilities. In either case, in order to certify someone wanting to get into the program, they'll need to present a portfolio of work to the faculty at the Academic Fair. Additionally, they will need to have extremely good discipline and work habits. Currently, students in the program are required to put in 48 hours per week. This is something the faculty tracks by having students come to class five-days-a-week and spend part of each day working in their studio spaces in the Arts Annex. Anyone wishing to join the program will have to submit an evaluation of one of their most recent programs; if there is an indication in the evaluation that the person's work habits are poor, there's little likelihood that they'll be accepted them into the program. Anyone applying for Winter Quarter will have to get a signature from both Joe Fedderson and Bob Haft.

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Four Philosophers
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: David Marr
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

In the beginning, the American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson urged: "Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string." Can we find out what he meant by that? Second, the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, Emerson’s disciple and with him a co-founder of modern thought, used up his life investigating what he called the spiritualization of cruelty—another name for morals, culture, civilization. We will use the Nietzsche–Emerson connection as a hypothesis for studying modern times. Third, the American philosopher William James, a soul-nephew of Emerson, believed that "reality, life, experience, concreteness, immediacy, use what word you will, exceeds our logic, overflows and surrounds it." Was he right? Fourth, the contemporary German philosopher Odo Marquard bids farewell to matters of principle, declares that people no longer grow up, and argues that the best thing for us would be to go on a meaning diet. Sense or meaning, says this skeptic, "is always the nonsense one lets go."
Expect to work very hard in Four Philosophers: on these thinkers, on a philosophical statement of your own, in historical research, and on modern literary masters such as Melville, Dickinson, Camus and DeLillo.
Credit awarded in: modern philosophy, modern literature, American and European history.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in any field requiring competence in using words.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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The Fungal Kingdom: Lichens and Mushrooms, Nature's Recyclers
Fall quarter
Faculty: Paul Przybylowicz, Michael Beug
Enrollment: 40
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; one year of general biology and one quarter of ecology or natural history. This program begins on September 18, 2003, prior to the beginning of the quarter.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Four-day field trip to northern Idaho, $50 due September 24, 2003; four-day field trip to the southern Oregon coast, $75 due October 24, 2003.
Internship Possibilities: No

Many people study plants and are familiar with their ecology and role in the energy cycle, but few people study lichens, mushrooms and the fungal kingdom. In this program we will ask the following questions: What are these organisms? How do they get their energy? What roles do they play in the ecosystem? Students will gain proficiency in and/or knowledge of mushroom and lichen taxonomy, ecology and biology, as well as be engaged in technical writing, library research, critical thinking and developing their oral presentation skills. There will be an emphasis on work in the laboratory learning to classify lichens and mushrooms using chemical and microscopic techniques. Students will work with a wide variety of taxonomic keys to accurately identify mushrooms and lichens. In addition to lecture and laboratory activities, there will be numerous field trips and a student research project.
The program will begin early with our first class meeting on Thursday, September 18, 2003. Field trips will sometimes be over weekends so that we can participate in regional mushroom forays.
Credit awarded in: the biology and ecology of lichens and mushrooms. Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in ecology, biology, natural history and environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program Updates:    

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Growing Up Global
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Stephanie Coontz
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program explores the origins and complexities of contemporary issues associated with reaching adulthood, raising children and the role of youth in a global society. We will develop a theoretical and historical background for understanding these issues, beginning with cross-cultural studies of childhood, then tracing the American experience from the 19th century through the end of the 20th century. Winter quarter, we will explore the current status of children, parents and youth on a global level. As part of this work, we’ll look at how economic globalization is affecting the process of growing up and what types of social movements youth are creating in specific nation states and cultures from around the world. We will then discuss contemporary issues and policy debates. Program activities will include seminars, lectures, a variety of writing assignments and weekly field research in the local schools.
Credit awarded in: sociology, cultural studies, history, field ethnography, gender studies and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in law, social work, teaching, organizing, labor and race relations, counseling and engaged citizenship.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (2/18/03) Dan Leahy has left this program.The enrollment limit has been reduced

