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2004-2005 Catalog

Undergraduate Studies 2004-05

Programs for Freshmen

Culture, Text and Language

Environmental Studies

Expressive Arts

Native American and World Indigenous Peoples' Studies

Scientific Inquiry

Society, Politics, Behavior and Change

Tacoma Campus Program

Evening and Weekend Studies

Evening and Weekend Class Listing

Summer Studies

Summer 2005 Class Listing

Graduate Studies

Graduate Electives

Master of Environmental Studies

Master of Public Administration

Master in Teaching

 

 


 
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Latin America in a Global Free Market

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Jorge Gilbert
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: New students who are interested in traveling to Chile during spring quarter are welcome. The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program during the first week of class. New students should contact Jorge Gilbert, (360) 867-6740 for more information.
Special Expenses: Approximately $15 for program materials and $2,850 for optional spring quarter trip to Chile. A non-refundable deposit of $150 must be paid by February 15, 2005.
Travel Component: Optional four weeks in Chile.

Rich and industrialized nations from the North assert that the new world order is bringing democracy, progress and welfare to many nations in the "global village." Many world events in the 21st century seem to indicate that the new global model is forming a deep crisis and confrontation between North and South. Terrorism, drug production and trafficking, massive illegal immigration, regional conflicts and deep environmental damage seem to be some of the main components of the crisis. This situation generates many concerns among nations from the South, whose attempts to overcome poverty and underdevelopment are challenged.
We will study the effects of international transformations on Latin America since the Cuban Revolution and President Kennedy's Alliance for Progress Program up to the current neoliberal economic and political order. We will also study different Latin American sociopolitical and economic formations and their impact on the regional economic development. The insertion of Latin America into the new world economy will be analyzed. Comparative analyses of regional and international trade agreements and negotiations will be made to observe their effects on eradication of poverty, human rights issues, ecological concerns, unemployment and preservation of democracy.
We will research the economies of Mexico, Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Chile and the United States. Spring quarter, interested students will have the option to travel to Chile to study, in depth, one of the economic models most praised by international agencies and governments.
Students will complete research projects and produce short documentaries.
Credit awarded in: political economy, international trade, social communication, research methods, television production, sociology and economics.
Total: 12 (plus 4-credit beginning/intermediate Spanish through Evening & Weekend Studies) or 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences, Latin American, cultural or media studies and television production.
Program Updates:

(12/07/04) New students who are interested in traveling to Chile during spring quarter are welcome. The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program during the first week of class.
12/07/04) The faculty signature has been removed.

 


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Light and Terror: France in the Age of Voltaire and Robespierre

Cancelled
Fall quarter
Faculty: Stacey Davis
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.

This program will probe the links between the European Enlightenment and the French Revolution. We will start with a study of ancien régime French society beginning with the reign of Louis XIV, then we will turn to critiques of the monarchy and its nobles during the Enlightenment. Finally, we will explore the French Revolution from its origins with the fall of the Bastille through the violent days of the Terror and the rise of the powerful Napoleonic Empire. Throughout, our main question will be: To what extent did the political theory, philosophy and literature of Voltaire, Rousseau and their more humble "grub street" imitators influence the course of the Revolution?
To aid our inquiries, we will read literature of all stripes, from the lofty Persian Letters by Montesquieu to the sexual intrigue of Laclos' Dangerous Liaisons to the frankly bawdy popular pamphlets satirizing the life of Marie-Antoinette. We will study the political theory of Rousseau, Voltaire and Montesquieu. We will examine the fine arts, including paintings from Watteau to David, as well as architecture and decorative style. Finally, we will cement our studies with a variety of historical texts, both secondary works and primary sources, which will allow us to uncover the lives and passions of common folk throughout this tumultuous time. Although France will be our primary focus, we will also look at related European trends, from the Scottish Enlightenment to Kantian philosophy to the British reaction to the French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars.
Students will work both with primary source material and secondary scholarly essays. They will complete intensive writing assignments, lead seminars, and give oral presentations.
Credit awarded in: European history, political philosophy, literature and art history. Upper-division Credit awarded: for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in history, literature, art history, philosophy and cultural studies.
Program Updates: (1/21/04) Cancelled
As alternatives, refer to Renaissance Studies: Literature and Identity and Student Originated Studies: Humanites


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Local Knowledge: Community, Media Activism, Public Health and the Environment

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Anne Fischel, Lin Nelson
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: See faculty at the Academic Fair, May 12, 2004. For more information contact Anne Fischel, (360) 867-6416, or Lin Nelson, (360) 867-6056. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 or more for research, local travel and media production expenses.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter with faculty approval.

Local Knowledge is a program in community-based work using video, oral history, participatory research and other forms of activist learning. It is offered every few years, and builds on work and relationships that faculty, students, staff and community members have developed. Our goal is to develop strategies for collaborating with local communities as they respond to change and crisis. We will learn how to research and analyze locally held knowledge and resources, support community initiatives and implement projects for sustainable community development.
In the fall, we will explore regional and national case studies, popular education, community-based research and environmental, public health and social justice issues. We will examine community projects creating economic, cultural and ecological sustainability. We will familiarize ourselves with community resources, visit archives, observe projects and develop relationships with community members. We will learn skills in video, media literacy, historical research, oral history and use of government documents. Through these studies we will build a base for collaborative community work.
In winter quarter, we will deepen skills in video production, oral history, research and community education and organizing. We will plan projects to implement in spring quarter. In spring, we will work on community-based, collaborative projects that put in practice the skills, knowledge and relationships we developed. The focus of our projects might include education, social justice, media, environment, public health, public art, food systems or public policy.
Credits awarded in environmental and labor studies, history, media analysis and media production.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in community development, public policy, media, and nonprofit and social justice organizations.
This program is also listed under Expressive Arts.
Program Updates: (1/27/05) This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.


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Marching

New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Dan Leahy
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program will accept up to 25 percent freshmen; 25 percent sophomores and 50 percent sophomore or above.

