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Labyrinths
Fall quarter
Faculty: Susan Aurand, Joe Feddersen
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $150–$200 for art supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

The symbol of the labyrinth is a universal form, dating to Neolithic times, and has been a persistent image in myth, literature and art throughout history. The labyrinth can be understood as many things: life’s path into the center of being and outward again; the spiritual journey through confusion to understanding; the search for a hidden treasure at the center of a difficult situation; the twisting narrative structure of a novel; or the complex layering of form and idea in a visual image.
We will study this potent symbol in literature and art history, and through our own work in image making and writing. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills in drawing, printmaking, writing and critical reading. Our weekly work will include lectures, seminars and studio workshops. Students in this program might want to consider enrolling in the program, Light, for winter and spring quarters.
Credit awarded in: art history, studio art, literature and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in literature, humanities, mythology, art and art history.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:    

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Language and Mind: Classics in 20th-Century Philosophy
New Program, Not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Charles Pailthorp
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

For two and a half centuries, a central debate in Western philosophy had been whether reason or empirical experience lay at the foundation of human knowledge. In the early 20th century, this dispute was transformed by a “linguistic turn” and language rather than mind became the central subject of discussion. For fifty years “logical positivism” (or “logical empiricism”) dominated the “analytic” wing of Western thought. Then, in mid-century, a profound shift occurred that undercut the very distinction between “rationalism” and “empiricism,” a shift that laid the groundwork for many currents in “post-modern” thought. Virtually every discipline in the humanities and social sciences has been deeply affected by this mid-century development.
Against the background of A. J. Ayer’s Language, Truth and Logic, a key formulation of “logical positivism,” we will read, closely and completely, three seminal mid-century works: Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations, W.V.O Quine’s “Two Dogmas of Empiricism” and Wilfrid Sellars’ Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind.
Each student will be responsible for a weekly formal presentation, and each will commit to a quarterlong independent study on problems of language and mind discussed either in contemporary philosophy or in earlier historical work. Evaluations will focus on the student’s presentations, contributions to seminar discussions and a paper resulting from independent study.
Credit will be awarded in: the philosophy of language and mind, the history of philosophy and for work accomplished independently.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in philosophy, the humanities and social sciences.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (4/11/03) New Program, Not in printed catalog
N ew spring, 2004 program for sophomores or above
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Light
Cancelled
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Dharshi Bopegedera, Janet Ott (W), Susan Aurand (S)
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: High school algebra proficiency assumed. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $150–$200 for art supplies and lab safety equipment (lab coat, goggles and gloves).
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is a two-quarter interdisciplinary study of light. We will explore light in art, art history, science and mythology. All students will work in the art studio and study how artists have thought about and expressed light in their work. They will also explore the interaction of light with matter in the classroom as well as in the laboratory, and explore the physiology of light in the human body. This integrated program is designed for students who are willing to explore both art and science. Our weekly schedule will include studio and science labs, specific skill workshops, lectures and seminars.
During winter, we will focus on skill building in art and lab science and on library research methods. During spring, each student will have the opportunity to design an interdisciplinary individual or group project exploring a topic related to the theme of light.
Credit awarded in: introductory science with laboratory, studio art and art history.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in science, art, art history and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (3/6/03) This Core program has reduced its Core seats
(6/16/03) Cancelled

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Leadership for Urban Sustainability
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Willie Parson, Joye Hardiman, Duke Kuehn, Kabby Mitchell, Gilda Sheppard, Tyrus Smith, Artee Young, Carl Waluconis, TBA
Enrollment: 225
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing; formal admission to the Tacoma campus.
Faculty Signature: No. Nonetheless, prospective students must attend an intake interview and produce two short writing samples as part of the interview. For information about admission and the application process call (253) 680-3000.
Special Expenses: Approximately $25–$50 per quarter for videotapes, storage media and related items for multimedia and project work.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, spring quarter with faculty approval.

This program is designed to help students discover new understandings about leadership and the various issues associated with effective action in urban communities. In fall, students will examine historical notions of leadership, leadership theories, leadership styles and contemporary views of leaders and followers. In winter, we will focus on broader urban leadership issues and investigate the experiences and effectiveness of leaders as evidenced in historical writings and biographies. The work of this quarter will serve to enhance students’ knowledge of contemporary leadership theory and praxis. Collaborative research project work and the development of vision statements will provide the context for students to begin to think about how to build and sustain more efficacious urban organizations and institutions. In spring, the curriculum will bridge the gap between theory and practice through completion of urban sustainability projects. Each project will be centered on a critical educational, social, political, cultural or environmental issue that promotes or impedes urban sustainability.
Credit awarded in: urban education, community and environmental studies, law and public policy, public health, science and social science research, research methodology, literature, history, humanities, composition, media literacy, computer studies, multimedia and statistics.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, law and public policy, media arts, organizational development, community development, social and human service administration, cultural advocacy, public health and environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Tacoma Campus
For more information about the Tacoma Campus, visit their web site or call (253) 680-3000.
Program Updates:   (7/14/03) Carl Waluconis has replaced Eddy Brown in the Tacoma faculty team

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Looking Backward: America in the 20th Century
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David Hitchens, Jerry Lassen
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expense: No
Internship Possibility: No

The United States began the 20th century as a second-rate military and naval power, and a debtor nation. The nation ended the century as the last superpower with an economy that sparked responses across the globe. In between, we sent men to the moon and began to explore our place in space. Many observers have characterized the 20th century as "America’s Century" because, in addition to developing into the mightiest military machine on the face of the earth, the United States also spawned the central phenomenon of "the mass." Mass culture, mass media, mass action, massive destruction, massive fortunes—all are significant elements of life in the United States, especially after the national participation in World War I.
Looking Backward will be a retrospective, close study of the origins, development, expansion and elaboration of "the mass" phenomena and will place those aspects of national life against our heritage to determine if the growth of the nation in the last century was a new thing or the logical continuation of long-standing, familiar impulses and forces in American life. While exploring these issues, we will use history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture and the tools of statistics to help us understand the nation and its place in the century. At the same time, students will be challenged to understand their place in the scope of national affairs; read closely; write effectively; and develop appropriate research projects to refine their skills and contribute to the collective enrichment of the program. There will be program-wide public symposia at the end of fall and winter quarters, and a presentation of creative projects to wrap up the spring quarter.
Credit awarded in: U.S. political and economic history, U.S. social and intellectual history, American economics and global connections, and American literature.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and social science areas of inquiry, law, journalism, history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture, cultural anthropology and teaching.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should speak with the faculty.
(2/18/04) Will accept new students in spring. Incoming students should read The Fifties by David Halberstam before the first class of spring quarter.

