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2004-2005 Catalog

Undergraduate Studies 2004-05

Programs for Freshmen

Culture, Text and Language

Environmental Studies

Expressive Arts

Native American and World Indigenous Peoples' Studies

Scientific Inquiry

Society, Politics, Behavior and Change

Tacoma Campus Program

Evening and Weekend Studies

Evening and Weekend Class Listing

Summer Studies

Summer 2005 Class Listing

Graduate Studies

Graduate Electives

Master of Environmental Studies

Master of Public Administration

Master in Teaching

 

 


 
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500 Years of Globalization

Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Jeanne Hahn
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Previous study in political economy, political science and history.
Faculty Signature: With interview and writing sample; transcript or evaluations when available. Contact Jeanne Hahn for an interview, or (360) 867-6014. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

The world is undergoing unprecedented flux and transformation; some argue we are in the midst of a passage to a qualitatively different world. How do we understand this, historically and in the present? What is the future of the nation-state in the face of the hypermobility of capital, the re-emergence of nationalism, the increasing disparity and similarity between "first" and "third" worlds, and the United States post-1991 attempts to assert global dominance? Is the public sphere disappearing in the face of privatization and neo-liberal policy? These are big questions; every person on earth has a stake in the answers.
Winter will focus on a study of the evolution of the international political economy to understand the historical process by which over the past 500 years Europeans (and later Euro-Americans) created capitalism and the nation-state, rewrote the world map through imperialism, established the rules of the international system and initiated the process by which the rest of the world generally became poor and powerless. We will then assess the rapidly changing international political economy and geostrategic developments. We will explore the relationship between transnational corporations and multilateral institutions, investigate the neo-liberal agenda as expressed through public policies in the First World and structural adjustment programs in the Third World, explore changing structures of power through an examination of state-market and regional trading-bloc relationships. We will look directly at the rise of revolutionary (often religious) nationalism, resistance strategies and the nature of global social change. Students will write frequently, engage in a major research project, and analyze world developments through the daily New York Times and one foreign newspaper.
Credit awarded in: globalization, world history, political economy, geography, sociology and world-systems analysis.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in graduate work, law school, education and informed citizenship.
Program Updates: (1/27/05) This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.

 

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Acting and Directing: Queer Theory and Practice

New, not in printed catalog
Fall and Winter quarter
Faculty: Walter Eugene Grodzik
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Walter Grodzik, (360) 867-6076 or grodzikw@evergreen.edu.
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for theater tickets.

The appearance of queer people on the stage is not only a modern phenomenon. This program will investigate the portrayal of gays and lesbians in the theatre from Shakespeare, through the pioneering plays of the early and mid-20th century, to contemporary playwrights and queer performance. This program will also examine how the nature and practice of dramatic performance has transformed, from the realism of the early 20th century to the postmodern performance of today. Students will study theatre history and dramatic literature and acting and directing theories and techniques from Stanislavsky to Robert Wilson and Anne Bogart.

Students will select and perform monologues, scene work, and also direct and act in one-act plays. There is also the possibility of a full-length production in the winter quarter. Students interested in this program should come prepared with commitment, enthusiasm and creativity. This is an intensive preparatory theatre training program, in a liberal arts setting, and in addition to the performance aspects of the class, students should possess a strong interest in reading, critical thinking, theatre history and dramatic literature.

Students will participate in weekly seminars, critiques and theatre workshops and students who show the discipline and ability to perform at an advanced level will be invited to join the Spring quarter Theatre Intensive program.

For information contact Walter Eugene Grodzik, The Evergreen State College, SEM II C4106 Olympia, WA 98505.

Credit awarded in: acting, directing, theater history and dramatic literature.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.

Program Updates:

(4/30/04) New, not in printed catalog.
(11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.

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Advanced Poetics

New, not in printed catalog.

Spring quarter

Faculty: Leonard Schwartz, Steven Hendricks
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Faculty Signature: Admittance into the program will be by portfolio which includes ten to twelve pages of poetry, prose poetry, or critical writing on a related subject. Students must submit the portfolio no later than March 11, 2005. For information contact Leonard Schwartz, or (360) 867-5412.

This program will explore a full range of avant-garde poetry and poetics, and will include both a poetry composition workshop and an examination of key texts in the American avant-garde poetic tradition. Students will be asked to explore their own writing by means of formal constraints and frequent writing exercises, and to produce a body of poems through the course of the quarter. Readings will focus on Ezra Pound and the Pound tradition, from H.D.-but also Gertrude Stein and Wallace Stevens-to contemporary figures like Barbara Guest, Alice Notley, Michael Palmer and Kamau Brathwaite. We will also read select poets in translation, and look at/think about the translation process as metaphor for the composition of poetry itself. Admittance into the program will be by portfolio to include ten to twelve pages of poetry, prose poetry, or critical writing on a related subject, to be submitted to the instructor by March 11, 2005.

Credit awarded in: creative writing, 20th-century American Poetry and translation theory.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities.

Program Updates:

(4/21/04) New, not in printed catalog.
(10/20/04) Steven Hendricks has joined this program


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A Few Good Managers Wanted

Winter and Spring quarters
Enrollment: 25
Faculty: John Filmer
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Internet access and one year of work experience; microeconomics, statistics or business mathematics desirable.
Faculty Signature: This program will not accept new students in spring quarter.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter with faculty approval.

As an effective manager your services will be in demand. Organizations, be they governments, businesses or nonprofits, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid economic, legal, cultural, political and economic realities. Strong, competent management leads to strong successful organizations. You will be introduced to the management tools, skills and concepts you need to develop effective strategies for managing these transitions resulting in organizational success.
Tools and skills are not enough. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. As an effective leader/manager you must develop the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting your organization. You will learn communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material that separate the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager from the administrator. Class work will typically include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies and field trips. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Your competence as a manager is in the balance.
Credit awarded in: managerial skill development, economic development, organizational leadership, international management, marketing, small business management, communications, project management and public relations.
Total: 8, 12 or 16 credits each quarter to accommodate part-time students.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in public administration, nonprofit organizational management
and business management.
Program Updates: (10/20/04) Steven Hendricks has joined this program.
(02/07/05) This program will not accept new students in spring quarter.


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Advanced Research in Environmental Studies

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Gerardo Chin-Leo, Martha Henderson Tubesing, Lin Nelson, Ken Tabbutt, Erik V. Thuesen
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: Negotiated individually with faculty sponsor.
Faculty Signature: Students must contact individual faculty to work out arrangements. Graduate students must also get signature of MES director.
Special Expenses: There may be transportation costs involved in field work.

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. Research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills will be developed in this program. These research skills are of particular importance for those students interested in pursuing a graduate degree, and can provide important experience for graduates in the job market. Several faculty in the Environmental Studies planning unit are currently engaged in research projects and want advanced students to participate in these investigations. The research, conducted by the student, would generally last multiple quarters and function as a capstone of their academic work at Evergreen. Students can take advantage of this program to write a senior thesis.
Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.
Martha Henderson Tubesing studies the ways in which humans transform Earth's surfaces. She is particularly interested in cultural and social ideas that become evident in landscapes. Students interested in cultural landscapes, ethnic studies, environmental history, land-use patterns and urban agriculture are encouraged to develop projects. Qualitative research methodologies will be taught.
Lin Nelson is a social scientist who has worked with national and regional organizations doing research and advocacy on the linkages among environment, health and community. Students who would like to assist in developing case studies of environmental health in Northwest communities (with a focus on environmental justice and environment-labor connections) can contact her. A related area, for students with sufficient preparation, is the examination of Washington state's plan to phase out selected persistent, bioaccumulative toxics.
Ken Tabbutt is a geologist with two areas of interest, using GIS to reconstruct Pleistocene landscapes in the southern Puget Sound and aqueous chemistry. He would welcome conversations with students interested in doing research along these lines, but would expect some background in GIS, geology, hydrology or chemistry, consistent with the research topic.
Erik V. Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to estuarine hypoxia. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry.
Credit awarded in: areas of student work.
Total: 4 to 16 credits each quarter. Students will negotiate credit with faculty sponsor.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005-06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in botany, ecology, entomology, environmental studies, marine science, zoology and taxonomy.
Program Updates: (3/22/04) Heather Heying will not offer advanced research in environmental studies opportunities during the year.