People in the United States are continually marching. We march to prepare for war, to ask for peace, to show our pride, to demand our rights. We march on Washington, D.C. and we march to Miami. There’s the Million Man March, the Million Worker March and the March for Women’s Lives. Jesse Jackson has said that marching educates, marching galvanizes, marching builds confidence, marching expresses the will to fight and marching builds coalitions. We are going to explore the phenomenon of marching by examining the act of marching, as well as the purposes, strategies and tactics of historically famous marches in U.S. history. We’ll also talk with march organizers and drill sergeants and simulate our own marches.
Credit awarded in U.S. history, social movement theory and practice and organizational development.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in teaching, organizing, peace and war.
This program is also listed under First-Year Programs and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates: (10/20/04) New, not in printed catalog


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Marine Life: Marine Organisms and Their Environments

Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Erik V. Thuesen, Stephen Norton
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Two quarters of college chemistry with labs; two quarters of biological sciences with labs; and college-level algebra.
Faculty Signature:This program will not accept new students for spring quarter. For information, contact Erik Thuesen, (360) 867-6584.
Special Expenses: Up to $150 per quarter for overnight field trips.

Marine Life focuses on marine organisms, the sea as a habitat, relationships between the organisms and the physical/chemical properties of their environments, and their adaptations to those environments. Students will study marine organisms, elements of biological, chemical and physical oceanography field sampling methods with associated statistics and laboratory techniques. Throughout the program, students will focus on the identification of marine organisms and aspects of the ecology of selected species. Physiological adaptations to diverse marine environments and comparative anatomy will also be emphasized. The class will study physical features of marine waters, nutrients, biological productivity and regional topics in marine science. Concepts will be applied via faculty-designed experiments and student-designed research projects. Data analysis will be facilitated through the use of Excel spreadsheets and elementary statistics. Seminars will analyze primary literature on topics from lectures and research projects.
The faculty will facilitate identification of student research projects, which may range from studies of trace metals in local organisms and sediments to ecological investigations of local estuarine animals. Students will design their research projects during winter quarter and write a research proposal that will undergo class-wide peer review. The research projects will then be carried out during spring quarter. The scientific process is completed when results of the research projects are documented in written papers and students give oral presentations during the last week of spring quarter.
Credit awarded in: biological oceanography, marine biology, invertebrate zoology, marine science laboratory and marine science research. Although circumstances may change, we anticipate that all credit will be designated upper-division science for those students completing both quarters of the program.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006-07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in marine science, environmental science and other life sciences.
Program Updates: (5/27/04) Stephen Norton (Biology) has joined this program.
(1/27/05) this program will not accept new students for spring quarter.  A faculty signature has been added.


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Marxist Theory

Spring quarter
Faculty: Larry Mosqueda
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Equivalent of Political Economy and Social Change program or one year of political science, sociology
or history.
Faculty Signature: Faculty will assess students' ability to write at the college-level. Students should submit a past social science research paper and set up an interview appointment in February, 2005, to receive priority. Dr. Mosqueda will notify students of acceptance before the Academic Fair, March 2, 2005. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

I am not a Marxist -Karl Marx
Sit down and read. Educate yourself for the coming conflicts -Mary Harris (Mother) Jones
If one believes the current mass media, one would believe that Marxism is dead, and that the "end of history" is upon us. As Mark Twain is reported to have said upon news account of his demise, "The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated." The same, of course, is true for Marxist Theory.
Few Americans have read more than The Communist Manifesto, if that. Very few "educated" people have a clear understanding of Marx's concept of alienation, dialectics, historical materialism, or his analysis of labor or revolutionary change.
In this program, we will examine the development of Marx's thought and Marxist Theory. We will read and discuss some of Marx's early and later writings as well as writings of Lenin and others. We will also explore concrete examples of how "dialectics" and "materialism" can be applied to race and gender issues. At the end of the program students should have a solid foundation for further study of Marxist analysis.
Credit awarded in: Marxist Theory* and theories of social and political change*.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in political science, political theory and history.
Program Updates:  


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Masculinities and Femininities Across the Globe: Sex Is Fun, but Gender Is a Drag

Spring quarter
Faculty: Toska Olson
Enrollment: 23
Class Standing:This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent first-year students. Transfer students are welcome.
Special Expenses: Approximately $20 for program retreat.
Internship Possibilities: With faculty approval.

This program is a cross-cultural exploration of gender, masculinity, and femininity. We will examine questions such as: How do expectations of masculine and feminine behavior manifest themselves worldwide in social institutions like work, families, schools, and the media? How do social theorists explain the current state of gender stratification? How does gender intersect with issues of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and social class identity?

During the majority of the quarter, we will study cross-cultural variation in women’s and men’s experiences and opportunities within several different social institutions. Lectures and seminar readings will provide students with a common set of knowledge about gendered experiences in the United States. Peer research presentations will provide students with information about gender in cultures other than your own.

This program involves extensive student-initiated research, and puts a heavy emphasis on public speaking and group work. Students will learn how to conduct cross-cultural archival research on gender and they will be encouraged to produce a research paper that represents their best college writing and thinking abilities.

Credit awarded in: areas such as sociology, cultural studies, anthropology, public speaking and library research.  Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 12 or 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates: (1/27/05) The program content has changed. The title has been revised to reflect the program content.


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Mathematical Origins of Life

Spring quarter
Faculty: David McAvity
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: College-level algebra is required.