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The Good Life in the Good Society: Modern Social and Political Philosophy from Machiavelli to Marx
Spring quarter
Faculty: Alan Nasser
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students should submit copies of Evergreen evaluations and writing samples to Alan Nasser at the Academic Fair, March 3, 2004.
Transfer students can send transcripts and writing samples to Alan Nasser, The Evergreen State College, SE 3127, Olympia, WA 98505. Applications will continue to be accepted until the program is filled. For more information call (360) 867-6759.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibillities: No

We will carefully and analytically examine the major issues in social and political theory that define the tradition of classical modern social and political philosophy. We will focus on the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, John Stuart Mill, Rousseau and Marx. We will also read articles and chapters from selected books on central issues arising from these philosophers’ writings.
Our objective will be to understand the historical, theoretical and philosophical developments that set the stage for contemporary political, economic and social culture dominated by the interests of corporate business and the subordination of the interests of working people to the demands of the business community. We will see how modern social and political philosophy contributed to the present dominance of born-again capitalism.
Among the issues we will examine are the rise of individualism; the role of self-interest in human motivation; the historical emergence of capitalism and its distinctive notions of freedom and liberty; the alleged conflict between liberty and equality; the role of the State and its relation to the economy; the constraints placed on democracy by the new global market culture; and the implications of all these developments for the nature of work in the modern world.
Credit awarded in: political philosophy, social philosophy and history of capitalism.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social science, law, philosophy, political philosophy and ethics.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:    

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Health and Human Development
This program has changed from a three quarter to a two quarter offering.
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Carrie Margolin, Nancy Cordell, Janet Ott
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $50 per quarter for retreats.
Internship Possibilities: No

Health and Human Development will build a background in human biology and psychology affording students the knowledge to make conscious choices in their own lifestyle. We’ll look at life-span human development, in the fall from prenatal to adolescence, and in the winter, adulthood through aging to mortality. Concurrently, we’ll cover development and aging from a biological perspective.
In the fall, we wish to explore our life’s choices in the areas of nutrition, exercise, living spaces, and environment to see which are healthy and which could use improving. Students will learn research methodology and design, descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as nutrition and the biological organ systems that are involved in nutrient processing. In winter, with this knowledge and these skills, students will begin a research-based examination of healthy choices by choosing a diet and/or exercise regime for the quarter and measurements of change. We will continue to study the human body, learning more organ systems. We will also look at the aging processes, exploring those that cannot be changed and those that can through lifestyle changes.
The program format will include workshops, lectures, films, seminars, guest presentations, and group and individual projects. We will focus on clarity in oral and written communication, quantitative skills, the ability to work across significant differences and the development of an aesthetic sensibility.
Credit awarded in: human biology (without lab), developmental psychology, nutrition, anthropology, evolution, research methodology and descriptive and inferential statistics. All credit is lower division.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in biology, psychology, the health professions, human services and education.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (1/8/03) New faculty team, enrollment dropped to 50.
(2/18/03) Rachel Brem (human biology) has been added to HHD
(4/11/03) Dropped: Rachel Brem from the faculty team. She will be replaced by TBA until a new faculty is hired.
(4/25/03) This program has changed from a yearlong offering to a two quarter offering.
(6/10/03) Nancy Cordell has joined this program.
(6/16/03) Janet Ott has joined this program. Enrollment has been increased to 75 students.
(11/24/03) New students must have a similar background to what was covering in Fall, though only one area is modularized, and thus can be skipped. Here's an approximate list of Fall credit areas. They either need these credits, or will have to speak to the faculty as to how to make this up: Child and Adolescent Development (OK to skip this because Winter will be Adult Development) Descriptive Statistics (graphing, real limits, frequency distributions, mean, median, mode, standard deviation, variance, probability, percentiles, normal distribution, and how to use a calculator), and to some extent - Research Methods, Genetics, Anatomy and Physiology, Evolution, Nutrition. Speak with the faculty for more details.