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After Nietzsche: Arts, Literature and Philosophy in the Wanderer's Shadow

Spring quarter
Faculty: Marianne Bailey
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Participation is based on prior reading of Nietzsche's work, at least of Birth of Tragedy, Zarathustra, The Gay Science and Ecce Homo, or successful completion of winter quarter's Nietzsche: Life, Time, Work.

Nietzsche's writings have intrigued artists and writers since his death in 1900. Today, more than ever, he speaks to us and shapes intellectual discourse. His Birth of Tragedy from the Spirit of Music shaped both modernist experimentation in ritualized theater performance, and through the aesthetic tension of Apollinian and Dionysian forces, established a context for modernist aesthetic debate. His work placed the artist in the center of aesthetic metamorphosis; that is, the artist became a "work of art," shaping 20th-century artists' self-conception. Finally, his philosophical annexation of issues of styles and language, his "dancing philosophy" and his self-description as "artist-philosopher" made possible the postmodern theories most influential today. We will consider major writers marked by Nietzsche's work, including Gide, Rilke, Mann, Hesse, Sartre, Yeats, Mishima, Bataille, Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida and Iriguaray, as well as visual and performing artists.
Students will research and present a writer or artist of choice; they will demonstrate the relationship of that author to Nietzsche's thought. In addition, they will also complete a body of creative or analytical work reflecting their encounter with Nietzsche, and with the works under study this quarter.
Credit awarded in: philosophy, aesthetics and literature.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and the arts.
Program Updates:  


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Algebra to Algorithms: An Introduction to Mathematics for Science and Computing

New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter

Faculty: Brian Walter
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 33 percent first-year, 33 percent sophomore and 33 percent junior or senior students.
Prerequisites: High school algebra proficiency assumed.

Western science relies on mathematics as a powerful language for expressing the character of the observed world. Mathematical models allow predictions (more or less) of complex natural systems, and modern computing has magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence 21st-century decisions. Computer science relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving, and also enables the construction of mathematical models. In fact, computer science is the constructive branch of mathematics.

This program will explore connections among mathematics, computer science and the natural sciences, and will develop mathematical abstractions and the skills needed to express, analyze and solve problems arising in the sciences, particularly in computer science. The program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or pursuing further work in the sciences. The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical thinking and expression, along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, functions, algorithms, programming and, depending on interest, calculus, logic or geometry; all with relevant historical and philosophical readings.

Credit awarded in: algebra, geometry, mathematical modeling, programming, and history and philosophy of mathematics.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the sciences or mathematics.

Program Updates: (4/19/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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America in the 20th Century

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: David Hitchens, Tom Grissom, Jerry Lassen
Enrollment: 72
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.

The United States began the 20th century as a second-rate military and naval power and a debtor country. The nation ended the century as the last superpower with an economy that sparked responses across the globe. In between, we invented flying, split the atom, sent men to the moon and began to explore our place in space. Many observers have characterized the 20th century as "America's Century" because, in addition to developing as the mightiest military machine on the face of the earth, the United States also experienced the central phenomenon of mass culture: mass media, mass action, massive destruction and massive fortunes-all significant elements of life in the United States.
This program will be a close study of the origins, development, expansion and elaboration of American cultural phenomena and will place those aspects of national life against our heritage to determine if the growth of the nation in the last century was a new thing or the logical continuation of long-standing, familiar impulses and forces in American life. While exploring these issues, we will use history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture and scientific thought to help us understand the nation and its place in the last century. Students will be challenged to understand their place in the scope of national affairs; read closely; write effectively; and develop projects to refine their skills and contribute to the collective enrichment of the program. There will be program-wide symposia at the end of each quarter. Each symposium will provide a means of rounding out our work and will provide students with valuable experience in public speaking and presentation.
Credit awarded in: U.S. political and economic history, U.S. social and intellectual history, American economics and global connections, scientific thought and 20th-century physics and American literature.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, sciences and social science areas of inquiry, law, journalism, history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture, cultural anthropology and teaching.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates: (11/15/04) Will accept new students for winter quarter. Students will benefit from reading Bayln, et. al., The Great Republic, Volume II, chapters 1-30, and J.B. Kennedy's Space, Time and Einstein: An Introduction, to gain a sense of the 20th-century physics element to the program.


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American Eye, The: A History of America in Photographs and Fiction

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall quarter
Faculty: Bob Haft
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Prerequisites: Core program or one-year of college study.
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 for photographic supplies.

This program involves both hands-on photography and a study of American history that helped shape the way photographic images of the United States have looked for the past 160 years. We will begin with a short look at the birth of photography in Europe, and then how it was used as a tool of documentation for major points in American history, such as the Civil War; the opening of the American West; the Roaring 20s; the Great Depression; World War II; and, the 1950s.

In addition to looking at and learning how to read photographs by others, we will learn to make photographs ourselves as recording devices for our own lives and times. We will also read several novels (possible titles include The Red Badge of Courage , The Great Gatsby , The Grapes of Wrath , On the Road , and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas ) to add another perspective to our understanding of the periods we study.

Credit awarded in: black-and-white photography, art history and American literature.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in photography and the arts and the humanities.

Program Updates: (7/30/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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American Indians and the Constitution

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall quarter
Faculty: José Gómez
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.

The roots of American Indian Law, which today governs relations among the federal government, the states and the Indian tribes, predate the United States Constitution. It is an area of law that is uniquely complex, due in large part to the ambivalence, vacillation and racism that all three branches of government have demonstrated toward Native Americans.

The treaty-making era that began prior to the Revolutionary War ended abruptly in 1830 with Andrew Johnson's policy of "removal." Backed by Congress and the Supreme Court, the president initiated a 60-year drive to herd hundreds of Indian tribes onto reservations in the West. Just as abruptly, the Congress in 1887 decided that it was time for Indians to assimilate into white society and authorized the dissolution of tribal governments and the elimination of Indian reservations. In 1934, after confiscating 90 million acres of Indian land and inflicting incalculable damage on tribal culture, the federal government again reversed course and decided that Indian tribes and tribal governments ought to continue after all.

In 1953, Congress then terminated some Indian tribes, discontinued federal trusteeship over Indian lands, and mandated or permitted state jurisdiction over tribes. That policy ended in 1968 when the Congress ignored the sovereignty of tribes and imposed upon them most of the constitutional mandates of the American Bill of Rights. A silver lining in that cloud was the federal government's implied recognition of tribal government. Subsequent federal legislation has given tribes increased autonomy and control over their own affairs.

This program will not provide a comprehensive study of American Indian Law. We will not, for example, study tribal law. Rather, we will focus on American constitutional law, particularly the impact of Supreme Court opinions on American Indians, their tribes, and their legal and political status.

Reading for the program will include court opinions, Internet resources, and various books and journal articles that explore the constitutional status of American Indians. Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real cases decided recently by the federal courts and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions.