What are the origins of life? The human race has been pondering this question since the dawn of civilization. The question and answer are multifaceted and have religious, philosophical and scientific implications. The diversity and complexity of life that inhabits the Earth would seem to require that the answer be a complex one, yet recent developments in science indicate that complex order can and does emerge from random processes and simple rules. In this program, we will investigate the mathematical basis of the origins of life. First, it will be important to understand how ordered structures can emerge from random process. We will examine the self-organising behavior of inorganic matter occurring in chemical oscillations and other reaction diffusion processes. We will also study cellular automata and how they model self-replicating structures. An essential component of understanding the origins of life is to understand its evolution. We will examine the mathematical aspects of evolution including the evolution of macro-molecules and the genetic code, the game theoretic modeling of animal behavior and the dynamics of population genetics.
In this interdisciplinary program, students must have an interest in pursuing connections between biology and mathematics. No previous background in biology is required, but the program will be enriched by the presence of students with such a background. The program will consist of lectures, workshops, computer modeling labs and seminars. Students will be expected to complete an independent project with the aim of creating mathematical models of biological processes.
Credit awarded in: mathematical biology*, computer modelling* and philosophies of life.
Total: 8 or 12 credits. Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in mathematics and biology.
Program Updates: (7/06/04) Methods of Applied Mathematics option for 16 credits will not be offered.
(2/13/04) This program has changed from a sophomore or above to a junior or senior class standing. David will enroll qualified sophomores.


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Matter and Motion

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Rob Knapp, Laura Michelsen
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore, transfer
students welcome.
Prerequisites: Strong critical thinking skills; proficiency in pre-calculus and trigonometry (extremely important); willingness to sustain heavy academic workload. High school physics and chemistry helpful but not required.

This program is designed for students with a keen desire for a strong background in physics, chemistry and mathematics of the kind needed for serious work in the physical and biological sciences. The program's work will include lectures, readings (both technical and general), calculations, labs, reports and seminar discussion.
We will cover standard introductory topics in differential and integral calculus, university physics and university chemistry. We will attend to conceptual understanding as well as calculational skill and practice in framing and solving problems. In addition to work in the science subjects, the program will involve structured and exploratory laboratories, which will teach standard scientific techniques as well as successful ways of defining questions and pursuing understanding of unfamiliar physical systems.
Seminar readings and discussions will investi-gate the human dimensions of discovery and cultural patterns within the physical sciences, together with the abilities and limitations of scientific contributions to human affairs. Readings may be from classics in history/philosophy of science, literature, journal articles or other sources.
Detailed information about texts, schedules and arrangements will be available after May 15, 2004 on the program Web page: http://192.211.16.13/curricular/mandm2002/home.htm.
Credit awarded in: general chemistry, university physics, calculus and history, philosophy and cultural studies of science.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program will probably be available in 2005-06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in medicine, engineering, physics, mathematics, chemistry, environmental science and philosophy of science.
Program Updates: (4/19/04) Rebecca Sunderman has left this program
(6/01/04) Laura Michelsen (Inorganic Chemistry) has joined this program


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Mediaworks: Experiments with Movement, Light and Sound

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Ruth Hayes (F), Laurie Meeker (WS), Julia Zay (FWS)
Enrollment: 40
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: Core or interdisciplinary studies program. Transfer students must complete at least one quarter of interdisciplinary studies.
Faculty Signature: This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.
Special Expenses: Approximately $200 - $300 each quarter for production supplies.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter with faculty approval.

What does it mean to make moving images in the information age? How do we critically engage the traditions of moving image practices while pushing beyond established forms? What responsibilities do filmmakers have to their subjects and audiences? In this foundation program, students will engage with these questions and gain skills in film/video history, theory, critical analysis and media production.
We will explore a variety of filmic modes and communication strategies including animation, documentary and experimental film/video, emphasizing the materiality and specific artistic properties of film, digital video and other sound and moving image media, as well as the various strategies artists and media producers have employed to challenge traditional or mainstream media forms.
In fall and winter quarters, students will acquire specific critical and technical skills as they work collaboratively to explore different ways to design moving image works, execute experiments in image-making and sound, and evaluate films and video tapes. Students will read significant amounts of media criticism and film theory and will learn to analyze visual material and the politics of representation through seminars, research and critical writing. They will link this theoretical material to their production practices as they develop skills in drawing, animation, cinematography, digital video, audio and a variety of post-production techniques. Artist statements and project proposals will be developed in preparation for the production of individual or collaborative projects in the spring.
Credits awarded in: film theory and criticism, animation, cinematography, digital video production, audio production, documentary history and theory, experimental film/video history and independent projects in film and video.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in media, visual art and communication.
Mediaworks 2004-05 Program Page
Program Updates: (4/5/04) Julia Zay has joined this program.
(02/16/05) This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.


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Memory of Fire: Spain and Latin America

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Nancy Allen, Alice Nelson, David Phillips (FW), Ethan Rogol (W), Steve Blakeslee (W)
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Some study of history or literature.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student Spanish language skills to join the program. For information contact Alice Nelson, (360) 867-6629.
Special Expenses: Approximately $3,500 for optional spring quarter trip to Spain or Latin America.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter only.
Travel Component: Optional travel to Granada, Spain, and Santo Tom's, Nicaragua.

Memory of Fire, the title of Eduardo Galeano's historical/fictional trilogy on Latin America, captures the human need to create memories of the past in order to understand the present. The image of fire embodies the violent relations among ethnic and religious groups on the Spanish peninsula that led to the violence of the Conquest: fires of the Inquisition, fires of imperialism. Yet, the image of fire also embodies the brilliant enduring spirit of the convivencia among Muslims, Jews and Christians, which preceded the violence, and the creative religious fervor of a 16th-century Spanish mystic like Santa Teresa de Jesús. This image also conveys the ingenious spark of Latin American resistance in Guamán Poma's drawings, representative of many such actions by indigenous and mestizo people in the Americas past and present. The convivencia and resistance are works of the imagination.
In this program, students will engage in an intensive study of the Spanish language as well as study the literature remembered, imagined and recorded by Spaniards and Latin Americans in historical context. We will critically analyze selected literary texts from medieval times to the present. Every week will include seminars on readings in English translation, Spanish language classes, a lecture delivered in Spanish and a film in Spanish. Spring quarter will offer opportunities to study abroad in Santo Tomás, Nicaragua, or Granada, Spain, as well as internships with local Latino organizations for those who stay on campus. All classes during the spring will be conducted in Spanish.
Credit awarded in: Spanish, history and literature of medieval Spain, history and literature of colonial Spanish America, contemporary Latin American literature and culture, research, writing and additional equivalencies depending on students' projects completed during spring quarter.
Total: 16 credits fall and winter quarter; 8, 12 or 16 credits spring quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006-07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in languages, history, literature, writing and international studies.