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Here, There and Everywhere: Finding Place in a Global World
New, not in printed catalog
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Cynthia Kennedy, Ted Whitesell
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This Core/sophomore-level program is designed for first-year and sophomore students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Potentially $50 a quarter for overnight or out-of-state field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Globalization, the rapid and radical integration of world cultures, economies, politics and environments, affects everyone. This two-quarter program will ask “how can we direct globalization to serve human needs, promote cultural self-determination, and protect environmental quality?”
We will explore: globalization: its definition, historical roots, and current characteristics; how globalization is influenced by unequal power relationships within society and across geographic space; the contradictory effects of globalization on culture, politics, economics and the environment; the shifting meanings of local, regional and global; and movements that affect globalization.
Students will study scholarly and popular writings from the perspectives of geography, cultural and environmental studies, business and economics. They will critique a full range of viewpoints to develop their own conclusions. Field trips will provide opportunities for direct field observation and encounters with community members. In the fall, we will develop foundational knowledge and skills and a prospectus for winter projects. In the winter, students will write research papers and engage in community service to influence globalization in ways that serve human needs, promote cultural self-determination, and protect environmental quality for all of life on Earth.
Credit awarded in: economics, international business, human and cultural geography, environment and development, writing and quantitative reasoning.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in geography, business and economics.
Planning Unit(s): First-Year Programs, Environmental Studies and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (4/17/03) New, not in printed catalog
This is a Core/sophomore-level program designed for first-year and sophomore students.
(11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Students who want to enter in Winter will need to prepare a prospectus centering around a research question that will inform a 15-20 paper they will write in the winter quarter. They will need to demonstrate a basic understanding of economics, neoliberalism, and writing.
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Hydrology
Spring quarter
Faculty: Paul Butler, Ken Tabbutt
Enrollment:25 undergraduate students; 18 graduate students.
Prerequisites: Junior, senior or graduate standing, transfer students welcome. Good mathematical skills through precalculus recommended.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Optional Grand Canyon dory field trip, approximately $1,800.
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Optional 16-day dory trip in Grand Canyon National Park.

Water plays a critical role in the physical, chemical and biological processes of ecosystems. It is a dominant factor in landscape development and is a valuable resource, even in the water-rich Pacific Northwest. This program will focus on the groundwater and surface water components of the hydrologic cycle. Students will learn quantitative methods of assessing the distribution and movement of water in these environments and have the opportunity to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to display and assess spatial data. Local field trips will provide an opportunity for students to observe hydrologic systems.
Graduate students will have the opportunity to study surface water and/or groundwater hydrology. Each of these options will be offered as a separate four-credit course. Undergraduate students will be required to enroll in both of these courses and the GIS component. In addition, undergraduate students will have the option of taking four credits of research or to participate in a 16-day dory trip in Grand Canyon National Park with a focus on fluvial processes in an arid environment. Space on this trip will be limited, so interested students should contact Paul Butler by the end of the first week of winter quarter.
Credit awarded in: groundwater hydrology*, surface-water hydrology*, applications of Geographic Information Systems to hydrology* and research topics in hydrology*.
Total: 12 or 16 credits for undergraduates; 4 or 8 credits for graduate students.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in hydrology, geology, environmental science, natural resource management and land-use planning.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:    

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Illustrations of Character: Literary and Philosophical Studies
New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Andrew Reece, Nancy Koppelman
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for first-year students as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

What is character but the determination of incident? What is incident but the illustration of character?- Henry James, The Art of Fiction
Character is a person's own god .-Heraclitus