Credit awarded in: constitutional law, Native American studies, critical legal reasoning, legal research and writing and oral advocacy.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in social science, constitutional law, education, public policy, political theory, history, and political science.

This program is also listed under: Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change and Native American; and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.

Program Updates: (5/3/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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American Places

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Sam Schrager, Kristina Ackley, Matt Smith
Enrollment: 72
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Sam Schrager, (360) 867-6335.
Special Expenses: $200 for field trips in fall and spring quarters.

Place absorbs our earliest notice and attention, it bestows on us our original awareness; and our critical powers spring up from the study of it and the growth of experience inside it. Sense of place gives equilibrium; extended, it is sense of direction too.- Eudora Welty
This program will explore how places in America are created and experienced. We will learn how they have emerged at the intersection of geography and history, and how they are lived in, felt about, perceived, shaped, fought over, and transformed by persons and groups. As Welty says, we depend on being rooted in an actual place for our sense of who we are and what we can do. Yet in this age of unprecedented interchangeability of spaces, what happens to the distinctive character of places? In the face of the mobility, uprooting, and alienation endemic to American society, what connections to places do we have and can we hope to nurture?
We will study dispossession and survival of Native American communities; experiences of place for African Americans and immigrant groups; place-based identities in the West, South, Midwest, and New England. We'll look at the interplay of nature, economics, religion, and nationalism in urban and rural localities. We will examine how people infuse meaning into places through stories, literature, material culture, and collective practices. We'll also examine moral implications of policies regarding place. We will conceive our subject broadly, to include not only Olympia and Chicago, Squaxin Island and Yosemite, but also homes and farms, classrooms and beauty salons.
Students will develop skills as interpreters, writers, and researchers by studying scholarly and imaginative works and by conducting policy research and ethnographic fieldwork (observation, interviewing, documentation of social life).
They'll undertake an extended project on an American place of their choice, locally or elsewhere, in spring. Faculty will give strong support to upper-division students and seniors writing theses. The program is also recommended for students new to the Northwest who want to explore it at firsthand.
Credit awarded in: anthropology, literature, policy, U.S. history and community studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.
Program Updates:

(11/15/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. The faculty will accept new students who are ready to undertake an independent project involving the study of community of place. Faculty will provide guidance in developing the proposal during the first weeks of winter quarter. The project can be based on an internship, volunteering, or a look at place. It can be conducted in the Olympia area or elsewhere. New students entering the program must read one book and several articles from the fall syllabus for background.
(1/27/05) This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.


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Animal Behavior

Spring quarter
Faculty: Heather Heying
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology; one year of college-level writing. Students should also have background in evolutionary and ecological theory, or be prepared to quickly catch up with substantial readings from the texts, as described on the program Web site, that we will not be discussing in class.
Special Expenses: Approximately $125 for overnight field trips; and any expenses associated with independent research projects (in most cases $0-$100).

What do animals do? How do animals achieve these things? Why do animals do what they do? In this program, students will begin to answer these questions with extensive use of the existing literature, and by generating their own data in independent research projects. Animals hibernate, forage, mate, form social groups, compete, communicate, care for their young, and so much more. They do so with the tools of their physiology, anatomy, and, in some cases, culture, for reasons having to do with their particular ecology and evolutionary history. By focusing on the interplay between ecology and evolution, we can understand animal behavior.
In this program, we will begin with a review of animal diversity, and continue our studies of behavior from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Students will be expected to engage some of the complex and often contradictory scientific predictions and results that have been generated in this field, as well as undertake their own, intensive field research. After studying the methods, statistical tests, and literature base frequently used in behavioral research, students will generate their own hypotheses, and go into the field to test them over several weeks of research. Research will be written up into scientific papers and presented to the entire program in a mini-conference in the final week.
Some topics that we will focus on include mating systems, territoriality, female mate choice, competition, communication, parental care, game theory, plant/animal interactions and convergent evolution. Seminar readings will focus on one group of animals in particular: the primates, including Homo sapiens.
Credit awarded in: behavioral ecology, evolution, zoology and biological anthropology. Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006-07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in field biology, evolution, ecology and other life sciences.
Program Updates:  


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Arab and Muslim Women Writers

New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Therese Saliba
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: For information contact Therese Saliba, (360) 867-6854.

At a time of heightened political conflict between the United States and the Arab/Muslim world, gender issues and the oppression of women have been invoked to justify military intervention. Contemporary writings by Arab and Muslim women, increasingly available in English translation, have often challenged these assumptions and enriched our understanding of women’s lives. Focusing on contemporary literary works by Arab, Iranian and Kurdish women from the Middle East and the Diaspora, this program will examine the intersections of literary production, women’s issues, national struggles, religion, war, globalization and immigration. Held in conjunction with a Seattle project to bring Arab women writers to the Northwest, the program seeks to foster greater understanding of the region and its peoples. Thus students will have the opportunity to read several writers’ works, attend their lectures in Seattle and share classroom exchanges with some of the visiting writers—Iraqi, Kurdish, Egyptian, Saudi and Palestinian American.

We will read novels, poetry, essays and memoirs by Arab (Christian, Jewish, Muslim), Kurdish and Iranian women writers, focusing on issues of nationalism, feminism, postcolonialism, war, imperialism and societal change. We will situate our literary analysis within the historical and political events that shape Arab and Muslim women’s texts and examine their critique of masculinist narratives that justify violence and exclude women’s voices. We will also view films by and about women in the Middle East and in the Diaspora. Students will write literary analysis and creative essays and conduct independent research projects on a woman writer of their choice. Through this study, students will consider the impact of political, economic, cultural and military forces on Arab and Muslim women’s lives and literary production, and examine literary and film representation as a site of resistance.

Credit awarded in: Middle East studies, women’s studies and postcolonial literature.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, international human rights, and women and immigrant advocacy.

Program Updates: (02/07/05) New, not in printed catalog.


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Articulating Power: Text and Image in the Public Sphere

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Ellen Fernandez-Sacco, Jeannette Garceau
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Ellen Fernandez-Sacco, (360) 867-5422.

On a daily basis, we are inundated by thousands of images which bear messages that suggest, imply and construct the identity of the consumer. More importantly, what effects do visual, sensorial and textual arguments have on our understanding of belonging? How are the relationship of the self, the citizen and populace to a particular nation or place conveyed? How is this reflected in our understanding of democracy-in how we live, make our living, and participate in a democratic society? Does it get buried beneath the idea of consumption rather than realized as a capacity to invoke change? In this process, what visual and textual arguments are produced, for what particular audience, by whom, for what purpose and to what effect? What role does technology play in conveying these arguments?

This two-quarter program will consider these relations of power through case studies drawn from readings, seminar, studies of film, media and contemporary events. Through this process, we will gain a better understanding of power-how it is produced, maintained and contested, and how the body (individual, political) is defined by power. During the first quarter, students will complete a series of workshops on writing, the web and PhotoShop. Writing assignments will be a means for processing various ideas, issues and modes of analysis covered in discussions, readings and presentations. These components enable students in the program to build their skills and generate responses to current events using text and image. Guest lecturers, a field trip to Seattle to attend the Northwest Social Forum in October and participation in the TESC Lecture Series are also part of the program. While examining the work of specific artists, writers and activists, students in the winter quarter will apply the skills gained the previous quarter to develop a final project.

Our main text will be The Visual Culture Reader , Nicholas Mirzoeff, ed., Second Edition, Routledge, July 2002. We will use supplemental readings on-line and through handouts.

Credit awarded in: rhetoric, writing, visual culture, media studies and political science.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in visual and cultural studies, teaching, media and communications, public policy and community organizations.
This program is listed under Culture, Text and Language and Expressive Arts.

