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Queer Looks, Queer Books
Fall quarter
Faculty: Hilary Binda, Greg Mullins
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. Previous college-level study of literature and/or film.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $100–$250 for attendance at the Seattle Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, October, 2003.
Internship Possibilities: No

Over the past 20 years, queer theory has transformed academic and activist work on gender and sexuality. By now we can say that queer theory has a past—but what is its future?
We will address this question by studying classic and cutting-edge theory and the literature and films upon which theorists draw. Readings in British and American literature will range from the Renaissance through Modernism/Postmodernism; films will include classic Hollywood and European cinema as well as independent works. We will focus on visual and textual representations of identity and desire, on sexuality and gender, including transgender personhood, and on additional axes of difference, including race, nation and class.
This upper-division program does not assume prior expertise in queer theory, but does assume background in film and/or literature. Students should finish the program with a strong foundation in post-structuralist theory, particularly as developed through feminist, queer and psychoanalytic models. In addition, students should emerge with a strong understanding of contemporary political advocacy on behalf of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer persons, and of the promise and pitfalls queer theory offers for political advocacy.
Credit awarded in: literature, film studies and literary theory. Upper-division credit awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in literature, film, philosophy, women’s studies, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) studies and activism, politics, education and human and social services.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (3/12/03) Winter quarter cancelled.

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Rainforest Research
Spring quarter
Faculty: John T. Longino
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; Temperate or Tropical Rainforests or equivalent.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must submit an application by November 14, 2003. The application will contain: (1) an essay addressing fulfillment of the prerequisites, interest in the program, and background knowledge in organismal biology; (2) a copy of an evaluation from a previous science program; and (3) the name and telephone number of a previous instructor. Assessment will be based on writing skills and background knowledge in organismal biology. Transfer students can arrange telephone interviews by calling John Longino at (360) 867-6511. Students will be informed of their acceptance by November 28, 2003.
Special Expenses: Students should be prepared to finance their own travel, daily living expenses and project needs. Most students will already be in Costa Rica from the Tropical Rainforests program. Ten days of joint meetings at a biological research station will be required, at a cost of about $31 per day.
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Fieldwork in Costa Rica.

This program is a logical successor to the Temperate Rainforests and Tropical Rainforests programs. Each student will carry out an independent scientific research project in tropical rainforest biology. Proposals for projects will have been developed during the earlier Tropical Rainforests program, or through direct consultation with the faculty. Projects will involve extensive fieldwork, and may be located in a variety of possible sites in Costa Rica. Students will gather and analyze their own data, write a technical research report and present their results in a symposium at the end of the quarter. Students will have weekly consultations with faculty via e-mail, and will meet with faculty twice during the quarter at the La Selva Biological Station, once early in the quarter for project development, and at the end of the quarter for final report writing and the symposium. Examples of previous studies include insect attraction to bioluminescent fungi, foraging behavior of nectar-feeding bats, and effect of canopy position on epiphyte drying rates.
Credit awarded in: tropical field biology*.
Total: 16 credits.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, ecology and conservation biology.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:    

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Recognition: The Politics of Human Exchange
New, not in printed catalog.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David Rutledge, Raul Nakasone, Gary Peterson
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $10
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will examine what it means to live in a pluralistic society at the beginning of the 21st century. We will look at a variety of cultural and historical perspectives and use them to help address the program theme. We will pay special attention to the value of human relationships to the land, to work, to others and to the unknown. We will concentrate our work in cultural studies, human resource development and cross-cultural communication. We shall explore Native American perspectives and look at issues that are particularly relevant to Native Americans. We will ask students to take a very personal stake in their educational development. Within the program’s themes and subjects, students will pay special attention to how they plan to learn, what individual and group work they plan on doing, and what difference the work will make in their lives and within their communities. Students will be encouraged to assume responsibility for their choices. Faculty and students together will work to develop habits of worthwhile community interaction in the context of the education process and liberation. The faculty are interested in providing an environment of collaboration where faculty and students identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics.
This program is for students who already have a research topic in mind, as well as for those who would like to learn how to do research in a student-centered environment. Students will be exposed to research methods, writing workshops, computer literacy, library workshops, educational technology and the educational philosophy that supports this program.
In fall, we hope to state our research questions. In winter, we plan to individually, or in small study groups, develop the historical background for the chosen question and do the integrative review of the literature and data collection. In the first part of spring quarter, we will write our conclusions and prepare for a public presentation. The last part of spring will be entirely dedicated to presentations. Research topics will be related to the program theme of how to live in a pluralistic society and a globalized world under humanistic standards for social justice, freedom and peace.
Students will use and explore Bloom’s Taxonomy, the theory of multiple intelligence, the relationship among curriculum, assessment and instruction, quantitative reasoning, self- and group-motivation, communication, e-mail, resources on the Web and Web crossing, and develop skills in interactive Web pages and independent research.
Credit awarded in: history, philosophy, cultural competency, communication, writing, political science, cultural anthropology, literature, indigenous arts, technology, indigenous studies, Native American studies, education and individual project work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, anthropology, the arts, multicultural studies, social work, human services and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.
Program Updates:   (2/18/03) New, not in printed catalog.This program is an alternative to the Cancelled, Student Originated Studies: Consciousness Studies program.
(11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should speak with the faculty.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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(Re)Interpreting Liberation: Latin America and the Middle East
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Therese Saliba, Alice Nelson (FW)
Enrollment: 50 (FW); 25 (S)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 each quarter for field trips; $3,500–$4,000 for spring travel option.
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Six weeks in Cairo and Jerusalem during spring quarter, or consortium travel programs in Central or South America.

Shouts of "Liberation!" have echoed through the streets of Latin America and the Middle East for centuries. But some groups’ notions of liberation radically conflict with those of other groups, creating often violent clashes. Historical struggles always introduce new interpretations of the past and new visions for the future. This program will explore how various ideas of liberation—sometimes complementary, sometimes contradictory—have emerged and changed over time, in specific local contexts of Latin America and the Middle East. We will explore how national, gender, ethnic and cultural identities shape narratives of "liberation" in dialogue with discourses of colonialism, religious traditions and other mythic constructions of the past.
Focusing on religious and literary texts, we will examine the ways in which authors revisit their histories of European and U.S. colonialism and imperialism, question the ways stories have been written, and seek to tell another story, reinterpreting liberation. We are considering the following comparative case studies: the defeat of majority leftist visions of liberation in Chile and Egypt; theologies of liberation challenging both state and religious power (e.g., Brazil, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Iran and Palestine/Israel); shared ideas and practices of the Palestinian intifada and the Zapatista movement in Chiapas, Mexico; the current "war on terrorism" and the U.S. wars on Central America in the 1980s; and women’s movements in the two regions.
During the spring, students will travel abroad to Cairo and Jerusalem, or with one of the Evergreen consortium programs in Central or South America. For those not traveling, the program will terminate at the end of winter quarter.
Credit awarded in: Latin American studies, Middle East studies, comparative religion, gender studies and multicultural literature.
Total: 16 credits each quarter or 12 credits with Arabic or Spanish.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in women’s advocacy, international relations, human rights work, social services, religious vocation, education and writing.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (7/14/03) Lance Laird has left the program and will not be replaced. Enrollment has been lowered to 50 for fall and winter and 25 for spring.
(12/1/03) Faculty signature added.

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Sailpower: Economic, Historical, Scientific and Cultural Principles
Cancelled.
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Cynthia Kennedy, Dean Olson, E.J. Zita
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry proficiency assumed, willingness to learn more mathematics. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Up to $250 for boating and field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

How have people navigated waters of the Pacific Northwest, and how have their travels affected people and knowledge? This two-quarter program combines the practical skill of operating sailing vessels with an intensive, text-based study of economics, history, navigation, physics and astronomy, literature and cultural studies of sailing and other boat travel. We will use navigation as our theme to study the economics and histories of indigenous cultures, and of maritime literature. The evolution of navigation will focus our study of science, social structure and the political economics of exploration and trade. We will sail the waters of Puget Sound while studying Pacific Northwest history and reading maritime literature about the age of sail.
Students will develop piloting and sailing skills in the classroom and in local waters. They will learn to understand the dedication and teamwork needed to mount a successful sailing voyage. As class time on the boats will be severely limited, students will crew on local boats on weekends, outside of class.
This program will be intellectually as well as physically challenging. Students who join the program must commit to spending long hours on the boats, often in inclement weather and uncomfortable conditions, as well as keeping up with a challenging load of college-level reading, writing, math-based homework and other academic assignments. Thorough reading, thoughtful discussion, effective writing and responsible teamwork will be emphasized.
Students completing Sailpower are encouraged to take the spring quarter program Working the Waters: The Pacific Northwest Maritime Industries.
Credit awarded in: economics, literature, leadership, sociology, history, science, mathematics, maritime studies and nautical sciences.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in management, economics, history, science, literature, maritime studies and trade.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   Cancelled.