Program Updates:

(7/19/04) David Phillips has joined this program. He will provide Spanish language support in the program.
(11/15/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. New students must have Spanish language skills commensurate with one of the three ongoing language levels in the program.
(12/14/04) Ethan Rogol has joined the program to provide Spanish language support.
(12/17/04) Steve Blakeslee has joined the program


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Methods of Applied Mathematics

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David McAvity
Enrollment: 25
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact David McAvity, (360) 867-5490 to discuss entrance to the program.
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Prerequisites: One year of college-level calculus and proficiency with the material covered in fall and winter quarters.

One of the goals of scientific inquiry is to understand the processes of nature on a quantitative basis. In pursuit of this goal, theorists create models to represent the order they observe, and, in turn, devise mathematical methods for interpreting and solving these models. This program will provide a thorough yet engaging introduction to such mathematical methods and the associated techniques of model building. Differential equations, ordinary, partial and non-linear, will be an important component of the program. We will study both the derivation of these equations from physical and biological models and their solution, using analytical, numerical and computational methods.
In addition, we will study linear algebra and its various applications in physics and economics. We will study the calculus of variations with applications to finding optimal curves and surfaces. We will also consider non-linear systems and their role in cyclical, chaotic and self-organising behavior. Spring quarter we will focus on continuous and discrete mathematical methods in biology-exploring models of population dynamics, competition, evolution and the origins of life. In addition to the theoretical work, we will also discuss questions of a more philosophical and historical nature: Is mathematics discovered or created? Can mathematical models represent reality? What are the historical and cultural origins of our mathematical models?
Students will attend lectures, seminars and computer labs. They will also be expected to give presentations each quarter.
Credit awarded in: ordinary differential equations*, partial differential equations*, calculus of variations*, linear algebra, numerical methods*, nonlinear systems*, mathematical biology*, computer modeling* and history and philosophy of mathematics. Up to 44 credits of upper-division science credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits fall quarter; 12 or 16 credits winter quarter; 8 or 12 or 16 credits spring quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006 - 07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, engineering and economics.
Program Updates: (11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.


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Molecule to Corporation

Fall quarter
Faculty: Andrew Brabban
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: One year of general biology and general chemistry.
Faculty Signature: Students will be assessed on their science background, particularly biology lab experience, skills and scientific writing ability. For more information and to discuss qualifications, contact Andrew Brabban, (360) 867-6157. Students will be accepted until the program fills.


Over the centuries, human society has surged forward during times of great innovation that we have termed "revolutions," specifically the agricultural, industrial and chemical revolutions. Today, we are in a time that people in the future will call the technological revolution, comprising biotechnology and computers. As active participants in the biotechnology revolution, we need to prepare ourselves with the tools of the future.
In this program, we will focus on the practical applications of modern molecular biology and biochemistry. Based predominantly in the lab, students will learn the theoretical principles and gain extensive hands-on experience using all of the relevant techniques needed to work in this technically and intellectually challenging field. Within the program we will also examine many sectors of the global biotechnology industry, and examine the science, ethical issues and financing involved with each industry. Student presentations will be a significant portion of the class, such as an analysis of a U.S. biotech corporation, including research and development, corporate finance, stock market position, patents, sales, market share, new technologies and outlook. Seminar readings will be primary literature in the field of biotechnology.
It is expected that many incoming students will have taken Molecule to Organism and, although this is not a prerequisite, those who have not will need to make an extra effort to learn the basic techniques used in working with micro-organisms.
Students will be evaluated based on their laboratory techniques, lab reports, class presentations, examinations and homework assignments.
Credit awarded in: molecular methods*, protein biochemistry* and biotechnology*.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in biotechnology, biology, chemistry and health sciences.
Program Updates: (2/13/04) Signature requirement added.


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Molecule to Organism

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Donald Morisato, Jim Neitzel, Lydia McKinstry
Enrollment: 75
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:

Students must be proficient in two quarters of college-level organic chemistry, biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology.
Faculty Signature:The faculty will consider exceptions on a case by case basis. For information, contact Donald Morisato, (360) 867-6026.
Internship Possibilities: Spring quarter with faculty approval.

This program explores the composition of organisms to gain insight into how they function. It's intended for students who plan to continue studies in chemistry, laboratory biology, field biology and the medical sciences. This program will include organic chemistry and upper-division work in biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology and physiology in a yearlong sequence.
Molecule to Organism integrates two themes: one at the "organismal" level and one at the "molecular" level. In the organismal theme, we will start with cell and molecular biology and proceed to studying whole organisms. We will examine structure and function relationships at all levels, including some anatomy and physiology.
In the molecular theme, we will examine organic chemistry, the nature of organic compounds, and reactions that carry this theme into biochemistry and the fundamental chemical reactions of living systems. As the year progresses, the two themes will merge through studying the cellular, molecular and biochemical processes in physiology and neurobiology.
Most aspects of this program will contain a significant laboratory component. Students will write papers and maintain a laboratory notebook. All laboratory work and approximately one half of the non-lecture time will be spent working in collaborative problem-solving groups. The program will also contain reading and discussions of topics of current and historical scientific interest and controversy. Spring quarter will allow more flexibility for students who wish to take part of this program in conjunction with other work.
Credit awarded in: organic chemistry*, biochemistry*, molecular biology*, cellular biology* and physiology*. Up to 42 upper-division science credits.
Total: 6, 10 or 16 credits fall and winter quarters; 4, 8, 12 or 16 credits spring quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005-06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in biology, chemistry, health/medical sciences, environmental sciences and teaching.