Program Updates:

(8/17/04) New, not in printed catalog.
(8/17/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.


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Astronomy and Cosmologies

Spring quarter
Faculty: E. J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Prerequisites: High school algebra assumed.
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for materials; $200 - $300 for binoculars and tripod; and up to $300 for possible field trips.

Learn beginning-to-intermediate astronomy through lectures, discussions, interactive workshops and observation, using the naked eye, binoculars and telescopes. Students will build and take home learning tools such as spectro-meters and position finders, research a topic of interest (in the library and through observa-tions), create a Web page and share research with classmates.
We will also seminar on cosmologies: how people across cultures and throughout history have understood, modeled and ordered their universe. We will study creation stories and worldviews from ancient peoples to modern astrophysicists.
Students are invited to help organize a field trip to warm, clear skies.
Credit awarded in: astronomy, physical science and philosophy of science.
Total: 16 credits.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005-06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in astronomy, physical sciences, history and philosophy of science.
Program Updates:  


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Business in Action

Spring quarter
Faculty: Bill Bruner, Glenn Landram
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.

This program will serve as both an introduction to business for students with little or no knowledge of the topic and as an opportunity to connect theory and practice for those who have studied business in the past. The program will begin with intensive examinations of topics related to business strategy and business decisions. Then, all students will have an opportunity to put their business knowledge to the test in The Business Strategy Game, a remarkably realistic simulation involving the manufacture of athletic shoes for world markets. We will also consider several alternative views of American business and the U.S. economic system as presented in literature and film.
Whether you are an aspiring capitalist, a critic of corporate capitalism or just curious about what makes the economy run, this program might be for you. You can expect to gain knowledge of business terminology, a grasp of the fundamentals of business practices, experience with business strategy, appreciation for business economics and a sense of how businesses have been portrayed in American literature and film.
Credit awarded in: business, economics and literature.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in business, economics
and law.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates:

Program Update: (10/27/04) Glenn Landram has replaced Cynthia Kennedy and Virginia Darney in this program. (10/29/04) This description has been revised.


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Calculated Fiction

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall quarter
Faculty: Steven Hendricks, Brian Walter
Enrollment: 46
Class Standing: This is a Core program designed for first-year students.

"O Godiva, I could be bounded in a nympholepsy and count myself a kingfish of infinite spacemen". - Hamlet

Mathematical principles can provide the basis for creative writing, from the chance operations that generated the quote above to plot structures, themes, content, and even style. Author Italo Calvino views writing as a combinatorial game, an all but random process of associations, layers of implications that can lead to great works of literature as surely as nonsense. Calvino and others reveal that writing guided by abstract principles, particularly mathematical concepts and constraints, can lead to some of the most wondrous, original, and provocative work. Jorge Luis Borges's work provides numerous examples. In "The Aleph," the narrator attempts to describe a location from which all places can be seen simultaneously: "Mystics, faced with the same problem, fall back on symbols: to signify the godhead, one Persian speaks of a bird that somehow is all birds; Alanus De Insulis, of a sphere whose center is everywhere and circumference is nowhere; Ezekiel, of a four-faced angel, who at one and the same time moves east and west, north and south." Works like "The Aleph" not only reflect mathematical concepts in form, but also through themes and motifs that render those abstractions poetic and tangible.

Informed by the work of writers such as Borges and Calvino, we will construct fictional narratives that reflect or are governed by mathematical concepts. Workshops will introduce students to a wide range of mathematical principles and practices, guide students through creative and critical writing processes, and play with words and ideas to generate layered narratives, as rigorous in literary style and form as in mathematical precision and depth. Students will develop proficiency with computer-based graphic design applications in order to create visually complex and compelling finished works. Readings will introduce students to relevant historical and philosophical ideas, numerous examples of writing that fuse math and literature, and provocative mathematical concepts. Coursework will emphasize foundations and skill development in mathematics, creative writing, critical reading, argumentative writing, visual design, and literary theory.
Credit awarded in: mathematics, literature, creative writing and graphic design.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: future studies in mathematics, literature, creative writing and graphic design.

Program Updates: (4/19/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Changing Minds, Changing Course

Winter quarter
Faculty: Virginia Hill
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.

Rhetoric and propaganda are nearly as old as language itself, yet now the mass media and the Internet extend a communicator's persuasive reach still more deeply into the lives of others, magnifying and distorting that influence. This program examines a wide range of planned influence attempts, from cults and brainwashing to political campaigns and Internet advertising, asking how communications media in concert with persuasive messages re-form the social landscape. We will study the psychology of persuasion, as well as the ways in which various communications media encourage or inhibit particular forms of discourse. We will also discuss how telecommunications policy and media ownership might affect the persuasion process. To better understand the interplay of media and mind changing, students will learn production techniques in print, video and the Internet, and they will closely analyze propaganda campaigns.
Credit awarded in: persuasion and propaganda, mass media and society, public relations and campaign strategy.
All upper-division credit.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in communications, law, public relations and campaign
management.
Program Updates:  


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Chemistry for the Health Professions

New, not in printed catalog

Spring quarter
Faculty: Rebecca Sunderman
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 30 percent first-year students and 30 percent sophomores.

In this program, we will explore topics in organic chemistry and biochemistry with a focus on medical applications and examples. Additional topics that we will address include the history of medicine, bibliographic library research and abstract writing. We will also spend some time discussing the process of “getting in” to a professional school in the health field.

This program is designed for students who are contemplating careers in the health professions and have not yet taken Molecule to Organism. Credit awarded in introductory biochemistry introductory organic chemistry, bibliographic research in science, writing and history of medicine.

Credit awarded in:introductory biochemistry introductory organic chemistry, bibliographic research in science, writing and history of medicine.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: for careers and future studies in medicine, nursing, midwifery, dentistry, pharmacology, chemistry and teaching.

Program Updates: (01/20/05) New, not in printed catalog.


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Climate Change, Action and Influence

Cancelled
Please refer to the programs, Introduction to Environmental Chemistry and How People Learn as alternative selections.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Sharon Anthony, Sonja Wiedenhaupt
Enrollment:
46
Class Standing:
This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Special Expenses:
Approximately $125 for an overnight field trip during week three. Fee is due during the first week of class.

Is it really getting hotter? How do we make sense of what different people are saying about global warming? If we need to do something about it, how could we better use what we know about climate change to impact people’s behavior?

Through this program, we will analyze and interpret data to see what all the commotion is about. We will learn what factors scientists believe are responsible for climate change. For example, we will use chemistry both to understand how greenhouse gases influence the climate and to examine what our personal contributions are to the rise in greenhouse gas concentrations.

We will also examine the issue from a psychological perspective by looking closely at the types of images and information about climate change that are presented in the public domain, such as advertisements, newspaper and magazine articles. We will learn about tools of persuasion, and develop some theories about the psychological factors that make climate change such a contested issue.

Finally, we will work in teams to decide what we should do about climate change and then design effective and persuasive strategies for informing the public. Credit awarded in environmental science, psychology and writing. Total: 12 or 16 credits. Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in environmental studies, psychology and public policy.

Credit awarded in: environmental science, psychology and writing.

Total: 12 or 16 credits.

Program is preparatory: for careers and future studies in environmental studies, psychology and public policy.

Program Updates:

(12/26/05) Cancelled. Please refer to the programs, Introduction to Environmental Chemistry and How People Learn as alternative selections.


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Contemporary Issues

New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Zahid Shariff
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts 25 percent first-year students, 25 percent sophomores and offers appropriate support for those ready to do advanced work.

The purpose of this program is to focus on the significant developments that are currently unfolding and are likely to have major impacts. It will concentrate on the consequences of the policies that have been initiated, or are being considered, within the United States, as well as those that are that are likely to be triggered in response to them.