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Science of Mind
Cancelled: See Science, Cognition and Consciousness as an alternative.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David W. Paulsen, TBA
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome; one quarter of college-level biology recommended.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Philosophers, psychologists, neurobiologists, computer scientists, linguists and anthropologists have raised questions about the human mind. What is involved in studying the mind? What questions can be answered scientifically? What questions can’t? Is the mind nothing but the brain? If so, how do we account for human consciousness?
Science of Mind will address these questions by exploring approaches from past and contemporary cognitive psychology and neurobiology, as well as issues in philosophy of science and mind. We will emphasize theories about the nature of perception, attention, memory, reasoning and language as well as current developments in the study of consciousness. The program will cover basic neurophysiology and systems neurobiology, experimental cognitive psychology, research design in psychology, descriptive and inferential statistics with psychological research applications, as well as the use of the computer for data analysis.
We will begin by laying a foundation—looking at the historical and intellectual roots of contemporary cognitive science including cognitive psychology and cellular neurobiology. In winter, we will look at issues surrounding the transformation of psychology from the behaviorist to the cognitive paradigm and recent discussions of consciousness, as well as network neurobiology. Spring quarter will include an extensive research project in one of the following areas: experimental psychology, neurobiology or the philosophy of mind.
Credit awarded in: cognitive science*, cognitive psychology*, research methods in psychology*, neurobiology with laboratory*, descriptive and inferential statistics*, data analysis using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences* and a research project*.
Total: 12 or 16 credits fall quarter; 8, 12 or 16 credits winter quarter; 4, 8, 12 or 16 credits spring quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in psychology, medicine, biology, cognitive science, aspects of computer science and philosophy.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:   (2/18/03) Cancelled

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Science, Cognition and Consciousness
New, not in printed catalog.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David Paulsen, Jacob Leonesio
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The last quarter of the 20th century witnessed a remarkable expansion in our understanding of the human brain. This success has forced psychologists and philosophers of mind to confront the tangled issues surrounding the relationship between mind and body in a new way. What questions can be answered scientifically? What questions can’t? Is the mind nothing but the brain? If so, how do we account for human consciousness? The topic is filled with controversy. Some have taken the success of neuroscience as an indication that this “last frontier” of biology will lead to a complete understanding of the mind. Others argue that whatever success neuroscience might have, it must ultimately face what philosopher David Chalmer’s calls the “hard problem” of consciousness. Science, Cognition and Consciousness will explore these issues with the aim of understanding the scope and limits of a science of mind.
This program will provide a solid background in cognitive and experimental psychology, as well as statistics and research methodology. It will also examine the import of recent work in cognitive neuroscience. It will surround these subjects with substantial discussion of topics in the philosophy of science and philosophy of mind.
We will begin by laying a foundation—looking at the historical and intellectual roots of contemporary cognitive science, including cognitive psychology and behavioral neuroscience. In winter, we will look at issues surrounding the transformation of psychology from the behaviorist to the cognitive paradigm and recent discussions of consciousness. Spring quarter will include an extensive research project in one of the following areas: cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, or the philosophy of mind.
This program covers many of the topics customarily included in the Science of Mind program with the exception of the two-quarter neurobiology component.
Credit awarded in: cognitive science*, behavioral neuroscience*, cognitive psychology, philosophy of mind, research methods in psychology*, descriptive and inferential statistics*, data analysis using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences* and a research project*.
Total: 12 or 16 credits fall quarter; 8, 12 or 16 credits winter quarter; 4, 8, 12 or 16 credits spring quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in psychology, cognitive science, behavioral neuroscience, aspects of computer science and philosophy.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
* Indicates upper-division science credits
Program Updates:   (2/18/03) New, not in printed catalog. This program replaces the cancelled, Science of Mind program
(2/27/03) Jacob Leonesio added to the faculty team.
(11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.
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Science Seminar
New, not in printed catalog
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: E.J. Zita
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; decent writing ability. For more information e-mail E.J. Zita.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Each quarter, any student is welcome to join the seminar section of our primary science program. We read, discuss, and write on diverse works about science and math, to complement the quantitative work in our primary program. We assume no background in mathematics or physics. We explore observations and ideas about nature, history and philosophy of science, and methods of physics and mathematics. We investigate questions such as: How is knowledge created or discovered? How can new ideas develop into testable theories? How does scientific understanding change? Past topics of Science Seminar have included chaos, quantum mechanics, infinity, and cosmology. Past readings have ranged from Kuhn's classic, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions , to lighter works such as The Physics of Star Trek , and Alice in Quantumland . Readings and themes vary each quarter. Details for each quarter are available online at http://192.211.16.13/z/zita/scisem.htm .
Learning goals include improved critical thinking, deeper qualitative understanding of science, and improved communication skills, both oral and written. Optional quantitative investigations are possible for interested students, but are not required.
Seminar students work together with beginning to advanced science students. Small teams of peers meet to prepare key points and questions before each seminar. Students earn 4 (or 8) credits by participating in one (or two) seminars each week and completing short essays and online assignments. Students are encouraged to work with Writing Center tutors and attend occasional writing workshops.

This program will collaborate with the Working the Waters program to offer students an additional 2 credit option in Piloting and Inland Navigation . Students who chose this option will attend a 2 hour piloting and inland navigation workshop each week in addition to regular program activities. Students from the Working the Waters program may also register for our weekly Celestial Navigation workshop.
Credit awarded in: history and philosophy of science and math.
Total: 4 or 8 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in history, mathematics and science.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry.
Program Updates:   (4/23/03) New, not in printed catalog
(2/17/04) Students who want to take an additional 2 credits of Piloting and Inland Navigation, refer to CRN 30776 in Gateway.
(2/18/04) Will accept new students in spring. Incoming students should get the texts and read the Web pages http://192.211.16.13/curricular/PhyAstro/home.htm#seminarandassignments, as well as http://192.211.16.13/curricular/PhyAstro/semsyll.htm. There is a new two credit option in Celestial Navigation. Refer to schedule at http://192.211.13.13/curricular/PhyAstro/syll.htm#sched. The program is Monday and/or Thursday
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The Semantic Web Colloquium
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Judy Cushing, John Cushing, Brian Walter
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Signature: Yes, only for the 4 credit (seminar) option (see below). For a signature, contact the respective faculty who is teaching the seminar you want to enroll in. Judy Cushing, (360) 867-6652; John Cushing, (360) 867-6234 or Brian Walter (360)867-5435.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The semantic web, recently proposed by Tim Berners-Lee, is a "new form of Web content that is meaningful to computers." According to Lee, the semantic web will bring "structure to the meaningful content of Web pages, creating an environment where software agents roaming from page to page can readily carry out sophisticated tasks for users." This course will consist of lectures by outside speakers who conduct research in aspects of the semantic web. Through studying the lecture and reading, we will examine the computer science and information infrastructure required to make Berners-Lee's dream a reality. We will also examine application of the semantic web for one domain, the new National Science Foundation Cyberinfrastructure Initiative.

The series is jointly offered by Student Originated Software , Data to Information, Algebra to Algorithms and the CSEMS Scholarship recipients. All students in those programs will participate in the colloquium. Students not in the above programs may take the colloquium for two credits, and earn credit by attending the lectures series ( Tuesdays 1-3pm, Weeks 1-9 of the quarter ) and turning in a notebook with written reflections on each of the lectures.

A four-credit option is available for students who find places in one of the above program seminars, complete the required reading and writing assignments. To ensure a place in one of the seminars, students must get a faculty signature for the seminar they choose. Seminars will be offered : Tuesdays 3-4:30 p.m., with Brian Walter, Thursdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m., with Judy Cushing, and Thursdays 1-3 p.m., with John Cushing.
Credit awarded in: computer science and information science: the semantic web.
Total: 2 credits (lecture only), no faculty signature required, or 4 credits (lecture and seminar), faculty signature required.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in computer science, linguistics, library science, information science, any of the physical sciences, web development.
Program Updates:   (2/26/04) New, not in printed catalog

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Shakespeare
New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Hilary Binda, Nancy Taylor
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 37 percent first-year students and offers appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This rigorous all-level program will provide an introduction to the plays of William Shakespeare by focusing on The Taming of The Shrew , Richard II , Twelfth Night , The Merchant of Venice , Othello , and The Winter's Tale . In order to flesh out our knowledge of Shakespeare's world and enable us to better recognize both similarities and differences between Shakespeare and his contemporaries, we will read Shakespeare's plays in conjunction with two plays by Christopher Marlowe: Edward II and The Jew Of Malta . Although our primary focus will be on Shakespeare's poetics, imagery, and dramatic technique through close readings of the plays, we will also engage a variety of historical and critical contexts and a set of topical issues that remain especially resonant today. In addition to studying the rise of the public theater and its pervasive effects in English Renaissance culture, we will address the following topics in discussions, assignments and additional readings: gender, sexuality, and identity formation; economics and mercantilism; race and religion; and love and marriage. Expect to work in groups regularly, to write often, and to keep up with a steady and demanding reading load. We will incorporate performance into workshops regularly but our primary approach will remain literary and historical.

It will be important that we all use the same editions of each play (since the line numbers, page numbers, and the text itself often differ). The editions we have ordered for this program are as follows: The Taming of The Shrew , Folger, ed. Werstine; Richard II , Cambridge, ed. Gurr; Edward II , Consortium Book Sales; Twelfth Night , Cambridge, ed. Gibbons; The Merchant of Venice , Cambridge, ed. Mahood; The Jew of Malta , Revels, ed. Bevington; Othello , Norton Critical, ed. Pechter; The Winter's Tale , Oxford, ed. Orgel. We have ordered the paperback version of The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare . These will all be available in the bookstore.
Credit will be awarded in: Shakespeare, literary studies and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in English graduate studies, teaching and journalism.
Program Updates:   (2/9/04) New, not in printed catalog.

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So You Want to Be a Psychologist
Spring quarter
Faculty: Carrie Margolin
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students. Knowledge of statistics is helpful but not required.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Membership in Western Psychological Association (WPA) plus WPA convention registration fees total approximately $65 (payable to WPA before March 31, 2004. Contact Carrie Margolin for exact fees and deadline); shared hotel lodging at convention plus food approximately $175.
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Travel to WPA’s Annual Convention, Phoenix, Arizona, April 22-25, 2004.

This program is designed to be a career exploration and preparation for those students planning a career in psychology or social work. We will cover the typical activities of psychologists who work in academia, schools, counseling/clinical settings, social work agencies, and applied research settings. We will look at the academic preparations necessary for these career choices.
We will discuss ethical quandaries in psychology, and the ethics of human and animal experimentation. We will cover history and systems of psychology. Students will read original source literature from the major divisions of the field, covering both classic and contemporary journal articles and books by well-known psychologists. Library research skills, in particular the use of PsycINFO and Science and Social Science Citation Indexes, will be emphasized. Students will gain expertise in the technical writing style of the American Psychological Association (APA). The class format will include lectures, guest speakers, workshops, discussions, films, and a field trip.
There’s no better way to explore the range of activities and topics that psychology offers, and to learn of cutting edge research in the field, than to attend and participate in a convention of psychology professionals and students. To that end, students will attend the annual convention of the Western Psychological Association, which is the western regional arm of the APA.
Credit awarded in: history and systems of psychology, ethics of psychology, scientific writing (APA format) and general psychology.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in psychology and social work.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (5/12/03) New, not in printed catalog.