Program Updates:

(12/2/03) Lydia McKinstry has been added to this program. Lydia has a Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry. Stu Matz will leave the program after winter quarter.
(4/5/04) Donald Morisato has joined this program.
(9/10/04) Stu Matz has left the program.
(11/11/04) This program will not accept new students.
(1/27/05) this program will not accept new students for spring quarter except under exceptional circumstances.


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Multicultural Counseling: An Innovative Model

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Heesoon Jun
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Senior.
Prerequisites: At least one quarter at Evergreen with 95% attendance in programs covering general principles in
psychology, human biology, research methods and statistics as well as issues of diversity and inclusiveness.
Faculty Signature: No new students.
Internship Possibilities: 15 hours per week required during winter and spring quarters will provide opportunities for students to apply their classroom learning in a practical setting.

One of the program goals will be to increase the multicultural counseling competency through a non-hierarchical and non-dichotomous approach to education. The program will allow students to examine the efficacy of existing psychological paradigms and techniques for a diverse population. Students will learn to interpret research articles and to incorporate research findings into their counseling practice. Students will work with ethics, psychological counseling theories, multicultural counseling theories and psychopathology. We will use a range of instructional strategies such as lectures, workshops, films, seminars, role-playing, group discussions, videotaping, field trips, guest lectures and internship case studies.
Credit awarded in: psychological counseling, multicultural counseling theory and skill building, abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, personality theories, psychological research interpretation, studies of oppression and power, ethics in the helping professions, and internship.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in psychological counseling, clinical psychology, social work, school counseling, cross-cultural studies, research psychology, allopathic and complementary medicine, and class, race, gender and ethnicity studies.
Program Updates: (11/11/04) This program will not accept new students.


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Nature/Image

Spring quarter
Faculty: Susan Aurand
Enrollment: 23
Class Standing: This is a lower-division program designed for freshmen and sophomores.
Special Expenses: Approximately $150-$200 for art supplies.

This program will focus on building skills at making images from our experiences of, and thoughts about, nature. Students will learn studio art skills in drawing, painting and other 2-D media, the natural history skills of observation and recording using a nature journal, and basic skills in scientific illustration. Over the course of the program, each student will build a body of images that investigates and responds to a particular aspect of nature; for example, a particular species, habitat or phenomenon.
Each student will complete a research project on his/her selected topic. Together, we will study how artists, writers and scientists have thought about and depicted nature in various times and cultures, how our own culture represents nature now, and the politics of those representations. This study will inform our own work as observers in nature and as artists and writers responding to nature.
Program activities will include lectures, seminars and group time, studio workshops, writing workshops and individual conferences. All students will complete weekly writing assignments, readings, a research project, a nature journal and a body of work on an aspect of nature of their choice.
Credit awarded in: 2-D studio art, art history, natural history, humanities and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, art history, humanities, writing and ecology.

Program Updates: (2/16/05) This program has been changed from a Core offering to a lower-division program designed for freshmen and sophomores.


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Negotiating Cultural Landscapes: Money, Music, Citizens and Stories

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Toska Olson, Andrew Buchman, Jan Kido
Enrollment: 69
Class Standing: This is a Core program designed for freshmen students.
Prerequisites: New students should have completed one quarter of college-level work previously, but not more than five quarters.  New students will be expected to have read chapters 1-3 and 4.1 in Statistical Reasoning by Bennett et al.; chapters 1-4 in Sociology by Newman (5th edition); chapters 1-6 in Culture and Social Behavior by Triandis; chapters 1-4 in Soundscapes by Shelemay (and accompanying CD selections); sections 1-13 in The Everyday Writer by Lunsford; and all of the novel The Color Purple by Alice Walker before the first day of winter quarter.  Most texts are available now at the college bookstore.  Buy a copy of Walker at any bookstore (used copies are fine).  New students should bring completed answers to the odd-numbered homework assignments from Bennett and a writing sample (preferably a research paper) to the first class meeting.
Faculty Signature: No. For more information, contact Andrew Buchman, (360) 867-6391.
Special Expenses: $100 per quarter for workshop supplies, event tickets and retreat expenses.

How do we imagine and understand American culture? As a melting pot, a gorgeous mosaic, a patchwork quilt, a salad mix, a dominant, "mainstream" culture with subsidiary streams or a loose union of rugged individuals? What are the strengths and limits of each of these metaphors? We live in a dynamic era of almost instantly accessible mass media, global networks, rapidly changing technologies and many uncertainties about the future. How do we negotiate this landscape? Should we construct and maintain a unique identity in a culturally diverse world? How do we uphold our ethical duties in a world of divergent experiences and opportunities?
We will examine these and other questions in an attempt to understand our culture through our experience as producers and consumers, our social structures and institutions, our music, and the stories we tell in person, in print and in the media.
Students will participate in a series of skill-building workshops related to writing, quantitative methods, computer skills, music literacy and storytelling.
During fall quarter, we will develop theo-retical perspectives derived from musicology, sociology, economics and communication, with an emphasis on understanding individual behavior. In doing this, we will be interested in concerns about fairness and justice in social interaction and social organization. During winter quarter, we will apply these theoretical models to issues related to race, ethnicity, gender and social class, and our focus will be on groups within society.
Beginning the Journey is a 2-credit component of this 16-credit program. It will introduce students to the tools, practical skills and connections needed to do college-level work, and increase their likelihood for success, well-being and persistence at Evergreen. The planned activities will enhance students in four key areas: (1) academic skills, (2) support services awareness, (3) life skills, and (4) community connectedness. The program will begin Orientation Week, and continue through the first five weeks of the Fall Quarter, with follow-up weekly workshops in the four areas listed above. Students will be required to participate in selected Orientation Week activities and events, and attend all subsequent workshops and activities to earn the allotted 2 credits within the program. More information about Beginning the Journey.
Credit awarded in: communication arts, musicology, statistical reasoning, sociology, economics, expository writing, cultural studies and developmental psychology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social sciences, humanities, education, law and expressive arts.