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Looking Forward: Prospects for Liberal Democracy and a Global Society of Peoples
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Dean F. Olson
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Contact Dean Olson, (360) 867-6433.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: No

Some observers claim that democratic liberalism and global free trade will spread throughout the 21st century, bringing with them more just social institutions and improved economic equality. Others claim that global free trade empowers few and impoverishes many, and that reasonably just and decent social institutions can exist in well-ordered hierarchical societies, even though such societies are not liberal democracies. This program will attempt to sort out some of these issues. Weekly readings and seminar discussions will explore the principles of a reasonably just society; the nexus between cultural legacy and Western modernity; the claim that liberal trade regimes produce unjust outcomes; and assess the prospects for a reasonably just global society of peoples. Seminar discussions will feature student essays and research papers, as well as case studies and program readings.
This program will require advanced thinking and considerable motivation. Our review of reasonably just liberal democracies and decent hierarchical social institutions will follow the principles for a just society found in John Rawls, The Law of Peoples, Harvard University Press, 1999. In our discussion of globalization, we will seek to avoid the emotional rhetoric common to this issue. Cases will be drawn from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. Some of the readings are from the Brookings Institute, the Institute of International Economics and the United Nations.
Credit awarded in: economics, international trade and political science.
Total: 12 or 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in political economy or international relations.
Program Updates:   (12/19/03) New, not in printed catalog.

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Magic, Self and Other
New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Angela Gilliam, Valerie Bystrom
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Magic, Self and Other is an exploration into the writing of memoir and autobiography, and how certain authors have used this genre to pose questions about identity, politics, the self and other.
As such, the program will juxtapose magic realism with the ways contemporary writers and artists from silenced communities are utilizing this art form to interrogate inequality and questions of domination. Students will be expected to both produce, read and critique this emergent field of written and audiovisual textual analysis.
Credit awarded in: literature, cultural anthropology and media studies.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (6/3/03) New, not in printed catalog.

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Mathematics in the History of Science
New program, not in printed catalog.
Fall quarter
Faculty: Neal Nelson
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: High school algebra presumed. This all-level program accepts up to 8 first-year students; up to 8 sophomore students; up to 8 junior or senior students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Science emerged in the Western world with a fundamental reliance on mathematics as a powerful language for expressing the character of the observed world. Mathematical models of behavior in the natural world allow us to predict (more or less) what complex systems will do. The emergence of computing has magnified the power of mathematical models and helped shape new kinds of modeling that increasingly influence our planetary decisions in the 21st century. Much of the understanding of mathematical models today can be seen through the historical development of quantitative methods during the emergence of modern mathematically-based science.
Mathematics in the history of science will study the mathematical abstractions and techniques that evolved hand-in-hand with science. The common basis for the mathematics we know today coalesced during the scientific revolution of the 17th and 18th century when the predictive power of science emerged as a powerful influence on the world. Students will have an opportunity to develop the mathematical skills needed today by working within the original historical contexts in which methods for expressing, analyzing and solving problems arose in the sciences.
Mathematical techniques will be developed with attention to foundational methods of science and computing. The program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics before leaving college or going on to more work in the sciences. The emphasis is of this program is on the development of fluency in mathematical thinking and expression while reflecting on the role and influence of mathematics in the history of science.
Credit awarded in: concepts and techniques of algebra, logic, functions, modeling, and algorithms in the context of science history.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in mathematics or the sciences.
Planning Unit(s): First-Year Programs and Scientific Inquiry.
Program Updates:   (4/30/03) New, not in printed catalog.
This is a new fall quarter, all-level program. This program has seats reserved for Freshmen; Sophomores; and Junior and Seniors
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Mathematical Systems
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Don Middendorf
Enrollment: 30
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome; one year of calculus.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is an intensive study of several fundamental areas of pure mathematics, including a nucleus of advanced calculus, abstract algebra and topology. Students may also have the opportunity to learn other advanced topics in mathematics such as set theory, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry or number theory.
We will develop skills not only in handling mathematical syntax, but also in the crucial area of reading and writing rigorous proofs in axiomatic systems. We will also examine mathematics in a historical and philosophical context—asking questions such as: Are mathematical systems discovered or created? Why does a particular culture allow some systems to flourish while ignoring others? What are some of the ramifications of embracing one model instead of another?
The program is designed for students who intend to pursue studies or teach in mathematics and the sciences, and for those who want to know more about mathematical thinking. Students will have the opportunity to engage in individual projects and present material to the class on topics in mathematics that they study during the year.
Credit awarded in: advanced calculus*, abstract algebra*, topology*, history and philosophy of mathematics, and special topics in mathematics.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
This program now has a 5, 10 and 16 credit option. Enrollment limit has been increased to 30.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in mathematics, physics, mathematic education, history of mathematics and science.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:   (3/7/03) Spring quarter has been cancelled. Don Middendorf is faculty.
(5/14/03) Change to Prerequisites: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome; one year of calculus.
(5/19/03) This program now has a 5, 10 and 16 credit option. Enrollment limit has been increased to 30.

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Masculinity and Femininity in Global Perspective: Sex Is Fun, but Gender Is a Drag
Cancelled
Fall quarter
Faculty: Toska Olson
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None, transfer students are welcome. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $75 for program retreat.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, with faculty approval.

This program is a cross-cultural exploration of gender, masculinity and femininity. We will examine questions such as: How do expectations of masculine and feminine behavior manifest themselves worldwide in social institutions such as work, families and schools? How do social theorists explain the current state of gender stratification? How does gender intersect with issues of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and social class identity?
Students will begin by examining how to conduct cross-cultural archival research on gender. In addition, we will consider issues related to ethnocentrism in cross-cultural and historical research. Then, we will study cross-cultural variation in women’s and men’s experiences and opportunities within several different social institutions. Lectures and seminar readings will provide students with a common set of knowledge about gendered experiences in the United States. Peer research presentations will provide students with information about gender in other cultures.
This program involves extensive student-initiated research, and puts a heavy emphasis on public speaking and advanced group work. Seniors will be encouraged to produce a research paper that represents a culmination of their college writing and thinking abilities.
Credit awarded in: areas such as sociology, cultural studies, anthropology, public speaking and library research.
Total: 12 or 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (1/16/03) Cancelled

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Meanings of Multicultural History
Cancelled
Spring quarter
Faculty: Michael Vavrus, Simona Sharoni
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $10 for museum admission fee.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is designed to investigate histories that are often hidden or suppressed in U.S. texts and curricula. Our investigation will uncover multicultural and immigration histories, and multicultural perspectives and accounts largely missing in the public schooling process.
While "multiculturalism" is often framed in contexts ignoring the historical exercise of power, our studies will focus on the histories of institutionalized oppression and resistance movements. Our examination will look at challenges within social movements as well, such as alliance-building or conflicts across lines of race, class, gender, sexuality and physical ability. We will explore the varied uses and applications of the terms "multiculturalism" and "multicultural education."
We understand schools do not exist in a social vacuum, but as institutions influenced significantly by dominant political and social forces. We recognize that, in the face of this domination, schools have the power to be agents of social change by offering multicultural transformative opportunities.
Each student will complete a project to revise and transform a standardized way of transmitting an aspect of history or another discipline in the K–12 public school curriculum. The project will require extensive research to critique and develop contemporary representations of U.S. histories in school curricula.
Credit awarded in: U.S. history, social movement history and multicultural education.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences, history and education.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (6/10/03) Simona Sharoni replaces Grace Chang in this program.
(8/8/03) Cancelled

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Media Rhetoric
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Virginia Hill
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter, with faculty approval.