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The Social Change of Music
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Arun Chandra and resident guest artists
Enrollment: 30
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For more information contact Arun Chandra, (360) 867-6077.
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 each quarter for performance expenses and museum tickets.
Internship Possibilities: No

Acting in the public interest, Plato banished all artists from his imagined perfect state. Why was he so afraid of the arts? Why would Plato propose banishing art from a perfect society? Why do we today drown in art? Is music harmless to society, and therefore allowed and encouraged? Is it ignored while being encouraged? ("It keeps the kids happy and out of our hair!") Does music serve to suppress the aspirations of its audience while appearing to fulfill them? Does anyone hear music any longer, or do they only hear and speak about what they already know?
Pablo Picasso once said, "I don’t care who I’m influenced by, as long as it’s not me." Why would Picasso not want to be influenced by himself? How does that stand in comparison to "rugged individuals" who shy away from the possibility of being influenced by anyone?
This is a yearlong program where we will explore the relationship(s) among art, artists and their audiences, focusing particularly on the art of music. We will welcome resident guest artists throughout the year. In fall, "The Prince Myshkins," Rick Burkhardt and Andy Griesivich, a duo who compose both political satires and avant-garde works for instrumental ensembles. In winter, Susan Parenti, a composer of music compositions and theater plays; Ann Warde, who has worked at composing across traditions by combining computers with gamelan music; and Ben Boretz, a composer of music and texts, who started "Music Program Zero" at Bard College. In spring, Gerhard Staebler, an internationally known composer who has written compositions such as To the Garbagemen of San Francisco and has organized the Active Music Festival (for music that is socially active) in Germany, will be our final guest artist.
We will look at poetry by Audre Lorde, Forugh Farrokhzad, Roque Dalton and Sonia Sanchez; the plays of Bernard Shaw, Dario Fo and Bertolt Brecht; the music of Luigi Nono; the paintings of Ben Shan and Diego Riviera—lots of music, writing and visual artwork. We will take trips to Seattle to see live performances of experimental music, opera and theater and to museums.
Works of art will be read, viewed and listened to with an eye and an ear alert to noticing the address made by the artists to their society: What does a work of art call upon its audience to do? Is a work indifferent to its public once the price of a ticket has been paid? In addition to reading, viewing and listening to older creations, students will be encouraged to create and perform their own works.
Credit awarded in: social history of art, music composition, theories of art and performance and contemporary art and performance.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the arts and humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should speak with the faculty about necessary readings.
(2/20/04) Faculty signature added. Faculty will consider new students in spring. Prospective students must speak with Arun to obtain permission to enter. For more information contact Arun Chandra, (360) 867-6077.

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Social and Economic Policies: Bridges to Improving Global Human Welfare
Cancelled.
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Dean Olson, Toska Olson
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 per quarter for retreats.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter with faculty approval.

What is the state of the world? Some sources report the following trends: That on average, the world population lives longer, healthier, more productive lives than 50 years ago. That the supply of food has increased and food prices have fallen, the proportion of malnourished people has fallen and more people have access to clean water. That the proportion of the planet covered by forest has remained constant, and air quality studies indicate that lower levels of air pollution and continued economic growth are both attainable. Nevertheless, significant challenges remain, particularly now. The removal and reduction of trade barriers has energized environmentalists and anti-globalists who urge regional agendas. These agendas may threaten economic, political and social outcomes in developing societies. Global climate change models are used to support agendas urging reduced production and consumption, and the adoption of simpler life styles in wealthy societies. This may threaten to freeze the wealth gap between the world’s richest and poorest; a gap that has narrowed over the past 50 years.
This program will provide students with the tools and information needed to evaluate these claims. The program uses sociology, anthropology, economics and moral philosophy to assess political agendas for the 21st century. We will attempt to construct global policy agendas most likely to enhance human welfare for developing societies. Students will critically examine topics such as social justice, wealth disparities, gender relations, the role of international organizations (World Trade Organization, International Monetary Fund), resource distribution, environmental resilience, terrorism and war. In spring, students will complete a major research project that will serve as the capstone of their college education.
Credit awarded in: economic development, statistics, sociology, anthropology, public policy, international relations and capstone research.
Total: 16 credits per quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in international relations, sociology, political economy, international business and anthropology.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (1/17/03) Cancelled

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Something Out of the Ordinary
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: George Freeman, Jr., Ariel Goldberger
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $55 each quarter for retreats, conferences and travel; approximately $40 each quarter for art workshop materials.
Internship Possibilities: No

Joseph Campbell once said that monsters are the door to the sublime. Our program will explore the means by which we come to know both the extraordinary and the ordinary. Using our knowledge of performance and movement, of identity and difference, of psychology of the self and other, we’ll come to a personal understanding of what persuades us of something falling outside what we expect or have come to understand as ordinary. Our program will explore the statistical meaning of normal, the experiential knowing of being in the world and how we can move outside that which we define as ordinary to find ourselves living in the space and time “outside the ordinary”.
Some of our essential questions revolve around how people endow their life with meaning. When does something leave the liminal and becomes “out of the ordinary?” Ugliness to beauty. Holy to profane. The familiar to the strange? When does a boring event become interesting? All of these speak to dichotomies that foster dynamic tensions we intend to investigate through our study of psychology, performance, religion, art movement, personal biography and cultural studies. In psychology we will examine the conscious and unconscious through the writings of Freud, Jung and those who follow. We will examine perception through the lend of Gestalt psychology and the field of cognitive psychology. The faculty will foster creativity, experimentation and imaginative process as means of discovering and bringing the extraordinary into the world. The students will respond to the themes of the program through individual and collaborative performance and art projects.
The performance, puppetry and experimental art projects will lead us into exploring ways to bring extraordinary ideas and images into the world. How do we engage in rituals and other activities to have a mundane event become something out of the ordinary? How do we tap into different modes or ways of perceiving reality? What intuitive processes can we discover in our minds? Art, performance and movement will express the unexplainable aspect of experience.
To build our learning community we will be using challenge and experiential education as a means to develop a sense of commitment and group citizenship. We will use critical moments to explore the politics of identity and meaning. We will have writing workshops to further develop students’ current skills and to develop advanced skills in written communication.
Students completing this program will come to a stronger understanding of their personal lives as situated in a variety of contexts. They will develop strategies for engaging in a range of settings to promote social change, in-depth personal development, increased self-awareness, critical commentary and analyses, and practices that promote health and well-being. They will come to understand themselves as a member of multiple communities and as having responsibility to these communities.
Credit awarded in: abnormal psychology and personality theory, multicultural studies, writing, art, performance, puppet theater, and quantitative skills or subjects depending on student work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in psychology, behavior sciences, arts, performance and puppet theater.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First Year Students
Program Updates:  

(5/9/03) This is a new Core program that replaces The Ties That Bind program.
(11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should complete the reading from fall quarter in the Jung primer and from our diversity work. They should talk with the faculty before they register and will need to provide evidence of having completed the required reading. The faculty will provide the materials for them to demonstrate their having completed the reading.
(12/10/03) Students who want to enter this program in Winter quarter should talk with the faculty prior to registering, and read the book, The Soul's Code by James Hillman.
(2/24/04)Not accepting new students in spring. A faculty signature has been added.
(3/4/04) Due to the nature of spring quarter's content, new students entering the program will need to provide evidence of their ability to support independent work, their ability to use a range of artistic formats, proficient writing skills, and a prior knowledge-base regarding issues of identity, multiculturalism, and the dynamics of oppression. Much of our work spring quarter is based on the prior knowledge, skills and understanding established during fall and/or winter quarter.

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Sources of Japanese Animation: Its Heroes and Villains
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Setsuko Tsutsumi
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; Core program or equivalent.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 for field trips to cultural events.
Internship Possibilities: No

Japanese animation has garnered legions of admirers in recent years. It has attracted audiences by its cutting-edge technical innovation as well as by its poetic evocation. This program will examine the cultural sources from which Japanese animation derives its recurring themes and its characteristic features, such as multidimensional characters, supernatural qualities in the story, and unique heroism. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which Japan’s enduring cultural values emerge from beneath Anime’s ultra-modern façade and how Anime reflects Japan’s hopes and fears for the future. Materials will be drawn from literature, history and films appropriate to the topics under consideration.
We will begin by examining myths, legends, religions, aesthetics and standards of morals and values, which vary from period to period. We will pay special attention to various heroes and villains in Japanese history who transformed into colorful characters in the animation. Next, we will focus on contemporary Japan and its popular culture—music, fashion, film, television and literature—that have provided the context and the themes for many animations. We will see how the traditions were carried out or changed and whether Japanese animation still conveys a strong sense of "Japaneseness" in the rapidly growing global culture.
Credit awarded in: themes and aesthetics of Japanese animation, Japanese history, Japanese literature and Japanese popular culture.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in Japanese studies and cultural studies.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:    

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Sovereignty: Reclaiming Voice and Authority
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Kristina Ackley (FW), Zahid Shariff, D. Michael Pavel (FW)
Enrollment: 72 (FW); 24 (S)
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $75 for field trips.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter with faculty approval.