Program Updates:

(2/13/04) Bill Bruner has left this program. The Enrollment limit has been lowered.
(11/16/04) New students should have completed one quarter of college-level work previously, but not more than five quarters.  New students will be expected to have read chapters 1-3 and 4.1 in Statistical Reasoning by Bennett et al.; chapters 1-4 in Sociology by Newman (5th edition); chapters 1-6 in Culture and Social Behavior by Triandis; chapters 1-4 in Soundscapes by Shelemay (and accompanying CD selections); sections 1-13 in The Everyday Writer by Lunsford; and all of the novel The Color Purple by Alice Walker before the first day of winter quarter.  Most texts are available now at the college bookstore.  Buy a copy of Walker at any bookstore (used copies are fine).  New students should bring completed answers to the odd-numbered homework assignments from Bennett and a writing sample (preferably a research paper) to the first class meeting.


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Nietzsche: Life, Times, Work

Winter quarter
Faculty: Marianne Bailey
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Core program and one year of humanities studies or two years college, during which students took at least three to four quarters of humanities courses.

Friedrich Nietzsche, artist-philosopher, first modernist and first postmodern philosopher, called himself a posthumous man, and said his readers were yet to be born. Nietzsche struggled physically to write; struggled financially to be published; and suffered the isolation of a self-exiled nomad. Born before his time, unread in his lifetime, his writings have influenced nearly every interesting mind since his death. A consummate stylist, Nietzsche saw philosophy as an art form; under his pen, philosophy danced over systematizing and rules of argumentation becoming essay, epigram, aphorism, parable, performance and puzzle.
Students in this program must be prepared for difficult readings, sustained hard independent work and high expectations. They will read, discuss and write about Nietzsche's major works. Each student will be responsible for the formal, oral presentation of a major Nietzsche interpreter and for a public reading and analysis of a passage from Nietzsche's work. Groups of students will create presentations/performances based on major concepts in Nietzsche's writings.
Credit awarded in: philosophy, aesthetics and literature.
Total: 12 or 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and the arts.
Program Updates:  


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Old and New Worlds: The Making of the Western Tradition

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: David Marr, Michael Pfeifer, Andrew Reece
Enrollment: 69
Class Standing: This Core program is designed for first-year students and will accept 18 Sophomore students.
Prerequisites: New students must read the following prior to the first day of winter quarter. Dennis Sherman: Western Civilization: Sources, Images, and Interpretations, Volume 1, 6th Edition, ISBN 0072565675. READ ALL; Plato: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo, 2nd edition. Translated by G.M.A. Grube and revised by John Cooper. ISBN 0872206335. READ MENO ONLY; John Locke: Two Treatises of Government and Letter Concerning Toleration, Ed. John Dunn, et al. ISBN 0300100183. READ SECOND TREATISE ONLY; Adrienne Koch and William Peden, eds.: The Life and Selected Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ISBN 0679748946. Read pp. xvii-xlii, 7-104, 163-172, 173-267. In addition to the above readings from fall, new students, like continuing students, will need to have read the following by the first day of the new quarter: David Wootton, ed. The Essential Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers, ISBN 0872206556. READ pp. ix-xliii, 317-339, Federalist Papers 1, 2, 6, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 23, 37, 39, 47, 48, 49, 51, 70, 78, 84, 85, and pp. 3-41.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact David Marr, (360) 867-6751.

The past is not dead. It is not even past.
-William Faulkner
Where do American ideas of democracy come from? What are the origins of American concepts of the self? Of freedom and authority? Of justice and the good? Old and New Worlds rests on the premise that it is by close study of the past that we can understand the origins of these ideas and in that way find out something important about who we are, what we believe and why. World-shaping ideas are most profitably studied in conjunction with world-shaping events and the history of social life. So, in this program we will study important philosophers such as Plato and John Locke but also the rise and fall of the ancient Greek city state, the emergence of Christianity and the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-reformation, the rebellion of the American colonies and foundation of the American republic, the enslavement of African Americans, and the growth of capitalism in 19th-century America.
This program offers an introduction to the western tradition in philosophy, literature, art, politics, and society from Athens in the 5th century BCE to the United States in 1900. In fall, we will examine consciousness and society from Ancient Greece through the American Revolution. Main authors will include Plato, Sophocles, Shakespeare, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson. In winter, we will trace American consciousness and society in the 19th century, investigating European, African and Native American traditions. Main authors will include Ralph Waldo Emerson, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln and Mark Twain.
Credit awarded in: classical studies, humanities, literature, European history, American history, art history, philosophy and social thought.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, teaching, law and other professions.
Program Updates: (7/16/04) Bob Haft has left the program. This Core program accepts 18 Sophomores. Enrollment limits have been reduced to 51 first-year seats; 18 sophomore seats.
(11/17/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. New students refer to prerequisites for eligibility.


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Organizing for Democracy: Problems and Possibilities in the 21st Century

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Peter Bohmer, Martha Schmidt, Jeanne Hahn (F)
Enrollment: 60
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.
Faculty Signature: New students must submit a written proposal to work with a social justice organization due prior to the beginning of class, January  3, 2005. The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact Peter Bohmer, (360) 867-6431 or Martha Schmidt, (360) 867-6396 or to discuss entrance to the program.