Media of mass communications are intensely rhetorical. It’s no news that communicators regularly use them to convey persuasive and propagandistic content, but media technologies themselves also can be seen as rhetorical. Both their structure and the conventions developed for using them bias the content they carry. This program will probe both senses of media rhetoric. It will also provide practical instruction in the rhetorical uses of media, giving students an opportunity to design persuasive media campaigns aimed at addressing both public and commercial interests.
In fall, we will focus on media theory and on public campaigns, followed by study of marketing, advertising and public relations in winter. This work will culminate in team-designed, professional caliber, multimedia campaigns. Individual performances will include a research paper and presentation, and essay exam. Since the fall and winter quarters are closely integrated, students are expected to enroll for both quarters. In spring, students will also pursue individual academic interests through independent study or cap their practical efforts with an internship.
Credit awarded in: mass communications and society, media theory, persuasion and propaganda, marketing, advertising, public relations, public speaking and campaign strategy.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in communications, campaign management, public relations, advertising and law.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Mediaworks
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Ruth Hayes, Julia Zay
Enrollment: 44
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing having completed a Core or coordinated studies program; transfer students welcome to apply but are strongly advised to complete at least one quarter of a coordinated studies program first. Students must demonstrate college-level critical reading and writing. College-level work in visual arts, media, audio and/or performance is encouraged but not required. Students who cannot commit to taking all three quarters of the program should not apply.
Faculty Signature: Yes. An application packet will be available from the program secretaries in COM 301 or Academic Advising by mid-April, 2003. Applications received by 5 p.m., May 15, 2003, will be given priority. Students must include copies of faculty and self-evaluations from a previous coordinated studies program. In lieu of narrative evaluations, transfer students should submit a transcript and two letters of recommendation that speak to the quality of their academic work.
Special Expenses: Approximately $150–$300 per quarter for animation, film and video supplies and post-production expenses.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, spring quarter with faculty approval.

Mediaworks is the entry-level moving image program. Its specific disciplinary focus changes from year to year according to the faculty who teach it, but in general, it is designed to provide students with some background in media history and theory as well as basic skills in media production. It emphasizes linkages between theory and practice, focuses on the development of critical perspectives towards image making and explores the social implications of media representation.
We will explore works of animation and live-action, examining mainstream media’s responses to events in the world and how it imposes form and meaning on them. We will also view, read and discuss works by artists and producers who challenge dominant media forms and images through independent and/or experimental strategies and techniques, while paying particular attention to artists who deliberately mix styles, incorporate diverse aesthetic impulses in their work, cross disciplines, critique dominant corporate media, explore autobiographical themes and attempt to broaden the language of media in dialog with their audiences. Students will learn skills in 16mm and digital filmmaking, animation and audio production through intensive hands-on workshops and design problems.
Students should expect to work individually and collaboratively throughout fall and winter as they acquire critical and technical skills, execute design problems and experiments, and screen, discuss, write and read about a wide variety of historical and contemporary works. Spring quarter, students will research and develop a proposal for a short media piece (or an internship if they choose). They will then work on that project through a collaborative critique process. Completed works will be screened publicly at the end of the quarter.
Students must fulfill the requirements of each quarter in order to continue to the next.
To complete the requirements, students will need to carefully balance their outside commitments with the scheduling demands of this rigorous program.
Credit awarded in: animation, film, video, audio and digital media production; media history, theory and criticism; and independent film, video, animation or digital media projects.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in media arts, visual arts and communications.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (4/1/03) Julia Zay, MFA in Video, has been added to the faculty team.
(11/17/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Modeling Motion
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David McAvity, Barry Tolnas
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome; precalculus required. Students enrolled in Transforming the Globe in fall will gain sufficient mathematical backgound to enroll in this program.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Careful observation of the physical world reveals an underlying order. The goal of science is to build models that explain the order we see as simply and accurately as possible. Crucial among such models are those that explain the interactions between objects and the changes in motion those interactions bring about. The history of physics is replete with attempts to model motion accurately, and that quest is an ongoing process today. With the development of new models, come also new mathematical methods needed for describing them. Calculus, for example, was born out of the efforts to make predictions from Newton’s models of motion. Nonetheless, even with the power of calculus, a model may yield answers only in approximate circumstances. The advent of computer modeling has allowed more realistic scenarios to be examined.
We will explore the theme of scientific model building through small-group workshops, interactive lectures, hands-on laboratory investigations, computer programming labs and seminar discussions. Through our study of physics we will learn about models of motion and change and the process for constructing them. We will also learn how to use the tools of calculus and computer modeling to understand what those models predict.
Credit awarded in: university physics, calculus and computer modeling.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in engineering, medicine, physics, chemistry, computer science and mathematics.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (3/13/03) Barry Tolnas add to faculty team.

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Molecule to Organism
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Paula Schofield, Andrew Brabban, Donald Morisato
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; one year of college chemistry required; and college general biology preferred.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Yes, spring quarter only.

This program will develop and interrelate concepts in experimental (laboratory) biology, organic chemistry and biochemistry.
It will integrate two themes—one at the "cell" level and the other at the "molecule" level. In the cell theme, we will start with the cell and microbiology and proceed to the whole organism with the examination of structure/function relationships at all levels.
In the molecular theme, we will examine organic chemistry, the nature of organic compounds and reactions and carry this theme into biochemistry and the fundamental chemical reactions of living systems. As the year progresses, the two themes will continually merge through studies of cellular and molecular processes in molecular biology and genetics.
The program will contain a significant laboratory component; each week, students will write papers and maintain laboratory notebooks. All laboratory work, and approximately one half of the non-lecture time will be spent working in collaborative problem-solving groups.
This will be an intensive program. Its subjects are complex and the sophisticated understanding we expect to develop will require devoted attention and many hours of scheduled lab work each week.
Credit awarded in: genetics*, cell biology*, molecular biology*, organic chemistry I, organic chemistry II*, organic chemistry III*, biochemistry* and microbiology*.
Total: 6 or 10 or 16 credits fall and winter quarters; 4 or 8 or 12 or 16 credits spring quarter. During fall quarter, students may register for organic chemistry or biology as an option.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in biology, chemistry, health/medical sciences, environmental studies and education.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:   (3/4/03) Credit revision.
(11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should speak with the faculty.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Multicultural Counseling: A New Way to Integrate and Innovate Psychological Theory and Practice
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Heesoon Jun
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Senior standing. A working knowledge of personality theory, abnormal psychology, developmental psychology and statistics. Students should have had at least one quarter of an Evergreen coordinated studies program. Students should be ready to embrace a diversity of opinions and to work independently.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Application materials for the program will be available by March 28, 2003, and can be obtained by calling the faculty at (360) 867-6855 to request the packet. Applications received by May 1, 2003, will be given priority.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: 15 hours per week required during winter and spring quarters.