What voice does the Other have in a society that is dominated by a discourse of conquest? What does it mean to assert sovereignty, jurisdiction or autonomy in a global society? Maori scholar Linda Tuhiwai Smith asserts that "our communities, cultures, languages and social practices—all may be spaces of marginalization, but they have also become spaces of resistance and hope." This program is particularly concerned with identifying and contextualizing these "spaces of resistance and hope"—contesting the American discourse of conquest.
The concept of sovereignty must be placed within a local, historical, cultural and global context. This program provides a foundation for articulating and contesting the modes of colonialism that went into the extension of European domination in what eventually emerged as the United States and the Southern Hemisphere (most of which consists of the "Third World," but also includes Australia and New Zealand). Through theoretical readings and discussion, we will move from nation-building in America to Native forms of nationalism. Students will challenge post-colonial theory that merely deconstructs and move to a consideration of decolonizing practices. We will also consider how the voices of the subaltern are being heard in legal case studies, literature and grassroots community movements.
Students will have opportunities to pursue significant research projects. For students registering for 16 credits, the faculty envision an opportunity for students to engage in topics relevant to faculty backgrounds in Native American studies, critical theory and the social sciences.
Credit awarded in: contemporary Native American studies, American history, political theory, politics of globalization, federal Indian law and policy, theory and methodology in the social sciences.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, politics, law, human rights work, tribal government and indigenous communities.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change; Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies
Program Updates:   (12/06/02) Enrollment lowered to 48
(4/30/03) A visiting faculty will be added to this program. The enrollment limit has increased to 72 students. This program will accept 18 first-year students.
(6/20/03) D. Michael Pavel has joined this program. He has a Ph.D. in Higher and Adult Education. He is a member of the Skokomish Indian Nation. Instrumental in reviving traditional activities on the Skokomish Indian Reservation that include first food ceremonies, traditional namings, weddings, burials, winter spirit dances, oral history, and Native dance and song. He has a desire to write the definitive work on American Indians and Alaska Natives in higher education.
(11/17/03) Studentsshould be prepared to read sections of _Law, Power and the Sovereign State_ and _American Indian Politics_, both of which are on reserve at the Library. They should contact faculty to see which sections.
(2/3/04) Zahid will teach Sovereignty alone during spring quarter. His focus will be on international views of sovereignty. No new students will be accepted into the program.
(2/19/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Steinbeck's Americans
Spring quarter
Faculty: Tom Grissom
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

John Steinbeck created a uniquely American literature in his depiction of individuals caught up in and struggling with the conflicting tensions and situations that characterize American society. His strong social consciousness and voice in novels, short stories and nonfiction writings were specifically cited in awarding him the Nobel Prize for literature in 1962.
In this program we will examine major works of fiction and nonfiction by this important writer, such as Cannery Row, Of Mice and Men, To a God Unknown, The Pearl, The Red Pony, In Dubious Battle, Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, Sweet Thursday, The Wayward Bus, The Winter of Our Discontent, The Long Valley and Travels with Charley. In addition, we will read literary criticisms and commentary of Steinbeck’s work and a biography of the life and times of the writer. Students will write responses each week to the readings and will produce a longer expository paper on some chosen aspect of Steinbeck’s writing. In our work we will pay attention to the structure and aesthetic qualities of the writings and to their meaning and relevance, responding always to the question: What is the writer doing, and how does he do it? We will read and discuss with the aim of understanding and assessing Steinbeck’s contribution to and place in American literature. Classes will be seminars and recitations in which students will be responsible for presenting their own writing and work.
Credit awarded in: topics in 20th-century American literature, contemporary intellectual history, research and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in literature and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:    

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Stone
Cancelled
Spring quarter
Faculty: Robert Leverich, Martha Henderson Tubesing
Enrollment: 40
Prerequisites: Two quarters of Core or equivalent. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $150 for art supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

We have an ageless association with stone. Stone gives shape and meaning to the landscapes we inhabit and shapes our perceptions of time and space. We in turn shape stone: for shelter, for tools and for expression. This program is designed to give students a closer understanding of the physical and geographical character of stone, its place in our culture and history, and its potential as a material for sculptural expression.
Program work will center around the sculpture studio and the physical geography lab, with supporting lectures, field trips and seminars. In the studio, we will draw, work with stones as found objects and learn basic stone-carving methods. We’ll consider alternative ways for using stone expressively. Physical geography labs and lectures will give an introduction to the classification, physical and chemical character, morphology, location and use of stone types in the landscape. Cultural geography lectures and workshops will address the ways in which we shape stone to symbolize ourselves, and in turn how we read those symbols. We will reflect on this interactive shaping of stones and people through readings, seminars, work discussions and writing.
Credit awarded in: sculpture, drawing, physical geography and cultural geography.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, science and the humanities.
This program is also listed under First-Year Programs and Expressive Arts.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Environmental Studies; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (4/1/03) Cancelled

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Student Originated Software
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Judith Bayard Cushing, Sheryl Shulman
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. Data to Information or equivalent, or expertise in both programming and an application area such as science or media.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must complete a questionnaire and an interview with faculty. Students must demonstrate both technical expertise and a commitment to a group software development project. The questionnaire is available from Judith Bayard Cushing, and from Academic Advising after May 1, 2003.
Special Expenses: Approximately $200 for materials for student project work, visits to project sponsors and two field trips.
Internship Possibilities: Only if in conjunction with the software project, or for four credits spring quarter.

Software engineering is the study of how to design and build, within budget, socially responsible software systems that meet functional requirements. In spite of an increasing body of knowledge, however, software is often late, over-budget or unable to perform according to needs. Why? The "software engineering" problem is not just a matter of technology, but of organization, psychology, group dynamics and culture, and an understanding of the relevant domain. Student Originated Software addresses these issues, and is intended to prepare students to build good software.
This yearlong program is designed to give students, at an advanced undergraduate level, the ability to identify and carry out a viable software project. Students will work in teams to identify a project, prepare feasibility studies, identify "real world" clients or setting, and write software specifications. Under the guidance of faculty, students will conduct systems analysis and design, implementation and product testing and validation. Students will evaluate their software according to technical, legal and social criteria.
Advanced topics in computer science will be presented in lecture, workshops and seminars, and seminars will relate to the history and culture of the software industry, as well as psychological and cultural aspects of software systems such as ergonomics, human-machine interaction and the psychology of computer programming.
Credit awarded in: Upper-division science credit will be distributed among computer science and software engineering: object-oriented analysis, design and programming; databases; and special topics such as operating systems, user interface design, distributed computing or software tools.
Total: 8 or 16 credits fall and winter quarters; 4 or 8 or 16 credits spring quarter. Eight-credit option is for part-time students only; spring quarter 4-credit option is for internship.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in computer science and software engineering or the project application area.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (4/30/03) The faculty have been switched. Neal Nelson has left the program; Sheryl Shulman has been added.
(2/18/04) Will consider new students in spring for parts of the program for which students are qualified (most likely seminar, software patterns, or for a software project). Incoming students whould read the spring quarter prospectus, which will be on the Web site a few days prior to the Academic Fair, March 3. For information contact Judith Bayard Cushing at the Academic Fair, March 3, or (360) 867-6652.

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Student Originated Studies: Consciousness Studies
Cancelled, refer to Science, Cognition and Consciousness and/or Recognition: The Politics of Human Exchange programs as an alternative.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David Rutledge
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Sophomores who are prepared to carry out advanced study are welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Read the description below for the application process and dates. Applicants will be notified of acceptance the week before registration begins each quarter.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Consciousness studies is a study of the patterns of mental functioning that determine thought, feeling, imagery and action. It is intended to provide students with a worldwide, cross-cultural body of knowledge that is of practical use in exploring human nature. Students will do research into the modes of awareness that human beings experience, including the concern with the study of humanity’s highest potential and with the recognition, understanding and realization of unitive, spiritual and transcendent states.
This program will offer advanced-level students the opportunity to design their own curriculum in group contracts. The more successful groups have collaborated on one project often centered on topics such as cognition and perception, ethnic studies, gender studies, the history of consciousness, transpersonal psychology and depth psychology. SOS is not a collection of individual contracts, but a program created by students with common academic goals.
Groups of two or more students should submit a detailed proposal to the faculty no later than May 14, 2003, to be considered for the fall quarter; December 3, 2003, for winter quarter; and March 3, 2004, for spring quarter. The proposal must include a statement of the group’s goals, weekly schedules that detail workshops, readings and seminars (i.e., a draft of a syllabus). Applicants also should submit a portfolio with contact information, recent faculty evaluations and a writing sample.
Credit awarded will reflect the type of work done by each student and may vary depending on individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences, teaching, law, business and the arts.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (2/12/03) Cancelled

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Student Originated Studies: Environmental Studies
New, not in printed catalog
Winter quarter
Faculty: Oscar Soule
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and sophomores ready for advanced study. Preference will be given to student research teams.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Interested students who have a project in mind must draw up an Independent Learning Contract and arrange for an informational discussion with Oscar Soule between July 30 and December 5, 2003. In addition, students must submit a complete research proposal and present a portfolio of work including faculty and self evaluations before admission to this student originated study. For information contact Oscar Soule, (360) 867-6774, or The Evergreen State College, Lab I, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Only local and with a research component.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) have a rich history at Evergreen and offer opportunities for students to do advanced research in a collaborative setting. Students, in teams of two or more, should design a research project to be completed during the winter quarter. Completed includes preparation of a final report. All students will be required to take part in a bi-weekly, half-day seminar where they will present their progress in addition to other activities. This is an excellent opportunity to follow up or expand on earlier research projects. The faculty sponsor will support students to do research in various aspects of natural history, plant or animal ecology, environmental science, environmental studies, urban ecology, community studies and environmental education.
Credit awarded will reflect the type of work completed by each student and will vary depending on the individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in natural history, environmental studies, environmental science, environmental education, environmental policy and planning and community development.
Program Updates:   (8/4/03) New, not in printed catalog

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Student Originated Studies: Humanities and American Studies
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: David Marr
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and for sophomores prepared to carry out advanced study.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Interested students who have a project in mind should arrange an appointment to meet with David Marr, from January 5 to February 27, 2004, to discuss their plans. Students may contact David Marr, (360) 867-6751, or The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for students to create their own course of study and research. Working with the faculty sponsor, individual students or small groups devise projects and then meet, usually weekly, in a small seminar to present their work. The sponsor will support students who wish to do research in the major humanities disciplines (literature, history, and philosophy) and in American Studies.
Topics of previous SOS projects include the following: Utopia, trends in literary theory, skepticism and belief in American philosophy, George Orwell as political intellectual, comedy, American social reform, the Protestant Reformation, identity in African American thought, literary selves, and pseudo-events in American culture and politics.
Credit awarded will reflect the type of work done by each student and may vary depending on individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, teaching, law, business and the arts.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language.
Program Updates:   (1/14/03) New, not in printed catalog

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Student Originated Studies: Making Contemporary Music
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Terry Setter
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Students must be prepared to carry out advanced work in music composition and/or production.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must draw up an Independent Learning Contract in consultation with Terry Setter. Interested students who have a project in mind should arrange an appointment to meet with Terry Setter between January 10 and February 27, 2004, will be given priority. For more information contact Terry Setter, (360) 867-6615, or The Evergreen State College, Com 306, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for students to create their own course of study and research. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. Working with the faculty sponsor, individual students or small groups devise projects and then meet, usually weekly, in a seminar format to present their work. This group is intended to support students who wish to do advanced work in music composition or, who are working in advanced production techniques.
Credit awarded will reflect the type of work done by each student and may vary depending on the individual's course of study and research.
Credit: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in music and media arts.
Planning Unit: Expressive Arts.
Program Updates:   (12/4/03) New, not in printed catalog
Students must write up Independent Learning Contracts through Terry Setter.