How do we determine what to do when faced with hard choices? For that matter, how do we know what to do even when the choices seem trivial? Is our own happiness uppermost in our minds, or is something else-loyalty to a friend, say, or religious principles? How can we live with integrity in the face of temptation or tragedy? These are all ethical questions, and questions like these demand that we think carefully about character. For character comprises not only our distinctive qualities but also our disposition to act in certain ways, for good or ill. Indeed, our word "ethical" derives from the Greek word for character, ethos , which, like our word, can refer to a literary figure ( a character) or to one's combination of qualities and dispositions.
In this program, then, we study works of philosophy, history, drama, and fiction that illuminate our understanding of character. We enlist their aid in our exploration of the ways in which character affects, and is affected by, desire, deliberation, action and suffering. Borrowing from the excerpt of James above, we are especially interested in literary and historical accounts of incidents that illustrate the character of people or a people. These incidents may be profound moral dilemmas, or they may be the day-to-day trials that are woven into the fabric of individual and communal experience. As we read, discuss, and write about these accounts, texts in ethical philosophy will challenge and, we hope, broaden our notions of character, particularly its relations to external goods, habit, happiness, friendships, and duties. They will also provide us with powerful interpretive tools and a highly refined vocabulary for grappling with the questions posed by our other texts. Authors include Aristotle, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Immanuel Kant, Soren Kierkegaard, Henry James, William Styron and William Leach.
Students joining this program should be highly motivated and intellectually ambitious. They should be prepared not only to think critically about what we read, but also to investigate their own beliefs and to submit them to rigorous analytical scrutiny, that is, to practice ethical thinking as well as study it. Writing will be central to that practice. In semiweekly seminar papers, students will learn to express effectively and persuasively their questions, criticisms, analyses, and investigations. These papers will circulate among the program's participants throughout the quarter, and they will be central to seminar discussions. Weekly writing workshops will focus closely on matters of form. In addition, each student will complete a longer paper on some dimension of character (in both senses of the word) drawing from the program's texts.
Credit awarded in: classical studies, philosophy, literature and American history.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, teaching and law.
Program Updates:   (1/30/04) New, not in printed catalog.
This is a new all-level humanities program for spring quarter.

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Imagining Books
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Steven Hendricks
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 40 percent first-year students and offers appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $25 studio fee, in addition to approximately $30 to $150 for materials and tools.
Internship Possibilities: No

Books hold a place in our imaginations paralleled by few other daily objects. They symbolize the intellect, the vast resources of fantasy, the whole of human history, and they can contain, in some manner, almost anything we wish them to. The rise of digital and internet technology has made at least a theoretical threat to an established culture of the book. It is in this potentially transitional moment that we, as writers, artists and book-lovers, can articulate both old and new relationships to the book as a creative form, as an institution and as the material container of consciousness.

We will do this through creative and critical inquiry: making books with our hands using ancient techniques; testing and inventing new forms and functions for books; exploring digital media as an alternative and an extension of the essential qualities of books; examining the emerging discourse of artists' books as a revitalization of the book's potential; and by creating our own stories and images to render in book form.

In addition to learning arts and crafts related to bookmaking, students will write creatively and critically, participate in text-based seminars, and gain proficiency in several print media and graphic design programs.
Credit awarded in: book arts, writing, printmaking, literary studies, graphic design and typography.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in writing, art, graphic design, art theory and cultural studies.
This program is listed under Culture, Text, and Language and Expressive Arts.
Program Updates:   (2/9/04) New, not in printed catalog