While the need for such a program always exists, it is perhaps even greater soon after a presidential election when the international scene is turbulent and the domestic agenda is ambitious. We will concentrate on the national issues of a topical nature. While we will meet regularly, the program will be driven mostly by students’ interests. While group projects are encouraged, students may also work independently. Some of the readings include: Niall Ferguson, Clossus: The Price of America’s Empire. New York: Penguin, 2004; Michael Scheur, Imperial Hubris. Washington, D.C.: Potomic Books, 2004; and recent publications on social security.

Credit awarded in: political science, history, sociology and post-colonial studies.

Total: 16 credits.

Program is preparation for: careers and future studies in law, public service, politics, non-profit organizations, political science, history, sociology and post-colonial studies.

Program Updates:

(01/26/05) New, not in printed catalog.

 


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Culture and Participatory Research

New, not in printed catalog
Fall quarter
Faculty: Carol J. Minugh
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Contact Carol J. Minugh at (360) 867-6025.
Special Expenses: Gas expenses to Maple Lane.

This program explores how cultures have been historically examined and provides opportunity for students to find new ways of learning about diverse people.

Topics to be covered include: The development of a model for examining cultures; colonialism and identity; humans used as objects of scientific research and personal gain; how defining a people from the outside takes away the power inherent in self-identity; and power structures of privilege. The program will also examine the power of identity as it relates to juvenile justice and how research can be changed from objectifying people into empowering people.

This class will meet once a week at Maple Lane School and confront the cultural and political struggles of incarceration. Students will be given an opportunity to utilize participatory research methods while providing cultural workshops. All students must pass the security check.

Credits awarded in: cultural studies and community studies.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, justice administration, community action and social work.

Program Updates: (4/29/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Colonialism, Indigenous Education and Native Art: The Historical Power to Define and Represent

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall quarter
Faculty: Frances V. Rains
Enrollment: 12
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.

This program will address the traditional systems of Indigenous education as well as the Colonizers efforts to use formal systems of education as a means of oppression. Seminars will focus on issues of Native and Colonial/U.S. history, geo-politics, Colonialism, Native sovereignty, assimilation and Native resistance. Missionary and military style boarding schools and their impact on Native Nations, their families and their children will be critically examined through historical analysis, historical artifacts and ethnographic interviews with Native students. Readings from a variety of sources as well as films of Australia, Canada and the United States will also examine how education and "schooling" became intertwined for Indigenous peoples, here and elsewhere.

Additionally, the history of Indigenous art, particularly from the Americas, will be explored. Looking backward and forward across time, critical analysis of the role that Colonialism has played in relation to Indigenous art will be explored. Various examples and a variety of mediums will be examined as a vehicle for critical reflection on what constitutes "Art" with a capital "A." Form, function, design elements and comparative artistic work will also be considered.

Learning will take place through readings, seminars, lectures, films, workshops and guest speakers. Students will improve their research skills through historical document review, observations and critical analysis. Students will also have opportunities to improve their writing skills through written assignments. Students may be required to meet weekly with a writing tutor to strengthen their writing skills. Oral speaking skills will be improved through seminar discussions and through small group and individual presentations. Options for the final project will be discussed in the syllabus and in class.

Credit awarded in: expressive arts, history, geography, political science, education and Native American studies.
Total: 8 or 16 credits. Students enrolled for 16 credits will complete an independent research project.

Program Updates: (9/10/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Community Food Systems in Cuba and Costa Rica

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Martha Rosemeyer, Martha Henderson (F)
Enrollment: 25
Faculty Signature: No new students.
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: Experience with agriculture or rural development is desirable. By the beginning of winter quarter, intermediate conversational Spanish is required. Enrollment in fall quarter does not guarantee enrollment in winter quarter. Winter quarter enrollment is contingent upon a successful study abroad application submitted during fall quarter.
Special Expenses: Approximately $3,400 for airfare, living expenses and transportation to Cuba and Costa Rica.
Internship Possibilities: With faculty approval if students remain in Costa Rica at the end of the program.
Travel Component: Seven weeks during winter quarter in Cuba and Costa Rica.

Community food systems have been used to describe an ideal food system in which there is local production and consumption that maximizes human and ecosystem health. Cuba stands out as the world leader in tropical sustainable agriculture and urban production-Havana is reported to produce some 90 percent of the vegetables consumed in the city. Costa Rica provides the contrasting situation where food for urban subsistence is mainly produced in rural areas. What can we learn from the Cuban and Costa Rican experience in community food systems that can be applicable here? How does community food security contribute to development?
After studying Latin American tropical agriculture, geography, development, Spanish and community food systems during fall quarter, winter quarter we will travel to Cuba and Costa Rica for seven weeks to explore their experiences with urban and organic agriculture. Students will carry on their own research projects in Costa Rica. We will return to Olympia to finish our research writing the last two weeks of the quarter. The spring quarter Farm to Table program will allow us to compare Latin American community food systems with those of Olympia, Washington.
Credit awarded in: topics in community food systems, urban agriculture, tropical cropping systems, Latin American geography and development.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in development, tropical sustainable agriculture and community food security.

Program Updates: (11/10/04) This program will not accept new students.


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Computability: The Scope and Limitations of Formal Systems

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Neal Nelson, Al Leisenring, Sheryl Shulman
Enrollment: 28
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Data to Information or equivalent, programming languages, data structures, architecture, discrete math. Some of these prerequisites may be waived for students with a strong mathematical background.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact Al Leisenring, (360) 867-6333 to discuss entrance into the four-credit connectionism component of the program. All other students interested in computing should contact Neal Nelson about enrolling in Data to Information. Neal Nelson, (360) 867-6738.

This program is designed for advanced computer science students or students with an interest in both mathematics and computer science. Topics in mathematics, such as mathematical logic and theory of computation, will be covered because they have strong connections to computer science. In addition, we will study the properties of algorithms, including analyzing what kinds of problems are intractable.
Students will study several programming languages representing different paradigms, including Prolog and C++. We will conclude the study of programming languages with an in-depth comparison of the properties and capabilities of languages in the four paradigms: functional, logic, imperative and object-oriented.
Students will also participate in a coordinated application or theory investigation that will vary from year to year, depending on student and faculty interests. We will select one of the following: formal language and its application in compiler writing; systems and OS programming; network protocols and their applications in providing network services; and selected math topics. Technical reading seminars will include current literature on selected topics such as type theory, programming language semantics, philosophy related to math and computer science, operating and distributed systems theory and database systems.
Credit will be awarded in: mathematical or symbolic logic, computer programming, formal language theory, theory of computability and other topics as covered during the year. Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 4 to 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006 - 07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in mathematics, computer science and teaching.
Program Updates:

(12/11/03) The faculty team has been replaced.
(5/11/04) The faculty, Neal Nelson, Al Leisenring and Sheryl Shulman, of Computability: The Scope and Limitations of Formal Systems and Data to Information have joined their efforts to collaboratively teach in both programs. The enrollment limit for each program has been reduced to 38 students. Each faculty will assume teaching responsibilities for both programs.
(9/7/04) The enrollment limit has been decreased to 28 students.
(11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.
(02/07/05) The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact Al Leisenring, (360) 867-6333 to discuss entrance into the four-credit connectionism component of the program. All other students interested in computing should contact Neal Nelson about enrolling in Data to Information. Neal Nelson, (360) 867-6738.