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Student Originated Studies: Media
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Anne Fischel
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Senior standing preferred; juniors may apply. Mediaworks or at least one year of coursework in Expressive Arts or equivalent for transfer students. Background in filmmaking or artmaking, and in art or media theory. You must be able to demonstrate competency in the areas in which you plan to do your project work.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Submit an artist’s statement (see body of description for details), along with an example of your media/art work and an evaluation. Transfer students, please submit an unofficial transcript. Applications will be processed as they are received. No applications will be read over the summer.
Special Expenses: $100-$300 per quarter, depending on medium used.

SOS Media is a program for advanced film, video and multi-media students. It is designed to facilitate your next steps in developing your work as an artist and filmmaker. Your work might focus on a single video, film or multi-media project, or you might identify a constellation of themes and projects you want to explore. It might include travel, research, film analysis, writing a screenplay and producing it, creating an installation, or making a documentary film. We will work together to determine the learning activities, projects and experiences that will define your work in SOS.
SOS Media is not just a collection of contracts; it is a learning community in which the students and faculty support, critique and facilitate one another’s work. Much of the work of the learning community takes place in weekly affinity group meetings which the faculty attends. You do not have to be part of an established affinity group; we will form the groups during the first week of class, if needed. There are no pre-assigned readings, but each affinity group is encouraged to develop a modest curriculum of screenings and readings to support their project work.
You may enroll in SOS Media for the entire year or for 1 quarter, depending on the scope of your project work.
To apply to SOS Media, please submit a 1-page artist's statement that includes the following: 1) ) Your name, phone number, e-mail address and student status (junior or senior); 2) A brief biography of your art/student experiences, including programs and courses you’ve taken and skills you’ve learned; 3) A description of a significant art/media project you’ve completed or are presently working on, including the subject matter, medium you’re working in, and approach (experimental, narrative, documentary, animation, etc.); 4) The themes or subject matter that are important to your work. What subjects compel you? Do you see a focus emerging in your work?; 5) What do you think your work will look like next year? What projects and learning activities would you hope to engage in? What are your goals and how do you see this program as helping you accomplish them?
Credit awarded in: media studies or media production.
Total: 12 or 16 credits per quarter; students may take 1 part-time studies class that supports project work.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in film, video, multi-media, broadcast journalism and the arts.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts

Program Updates:   (5/9/03) Anne Fischel has replaced JuPong Lin in this program
(5/15/03) The program description has been revised. This program now only offers 12 or 16 credit options.
(11/17/03) The faculty in SOS: Media (Anne Fischel) will consider accepting one or two highly qualified students in Winter Quarter. Interested students must fill out an SOS application (available from Program Secretary Vicky Arrington, and submit the application, a faculty evaluation, and an example of media/visual work. The program is designed for seniors with an extensive background in media and/or visual or sound arts. SOS: Media is not a place to begin developing skills in either media production or media analysis; it is a place to take those skills and apply them through project work.

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Student Originated Studies: Native American Studies
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Kristina Ackley, Michael Pavel
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent of first year students and offers appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Only with a research component and with faculty approval.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) has a rich history at Evergreen. It offers opportunities for students to do advanced research in a collaborative setting. Students will work independently or in small teams to create their own course of study and research related to the sovereignty of indigenous communities. All students will discuss how sovereignty and self-determination impacts contemporary indigenous communities and will use a framework of empowerment in their research. The concept of sovereignty must be placed within a local, historical, cultural and global context. Students will challenge post-colonial theory that merely deconstructs and move to a consideration of decolonizing practices. The faculty will work with the students to create a learning community in which students and faculty support, critique, and facilitate one another's work. All students will take part in weekly activities where they will discuss methodology, current

events, and the representation of Native Americans as well as present their progress to the group. The faculty will also facilitate a limited number of projects with two tribal communities (Squaxin Island and Skokomish) related to local history.

Credit awarded will reflect the type of work completed by each student and will vary depending on the individual course of study and research.
Total: 12 or 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, politics, law, human rights work, tribal government and indigenous communities.
Planning Unit(s): First-Year Programs; Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.
Program Updates:   (2/9/04) New, not in printed catalog
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Student Originated Studies: Political and Social Thought/Community Service
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Pris Bowerman
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and sophomores ready for advanced study.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Interested students who have a project in mind must draft an Independent Learning Contract or Internship Agreement and make an appointment to meet with Pris Bowerman, from February 9 to March 5, 2004, to discuss their plans. Students should bring their draft contract or internship agreement and a portfolio of writings (expository essays, research papers, as well as faculty and self evaluations from earlier TESC programs) to the meeting. Students may contact Pris Bowerman, (360) 867-6706, or The Evergreen State College, Seminar Building, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Yes, local and coupled with reflective writing and seminar.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) have a rich history at Evergreen and offer opportunities for students to create their own courses of study and research while enjoying some of the benefits of collaborative study. Working with the faculty sponsor, individual students or small groups of students design projects and then meet, weekly or bi-weekly, to present, discuss and reflect upon their work.

The sponsor will support students who wish to do research in political and social thought and policy and in community and public service. Some examples of topics are: a particular aspect of the theory of democracy or of the theory of non-violence; a specific theme(s) in the writings of one political thinker (like Martin Luther King, Jr. or J.S. Mill or Hannah Arendt); an issue on the current government's agenda (e.g., social security, Medicare, national security and civil rights); a current social problem (like hunger, homelessness, access to health care, unemployment, public health epidemics, or combating violence).

Credit awarded will reflect the type of work completed by each student and will vary depending on the individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences, public policy, community service, law and business.
Program Updates:   (2/3/04) New, not in printed catalog
Students will enroll through Independent Learning Contracts and Internship Agreements

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Student Originated Studies: Theater in Theory and Practice
New, not in printed catalog
Winter quarter
Faculty: Rose Jang
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisite: Junior or seniors prepared to carry out serious advanced study in theater theory or/and important roles and responsibilities of theatrical production.
Faculty Signature: Students must draw up an Independent Learning Contract in consultation with faculty sponsor Rose Jang. Priority will be given to contract proposals received by the Academic Fair, December 3. For more information contact Rose Jang, (360) 867-6705.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of winter quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students to do research in theater history, theory and dramatic literature in both American and world theater. She will also sponsor performance projects formed by individual students or small groups of students who are interested and proficiently trained to produce theatrical performances and share an evening of SOS showcase near the end of the quarter.
Previous SOS projects by Evergreen students have been centered on such topics as the plays and writing styles of prominent modern playwrights: Ibsen, Shaw, Engene O’Neill, the early 20th century theatrical movements, Absurdist drama and playwrights, Asian culture and performing arts, and postmodern theory and practice in theater. SOS has also been a fertile nurturing ground for several student productions with displayed competency, including senior thesis productions, in the last few years: Baal, Perestroika (Angels in America, Part II), and Walking Wounded.
Credit awarded will reflect the students’ individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in the theater, performing arts and humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) New, not in printed catalog

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Studio Projects: Painting
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Susan Aurand
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: This all-Level accepts first-year students and will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work. This program is intended for students who have a solid background in drawing and who have completed one or more quarters of college level studio work in art.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Students should be prepared to spend approximately $200 on art supplies and field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Studio Projects is a one-quarter group contract focusing on the development of studio skills and methods in painting. This program is designed for students who already have a strong work ethic and self-discipline, and who are willing to work long hours in the studio on campus in company with their fellow students. Students entering the program should have a solid background in drawing, in particular, good skills in shading. Some experience drawing from the figure is preferable. Students will have the opportunity to develop technical skills in the use of acrylics, oils and watercolor and to learn about the history of painting, with emphasis on 20th-century painting. Students will address weekly studio projects in class designed to improve their understanding of color, composition, thematic research and studio methodology. Each student will create a series of paintings on an individual theme over the course of the quarter, and will research topics in art history related to their work in painting.
Credit awarded in: painting, color theory and design, art history and aesthetics and criticism.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the arts.
Planning Unit(s): First-Year Programs and Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (1/23/04) New, not in printed catalog

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Study Abroad: Chile
Spring quarter
Faculty: Jorge Gilbert
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: Students with a background in video production, Latin American studies, political economy, communication, art, media, folklore, environmental or cultural studies may enroll in this program. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must contact Jórgé Gilbert, (360) 867-6740 for signature. Students must apply no later than February 16, 2004.
Special Expenses: Approximately $2,850 for travel expenses, including airfare. A non-refundable deposit of $150 is due by February 16, 2004.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, with faculty approval.
Travel Component: Four, or optional 10, weeks in Chile.