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Individual and Society: Studies of American and Japanese Society and Literature
Spring quarter
Faculty: William Arney, Harumi Moruzzi
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The 18th-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard chose "That Individual" as his epitaph. He was proclaiming himself an individual, the only concrete mode of existence. But Kierkegaard was keenly aware of the consequence of such a declaration: an unidentifiable feeling of dread and anxiety derived from being the sole responsible agent for who he was.
In America, the concept of the individual as an autonomous, free agent seems to have been accepted without much anguish. From the self-acquisitiveness of Benjamin Franklin’s Poor Richard to Thoreau’s rugged self-reliance to the Great Gatsby’s misguided self-creation to the sociological critiques of conformist tendencies (e.g., Whyte’s The Organization Man or Riesman’s Lonely Crowd), individualism has seemed an unquestioned value.
Japan appears to emphasize the opposite human values: the importance of group cohesion and harmony. Indeed, Japanese often seem to consider themselves the embodiment of concepts such as nationality, gender or family rather than individuals.
The realities of these two countries, of course, are not as simple as these stereotypical representations suggest. Nevertheless, this comparative frame presents a context in which we can explore the concepts of "individual," "community," "society" and the dynamic relationships among them. We will study American and Japanese society, literature and popular media to examine these ideas.
Credit awarded in: sociology, contemporary Japanese culture, Japanese literature, American literature and cultural studies.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in sociology, cultural studies, literature and international relations.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:    

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"Inherently Unequal"
Spring quarter
Faculty: José Gómez
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

May 17, 2004, marks the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, the most important ruling of the Supreme Court in the 20th century. Declaring racially segregated schools as inherently unequal, the court signaled a reversal of judicial support for apartheid, deeply rooted in America’s colonial foundation and elevated as national doctrine in the abominable "separate but equal" opinion of 1896.
Brown’s repudiation of Plessy v. Ferguson was seismic. Much more than an historical and constitutional watershed, the 1954 decision was a cultural shift that challenged habits, customs, traditions and way of life, North and South. Just as significantly, it helped to invigorate a century-old civil rights movement and to make progress beyond the schools—in housing, voting, transportation and public accommodations.
By the end of the 20th century, however, the nation appeared to have second thoughts about Brown. Racist opposition to African American progress and the resurgence of conservatism in all branches of government barricaded the road to desegregation. Justices with leanings closer to Plessy than to the Warren Court largely turned their backs on the spirit of Brown.
In this program, we will study the historical backdrop of Brown, the legal battle leading up to it, and its 50-year aftermath.
Credit awarded in: African American studies, constitutional law, racism and the law, sociology, critical reasoning and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in ethnic studies, social justice advocacy and organizing, political science, public policy, law and teaching.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change; Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (1/29/03) Planning Unit added - Culture, Text and Language.

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Introduction to Environmental Studies
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Paul Butler, Tom Rainey
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Environmental studies include many disciplines, with a primary focus on the relationship between human cultures and their physical and biological environment. This year, the faculty have decided to take a global perspective, looking at the distribution of vegetation, landforms, weather and climate, and natural resources and natural hazards, with respect to human settlement patterns. We will also consider how the Pacific Northwest compares to the world picture.
This program will serve as a foundation for more advanced work in environmental studies. As such, emphasis will be given to developing a sound understanding of methods and concepts needed at the advanced level. A combination of lectures, seminars, labs, field projects and library research will be used each quarter to further those aims. Students will have the opportunity to work both independently and in small groups. Particular emphasis will be placed on a quantitative understanding of the material, and to that end, students will be introduced to both descriptive and inferential statistics.
Credit awarded in: earth science, ecology, natural resource management and quantitative reasoning.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in ecology, earth science, natural resource management and environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (12/18/02) This is now an All-level Program.
(3/14/03) Tom Rainey added to faculty team.
(11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should review the first 15 chapters and chapter 26 in the primary text: Introduction to Environmental Science. We will use this text for the rest of winter quarter. Read the first 4 chapters of Environmental Politics. We will study the rest of this book during winter quarter. Some familiarity with Excel spreadsheet software would be very helpful.

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Introduction to Natural Science
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: James Neitzel, Rebecca Sunderman, Allen Mauney
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; high school algebra proficiency assumed.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Yes, spring quarter with faculty approval.