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Contemporary Social Issues: Analyzing Critically, Arguing Persuasively

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Stephanie Coontz, Dan Leahy, Charles Pailthorp
Enrollment: 72
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites: Qualified students should have experience in writing and background in sociology and political economy. Prior to the first class of winter quarter, new students must read and write a one page summary of the following four books: Silent Covenants by Derreck Bell; The Pecking Order by Dalton Conley; The Way We Were? by Richard Rothstein; and Down on Their Luck by Snow and Anderson.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Stephanie Coontz, (360) 867-6703 or Stephanie Coontz
Special Expenses: Approximately $30 each quarter for travel expenses.

This program will use sociological studies of controversial contemporary issues to aid students in analyzing and participating in current debates over social policy. Among the topics we may consider are such questions as the causes of poverty, what reforms are needed in the nation's schools, how we should evaluate and respond to contemporary trends in marriage, divorce and single parenthood, and what areas of personal life and interpersonal relations are properly subject to regulation. Students will read, outline and evaluate a variety of viewpoints on these issues during fall quarter, preparing themselves to research and debate selected topics during winter quarter.
This program stresses the development of critical tools of analysis, observation and argumentation, both written and oral. To hone those skills, we expect students to acquire and demonstrate competence in several different arenas, including: close textual analysis of authors' assumptions, arguments, and use of evidence; ethnographic observations in the public schools; use of graphs and statistics; expository writing; and oral argumentation.
Credit awarded in: sociology, expository writing, history, debate, ethnography, social psychology, civics, sociology of education and family studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in law, sociology, social psychology, public policy, education, political science and journalism.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates:

(3/11/04) Dan Leahy has joined this program. Enrollment has been increased.
(11/16/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. Qualified students should have experience in writing and background in sociology and political economy. Prior to the first class of winter quarter, new students must read and write a one page summary of the following four books: Silent Covenants by Derreck Bell; The Pecking Order by Dalton Conley; The Way We Were? by Richard Rothstein; and Down on Their Luck by Snow and Anderson.


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Creative Nonfiction: Reading and Writing the Literature of Reality

Cancelled
Please refer to the new program, Fiction and Nonfiction as an alternative.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Tom Foote, Evan Shopper
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Based on review of recent prose work; students must submit prose work to faculty by the Academic Fair, March 2, 2005. Send prose materials to Tom Foote, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA 98505. Qualified students will be accepted into the program until it fills.

Writers have come to realize that the genre of nonfiction writing can be as colorful and gripping as any piece of fiction. The difference is that nonfiction writers are not burdened with inventing characters, dialogue, plot and description as everything they write about actually happened. Creative nonfiction writers assemble the facts and events and array them artistically and stylistically, using the descriptive techniques of the fiction writer. They immerse themselves in a venue, set about gathering their facts while demonstrating scrupulous accuracy, and then write an account of what happened in their own voice. The Greyhound Bus Company advertised that "getting there is half the fun." In the genre of creative nonfiction, getting there is all the fun because the reader already knows how the piece ends before it begins. Students will become proficient with the form through intensive fieldwork, research and writing.

John McPhee said, "the piece of writing has a structure inside it. It begins, goes along and ends in a manner that is thought out beforehand." That being the case, all the writer has to do is find that architecture and the piece practically writes itself. The story and structure are already there, so the writer's task is to take the mallet and chisel and chip away the unnecessary marble encasing it to see the artistic form emerge.

This program combines field research and literary techniques. Students will conduct field research to learn to pay attention to detail, read and discuss representative examples of the form, and meet weekly in regularly scheduled writing workshop. Following a period of redrafting and corrections, students will present their final piece to the group in the last week of spring quarter. They will submit this polished piece for publication in a magazine or journal.

We will read and discuss creative nonfiction pieces written by noted authors such as Joseph Mitchell, John Krakauer, Susan Orlean, Hunter S. Thompson and Truman Capote.

Credit awarded in: reading creative nonfiction, writing creative nonfiction and fieldwork.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, creative writing and creative nonfiction writing.

Program Updates:

(5/3/04) New, not in printed catalog.
(10/28/04) Evan Shopper has joined this program. The enrollment limit has increased to 50 students
(12/02/04) Cancelled. Please refer to the new program, Fiction and Nonfiction as an alternative.


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Cultural Landscapes: Peoples, Places and Power

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Ted Whitesell, Therese Saliba (F W), Tony Zaragoza
Enrollment: 69 (FW), 46 (S)
Class Standing: This is a Core program designed for freshmen students.
Faculty Signature: This program will not accept new students for spring unless the student has strong foundational knowledge and preparation for spring quarter program activities. The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Ted Whitesell, (360) 867-6768.
Special Expenses: Potentially $75 a quarter for overnight field trips.

This program will introduce students to the foundations of cultural and environmental studies, with an emphasis on human geography, cultural practices and political struggles to preserve land and cultures in the face of colonization and globalization. Students will learn to read landscapes as primary sources of information about peoples, places and power relationships. We will read a variety of cultural texts, including literature, to understand peoples in terms of their relationships to their environments and the ways in which a people's sense of identity is influenced by their sense of place. We will look at threats to biological and cultural diversity, and examine their interconnectedness.
Our studies will focus on Brazil and the Middle East to explore the connection between native peoples, the land and resources and struggles for self-determination. We will examine the significance of land reform, socialism and other resistance movements as a means of maintaining cultural practices and identity in the face of colonialism, global capitalism, the globalization of culture and the politics of technology. Students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to environmental action and resistance movements, including feminist, radical and socialist.
There will be a number of field trips, emphasizing field observations of landscapes and cultures of the Pacific Northwest. Students will also engage in documenting local activism around cultural and environmental issues. Throughout the program, students will develop skills in field observation, creative and expository writing, interviewing and ethnography, literary analysis, the terminology and methodology of the natural and social sciences, and the use of maps.
Beginning the Journey is a 2-credit component of this 16-credit program. It will introduce students to the tools, practical skills and connections needed to do college-level work, and increase their likelihood for success, well-being and persistence at Evergreen. The planned activities will enhance students in four key areas: (1) academic skills, (2) support services awareness, (3) life skills, and (4) community connectedness. The program will begin Orientation Week, and continue through the first five weeks of the Fall Quarter, with follow-up weekly workshops in the four areas listed above. Students will be required to participate in selected Orientation Week activities and events, and attend all subsequent workshops and activities to earn the allotted 2 credits within the program. More information about Beginning the Journey.
Credit awarded in:
human and cultural geography, political economy, multicultural literature, environmental studies, writing, cultural studies, Middle East studies and Latin American studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in geography, cultural studies, international affairs, environmental conservation and education.
Program Updates: (3/11/04) Tony Zaragoza has joined this program.
(11/17/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.
(2/11/05) Therese Saliba has left the program for spring quarter. The Enrollment limit has been reduced. This program will not accept new students for spring unless the student has strong foundational knowledge and preparation for spring quarter program activities. The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Ted Whitesell, (360) 867-6768.


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Culture and Participatory Research

New, not in printed catalog
Fall quarter
Faculty: Carol J. Minugh
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Contact Carol J. Minugh at (360) 867-6025.
Special Expenses: Gas expenses to Maple Lane.

This program explores how cultures have been historically examined and provides opportunity for students to find new ways of learning about diverse people.

Topics to be covered include: The development of a model for examining cultures; colonialism and identity; humans used as objects of scientific research and personal gain; how defining a people from the outside takes away the power inherent in self-identity; and power structures of privilege. The program will also examine the power of identity as it relates to juvenile justice and how research can be changed from objectifying people into empowering people.

This class will meet once a week at Maple Lane School and confront the cultural and political struggles of incarceration. Students will be given an opportunity to utilize participatory research methods while providing cultural workshops. All students must pass the security check.