This program will allow students to test their commitment to work in counseling a culturally diverse clientele. One of the program goals will be to increase the multicultural counseling competency of the students through a non-heirarchical and non-dichotomous approach to education. The program will allow students to examine the efficacy of existing psychological paradigms and techniques for a diverse population. Students will learn to interpret research articles and to incorporate research findings into their counseling practice. In addition, students will work with ethics, psychological counseling theories, multicultural counseling theories and psychopathology. Students will complete an ethno-autobiography and videotape their counseling practice for their personal and academic development. We will use a range of instructional strategies such as lectures, workshops, films, seminars, role-playing, group discussions, videotaping, field trips, guest lectures and internship case studies.
Credit awarded in: psychological counseling, multicultural counseling theory and skill building, abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, personality theories, psychological research interpretation, ethnic studies, studies of oppression and power, ethics in the helping professions, group process and internship.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in psychological counseling, clinical psychology, social work, school counseling, cross-cultural studies, research psychology, class, race, gender and ethnicity studies.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.
(2/19/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Music Composition for the 21st Century
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Terry Setter
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; 12 credits of college study in music (composition, theory, technology or performance).
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $75 for concert tickets, travel and retreat.
Internship Possibilities: No

This is an upper-division program designed to support the creation of original music compositions for various instruments and contexts. It will focus on recent developments in contemporary "Art Music," such as minimalism, indeterminacy and 12-tone techniques. It is not a course in songwriting, "Electronica," or Hip-Hop related music. Students will study classical composition, musical aesthetics, contemporary music history and some innovative aspects of music technology, to gain the broadest possible perspective on these subjects and the greatest number of related skills. There will be historic, aesthetic and practical materials within the program that will place these compositional techniques within stylistic and cultural contexts. Students will compose pieces of music in response to assignments by the faculty. These pieces will be presented to the other members of the program during weekly "composition forums." Students will also research related topics and present their findings orally to the program. A concert of original pieces will be presented at the end of winter quarter. Students are also expected to take a skill-building course such as Music Theory; Piano; Voice; Music Technology; or Audio Recording.
If you are interested in developing your creative voice in music, this is the program for you.
Credit awarded in: music composition, music history, 20th-century aesthetics, music notation, orchestration and music theory.
Total: 12 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in music and the expressive arts.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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Narrative Poems of the Golden Age
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Charles McCann
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

We will read, in their entireties, Spenser’s The Fairie Queene, Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece and Venue and Adonis, Milton’s Paradise Lost and Samson Agonistes, together with two histories such as Bindoff’s Tudor England and Hill’s The Century of Revolution.
Each student will be responsible for a weekly formal presentation and will commit to a quarterlong independent study on some aspect of history or another author of the period. Evaluations will focus on the student’s presentation, contribution to seminar discussions and a paper resulting from independent study.
Credit awarded in: the poetry of Spenser, Shakespeare and Milton and independent study in either the literature or the history of the period.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and literature.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (4/21/03) New, not in printed catalog

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Natural History and Conservation of Shrubsteppe
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Steven G. Herman
Enrollment: 10
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must complete an application packet located outside Lab I 2012, and in the Program Secretary Office, Lab I.
Special Expenses: Good binoculars (subject to faculty approval). In order to qualify, new binoculars will necessarily cost no less than $100. Students must have personal camping gear (cookware and related materials will be provided by the faculty).
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Transportation and campground fees approximately $300. NOTE: All field trips are mandatory. No privately-owned vehicles allowed. Everyone will camp out, usually on public land.

Natural history is the scientific study of plants and animals in their natural environments. It is concerned with levels of organization from the individual organism to the ecosystem, and stresses life history, distribution, abundance and interrelationships. Aesthetic values are an integral component of this discipline.
Shrubsteppe is a term that refers to the shrub/grass desert or near-desert environments in the American West. Our experience will be with sagebrush/grass forms of this ecosystem. Shrubsteppe is one of the richest and most diverse landscapes in North America, and it has been under siege by domestic livestock for more than a century. Grazing is one of the most destructive and least appreciated agents of destruction that affect natural landscapes. In Washington, the Departments of Fish and Wildlife and Natural Resources both host huge numbers of privately-owned livestock on our public lands. We will study the remnant pristine sites in Washington and Oregon, and relate the flora and fauna there with the same components on grazed lands. We will also study and analyze the social and economic factors that perpetuate this remarkable alliance of public servants and private businessmen.
This field-oriented program has a long history at Evergreen, and is designed to teach students the history and practice of natural history, including especially identification skills. Working in a variety of landscapes, students will learn how to identify wild native vertebrate animals (with emphasis on birds) and major trees, shrubs, grasses and wildflowers. The methods that naturalists use to study these organisms (e.g., census techniques, bird netting and banding, small mammal trapping and marking, vegetation survey techniques, the importance of quantification) will also be covered.
The functional nucleus of the program will be the rigorous maintenance of a field journal according to a system established by a pioneer California naturalist, Joseph Grinnell. Lectures and seminars will cover the history of natural history exploration, basic ecological principles, taxonomic considerations and published descriptions of landscape characteristics in the Pacific Northwest, as well as the history and ecology of grazing animals, wild and domestic. Laboratories and museum instruction will stress identification techniques.
Total: 16 credits, upper-division science.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (6/3/03)New, not in printed catalog

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Nature, Nurture or Nonsense?
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Stuart Matz (FW), Stephanie Kozick, Steven Niva (FW)
Enrollment: 69 (FW) 23 (S)
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

What is our natural human state? What factors drive our behavior? What guides our social interactions? Is the human condition determined by our genes or shaped by our environment? Or, have we been deceived by this nature/nurture debate? In this program, we will examine several controversial issues that have been shaped by this debate such as: How is our gender and sexual orientation determined? What determines a child’s personality? Do poverty and class difference reflect a natural order?
In the course of addressing these issues, we will study great thinkers (and some not so great) who have contributed to these discussions. Our inquiry together will examine how the nature/nurture dichotomy has served as a foundation for discussions in human biology, psychology, family studies, human development, anthropology, sociology and political science. We will be engaged in critical thinking, reading and writing, visual and movement representation of work, and analytical reasoning through problem-based learning. Humor will be used to both defuse tension and inflame our discussions. As with all authentic inquiry, our work together might move in unexpected ways and new topics for investigation will emerge. We will integrate emerging topics as they transpire.
Credit awarded in: biology, human development, quantitative reasoning, political science, psychology and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, health sciences, human services, political theory, psychology, public policy, psychology and social services.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) New students must speak with the faculty before Winter break.
(11/18/03) Faculty signature added.
(2/19/04) Not accepting new students in spring.
(2/27/04) Stu Matz has left the program for spring quarter.

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Nature, Place, and Wonder
Cancelled, refer to Our Place in Nature which is the same program with a different title.
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Robert Smurr, Steve Hendricks
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Some field trip expenses.
Internship Possibilities: No

Does nature exist? As soon as we accept that we are a part of “nature,” the word becomes difficult to define. Join us as we strive to develop our own definitions of nature through our connections to land, place, and the world at large. This program requires a passion for the entire natural world: human and non-human, organic and inorganic, local and distant, familiar and foreign. We invite you to explore with us how humans have influenced nature, and how nature in turn has greatly influenced human culture. Throughout fall and winter quarter, we will examine how people have attempted to define and comprehend nature before us, and how new definitions and meanings might emerge through interdisciplinary approaches to history, social science, and art. Through critical reading and writing, art projects, films, and adventures in the varied terrain of Washington state, we will re-imagine our relationships to nature and challenge traditional boundaries of historical and environmentalist thinking. Whether we find ourselves amidst towering cedars in the lush Olympic rainforest, an arid coulee in Eastern Washington, or a sea of concrete and asphalt in a Tacoma strip-mall, our quest will remain the same: to determine how we might best appreciate, understand, and enhance the wonder and beauty of this miracle planet.
Fall quarter begins with a close examination of what might be defined as “environmental ethics” through numerous readings in environmental history and literature. Critical reading and writing skills will be emphasized through weekly workshops, writing assignments and meetings with writing tutors and peers. Local themes, enhanced by overnight adventures and histories of the lands that surround us, will allow us to question the meaning of beauty when we speak of nature: where do we find the sublime? How can we best express it? And, most importantly, why do these questions matter? Our winter quarter readings take us beyond the comfortable “lure of the local” into unfamiliar regions often perceived as harsh and exotic. Overnight trips will emphasize observation, reflection and analysis that ground course concepts in first-hand experience. Creative writing and printmaking projects will allow students to express their perspectives on nature and history. Our adventure-packed two-quarter program will ensure that students will be able to explore the relationship between observer and landscape, to journey from the familiar to the distant, and to move from the known to the mysterious.
Credit awarded in: history, environmental history, literature, philosophy of art, art appreciation, cultural studies, film, printmaking and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, arts, eco-tourism, writing, history and environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (4/22/03) New, not in printed catalog
(4/23/03) Cancelled
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The New World Order
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Jorge Gilbert
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $15 for program materials.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, with faculty approval.