This field school to Chile program has three general objectives. First, it provides participants with an interdisciplinary curriculum to study, research and experience firsthand a wide range of issues and concerns affecting Chile and South America at the beginning of the 21st century. Second, the field school provides practical opportunities for intensive language study. Students will attend regular classes, geared to their skill level, with the goal of developing or deepening their knowledge of Spanish. Third, this program immerses participants in the cultural, socio-political and economic reality of a country struggling to overcome its condition of underdevelopment. Students will focus on the study of different aspects of Chilean life. The subjects of the studies will include poverty, popular culture, the status of women, artistic expression, environmental concerns of the people and the particular struggles and issues facing different sectors of the population under Chile's current neoliberal model of economic development.
Credit awarded: varies depending on students' individual projects.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in Latin American studies, political economy, cultural studies, international relations, Spanish, social communication, education and international trade agreements.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:    

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Symbiosis
Winter quarter
Faculty: Erik V. Thuesen
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. A minimum of one year of college-level chemistry with lab and advanced course work in either botany, microbiology, mycology or zoology is required; one quarter of organic chemistry recommended.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Symbiosis can be defined as "the living together of differently named organisms." This program will examine the biology of symbiotic associations through lectures, readings, laboratory, fieldwork and seminar topics taken from the primary literature. Although particular attention will be paid to mutualistic symbioses, parasitic associations will also be covered. The defining aspects of plant–animal, animal–animal, bacteria–plant, bacteria–animal, protozoa–animal and fungi–plant symbioses will be examined at the organismal, physiological, cellular, biochemical, molecular and ecological levels. Characteristics that define the integration between the host and symbiont of specific associations will be investigated through fieldwork and in the laboratory. Students will keep a lab notebook and undertake a small research project that culminates in a poster with a short oral presentation.
Credit awarded in: symbiosis*, symbiosis seminar*, parasitology*, ecological physiology*, symbiosis laboratory* and research*.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in zoology, marine biology, parasitology, botany, forest ecology, microbiology, ecological agriculture and mycology.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:    

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Temperate Rainforests: The Forests and the Sea
Fall quarter
Faculty: Nalini Nadkarni, Erik V. Thuesen
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. One year of college biology with lab and one quarter of college chemistry with lab.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $120 for field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Temperate rainforests are a poorly understood and highly valued ecosystem in the Pacific Northwest and other parts of the world. They support a complex and interconnected web of life that encompasses a tremendous diversity of biota and interactions, both terrestrial and aquatic. We will focus on the interconnections between the forest ecosystem and the marine coastal environment. Unifying topics will include maritime climate effects on forest nutrient cycling; organismal connections (e.g., salmon, marbled murrelets); mutualistic relationships and the functional roles of detritus. Our focus will be on the ecology of rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula, but we will also consider their counterparts in other parts of the world.
Weekly seminars will be focused on reading and understanding articles from the scientific literature. Students will first undertake organized group projects in ecology and natural history, and then develop an independent study project that will require the development of research and quantitative skills. The program will go on an extended field trip to the Peninsula to study natural history and field ecological aspects of temperate rainforests and their associated marine coastal environments.
Credit awarded in: forest ecology*, marine science* and field research*. All credit is upper-division science credit.
Total: 16 credits.
Temperate Rainforests is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in forest ecology, marine science and scientific research.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (4/28/03) All credit is upper-division science credit.

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The Ties That Bind
Cancelled, refer to the new Core program Something Out of the Ordinary as an alternative.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: George Freeman, Jr., Anne Fischel, Ariel Goldberger
Enrollment: 69
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Art materials (depends on individual work in puppetry or video), and theater tickets up to $50 per quarter.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter, by permission of the faculty; community service projects required.

If I am not for myself, then who will be for me?
If I am only for myself, then what am I?
And if not now, when?

—Rabbi Hillel
We exist in a web of relationships: with families, friends, communities, the natural environment and others, named and unnamed. There are no simple ways of saying who we are, and what our identity represents, to ourselves, or others. What, then, are the sometimes contradictory narratives of family and community that shape us? What informs our sense of self and other, of choice, obligation, responsibility or freedom? How do we engage in relations of affiliation and obligation and how do these shape our personal, social and moral development?
To articulate the past historically is not
to recognize it "the way it really was"
… It means to catch hold of a memory as
it flashes up at the moment of danger.

—Walter Benjamin
We are shaped by our relationship to history, sometimes to multiple histories, and complex social discourses. What are the consequences for personal and social identity when history is "forgotten" or suppressed? We intend to engage in questions of personal, family and community history through film, experimental and puppet theater, and psychological development. We will study the art of filmmaking, narrative, experimental and puppet theater, and psychological theories of community and self. We will work with writing, quantitative reasoning and other essential explorations in education. A spring quarter community service project is required.
Credit awarded in: psychology, writing, history, performing arts, film theory and video production.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in performing arts, film, psychology, community development and community service.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (5/9/03) Cancelled

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Theater Intensive: Stage Production
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Walter Eugene Grodzik
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: This all-level program accepts up to 33 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Admission by interview. Interviews will be conducted at the end of winter quarter. For information contact Walter Eugene Grodzik, (360) 867-6076.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The program will consist exclusively of participating in a faculty-directed stage production of a play chosen by the instructor. The audition, rehearsal, and production work will follow a professional theater model that students can expect in any Off-Broadway or regional theater.
The play will be chosen from the realistic/avant-garde theater canon. This will allow us to work with acting and directing techniques that were specifically developed for each type of theater. For example, these techniques could include the Stanislavski’s Sense Memory, Michael Chekhov’s Psychological Gesture, Meyerhold’s Biomechanics, or Bogart’s Viewpoints. Students will experience a rigorous training in movement and vocal techniques and will learn to utilize these techniques in the performance of the play.
Participation in the production involves acting in the play, dramaturgical work, assistant directing, stage management, set, costume, lighting, and sound design, set and costume construction publicity, and all the other areas related to a successful play production. For example, after a successful audition, a student will be cast in the play, she will spend maybe half to three quarters of her time in rehearsal, and the rest of the time she might work in the shop building the set. A student might present a portfolio of his lighting design, and he will become the lighting designer for the production as well as the publicity coordinator. In short, every student will participate in more than one area of the production process. While the production will be directed by the faculty, the process will be an interactive collaboration among all participants.
The program will spend the first eight to nine weeks in rehearsal, and it will culminate in a fully mounted site-specific production or a production in the Experimental Theater.
In addition to rehearsals and production work, the program will meet at least once a week for an all-program seminar concerning dramaturgical matters closely related to the production. For example, if the production is a play by a twentieth century avant-garde writer, the seminars will deal with other plays by the same author, scholarship, and the social, political, economic and cultural environment of the play, and so on. Those weekly seminars will help us to understand the world of the play, as well as the world of the author.
Credit awarded in: acting, directing, design, stage management, dramaturgy, costuming, lighting, sound, and publicity according to which function the individual student specializes in, and also in theater history, critical theory, and dramatic literature for the seminar preparation and participation.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in teaching, theater, arts and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): First-Year Programs and Expressive Arts.
Program Updates:   (4/7/03) New, not in printed catalog
This is a new all-level program for spring 2004. This program accepts 33% first-year students.

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It's Time for Science
Cancelled
Fall quarter
Faculty: Dharshi Bopegedera, Janet Ott
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for science tools for students’ personal use.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is designed to engage students in exploring several interesting topics in science. Using hands-on labs and workshops we will explore topics in chemistry, biology, geology and physics. We will engage in discussions about why science is important, when it goes too far and what makes a good scientist. We especially want to invite those students who have avoided science to come and explore science with us.
Credit awarded in: introductory science, science laboratory, ethics and values in the sciences.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the sciences.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students
Program Updates:   (6/16/03) Cancelled

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Topics in Advanced Mathematics
New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Sean Eastman
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; transfer students welcome. One year of calculus is the absolute minimum; ability to reason abstractly is at least as important as the ability to do computations.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This one-quarter program follows on the heels of the Mathematical Systems program that was offered the previous fall and winter quarters. The program will consist of three courses and seminar/projects. We will study complex analysis (calculus with 'imaginary' numbers), as well as the calculus of vectors and tensors. Our approach to these two courses will be both theoretical and computational, with emphasis on computation. The third course, abstract linear algebra, will be a rigorous study of the theory of vector spaces and linear transformations. This is not applied linear algebra; rather it will be closer in flavor to abstract algebra in that the objects under study will be carefully defined, axioms presented, and theorems will be proved. Students will have the opportunity to engage in individual projects and present material to the class on topics in mathematics that they study during the quarter.
Credit awarded in: complex analysis*, vector calculus*, abstract linear algebra* and special topics in mathematics*.
Total: 4, 8, 12, and 16 credit options.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in mathematics, physics, mathematics education, history of mathematics, and science.
Program Updates:   (1/30/04) New, not in printed catalog.
This is a follow-up to the program Mathematical Systems.

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Transcendent Practices
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Sarah Williams, Robert Leverich, Timothy Kelly
Enrollment: 56
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For signature, contact Bob Leverich.
Special Expenses: Approximately $250 for studio supplies.
Internship Possibilities: Yes

Many of us remember transcendent moments in our lives, when we lost our sense of time and felt creatively connected with our environment, our bodies or our actions. This feeling has many names: in the zone, the sweet spot, creative flow, a peak experience, even enlightenment or samadhi. How do we characterize and value these experiences? How do we find them? Like good fortune, transcendent moments favor the prepared. The preparation is often a practice or craft, an individual way of being in the world that involves intentional commitment to some activity and a regular physical and mental recentering on it.
This program will actively involve you in three creative studio practices that can prepare or open one to transcendent experiences through moving, making and writing. We will explore classical yoga (the eight limbs), shape materials into sculpture and experiment with ecstatic poetry. We will consider how the body’s anatomy and rhythms inform these practices, comparing Western and non-Western perspectives. Activities may also include lectures, readings, seminars, field trips, student synthesis groups, presentations and portfolios. Through program work and reflection, each of us will seek to define and integrate her or his own transcendent practice.
Credit awarded in: sculpture, poetry, cultural studies, feminist theory and somatic studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the visual arts, creative writing, cultural studies and somatic studies.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (4/1/03) Bob Leverich will stay in the program for the full year.
(6/3/03) Enrollment increased from 48 to 56.
(6/10/03) Timothy Kelly has joined this program. He has a MA in English and a MS in Physical Therapy.
(11/11/03) New students must read Mary Oliver: A Poetry Handbook. Read Thomas McEvilley: Sculpture in the Age of Doubt, Intro. & Chs. 1-3. Read Beryl Bender Birch: Beyond Power Yoga, Intro. & Chs. 1-3
(3/2/04) New students will be accepted into the program for spring quarter. Students must contact Bob Leverich for signature approval.