This program will offer students a conceptual and methodological introduction to biology, chemistry and physics. As an organizing theme, we will examine the cycles and transformations of matter and energy at a variety of scales in both living and non-living systems. As appropriate, we will use mathematical modeling and other quantitative methods to gain additional insights into these processes. Students will learn to describe their work through writing and public presentations.
Program activities will include lectures, small-group problem-solving workshops, laboratories, field trips and seminars. In addition to studying our current scientific models for these processes, we will also examine the methods used to obtain these models and the historical, societal and personal factors that influence our thinking about the natural world. We will also examine some of the impacts on societies due to changes in science and technology. During spring, there will be an opportunity for small student-groups to conduct an independent scientific investigation designed in collaboration with the program faculty.
Students who complete this program should be prepared for more advanced study in programs such as Marine Life or Molecule to Organism. This program will also provide a background in disciplines required for careers as a health professional. It is also appropriate for students who wish to understand the process and role of science.
Credit awarded in: general chemistry, introductory biology, physics, history and philosophy of science, technical writing and communication.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the natural sciences, environmental studies and health sciences.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (3/6/03) Added Rebecca Sunderman (inorganic/physical chemist) to this program.
(4/15/03) Allen Mauney has been added to the program for fall, winter and spring quarters.
(11/17/03) New students will need the equivalent of 1 quarter college general biology, 1 quarter college general chemistry, and some writing and algebra experience.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Invertebrate Zoology and Evolution
Spring quarter
Faculty: Erik V. Thuesen
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: College-level general biology with lab. This all-level program accepts up to 25% first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $125 for overnight field trip; approximately $350 for textbooks, dissection tools and possible film/developing expenses for microscopy research project.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will examine the invertebrate phyla with particular regard to functional morphology, phylogeny and ecology. The evolution of invertebrates will be an underlying theme throughout the quarter, and students will study the science of evolution through seminar readings and oral presentations. The proximity of Evergreen’s campus to various marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats provides excellent opportunities to study many diverse groups of local organisms, and emphasis will be placed on learning the regional invertebrate fauna. Fundamental laboratory and field techniques in zoology will be learned, and students will be required to complete a research project using the available microscopy facilities (light and scanning electron microscope). A commitment to work long hours both in the field and the lab is expected.
Credit awarded in: invertebrate zoology, invertebrate zoology laboratory, evolution and microscopy. Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in zoology and marine biology.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (5/14/03) Enrollment increased to 25, Sophomore standing or above, college-level general biology with lab.
(9/26/03) This program has changed back to an all-level program. The original description in the catalog stands. Students can get general biology with lab in the Perceptions program.

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Ireland: Living between Worlds
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Sean Williams, Patrick Hill, Doranne Crable
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. Prior to enrolling, we ask only that you carefully read the syllabus and program covenant, available from Sean Williams, by May, 2003; assess your own capabilities; and be certain that you see yourself as a good match for this program.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This two-quarter program, with a spring quarter option of travel to Ireland, comprises a study of Ireland through its history and many modes of expression: songs, poetry, Irish-Gaelic language, stories, film, drama, literature. In focusing on pre-Christian and early Christian nature-based spirituality and expressive culture during fall, we will set the stage for understanding Irish reactions to English colonialism, the Famine and the social upheavals taking place at the beginning of the 21st century. Our work is interdisciplinary: you will be welcome in this program whether your personal passion is directed toward the peace process in Northern Ireland, literary giants such as Joyce and Yeats, theater or traditional music. By examining Ireland through the lenses of orality and literacy, philosophies involving cycles and seasons, language and cultural identity, and men and women, we will attempt to gain a holistic picture of the many facets of experience in Ireland.
We expect all students to participate in performances of play readings, poetic recitation and song performance in a supportive and safe environment. We expect you to learn enough basic Irish-Gaelic to use it as small talk in seminars and outside class. You should also expect to develop your skills in research and critical analysis to explore theoretical issues verbally and in writing.
During spring, selected students from this program will have the opportunity to study traditional language and culture in Ireland at the Oideas Gael Institute in Gleann Cholm Cille, Donegal.
Credit awarded in: Celtic studies, literature, traditional expressive arts, cultural studies, history and Irish-Gaelic language. Students will be awarded upper-division credit for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in Celtic studies, European studies, political economy, cultural studies, literature, Irish-American studies, ethnomusicology and the expressive arts.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (11/07/03) Any student wishing to enter the program needs to read and respond to three books: The Serpent and the Goddess (Mary Condren), The Cultural Conqest of Ireland (Kevin Collins), and The Tain (Thomas Kinsella). Then the prospective student would need to write a twelve-page integrative essay incorporating all three texts. That essay should be turned in to Sean Williams in Com 301. It would be due by December 19. It should include the student's name and e-mail address so that the faculty may contact the student to let him/her know about whether the integrative essay is acceptable. New students will not be eligible to go to Ireland in the spring quarter.