The great confrontation between capitalism and socialism that started in 1917 with the Russian Revolution and continued through the Cold War, ended in 1989 with the toppling of the Berlin Wall. Highly industrialized nations are optimistic and talk about democratization, transition and growing opportunities for the Americas and the rest of the world through neoliberal policies and a free-market economy. This optimism is not shared equally among all people of the world. Many claim that the world has approached the 21st century with another crisis and confrontation. The September 11, 2001, attack on the United States, the conflicts with Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and the Middle East and the blockade of Cuba, are some examples. Some political analysts argue that, in light of these conflicts all presumptively necessary violations of international law are justified, as are violations of the rights to self-determination. This program will study neoliberalism historically and internationally, with an emphasis on the Americas. Revolutions in the region will be analyzed and compared with the notion of terrorism, including terrorism by the state. Drug production and trafficking, illegal immigration, ethnic minority conflicts and environmental issues in the Americas will be compared within a neoliberal context and its free-market economy. During spring quarter, interested students may travel to Chile. Participation in research projects will be the focus of this Study Abroad: Chile program.
Credit awarded in: political economy, sociology, Latin American studies, Spanish, media studies and international relations.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social sciences, political economy, international studies, international relations, Latin American studies, public administration, political sociology and Spanish language.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (5/7/03) Faculty signature removed
(11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Students who want to enter in Winter must speak with the faculty. Preference will be given to students who intend to travel to Chile in Spring.

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Non-Violent Resistance
Cancelled, refer to The Art and Nature of Non-Violent Resistance
as an alternative

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Priscilla Bowerman
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The 20th century was marked by significant upheaval and social change. Some of the social change was effected through the use of non-violent resistance. This program will study the philosophy of non-violence and 20th-century examples of the use of non-violence to achieve just social change. We will attend particularly to the moral, political and religious sources in which non-violent philosophy is rooted, and we will seek to evaluate the success of its practice not only in resolving political conflicts but also in forming moral character and culture. Our studies will regularly engage us in the examination of the concept of justice.
Our focus will be a close, thoughtful reading of the classics of non-violent philosophy, including texts by Tolstoy, Thoreau, Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., and essays on non-violence and justice by important 20th-century intellectuals such as Camus, Arendt and Wolgast.
In winter, we will focus on examples of using non-violence on a large scale to effect political change. About half of the quarter will be given to studying the use of non-violence in the American civil rights movement as explored in major biographies of Martin Luther King, Jr., and studies of the role of students in that movement. We will also explore briefly non-violent movements in Europe during World War II, and, later in the century, in places such as South Africa, Poland and Chile.
This program will concentrate on assigned readings and a number of films and videos. Students will be expected to read texts—books, essays or films—closely and critically in preparation for seminar, to participate intelligently and regularly in seminars, and to write thoughtful expository essays.
Credit awarded in: political and moral philosophy, 20th-century political movements and the American civil rights movement.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social sciences, political economy, law, public and community service and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (8/25/03) Cancelled

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Our Place in Nature
New, not in printed catalog: The old title for this program was Nature, Place and Wonder.
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Robert Smurr, Steve Hendricks
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Some field trip expenses.
Internship Possibilities: No

Does nature exist? As soon as we accept that we are a part of “nature,” the word becomes difficult to define. Join us as we strive to develop our own definitions of nature through our connections to land, place, and the world at large. This program requires a passion for the entire natural world: human and non-human, organic and inorganic, local and distant, familiar and foreign. We invite you to explore with us how humans have influenced nature, and how nature in turn has greatly influenced human culture. Throughout fall and winter quarter, we will examine how people have attempted to define and comprehend nature before us, and how new definitions and meanings might emerge through interdisciplinary approaches to history, social science, and art. Through critical reading and writing, art projects, films, and adventures in the varied terrain of Washington state, we will re-imagine our relationships to nature and challenge traditional boundaries of historical and environmentalist thinking. Whether we find ourselves amidst towering cedars in the lush Olympic rainforest, an arid coulee in Eastern Washington, or a sea of concrete and asphalt in a Tacoma strip-mall, our quest will remain the same: to determine how we might best appreciate, understand, and enhance the wonder and beauty of this miracle planet.
Fall quarter begins with a close examination of what might be defined as “environmental ethics” through numerous readings in environmental history and literature. Critical reading and writing skills will be emphasized through weekly workshops, writing assignments and meetings with writing tutors and peers. Local themes, enhanced by overnight adventures and histories of the lands that surround us, will allow us to question the meaning of beauty when we speak of nature: where do we find the sublime? How can we best express it? And, most importantly, why do these questions matter? Our winter quarter readings take us beyond the comfortable “lure of the local” into unfamiliar regions often perceived as harsh and exotic. Overnight trips will emphasize observation, reflection and analysis that ground course concepts in first-hand experience. Creative writing and printmaking projects will allow students to express their perspectives on nature and history. Our adventure-packed two-quarter program will ensure that students will be able to explore the relationship between observer and landscape, to journey from the familiar to the distant, and to move from the known to the mysterious.
Credit awarded in: history, environmental history, literature, philosophy of art, art appreciation, cultural studies, film, printmaking and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, arts, eco-tourism, writing, history and environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-year students
Program Updates:   (4/23/03) New, not in printed catalog
(11/17/03) Students interested in joining the second quarter of our two-quarter program should contact Steve Hendricks or Rob Smurr.
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Paris, Dakar, Fort de France: Voices of Revolution and Tradition
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Marianne Bailey, Stacey Davis, Susan Fiksdal
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Optional spring quarter travel to France, approximately $4,000.
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Optional spring quarter travel to France.