Credits awarded in: cultural studies and community studies.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, justice administration, community action and social work.

Program Updates: (4/29/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Data to Information: Computer Science and Mathematics

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Sheryl Shulman, Al Leisenring, Neal Nelson
Enrollment: 48
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: High school algebra proficiency assumed. Freshmen students with confidence in their ability to do high school algebra are encouraged to contact the faculty.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact Neal Nelson, (360) 867-6738 or nealn@evergreen.edu to discuss entrance to the program.
Special Expenses: Approximately $300 each quarter for supplies and unusually expensive textbooks.

This is an entry-level program in computing and mathematics with a strong emphasis on individual and collaborative problem solving. The goal of the program is to lay a firm foundation for more advanced work in computer science. This program covers standard material in a core computer science curriculum, concentrating on mathematical abstractions and fundamental algorithmic and data modeling concepts. There is an intense hands-on laboratory component where students develop their own logic, programming and design skills.
The primary focus is problem solving, and real-world problems often do not have clear-cut textbook solutions. Throughout the program students will learn to search out the necessary information and develop the necessary skills to effectively solve mathematical and technical problems.
The program is organized around four, year-long and interwoven themes: computational organization covering computing hardware and systems; introductory programming and data structures; various topics in discrete mathematics; and a seminar exploring social, historical or philosophical topics of science, technology and society.
Credit awarded in: digital logic, computer architecture, programming, data structures and algorithms, discrete mathematics and social and historical implications of technology. At most, four credits will be upper-division science.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005-06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in computer-related fields, science and mathematics.
Program Updates:

(12/11/03) The faculty team has been replaced.
(5/11/04) The faculty, Sheryl Shulman, Neal Nelson and Al Leisenring, of Data to Information and Computability: The Scope and Limitations of Formal Systems have joined their efforts to collaboratively teach in both programs. The enrollment limit for each program has been reduced to 38 students. Each faculty will assume teaching responsibilities for both programs.
(5/18/04) The faculty signature has been lifted for sophomore, juniors and seniors. First-year students with confidence in their ability to do high school algebra are encouraged to contact the faculty.
(9/7/04) The enrollment limit has been increased to 48 students.
(11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.


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Democracy and Free Speech

Spring quarter
Faculty: José Gómez
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.

May racists burn crosses to express their supremacist views? May protesters burn flags to express their opposition to government policy? The First Amendment is most vulnerable to erosion when we fail to protect expression that some or many may find "unpopular," "offensive," "repugnant," "indecent," "subversive," "unpatriotic," "heretical," "blasphemous," etc. This program will be a comprehensive and critical examination of the wide range of issues implicated by the protection and censorship of expression.
We will use the case method to study every major free speech opinion issued by the courts. This intensive study focuses on the last 75 years, since it was not until well into the 20th century that the U.S. Supreme Court began to protect speech from governmental suppression. Our study of controversies will include the new challenges presented by hate speech, government-subsidized art, political campaign spending and new technologies such as the Internet.
Students will be expected to examine critically the formalist free speech paradigms that have evolved and to question the metaphor of the continuing viability of the "free marketplace of ideas." Reading for the program will include court opinions, Internet resources and various books and journal articles that explore First Amendment theory and its application. Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real free-speech cases decided recently by the U.S. Court of Appeals and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions.
Credit awarded in: First Amendment Law: Free Speech, critical legal reasoning, legal research and writing and oral appellate advocacy.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social science, constitutional law, education, journalism, public policy, political theory, history and political science.
Program Updates:  


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Democracy and Religious Freedom

New, not in printed catalog

Winter quarter
Faculty: José Gómez
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.

The framers of the U.S. Constitution sought to ensure that the federal government neither promote religion nor interfere with religious liberty. The very first two clauses of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution capture the framers' concern: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." On parchment, those 16 words seem simple enough. In practice, however, the two clauses often are in tension and give rise to enduring controversy over the meaning of "establishment" and "free exercise." For example, if the government exempts church property from taxation, is it assisting the establishment of religion? If the government does not exempt church property from taxation, is it interfering in the free exercise of religion?

In the United States, controversies about what the religion clauses prohibit or protect intensified in the 1940s, when the United States Supreme Court first recognized that the First Amendment applied to the states, not just the federal government. The disputes have arisen over such disagreements as what "religion" means, whether the First Amendment only prohibits the government from preferring one religion over another but permits it to aid all religion if it does so nonpreferentially, whether the government may prohibit certain religious practices, whether government must accommodate religious beliefs, whether governmental measures taken to protect the health, safety and welfare of the community may override religious beliefs, whether some or all types of prayer or religious instruction are impermissible in the public schools, whether the government may use tax money to transport parochial school children, to buy their textbooks, to subsidize their teachers' salaries or to reimburse noninstructional health services provided by their religious schools.

We will use the case method to study every major court opinion that implicates the First Amendment's religion clauses. This intensive study necessarily focuses on the last 64 years, since it was not until the 1940 case of Cantwell v. Connecticut that the Supreme Court began to protect religious rights under the First Amendment.

In addition to court opinions, reading for the program will include Internet resources and various books and journal articles that explore the history and theory of religious liberty as a constitutional right. Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real freedom of religion cases decided recently by the U.S. Courts of Appeals and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions.

Credit awarded in: First Amendment Law: Freedom of Religion, critical legal reasoning, legal research and writing and oral advocacy.

Total: 16 credits.

Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in social science, constitutional law, education, public policy, political theory, history and political science.

Program Updates: (4/13/04) New, not in printed catalog. It is an alternative to the cancelled Religion, Race and Law in America program.


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Designing Languages

Spring quarter
Faculty: Susan Fiksdal, Judith Cushing
Enrollment: 46
Class Standing: This is a lower-division program designed for freshmen and sophomores.
Prerequisites: No previous expertise in mathematics, computing or linguistics is required.

Since the dawn of mathematics and philosophy, humans have studied the nature of language (linguistics) and used artificial languages as well as natural languages. Only relatively recently, however, have we begun to think of work in the sciences and mathematics as "language design," and to apply linguistic concepts to mathematical and scientific parlance. This program will investigate such questions as: What skills are we using when we learn our native language? How should we teach a second language? Is mathematics a language? When we are learning programming or biology, are we learning a new language? What principles from the study of natural language provide exemplars for designing the "artificial" languages of science and mathematics?
Students will learn more about both natural and artificial languages. We will study theories of natural language acquisition and examine the challenges of learning both natural and artificial languages and how the latter differs from the former. Another focus will be the structure and function of natural languages, for example, principles of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Students will learn to "speak" a computer language, Logo, and solve problems using that language. As part of an exploration of language design, students will be involved in a practicum, tutoring for two hours each week in a language they know, e.g., English, Spanish, ASL, math, or dance (!). We hope to work with students from a wide range of backgrounds who are interested in expanding their knowledge of all languages within a better understanding of natural language.
Credit awarded in: introduction to linguistics, introduction to programming and computer graphics, and programming languages and language acquisition.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is specifically preparatory for: careers and future studies in linguistics, languages, mathematics and computer science, but is appropriate for any student interested in learning more about language or science.
Program Updates: (2/16/05) This program has been changed from a Core offering to a lower-division program designed for freshmen and sophomores.

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Energy Systems

New, not in printed catalog

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: E.J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Prerequisites: New students should read the program Web pages:
http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/energy0405/home.htm.
Take the online survey and exam:
http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/energy0405/quizzes.htm. Commit to joining an existing team of classmates for winter quarter research.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact E. J. Zita, (360) 867-6853 or zita@evergreen.edu to discuss entrance to the program.
Preferred: calculus and a full year of college-level science.
Special Expenses: Textbooks and other materials will be high; small lab fee may be necessary.
Internship Possibilities: With faculty approval.