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Ireland: Study Abroad
Spring quarter
Faculty: Sean Williams, Doranne Crable
Enrollment: 30
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; two successful quarters in the Ireland: Living between Worlds program. Participation will be determined by the student’s record of work in the Ireland program, and students must read the two required texts, Occasions of Faith: An Anthropology of Irish Catholics, Lawrence J. Taylor and Father McDyer of Glencolumbkille: An Autobiography, Father James McDyer.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must submit a preparatory essay based on two books about Gleann Cholm Chille. Students will be notified of acceptance in class by the end of January, 2004.
Special Expenses: Airfare, room, board, instructional fees in Ireland, approximately $3,000; and a non-refundable deposit of $1,000 by February 4, 2004.
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Five to six weeks of study in Ireland at the Oideas Gael Institute in Gleann Cholm Cille, Donegal.
This program is intended only for selected participants from the Ireland program, who will study traditional language and culture in Ireland at the Oideas Gael Institute in Gleann Cholm Cille, Donegal.

We will begin our studies in Ireland with a week of focused study in Irish-Gaelic language, song, poetry and dance. For several more weeks we will study language and aspects of traditional culture, including the options of archaeology, tapestry weaving, singing, dancing and playing music. Students will also have the opportunity to work closely with local poets, artists and musicians, and to witness firsthand the dramatic impact of the European Union on traditional culture. Field trips may include visits to Northern Ireland, the Burren traditional law conference in County Clare, Dublin, the Strokestown Famine Museum and selected locations in County Donegal.
The faculty expect dedicated participation in all activities, appropriate behavior for small-town Ireland, cooperation with hosts and host families, and strict adherence to the travel dates and essay deadlines. Students who do not follow these guidelines will be sent home at their own expense. All students must return to Evergreen by the end of the ninth week of spring quarter. A major summative and reflective essay will be due by the end of the program.
Credit awarded in: Celtic studies, European studies, cultural studies, fieldwork, history and Irish-Gaelic language.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in Celtic studies, European studies, political economy, expressive arts and cultural studies.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:    

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Islands
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Sally Cloninger, Virginia Darney
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. Students must have completed at least one quarter of some interdisciplinary study at Evergreen or elsewhere. To be approved for the travel portion of the program, students must demonstrate ability for independent study and maturity.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Travel and living expenses for eight weeks during winter and spring quarters (the amount depends on student’s choice of island).
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Eight-week independent travel.