The French-speaking world offers a veritable crossroads of cultures and its literature, history, film and visual arts provide the voices our program will explore. We will trace the history of aesthetic, social and political developments in France and the Francophone cultures of North and West Africa and the Caribbean from 1789 to the present. Our work will center on three complementary metaphors: (1) the image of points tournants: moments/places/works where upheavals—great or subtle—in worldview occurred; (2) the image of Outside/Inside or of Chaos/Cosmos and the tenuous but fruitful and necessary dialogue across this threshold; and (3) Reason/Unreason, as defined by M. Foucault’s Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason.
Fall quarter, we will study revolution through the parallel historical examples of the French and Haitian revolutions and through literary and artistic figures whose words caused upheaval in a tradition-bound society including romantic, symbolist, decadent and naturalist aesthetics. Winter quarter, we will consider the Cubist, Dada–Surrealist, Existentialist and Négritude movements, emphasizing the voices of writers from Africa and the Caribbean who use the colonizer’s French as a tool of their liberation. Major concepts will include religious and cultural syncretism, ritual, colonialism, language contact and change with a particular emphasis on the war for liberation in Algeria.
Intensive French language study from beginning to advanced levels will be a major part of the program. Spring quarter, we will travel to France, particularly Rennes, Paris and Lyon. Students remaining on campus will be able to continue their French language study for four credits.
Credit awarded in: French language, French and Francophone literature, history, art history, sociolinguistics and French and Francophone film.
Total: 16 credits fall and winter quarters; 4 or 16 credits spring quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, international affairs, French and Francophone studies, history, comparative literature, history and art.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (4/14/03) Marianne Bailey will leave the program at the end of winter quarter. Students may refer to her new program: Cabaret: Swansong of Western Humanism as an alternative.
(12/3/03) Marianne Bailey will rejoin the program for spring quarter. She will be the faculty who works with students who don't travel abroad during the spring.

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Philosophy, Society and Globalization: How We Got Where We Are
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Alan Nasser
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. Political economy or economics is recommended, but not required.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students should submit copies of all their faculty evaluations, and samples of their most recent writing to Alan at the Academic Fair, May 14, 2003. Transfer students can send transcripts and writing samples to Alan Nasser, The Evergreen State College, SE 3127, Olympia, WA 98505. Priority will be given to applications received by May 14, 2003. For more information call (360) 867-6759.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will trace the philosphical and historical background of the currently dominant global ideology of "neoliberalism/globalization." This term refers to the reliance by policymakers, in their attempts to address important social, political and economic problems, on a model of pure, market-driven capitalism dominated exclusively by the interests of corporate business. This model is now being put into practice, for the first time in history, on a global scale.
We will use philosophy, political economy and history to clarify the historical process leading up to neoliberalism/globalization. We will begin with the writings of major modern political philosophers, including, among others, Machiavelli, Locke, Adam Smith, J. S. Mill and Marx. We will trace the development of the notions of the modern individual, natural rights, liberty, the modern State, democracy, the free market and the work ethic. We will relate these notions to the emergence, in the 19th and 20th centuries, of industrial capitalism and representative democracy.
Capitalism and democracy, once established, have evolved oddly since 1900: from pure capitalism with no democratic welfare state (1898–1947), to capitalism modified by democratic welfare-state policies (1947–80), back to pure capitalism and the dismantling of welfare-state democracy (1980–present). We will examine the historical dynamics of these major political, economic, social and philosophical transformations. This will involve an introduction both to the basic principles of political economics and to some of the major political philosophers of the 20th century, e.g., John Rawls and Robert Nozick. We will also study some of the defining political and military events of the period of neoliberal globalization, including the wars in Yugoslavia and Afghanistan, and the "War on Terrorism."
This is a demanding, bookish, analytical program concerned exclusively with the careful analysis of challenging readings.
Credit awarded in: classical liberalism, critiques of classical liberalism, fundamentals of political economy and 20th-century political philosophy and globalization.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in teaching, economics, politics, government, philosophy and history.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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Photography
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Steve Davis
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 33 percent first-year students and offers appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: books, framing and finishing materials, plus $150 photo supplies fee.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program aims to educate students to a broad range of contemporary photographic practices. Targeted towards beginning to intermediate levels, we will explore photography history, approaches, theory and a wide range of techniques in order to provide students with the tools for personal expression through this medium.

Photography today exists in many forms and for many purposes. The tools and technologies used introduce problematic values and offer new possibilities for shifts in aesthetics and visual interpretation. Expect to become proficient with cameras of different formats (35mm, 120, digital, and possibly 4x5). Studio photography will be addressed, including how to effectively use professional lighting equipment. On the wet side of photography, we'll work in both black and white and color darkrooms. The digital, or dry end of the medium will be explored fully, including making high quality inkjet prints and crafting your own Web page as an effective means of presentation.

Work by historic and contemporary artists will be reviewed, and students will be asked to make presentations on photographers of their choice. Seminars groups will explore reading material in relation to the class's ongoing photography projects. Guest speakers and field trips are anticipated. Final projects, accompanied by artists' statements, will be presented for public display.
Credit awarded in: basic to advanced photography, history of photography and 2-D design.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in photography, art and media.
Program Updates:   (2/17/04) New, not in printed catalog

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The Physics of Astronomy
New, not in printed catalog
Winter and spring quarters
Faculty: E.J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. One year of calculus-based physics.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Details at http://academic.evergreen.edu/z/zita/home.htm
Special Expenses: Expensive textbooks, up to $500 total, to be used all year, must be purchased by the second day of class; good binoculars and journal subscriptions.
Internship Possibilities: No

How can we discover the genesis, structure, and evolution of our universe? What does physics tell us about the past, present, and future of our solar system, galaxy, and beyond?
This program will study fundamental concepts in classical and modern physics, with astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology as central areas of inquiry. Key themes will include scientific model making and conservation laws. We will study our current models of the universe, especially the role of electromagnetism and classical and quantum mechanics in understanding stars, galaxies and black holes. We will examine such questions as: How do we know that stars use fusion to produce energy? How do we interpret theory and experiments for objects such as stars and black holes? What are some of the ramifications of embracing one model instead of another? What is energy and how is it related to mass, space and time? Are we learning about pre-existing objective facts (truth) or do our experimental results depend on our theories?
We will examine the ideas of leading thinkers in physics, mathematics and philosophy to explore these questions. Although we will find many strange and provocative answers to our questions, our goal will be to learn to ask even more sophisticated questions about "nature" and "reality." Seminar is a fundamental and required part of this program.
This program is necessarily mathematical. Required mathematical methods (such as differential equations and vector calculus) will be developed as needed in the context of their use in the physical sciences. The central role of mathematics in describing nature is one of the core intellectual issues in this program. Quantitative problem solving will be emphasized.
Students must subscribe to three journals-Sky and Telescope, Science News and Physics Today. These journals will be used in weekly discussions and student presentations about recent developments in astronomy and modern physics. We will use our eyes, binoculars and telescopes to examine the sun and the night sky-so we'll need to meet at night a few times each quarter.