What did it mean when President Bush claimed "we are bringing democracy to the Middle East"? Is the United States a democratic country? In the 21st century? At its "founding"? What is democracy, exactly? What is the relationship between our view of what a just society is and our view of what democracy is? How can we organize and act to bring a deeper and more meaningful democracy to our lives and to our country? This program will examine how individuals and groups learn a democratic practice and organize for a democratic life and society. We'll focus on how to establish voice, develop strategies, build organizations, exercise tactics and confront obstacles to a just democracy.
We will study key areas of U.S. society such as civil liberties, economic inequality and the economy, gender relations, media, government, education and youth and foreign policy. We will look at what a democratic outcome would mean in each of these areas and how we as individuals and in groups and social movements can work to make this a reality. We will examine the relationship among the fall elections, the candidates and democracy.
We will learn how to organize for a democratic society. We will read about and view films on individuals and social movements that have worked for and are working for social change and justice. We will learn how each of us can make a difference, have our voices heard, and become actively involved in our community and society. There will be workshops on topics such as how to build democratic, inclusive, effective and sustainable organizations; organize protest and resistance; do relevant research; change public policy; develop effective strategy and tactics; do fundraising; and deal with repression and the media. Students will develop writing, speaking and other relevant skills useful for good organizing by selecting a community organizing project to work on in fall and winter quarters.
Credit awarded in: U.S. history, political economy, social movements, writing and organizing for social justice.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in teaching, working for social justice, organizing, social work, political economy, social science and media studies.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:

(3/11/04) Dan Leahy has left this program.
(3/19/04) Martha Schmidt has joined the faculty team.
(7/2/04) Enrollment has been reduced for fall quarter to avoid overenrollment when Jeanne Hahn leaves the program beginning winter quarter.
(11/10/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.


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Ornithology
New, not in printed catalog

Spring quarter
Faculty: Steven G. Herman
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: Junior or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Basic biology, developing identification skills.
Faculty Signature: Students must interview with the faculty prior to enrolling in this program. Contact Steve Herman, (360) 867-6063.
Special Expenses: $180 for field trip expenses throughout the quarter (approximately 22 days afield in eastern Washington and southeastern Oregon).

This field-based program will explore the class Aves generally, with emphasis on the avifauna of the Pacific Northwest. In lecture, field and laboratory, we will learn techniques of maintaining field records (the Grinnell system), ordinal characters, how to prepare scientific study skins of birds, topography, anatomy, and basic information about bird biology, behavior, communication, systematics and distribution. We will have weekly, local and regional field trips that will take us to a variety of habitat types. We will visit nearly wild landscapes on our major field trips and we will learn something of all landscape components we encounter, including especially plants.

Credit awarded in: ornithology, field ornithology, northwest natural history, field botany and field journal maintenance.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in natural resources agencies, non-governmental groups, conservation and zoology.

Program Updates:

(12/10/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Patience

New, not in printed catalog
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: David Rutledge, Raul Nakasone, Gary Peterson
Enrollment: 75
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: This program will not accept new students for spring quarter. For information about this program, contact David Rutledge, (360) 867-6633, Gary Peterson, (360) 867-6021 or Raul Nakasone, (360) 867-6065.
Special Expenses: Approximately $1,830 for five-week travel to Peru. Students must pay a $100 non-refundable travel deposit by December 3, 2004, to secure arrangements.
Internship Possibilities: With faculty approval.
Travel Component: Optional five-week travel to Guadalupe (La Libertad), Lambayeque and Cajamarca, Peru during winter quarter.

This program will examine what it means to live in a pluralistic society at the beginning of the 21st century. We will look at a variety of cultural and historical perspectives and use them to help address the program theme. We will pay special attention to the value of human relationships to the land, to work, to others and to the unknown. We will concentrate our work in cultural studies, human resource development and cross-cultural communication. We shall explore Native American perspectives and look at issues that are particularly relevant to Native Americans. We will ask students to take a very personal stake in their educational development. Within the program's themes and subjects, students will pay special attention to how they plan to learn, what individual and group work they plan on doing, and what difference the work will make in their lives and within their communities. Students will be encouraged to assume responsibility for their choices. Faculty and students together will work to develop habits of worthwhile community interaction in the context of the education process and liberation. The faculty are interested in providing an environment of collaboration where faculty and students will identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics.

This program is for students who already have a research topic in mind, as well as for those who would like to learn how to do research in a student-centered environment. Students will be exposed to research methods, writing workshops, computer literacy, library workshops, educational technology and the educational philosophy that supports this program.

In fall, we hope to state our research questions. In winter, we plan to individually, or in small study groups, develop the historical background for the chosen question and do the integrative review of the literature and data collection. In the first part of spring quarter, we will write our conclusions and prepare for a public presentation. The last part of spring will be entirely dedicated to presentations. Research topics will be related to the program theme of how to live in a pluralistic society and a globalized world under humanistic standards for social justice, freedom and peace.

Students will use and explore Bloom's Taxonomy , the theory of multiple intelligence, the relationship among curriculum, assessment and instruction, quantitative reasoning, self- and group-motivation, communication, e-mail, resources on the Web and Web crossing, and develop skills in interactive Web pages and independent research.

Credit awarded in: history, philosophy, cultural competency, communication, writing, political science, cultural anthropology, literature, indigenous arts, technology, indigenous studies, Native American studies, education and individual project work.

Total: 16 credits each quarter.

Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, anthropology, the arts, multicultural studies, social work, human services and the humanities.

This program is listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.
Program Updates:

(1/20/04) New, not in printed catalog
(4/21/04) Gary Peterson has joined this program. The enrollment limit has been increased.
(11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.
(2/1/05) This program will not accept new students for spring quarter.


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Perception, Language and Reality

New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Charles Pailthorp
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.

“Does experience or reason lie at the foundation of human knowledge?” This question has been central in Western philosophy for two and half centuries, and the discussion shows little sign of abating. A central element has been a critique of the nature of human perception, particularly vision. When we perceive the world around us, what is the actual object of our awareness? Is it things that physically exist, or is it something in our mind, and perhaps only in our mind?

These questions arose with new force as the power of natural science became increasingly evident. Modern science did not describe the world as we encounter it in our daily lives, and that disparity has grown as contemporary sciences propose increasingly unimaginable realities. This will be our central concern: how to understand, and rethink, the complex relationships between science, perception and reality.