From Manhattan to Madagascar, Santa Cruz to Sri Lanka, Vashon to Vanua Levu, islands have long been a source of allegory, myth, fantasy; a laboratory for artists, ethnographers and scientists. This yearlong program will investigate the notion of the island through collective studies, visits from "island experts," individual research and travel.
We will explore the island as "paradise on earth," the appeal of isolation, and the ways that islands fire imaginations. We will observe how islanders see themselves and how others see them.
Fall and winter, we will explore island texts—novels, paintings, Broadway musicals, scientific theories—films and music, and hear lectures on particular islands. We will study colonialism, development and tourism. We each will select an island destination, and learn visual anthropology and basic documentation skills to aid our study.
Week six of winter quarter each of us will depart for our selected island—whether in southern Puget Sound or the Indian Ocean. Each member of our learning community will produce a major document about her or his experience, to be presented to the entire program the end of spring quarter.
To be selected to travel, you must demonstrate preparedness for independent study and have a travel plan for the island you wish to document. If this island population is non–English speaking, you must have plans for language study when you enroll in this program.
Credit awarded in: literary analysis, media analysis, media skills, independent research, visual anthropology and cultural studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in communications, film studies, cultural studies and literary studies.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Issues in Contemporary Art
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Paul Sparks
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. One year of college-level study in studio art or the equivalent and a good working knowledge of art history.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must submit a portfolio of prior studio work (35mm slides preferred) and an expository writing sample to the faculty. Faculty will begin to review portfolios at the Academic Fair, December 3, 2003, and continue until the program is filled. Students will be notified of acceptance via e-mail by December 5, 2003.
Special Expenses: Approximately $200 for art supplies, depending on the individual student’s medium and project.
Internship Possibilities: No

What are the central issues in contemporary art and how do they affect the studio artist? In a period of post-post modernism, multi-culturalism and eclecticism, what are the aesthetic concerns that contemporary artists are dealing with? And, what are the social, political and personal concerns that inform our creative work?
This program offers students the opportunity to pursue a sustained body of work on a personal theme, examining that theme in relation to the larger context of current world art. It is designed for students who already have intermediate-level skills in one or more studio media (painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, photography or mixed media), and a strong studio work ethic. Students should come prepared with a good general knowledge of history and art history, and ready to do serious study of critical texts on contemporary art. They should also have good critical reading and writing skills. All students will do substantive research and writing on aesthetic issues. Field trips and guest speakers will augment our weekly lectures, seminars and critiques. Each student will also undertake an individual body of studio work in two- or three-dimensional art, building skills, developing a personal vision and responding to contemporary issues in art.
Credit awarded in: studio art (medium determined by student’s work), art history, art theory and criticism.
Total: 16 credits per quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, art history and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:    

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Just Looking: Self-Representation, Visual Culture and Contemporary Mexican Photography
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Ellen Fernandez-Sacco
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 30 percent first-year students and offers appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Expect out-of-pocket expenses for photography supplies and daylong field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Memory, identity and culture are closely intertwined in understanding how images work. Visual culture, as a field of inquiry is closely related to cultural studies and goes beyond traditional boundaries of art history. Under the rubric of photography, artists use a wide variety of techniques-media and supports-to produce visual statements about place, the body, gender, race, identity, sexuality, nationality and philosophical stances. If we inhabit worlds inundated by media, why and how do particular images seem apt examples of who we are? What kinds of negotiations are facilitated by images?

The reciprocity between the fields of photography, cinema, politics, indigenous and popular culture in Mexico means that each medium informs, if not infuses the other. The result is a wide variety of approaches that invent, borrow or combine iconography or symbols to comment on existence and observation from an artist's point of view. Students will have the opportunity to meet guest lecturers and attend field trips to Seattle area galleries.

This program is divided into three parts: a brief introduction to the history of photography; an exploration of theoretical frameworks around myth, self-representation and identity; and the body and photographic practice, as we delve into the works of contemporary artists and photographers from Mexico and Latin America. We will use the text by Marita Sturken and Lisa Cartwright, Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture . Oxford UP 2001.
Credit awarded in art history, ethnic studies, cultural studies and visual culture.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in the expressive arts, photography and cultural studies.
Program Updates:   (2/9/04) New, not in printed catalog

Catalog program descriptions: A to E, F to J, K to P, Q to Z

Last Updated: May 11, 2011
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