This program will collaborate with the Working the Waters program to offer students an additional 2 credit option in Piloting and Inland Navigation . Students who chose this option will attend a 2 hour piloting and inland navigation workshop each week in addition to regular program activities. Students from the Working the Waters program may also register for our weekly Celestial Navigation workshop.
Credit awarded in: astronomy, modern physics, quantum theory, electromagnetism, and history and philosophy of science. Upper-division credit is possible for more than half of the total credits depending on upper-division performance.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in science and mathematics, especially physics, astronomy, philosophy, mathematics or engineering.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (4/21/03) New, not in printed catalog
(2/17/04) Students who want to take an additional 2 credits of Piloting and Inland Navigation, refer to CRN 30776 in Gateway.
(2/19/04) Advanced students will continue in Physics of Astronomy (PA) in spring for 16 credits. New students will participate in the spring Astronomy and Cosmology (AC) program for 16 credits. All students in PA and AC will participate in Science Seminar, which is also open to other students for 4 or 8 credits. Visit the faculty's website at http://academic.evergreen.edu/z/zita/home.htm for complete information on all programs.
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The Physicist's World
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Tom Grissom
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The 20th century has brought about a revolution in our understanding of the physical universe. We have been forced to revise the way we think about even such basic concepts as space and time and causality, and about the properties of matter. An important part of this revolution has been the surprising discovery of fundamental ways in which our knowledge of the material world is ultimately limited. These limitations are not the result of surmountable shortcomings in human understanding but are more deeply rooted in the nature of the universe itself.
In this program, we will examine the mental world created by the physicist to make sense out of our experience of the material world around us, and to try and understand the nature of physical reality. We will ask and explore answers to the twin questions of epistemology: What can we know? and, How can we know it? starting with the Presocratic philosophers and continuing through each of the major developments of 20th-century physics, including the theories of relativity, quantum theory, deterministic chaos and modern cosmology. We will examine the nature and the origins of the limits that each imposes on our ultimate knowledge of the world.
No mathematical prerequisites are assumed. Mathematical thinking will be developed within the context of the other ideas as needed for our purposes. The only prerequisites are curiosity about the natural world and a willingness to read, think and write about challenging texts and ideas. We will read primary texts, such as works by the Presocratics, Plato, Lucretius, Galileo, Newton and Einstein, as well as selected contemporary writings on physics.
Credit awarded in: philosophy of science, history of science, introduction to physical science, introduction to mathematics and quantitative reasoning, and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in both the humanities and the sciences.
This program is also listed under First-Year Programs and Scientific Inquiry.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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From Pillar to Postmodernism: Contemporary Political Theory
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Steve Niva
Enrollment: 23
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This introductory program will survey the central traditions, or pillars, of modern political theory such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism and anarchism through an examination of both classical and contemporary thinkers and writings. We will also study theories of liberation that address gender, race and sexuality and examine the theoretical bases of contemporary environmentalism. The program will conclude with a focus on contemporary debates over the concept of "postmodernism" and whether or not this represents a new theoretical tradition or an end to modern political theory.
The goal of this program is to provide first-year students with a strong foundation for understanding the paradigms and debates that are at the center of contemporary political theory. Of particular interest is how major traditions such as liberalism, socialism and anarchism have been redefined, updated and possibly transformed in our current “postmodern” political, economic and cultural context.
The program will center on close readings of texts and articles and will include response papers, a mid-term take home examination and several thesis-driven papers. We will also participate in active learning exercises and view several films to illuminate how political theory informs various social and cultural perspectives.
Credit awarded in: political theory, philosophy and cultural studies.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in political science, philosophy, cultural studies, government and public policy.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (1/31/03) New, not in printed catalog.

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Perception
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Nancy Murray, Thad Curtz, Charles Pailthorp
Enrollment: 69
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for a program retreat and possible additional money for art supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

Although in some sense we and the animals that we share the planet with all live in the same world, we don’t experience it in the same way. Even different people can register the same place quite differently. Yet we think that we do hear and see and taste the same things, and that works of art can communicate how someone else experienced the world long ago or far away from us.
We’ll explore the biology and psychology of human and animal perception through experiential exercises, observation and some drawing, as well as regular labs, lectures and readings. We’ll study and talk about how the arts structure or transform our ordinary perceptions (especially vision and hearing). Our readings will explore the range and variation of sensory experience and how artists use it through literature such as To the Lighthouse or Perfume or Basho’s haiku; studies of cultural, historical and individual variation in perception such as A Natural History of the Senses or The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat; and some readings on the philosophy of mind and recent attempts to build autonomous robots. We’ll also analyze relevant films such as Blue or City of Lost Children each week.
Credit awarded in: biology, literature, art history, cognitive psychology, expository writing and quantitative reasoning.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in biology or environmental studies, literature or other humanities, psychology, anthropology and work with visual images.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (11/11/03) New students must read the Fall Quarter biology notes and handouts, plus Oliver Sacks "An Anthropologist on Mars" (3 selections from this book). Speak with the faculty for more details.

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Performing Gender: Cultural and Historical Representations of Gender and Sexuality in Theater, Film and Television
New, not in printed catalog
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Toska Olson, Walter Eugene Grodzik
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 33 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $50 for mandatory overnight program retreat in fall quarter. Students can also expect to spend approximately $50 per quarter for admission to performances.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will explore the reciprocal relationship between art and society through the lenses of gender and sexuality. We will examine how gender and sexuality are portrayed in cultures and throughout history in theater, film and television. In addition, we will look at how elements of popular culture, theatrical arts and cinematic arts reinforce and also challenge the socially-constructed notions of masculinity, femininity and sexuality. We may explore thematic questions such as: How have gender and sexuality been portrayed during different periods in history? How many genders are there, and how does the answer to this question vary across cultures? How do contemporary playwrights and filmmakers deconstruct traditional definitions and boundaries of sexuality? How does this inform the construction of our own sexuality?
No previous experience with sociology or performance is required. This program will make social science students comfortable with performance and theater/expressive arts students comfortable with social science. All students will participate in weekly sociology and theater workshops. Students will conduct fieldwork and oral histories on gender and sexuality that will lead to creative projects or performances. In examining the performing arts through sociology, students’ grasp of context and meaning will expand in depth and breadth to better understand the currents traveling under the surface of theater, film and television.
Credit awarded in: theater, sociology, anthropology, dramatic literature, history, cultural studies, media studies and research.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social science, professional theater, educational theater, humanities and liberal arts.
Planning Units: First-Year Programs; Expressive Arts; and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (1/31/01) New, not in printed catalog.
(11/11/03) We require that new students complete Bornstein's "My Gender Workbook" and that they read “Hands Around.” These books are available at the bookstore. We highly recommend that students also purchase our packet of articles from the bookstore and read the articles before they come to class. Students must also choose a monologue to work on in their theater workshop (students should contact Walter Grodzik, (360)867-6076. New students must email/call Walter to be assigned a workshop before the quarter starts. Our first class is a workshop on Tuesday morning, so they need to know where to show up.

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Performing the 20th and 21st Centuries: Acting and Directing from Realism to Post Modernism
Cancelled, refer to Performing Gender: Cultural and Historical Representations of Gender and Sexuality in Theater, Film and Television as alternatives.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Walter Eugene Grodzik
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. One year of college-level work in theater or the equivalent.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must audition by preparing a short piece, such as a two-minute speech. For information contact
Walter Grodzik, The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for theater tickets.
Internship Possibilities: No

How has the theory and practice of theater performance changed in the last century as a result of the dramatic changes we have witnessed in society and technology? This program will examine how the nature and practice of dramatic performance has transformed, from the realism of the early 20th century to post-modern performance of today. Students will study cultural history, theory and criticism, art history, the literature and history of 20th-century theater, and acting and directing theories and techniques from Stanislawsky to Robert Wilson and Anne Bogart.
Students will direct their own productions and there will be two faculty-directed productions. The first will focus on realistic theater, the second on postmodern performance. Students interested in this program should come prepared with a good base of skills in acting and prior theater experience, as well as good critical reading and writing skills. Students will participate in intensive workshops, weekly seminars and lectures. Winter and spring quarters will culminate in performances.
Credit awarded in: acting, directing, theater history, dramatic literature, art history and cultural theory and criticism.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in theater, performing arts, humanities and literature.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (1/31/01) Cancelled