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Transforming the Globe
Fall quarter
Faculty: Sharon Anthony, David McAvity
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. High school algebra proficiency assumed.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The globe has been transformed by the organisms that have inhabited it since the first bacteria started polluting the atmosphere with oxygen over two billion years ago. Certainly the impact of humankind on the Earth is considerable: global warming, ozone depletion, photochemical smog, acid rain and the buildup of radioactive waste, are just a few examples. The extent of the danger these changes present, and whether it is in our power to reverse them, remain difficult and open questions that cannot be answered without an understanding of the science behind them. The intention of this program is to provide students with a foundation in chemistry, physics and mathematics using the science of global change as a motivating and integrating theme.
Students will be introduced to topics in chemistry and physics primarily through discovery-oriented small-group activities. Mathematical methods and experimental skills essential for scientific inquiry will also be developed in lectures and labs. We will engage in weekly discussions to explore the interconnections between science and policy in the context of human-originated transformations of the globe.
This program is for fall quarter only. Programs in winter that build on the scientific concepts from this program are Modeling Motion and Exploring Biogeochemistry.
Credit awarded in: general chemistry, college physics and precalculus.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in physics, chemistry, environmental science and public policy.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies; Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:    

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Tribal: Reservation Based/Community-Determined
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Michelle Aguilar-Wells, Jeff Antonelis-Lapp, Frances Rains, Phil Smith, Allen Jenkins
Enrollment: 112
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing enrolling from the reservation sites, or Northwest Indian College bridge student.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must be living on or working for one of the reservation sites. For information contact Michelle Aguilar-Wells, (360) 276-4598 or Jeff Antonelis-Lapp, (253) 735-6647, ext. 120, or the Program Secretary Office, (360) 867-6000. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses: Travel expenses related to at least three weekend visits to the Olympia campus and one visit to one of the reservation sites each quarter.
Internship Possibilities: No

The River of Culture theme refers to the history of indigenous people and their encounters with the Other. From this investigation, multiple disciplines can be integrated into a yearlong curriculum. It is a community-based and community-determined program that seeks tribal members and other students who work or live on a reservation.
The program will emphasize community building at each of the reservation sites. Interactive workshops, student-led seminars, student-centered conferences to present program material, and student-designed newsletters are ways that program information will be presented. Students and tribal officials will design the curriculum by asking what an educated member of an Indian nation needs to know to contribute to the community. The interdisciplinary approach will allow students to participate in seminars and courses, while also studying in their individual academic interest areas. Within the framework of the identified curriculum, the premise is that an "educated person" needs to have skills in research, critical thinking, analysis and communication. Program material will be taught using a tribal perspective and issues related to tribal communities will often be the topics of discussion.
Credit awarded in: anthropology, history, political science, cultural resource management, genealogy, federal policy, American Indians and the law, writing, critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, environmental science, Coast Salish art, communication, gender issues, technology, global multicultural awareness, psychology and literature.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in human services, tribal government and management, law, natural resources, community development, Native American studies, cultural studies and education.
Planning Unit(s): Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies
Program Updates:   (8/6/03) Two visiting faculty have been added to the Tribal program

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Tropical Rainforests
Winter quarter
Faculty: John T. Longino, TBA
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; Introduction to Environmental Studies or one year of college-level science; Spanish is highly recommended.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must submit an application by November 14, 2003. The application will contain: (1) an essay addressing fulfillment of the prerequisites, interest in the program and background knowledge in organismal biology; (2) a copy of an evaluation from a previous science program; and (3) the name and telephone number of a previous instructor. Assessment will be based on writing skills and background knowledge in organismal biology. Transfer students can arrange telephone interviews by calling John Longino at (360) 867-6511. Students will be informed of their acceptance by November 28, 2003.
Special Expenses: Airfare to Costa Rica (often about $700), a student fee of about $1,100 that covers all in-country expenses (room, board, transportation, access fees and logistical support).
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Three-week field trip to Costa Rica.

The tropics are the cradle of the world’s biodiversity. This program will focus on Costa Rica, emphasizing biological richness, field ecology, statistical analysis of field data, conservation biology and Latin American culture. It is a successor to Temperate Rainforests, although Temperate Rainforests is not a prerequisite. The first seven weeks of the program will be held on the Evergreen campus, followed by a three-week field trip to Costa Rica. The on-campus portion of the program will include lectures, labs and instruction in introductory conversational Spanish. The field trip will introduce students to different habitats and field sites, and will require rigorous hiking and backpacking in remote locations.
Credit awarded in: tropical biology* and Latin American studies.
Total: 16 credits.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, ecology, conservation biology, evolutionary biology and Latin American studies.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:    

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Turning Eastward: Explorations in East/West Psychology
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Ryo Imamura
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. College-level expository writing ability.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must submit a portfolio including an essay questionnaire. For information and to obtain the questionnaire, contact Ryo Imamura or the program secretary at The Evergreen State College, Lab I, Olympia, WA 98505, (360) 867-6600. Submissions will be accepted beginning May 5, 2003, until the program is filled.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

So far, western psychology has failed to provide us with a satisfactory understanding of the full range of human experience. It has largely overlooked the core of human understanding—our everyday mind, our immediate awareness of being with all of its felt complexity and sensitive attunement to the vast network of interconnectedness with the universe around us. Instead, it has chosen to analyze the mind as though it were an object independent of the analyzer, consisting of hypothetical structures and mechanisms that cannot be directly experienced. Western psychology’s neglect of the living mind—both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities—has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of the East, particularly Buddhism, which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.
Eastern psychology shuns any impersonal attempt to objectify human life from the viewpoint of an external observer, instead studying consciousness as a living reality that shapes individual and collective perception and action. The primary tool for directly exploring the mind is meditation or mindfulness, an experiential process in which one becomes an attentive participant-observer in the unfolding of moment-to-moment consciousness.
In this program, we will take a critical look at the basic assumptions and tenets of the major currents in traditional western psychology, the concept of mental illness and the distinctions drawn between normal and abnormal thought and behavior. We will then investigate the eastern study of mind that has developed within spiritual traditions, particularly within the Buddhist tradition. In doing so, we will take special care to avoid the common pitfall of most western interpretations of eastern thought—the attempt to fit eastern ideas and practices into unexamined western assumptions and traditional intellectual categories. Lastly, we will address the encounter between eastern and western psychology as possibly having important ramifications for the human sciences in the future, potentially leading to new perspectives on the whole range of human experience and life concerns.
Credit awarded in: personality theory, abnormal psychology, Buddhist thought and practice, Taoism, communication skills and social psychology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in psychology, counseling, social work and religious studies.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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Undergraduate Research in Scientific Inquiry
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Dharshi Bopegedera, Andrew Brabban, Judith Cushing, Rob Knapp, Betty Kutter, Stu Matz, Donald Morisato, Nancy Murray, Jim Neitzel, Paula Schofield (FW), E. J. Zita (WS)
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Negotiated individually with faculty.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