How is energy created or harvested, stored and transformed, used or abused? Energy Systems is a 2 to 3 quarter, intensive study of ways energy is produced and changed. This is a good program for students interested in physics or environmental science, integrated with mathematics. It starts with skill building and background study, and finishes with major research projects related to energy. Classes meet full-time fall and winter. Students may continue their research projects in spring.

Energy Systems is designed to study issues of energy generation and utilization in society and in the natural world. One goal is to give students an understanding of the issues involved in achieving a sustainable energy society. A primary goal is to show students the power and beauty of physics and mathematics. Another goal is to study interactions between the Earth and Sun, from an energy perspective. We will examine energy science and technology, and related topics such as energy policy and environmental concerns, including climate change and global warming.

We will focus on solar, electric, and nuclear power and examine alternative energy sources such as wind, geothermal, biofuels, etc. We will examine possibilities and requirements for a "Hydrogen economy". Modules will cover fundamentals in conventional and alternative energy generation with a focus on the underlying physics. Students will be expected to complete a component in calculus to be offered either as part of this program or in conjunction with another program. Students who are already fluent in calculus will be encouraged to continue developing their math skills by applying them to coursework or research projects.

In Science Seminar, we will explore scientific, social, political, and/or economic aspects of energy production and use, such as environmental concerns, the effects of the Sun on Earth's climate, or other topics. Students may be responsible for researching and presenting on a topic of interest in seminar.

Students will design and carry out a major research project on an approved topic of particular interest to the individual student. Students will articulate a research question, propose hypotheses, and investigate their question directly. Research projects will involve quantitative analysis as well as a hands-on component. This could include field work or designing a small-scale energy system, possibly with community applications.

Credit will be awarded in: physics, applied mathematics, environmental studies and research.

Total: 16 credits each quarter, with a required seminar component. Additional students are welcome to join our evening Science Seminar module for 4 or 8 credits (refer to Science Seminar CRN fall quarter: 10065 (8 credits) 10066 (4 credits); winter quarter: 20072 (8 credits) 20073 (4 credits); spring quarter: 30083 (8 credits) 30084 (4 credits).

This program is preparatory for: careers and future study in physics, engineering, natural science, applied mathematics and studies of energy and the environment.
Program Updates: (3/9/04) New, not in printed catalog
Students may take this program as an alternative to Physical Systems.
(11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.
(1/27/05) This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.

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English Romantics, The

New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Charles McCann
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior; transfer students welcome.

Students in this program will work together in an intensive exploration of English romantic literature. There will be extensive reading, discussion and writing of five major poets: Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley and Byron. Also, weekly seminars will discuss novels by Edgeworth, Austen, Scott, M. Shelley and Bronte, as well as two studies of economic and social history. Each seminar member will pursue independent reading in some aspect of the period's history, and write a paper to be presented at the end of the quarter.

Students will be evaluated on their seminar participation, demonstrating familiarity with the common readings; organization, clarity and breadth of reading in presentations and papers; and, the depth of their essays on the novels and the histories.

Before the first class meeting, students should read the first chapter of T.S. Ashton, The Industrial Revolution, 1760-1830 .

Credit awarded in: English poetry, fiction and history of the period 1790-1850.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities.

Program Updates:

(7/30/04) New, not in printed catalog.

 

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Environmental Analysis: Chemistry and Geology of Aqueous Ecosystems

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Jeff Kelly, Clyde Barlow, James Stroh
Enrollment: 45
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: One year of college chemistry and college algebra required; and trigonometry strongly recommended.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact Jeff Kelly, (360) 867-6053 or kellyj@evergreen.edu to discuss entrance to the program.
Special Expenses: Approximately $250 for one-week field trip to Sun Lakes in Eastern Washington.
Internship Possibilities: Under special circumstances with faculty approval.

Baseline assessment of natural ecosystems and their environmental contamination require accurate chemical and geological measurements. Students will study geology and chemistry of ecosystems, using theoretical and experimental methods. This program will integrate chemical and physical applications of geology to aquatic systems. Instrumental techniques of chemical analysis will be developed in an advanced laboratory and technical writing will be emphasized.
During fall and winter quarters, topics in physical geology, hydrology, geochemistry, analytical chemistry, GIS, statistics and instrumental methods of chemical analysis will be addressed. Students will begin group projects working on the physical and chemical properties of natural water systems, especially lakes, bogs and streams. Methods and procedures based on EPA guidelines will be developed to analyze for trace materials using atomic absorption spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy, polarography, ion chromatography and GC-mass spectrometry. Computers and statistical methods will be used extensively for data analysis and simulation as well as for work on GIS.
Spring quarter will be devoted largely to project work and completing studies of statistics and analytical chemistry. Presentation of project results in both oral and written form will conclude the year.
Credit awarded in: geochemistry*, geohydrology*, analytical chemistry*, Geographic Information Systems*, statistics*, chemical instrumentation* and group projects*. Students leaving at the end of fall quarter will receive lower-division credit. Students who satisfactorily complete at least fall and winter quarters will receive upper-division credit for both quarters.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in geology, hydrology, chemistry, environmental analysis and environmental fieldwork.
This program is also listed under Scientific Inquiry.
Program Updates: (11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to the program.
(1/27/05) This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.


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Environmental Economics and Natural Resource Policy

Spring quarter
Faculty: Ralph Murphy
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: One quarter of micro-economics is strongly recommended.

This program surveys the applications of environmental economics to a variety of environmental problems including natural resource allocation; management and stewardship; pollution control and abatement; public policy analysis; selected aspects of environmental law; and market failure theory and practice. Specific case studies will provide opportunities to develop in-depth understandings and applications of environmental economic theory. Possible case studies include wetland protection and mitigation, restoration of Pacific salmon stocks in the Pacific Northwest, forest management issues, water resource allocation/reform, the economic context and cultural identity of natural resource dependent communities and regulatory reform theory and practice. Field trips will offer practical application and demonstrations of the work we do in class. Research projects will allow students to explore topics of interest from the perspective of selected environmental economic concepts. The program will conclude with a critical evaluation of the opportunities and limitations of environmental economics in environmental problem solving.
Credit awarded in: microeconomics, environmental economics, environmental policy and environmental law.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, public policy analysis, public sector regulatory agencies, non-governmental organizations, advocacy groups, the private sector and consulting companies.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:  


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Ethnic Food Systems of the Pacific Northwest

New, not in printed catalog
Winter quarter
Faculty: Martha Henderson
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore, transfer students welcome.
Special Expenses: $150 for daylong field trips.

Food systems is a growing body of knowledge that integrates food security within regional contexts, population studies, ecological agricultural, marketing and local to global sustainability. This program will focus on ethnic population groups in the Pacific Northwest across all aspects of food security, marketing, and sustainability. We will investigate population changes in the Pacific Northwest over the last fifty years, measure the rate of immigration into the region, and how these populations are securing, marketing and sustaining their communities with respect to food. The program is product oriented. We will work in teams to produce products such as a web site, regional shopping guide, maps and a resource guide for ethnic populations and others interested in local food systems. Our region of concern will be primarily western Washington and Oregon with an expanded view of the Yakima Valley and Central Oregon. The program will include guest speakers, workshops, field trips and seminar.

Credit awarded in: ethnic studies, cultural geography, regional geography and research methods.

Total: 16 credits.

Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in food systems, geography, planning and community development.

Program Updates: (11/10/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Last Updated: May 11, 2011


The Evergreen State College

2700 Evergreen Parkway NW

Olympia, Washington 98505

(360) 867-6000