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Political Economy and Social Movements
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Peter Bohmer, Jeanne E. Hahn, Michael Vavrus
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. Some background in history and social science recommended.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is designed to introduce students to the major concepts, historical developments and theories in political economy, and to provide a foundation for more advanced work in political economy and the social sciences. We will examine the historical construction of the U.S. political economy, the role social movements have played in its development and future possibilities for social justice.
We will begin our study by focusing on the historical development of the United States, and analyzing various ideologies and frameworks such as liberalism, some feminist theories, Marxism and neoclassical economics. Current economic restructuring efforts and the reorganization of the social welfare state will be examined. Issues such as the growing inequality of income and wealth; work and unions; and public education will be studied. A central goal will be to gain a clear understanding of how the U.S. economy has been organized, the nature of racism and sexism and how social movements, particularly those based on race, class and gender, have resisted, and shaped its direction.
We will analyze the interrelationship between the U.S. economy and the changing global system. We will study the causes and consequences of the growing globalization of capital; the role of multilateral institutions such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization; and the response of social movements. We will pay particular attention to the human consequences of globalization and resistance to it. We will look at alternative ways of organizing society for the United States and beyond. We will study major economic concepts and economic theories, placing them in their historical context. Students will be introduced to key social statistics such as poverty and the unemployment rate.
Credit awarded in: political economy, U.S. history, race, class and gender studies, economics, theory of social movements, international political economy and international relations.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in economics, political economy, organizing, social studies teaching, working for a social justice group and working in non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for global justice.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Students who want to enter in Winter must meet with one of faculty members to discuss which fall books they must read by week 1 of winter.

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Politics and Ideologies from the Americas
Cancelled
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Jorge Gilbert
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No.
Internship Possibilities: No

Rich and industrialized nations from the North assert that capitalism brought progress and welfare to many nations. People from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean argue that capitalism was based on primitive accumulation rooted in the primitive violence, pillage and genocide of the inhabitants of the Third World. Accordingly, they claim that rich nations exist today because their ancestors plundered other nations for centuries. Europe, and then the United States, created and imposed structures and laws that allowed them to decide the destiny of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.
This program will study the processes of underdevelopment in the Americas from pre-Columbian times until today from a multi-disciplinary approach. These processes, which characterize the region today, will be historically analyzed and evaluated in light of the formation and expansion of the capitalist system in Europe first and the United States later. We will use Latin American approaches and interpretations as opposed to Eurocentric studies and models from Europe and the United States.
This program will also include a component that applies social research methods to study the subjects described above. Working in small groups, students will develop independent projects. During winter, the program will offer interested students a chance to prepare for spring quarter travel to Chile. Participation in research projects and production of several short documentaries about relevant topics studied in this program will be the focus of Study Abroad: Chile, a separate program.
Credit awarded in: social sciences, communications, Latin American studies, political economy, art, television production and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social science, media, social research, cultural studies and television production.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (12/18/02) Cancelled

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Politics, Power and Media
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Larry Mosqueda, Laurie Meeker
Enrollment: 40
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. One quarter of a full-time media program or political economy program or equivalent.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Application forms will be available April 11, 2003, from Academic Advising. Applications received by May 7, 2003, will be given priority. Additional applications will be accepted through a rolling admissions process until the program is full. For application information, contact Larry Mosqueda at (360) 867-6513, or Laurie Meeker at (360) 867-6613.
Special Expenses: $100–$500 over both quarters for media production costs.
Internship Possibilities: No

Politics is the study of who gets what, when and how. The media, both print and visual, have a profound impact on the construction, presentation, creation and invention of political reality. The relationship between the powerful and relatively powerless is a constant political battle. The modern media is much more than a neutral camera eye or an unbiased description of events; it is a field of contention for various political actors. This program will explore the relationships between political events and the media as a tool for both documentation and social change.
While the mainstream media reflects the interests of the dominant ideology, independent documentary filmmakers have long been active in political movements and struggles, documenting events as they unfold. The resulting films often have become important historical documents, providing an alternative perspective that simply does not exist in corporate media archives. In addition, independent political films have often played important roles in movements for social change, bringing alternative perspectives to activists as well as the general public. This program will focus on the political economy of social and political movements and we will study important films that were a part of those movements. Central themes will be war and peace, labor, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement.
Our objective is to provide a forum for interdisciplinary collaboration involving research, writing and media production. Students will develop collaborative project proposals for documentary films and videos that will be produced during winter quarter.
Credit awarded in: political economy, political philosophy, cultural studies, documentary film history, film criticism, film theory and film/video production.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in political economy, media and communications.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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The Practice of Sustainable Agriculture
Spring, Summer, and Fall quarters
Faculty: Kevin Underwood, Frederica Bowcutt
Enrollment: 16
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must fill out questionnaire to assess motivation, maturity, communication, writing skills and background in agriculture and environmental studies. Transfer students must include a description of college courses taken, related work experience and letters of recommendation. To apply, contact Martha Rosemeyer, The Evergreen Sate College, Lab I, Olympia WA 98505 or the Academic Advising Office, 360-867-6312. For spring quarter, applications received by March 4, 2004 will be given priority.
Special expenses: Field trips, approximately $60-80.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will provide students with direct experience in the practices of sustainable agriculture. There will be weekly lectures, occasional field trips and an emphasis on practical skill development in intensive food production at the Organic Farm. Students can expect instruction in a variety of farm-related topics which may include: soils, plant propagation, greenhouse management, composting, green manures, the use of animal manures, equipment operation, small farm economics, pest control, livestock management, weed control strategies, irrigation system design and management, basic horticulture, machinery maintenance, vegetable and small fruit culture, marketing and orchard systems. Because spring and summer studies provide the foundation for fall quarter, no new students will be admitted in fall, 2004.
Credit awarded in: horticulture, greenhouse management, livestock management and organic farming practicum.
Total: 4 to 16 credits spring, summer and fall quarters. 16 credits include in-program internship.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004-2005.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in agriculture and horticulture.
Program Updates:  

(1/30/04) New program description added.
(2/17/04) Questionnaire added.
(3/2/04) Michael Beug has joined the program.
(9/15/04) Frederica Bowcutt has joined this program. She will sponsor the farm internships and offer 5 workshops that focus mainly on herbs.

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Protected Areas
Cancelled
Spring quarter
Faculty: Carolyn Dobbs
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. At least two quarters in an intermediate- or advanced-level program in environmental studies.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for possible overnight field trip.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will study domestic and international protected areas with an emphasis on national parks. The focus of the class will be to develop a supported answer for the question of whether these areas are in fact protected. For whom? By whom? For what purposes? In what ways? For how long? In the face of what threats and opportunities? The program will explore the histories of protected areas and issues of indigenous rights, use patterns within national parks and other protected areas, biodiversity and conservation, governance systems, transnational boundary issues and the role of domestic and international environmental organizations.
Credit awarded in: environmental studies*, protected areas*, biodiversity* and conservation*.
* Indicates upper-division credits
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (1/3/03) One faculty. Enrollment reduced to 25.
(5/14/03 Cancelled

Catalog program descriptions: A to E, F to J, K to P, Q to Z

Last Updated: May 11, 2011
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2700 Evergreen Parkway NW
Olympia, WA 98505
(360) 867-6000

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