A number of faculty in this planning group are engaged in research projects that offer collaborative research opportunities for advanced students. These provide an important aspect of advanced work in the sciences that take advantage of faculty expertise, Evergreen’s flexible structure and excellent equipment. In general, students begin by working in apprenticeship with faculty and laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific program. These projects generally run 12 months a year; a signature is required from the faculty with whom students will be working.
Clyde Barlow and Jeff Kelly work with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment.
Dharshi Bopegedera would like to engage students in the following four projects: FTIR spectroscopy of free radicals (2 students): This project is for advanced chemistry students who are interested in using infrared spectroscopy to understand molecular properties of free radicals synthesized in situ in a microwave discharge. Exploration of toxic properties in noxious plants (2 students): Chemicals from noxious plants (such as Scotch broom) will be extracted and investigated using several spectrometric methods in order to understand what makes these plants "noxious." This project is for students who have completed general chemistry (with laboratory). Knowledge of organic chemistry is preferred but not required. An interdisciplinary study of drinking water in the South Puget Sound (2 students): This is an ongoing study to investigate the quality of drinking water in the Puget Sound area. We will analyze drinking water in the South Puget Sound area and explore the connections between the minerals found in drinking water with the geological properties of the land. Students who have completed general chemistry with laboratory can carry out this project. Science in Local Schools (2 students): We will work with local schoolteachers to develop science lab activities that will enhance the science curriculum in local schools. About four science labs will be taken to local schools each quarter. Students who have an interest in teaching science and who have completed general chemistry with laboratory would be ideal for this project.
Andrew Brabban (biotechnology) is interested in developing biological technologies for agriculture, industry and health care that improve the efficiency of a modern process, or generally improve the quality of life for society. Current student projects include technologies to produce pharmaceutical synthons, reduce the incidence of E. coli 0157:H7 in the human food chain (in collaboration with Betty Kutter and Dr. Callaway, Texas A&M University) and the role of DNA as an environmental pollutant (in collaboration with LOTT sewage treatment plant). Student projects will use techniques and receive credit in molecular biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry and microbiology.
Judith Bayard Cushing studies how scientists use distributed computing and data to conduct research. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or molecular biology, forest ecology, chemistry or physics and a strong motivation to explore new computing paradigms, such as object-oriented systems and multiplatform computing.
Rob Knapp studies thermal and electric energy flows in buildings, as a contribution to ecologically conscious design of homes and workplaces. A National Science Foundation grant has provided instrumentation to measure heat loss, air flows, solar gains and related aspects of conventional and alternative buildings, by which to compare different approaches to energy conservation and renewable resource use. Students with backgrounds in physics, electronics or computer modeling can help with these explorations.
Betty Kutter (molecular biology) and Jim Neitzel (biochemistry) study Bacteriophage T4, which has been a key model organism in molecular genetics for more than 50 years. Its infection of E. coli leads to rapid cessation of host DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. These faculty members are working to clone and over-express the many host-lethal genes that are responsible, purify and characterize their protein products, determine their specific functions, look at ways in which they can be used to better understand bacterial metabolism, and examine the infection process under a variety of environmental conditions. Evergreen is the center for genomic analysis and database development for these phages, and for work with phage ecology and potential uses as antibiotics.
Stu Matz (biology) uses a variety of anatomical, molecular and developmental techniques to analyze the organization of various regions of the brain in order to understand the behavior of aquatic organisms. Currently, he is investigating the Pacific salmon brain. In the past, he has worked with zebrafish, cichlid fish and aquatic salamanders.
Donald Morisato and Nancy Murray are interested in the developmental biology of the Drosophila embryo, a model system for analyzing how patterning occurs. Maternally encoded signaling pathways establish the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Individual student projects will use a combination of genetic, molecular biological, and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial regulation of this complex process.
Paula Schofield (polymer chemistry, organic chemistry) is interested in the fields of biodegradable and biomedical polymers. Efforts to use biodegradable materials have been initiated to reduce the environmental impact of plastic wastes. Several of these biodegradable materials are polyesters and they have attracted much industrial attention as "green thermoplastics." Biomedical polymers are widely used as replacements for heart valves, tissue, hip joints and blood vessels. Polyurethanes show potential as replacements for small diameter blood vessels, particularly required by patients suffering from vascular disease resulting from complications of diabetes. Suitable replacement vessels could prevent the thousands of amputations performed each year in the United States.
Today, research and development on biodegradable and biomedical polymers are expanding in both polymer and biological sciences. Students with a background in organic chemistry and biology will gain experience in the preparation and characterization of suitable polymers, and in biological procedures used to monitor biodegradation and biocompatibility. Techniques students will use include SEM, DSC, GPC, FTIR, FTNMR and enzyme isolation and purification.
E.J. Zita (physics) studies the structure and dynamics of magnetic stars such as the Sun. Like plasmas (ionized gases) in fusion energy research labs, stars can create and respond to electromagnetic fields. For example, the changing magnetic fields near the surface of the Sun can heat the solar atmosphere and increase the Sun’s luminosity. One would expect the Sun’s gas to cool as it moves away from the surface; nevertheless, the solar corona can be millions of degrees hotter than the photosphere. A NASA grant funds investigations into this puzzle and for collaborations with scientists in Boulder, Colorado, and abroad. Students can help Zita do analytic calculations of magnetic dynamics or compare numerical models with extensive datasets from ground- and space-based observations.
Credit will be awarded in areas of student work e.g., lab biology* and chemistry,* computer science*, health sciences*, teaching and environmental sciences*, physics* and astronomy lab biology*.
Total: 4 to 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in chemistry, biology, computer science, health science, environmental sciences, physics, astronomy and teaching.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:   (4/22/03) Donald and Nancy will join the Undergraduate Research in Scientific Inquiry team to provide research opportunities in the developmental biology of the Drosophila embryo.

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Up Close
Spring quarter
Faculty: Frederica Bowcutt
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Christian Roots program. Entering students must read the required James R. Jacob's The Scientific Revolution, and Jardine's Ingenious Pursuits is highly recommended. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $150 for field trip.
Internship Possibilities: No

In 1665, English experimenter Robert Hooke published his best-selling coffee-table book Micrographia. In splendid detail, fleas, oak bark and other treasures from nature could be viewed close up. The etchings used to illustrate the book were drawn from Hooke’s microscope. In this program, we will take Hooke’s lead and explore a world new to us with dissecting, compound and scanning electron microscopes. We will meticulously record our findings in our journals of exploration, illustrating and analyzing what we see. In our intellectual journey we will use maps to chart our way both literally and metaphorically. We will put our new skills of observation and documentation to use in research. We will also explore the antecedents of science. Medieval magic preceded the scientific revolution and informed the humanist approach of learning about nature to manipulate it for the benefit of people. During the Renaissance, experiments and demonstrations with microscopes and other new technology took the form of performances. Hooke served as official demonstrator for the Royal Society in London. As a learning community we will ponder the questions: To what extent is science a magic show? What constitutes good magic? What is the nature of expert observation? How has the early history of science informed the practice and perception of science today?
Credit awarded in: introductory plant biology, scientific illustration, history of science, microscopy and independent research in botany.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in history of science, life sciences and ethnobotany.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Environmental Studies
Program Updates:    

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Vertebrate Evolution and the Nature of Scientific Controversy
Spring quarter
Faculty: Amy Cook
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: Background in biology is strongly recommended. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The evolutionary history of vertebrates has included some rather dramatic transitions such as the evolution of flight in birds, the evolution of land vertebrates and the return of some vertebrates, whales and dolphins, to the ocean. Because we cannot directly observe any of these events, evolutionary biologists are dependent on fossil evidence and the study of extant vertebrates to try to piece together how these transitions occurred. The incomplete nature of the evidence has lead to varying degrees of disagreement among evolutionary biologists. In examining these controversies and the scientists who are involved in them, we will gain a better understanding of how science works.
This program will look at vertebrate biology, evolution and the controversies that have surfaced in evolutionary biology over questions such as how flight evolved in birds and whether dinosaurs were warm-blooded. Topics will include vertebrate functional morphology, physiology, taxonomy, natural selection and macroevolution. In seminar, we will focus on several questions in vertebrate evolutionary biology to explore how controversy arises in the scientific community. Students can earn upper-division credit by doing a library research project on some aspect of vertebrate evolutionary biology not covered in seminar.
Credit awarded in: vertebrate physiology, vertebrate morphology, and evolutionary biology. Upper-division science credit will be awarded for upper-division science work.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in vertebrate biology including ichthyology, herpetology, ornithology and mammalogy, veterinary medicine, the history of science, evolutionary biology and paleontology.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (3/12/03) Heather Heying dropped as faculty. Enrollment limit lowered to 24. Upper-division credit option added.

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Working Small
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Jean Mandeberg
Enrollment: 18
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. Foundations of Visual Art or equivalent college-level experience in design, drawing and sculpture (which might include woodworking, fiber arts, metalworking, fine metals or ceramics).
Faculty Signature: Yes. Portfolio reviews and interviews will begin at the Academic Fair, May 14, 2003, and continue until the program is filled. Transfer students can mail a slide portfolio and statement of interest to Jean Mandeberg, The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505. Jean will notify transfer students of acceptance by telephone, and she will post an acceptance list on her office door, Lab II 3263.
Special Expenses: Students can expect to provide art materials including precious metals and nonferrous metals, and specialized tools and supplies needed to accomplish a series of small scale works.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is for advanced visual art students interested in the particular demands of making small scale art. We will be working in jewelry making, metalsmithing and mixed media sculpture, combining intensive studio work and critique with related reading, research, writing and weekly seminar.
Students must be prepared to confront the artist’s and audience’s experience of small scale artwork while considering such issues as the cultural values associated with scale, miniaturization, the intensification of form, imagination, mobility, technical precision and craftsmanship.
Students will learn to express their ideas through inventive designs and appropriate materials in order to take advantage of this unique point of view.
Credit awarded in: metalsmithing and jewelry making, issues in art and contemporary craft, art history and aesthetics.
Total: 16 credits fall quarter; 12, 14 or 16 credits winter quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the arts and humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (4/25/03) Enrollment limit has been increased to 18 students.
(11/07/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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Working the Waters: The Pacific Northwest Maritime Industries
Spring quarter
Faculty: Cynthia Kennedy, Sarah Pedersen
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: College-level academic writing. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students. No sailing experience required.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $750 for one- to two-week sailing voyage and field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

This boat-based program will explore the economic and social history and current conditions of the maritime trades and industry in the Pacific Northwest. Beginning with a brief introductory history to Puget Sound as an economic resource, we will then focus on the contemporary economic and work climate in the maritime industries and trades with emphasis on the Northwest region. We will use economics, leadership, sociology, race and gender studies, and literary reading and analysis to gain an understanding of the nature of today's maritime work and economy. An extended sailing expedition will include visits to a variety of maritime businesses, tribal communities, historical locales and ports where economic development issues are evolving. The expedition will also focus on the experience of working as crew, the development of leadership within small groups and the creation of an intense and powerful learning community. Students should expect to read and write extensively throughout the expeditions as well as at home, and to engage in extensive work on literary analysis of maritime classics. Workshops and practical application will develop students' skills in mathematics, basic geometry, map reading, meteorology and astronomy.

This program will collaborate with Astronomy and Cosmologies, Science Seminar and The Physics of Astronomy programs to offer students an additional 2 credit option in Celestial Navigation . Students who choose this option will attend a 2 hour astronomy lab each week on Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., in addition to regular program activities. Students from The Physics of Astronomy and Astronomy and Cosmologies programs may also register our our weekly Piloting and Inland Navigation workshop.
Credit awarded in: economics, literature, leadership, sociology, science, mathematics, Pacific Northwest cultural maritime studies and nautical sciences.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in economics, management, science, mathematics, literature, maritime studies and trade.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (7/18/03) Prerequisites change.
(2/17/04) Students who want to take an additional 2 credits of Celestial Navigation, refer to CRN 30777 in Gateway.

Catalog program descriptions: A to E, F to J, K to P, Q to Z

Last Updated: May 11, 2011
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The Evergreen State College
2700 Evergreen Parkway NW
Olympia, WA 98505
(360) 867-6000

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