For the first four weeks, we will develop the historical background in which these issues arose and were given new shape. Our first reading will be Descartes’ Discourse on Method (1637, Paris), which will be followed by selections from both Hume’s Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1738, London) and Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (1787, Riga).

In the weeks remaining, we will turn to seminal works of the 20th century. These will include G. E. Moore’s “A Defense of Common Sense”, Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, W. V. O Quine’s “Two Dogmas of Empiricism,” and “Ontological Relativity,” Wilfrid Sellars’ “Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man” and “Being and Being Known.” These philosophers turned their attention, increasingly, from mind to language, and we will follow this shift with some care.

This short list touches only on some of the important work in this area of philosophy. In addition to our work in common, each student will be asked to complete an independent study of something important we have ignored. Students will present this independent work to their peers during the quarter. Evaluations will focus on contributions to seminar discussion, presentations and an essay resulting from independent study.

(This curriculum parallels but does not presuppose or replicate Language and Mind, which I taught in Spring quarter, 2004.)

Credit awarded in: the philosophy of language and mind, the history of philosophy and credit that reflect the students’ individual course of study and research.

Total: 16 credits.

Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in philosophy, the humanities and social sciences.
Program Updates:

(10/12/04) New, not in printed catalog
This program has 8 seats reserved for sophomores only.


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Photo Projects
New, not in printed catalog

Spring quarter
Faculty: Steve Davis
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Prerequisites: Basic photography experience.
Faculty Signature: Admittance into this program will be based on a brief interview and a portfolio of no more than 15 prints, slides, or CD-ROM. It should reflect basic conceptual and technical skills in photographic and/or digital practices. Submit portfolios to Steve Davis, daviss@evergreen.edu room L1340 by March 2, 2005.
Special Expenses: $250 for film, paper and related materials.

This course is geared towards the development of individual photography projects. Through assignments, research and critiques you will develop a personal photographic project, complete with electronic and/or slide portfolio. Areas covered in regularly scheduled workshops may include digital image editing, fine printing, studio lighting, matting and presentation. You will have a wide variety of options in theme, technology, and stylistic approach. Expect to produce a professional and public exhibition at the program’s end.
Credit awarded in: photography
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006 - 07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in photography and art.

Program Updates: (01/21/05) New, not in printed catalog


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Physical Systems

Cancelled
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: E. J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one year of college-level, calculus-based physics, such as Matter and Motion; facility with basic calculus (integration and differentiation); and good writing skills.
Special Expenses: Textbooks typically total $500, required for the first week of class, to be used all year.

How do physicists explore and describe the physical world, from the realm of our immediate senses of classical physics to the very small quantum mechanics to the vast astrophysics and cosmology? We will emphasize the nature and formal structure of quantitative physical theories. We will focus on the unifying concepts and common mathematical structures that organize diverse physical theories into a coherent body of knowledge. Required mathematical methods will be developed as needed, in the context of their use in the physical sciences.
The central role of mathematics in describing nature is one of the core intellectual issues in this program. Quantitative problem solving will be emphasized. Physics topics typically include classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, astrophysics and topics in contemporary physics. Mathematical topics typically include multivariable calculus, differential equations, vector calculus and linear algebra. Computers will be used as appropriate for numerical solutions, graphing and qualitative insight into physical processes.
Students will be responsible for library research and laboratory experiments on topics of special interest, and for some peer instruction. Faculty and student presentations may include lectures, seminars, hands-on workshops and group problem-solving workshops. Required seminars on history, literature, philosophy and/or cultural studies of science will stimulate ongoing consideration of the context and meaning of scientific knowledge systems and practices.
Credit awarded in: physics, mathematics, numerical methods, philosophy and history of science. Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006 - 07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in physical sciences, engineering and applied mathematics, and/or philosophy, history and cultural studies of science.
Program Updates: (3/8/04) Cancelled
Refer to Energy Systems as an alternative


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Plant Ecology and Taxonomy

Spring quarter
Faculty: Frederica Bowcutt, Al Wiedemann
Enrollment: 44
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Introduction to plant biology, including evolution and morphology.
Faculty Signature: Interested students should submit a letter outlining their background in botany, interest in the program and class standing by the Academic Fair, March 2, 2005. Send letters to Frederica Bowcutt, The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505 . Qualified students will be accepted into the program until the program fills.
Special Expenses: Approximately $250 for field trips.

We will examine the fundamentals of plant ecology and taxonomy. Lectures will loosely follow the textbook readings. Students will work in the laboratory learning how to use Hitchcock and Cronquist's Flora of the Pacific Northwest, a technical key for identifying unknown plants. We will spend time in the field and laboratory discussing the diagnostic characters of plant families. Our seminar readings of scientific journal articles will focus on vegetation ecology. Students will learn basic vegetation sampling methods that they will apply to a field project. This project will allow students to develop data analysis and presentation skills, in addition to learning about field methods. Two multiple-day field trips, a requirement of the program, will give students an opportunity to learn about Pacific Northwest plant communities in the field.
Credit awarded in: plant taxonomy*, plant ecology*, and vegetation of the Pacific Northwest*.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in conservation, ecological restoration, forestry, natural resource
management, plant ecology or plant taxonomy.
Program Updates: (5/27/04) The enrollment limit has been reduced to 44 students.
(7/19/04) Al Wiedemann has joined this program.


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Poetics and Power

New, not in printed catalog
Fall, Winter quarters
Faculty: Steve Niva, Leonard Schwartz
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Steve Niva, (360) 867-5612.

To what is extent is political power created, transmitted and/or resisted through language? How do poetry and fiction negotiate with power, reinforcing it or changing its flow? How do linguistic conventions shape political and economic policies and how can they be challenged? This two-quarter program will examine these and other questions as it explores the function of the written word as a masking agent and a mediator of history, power and violence in a variety of different genres and political contexts.
Poetics and Power will include an examination of twentieth-century poetry and poetics in the shadow of world wars, genocide and decolonization, beginning with the visionary poetics of Arthur Rimbaud and critical responses by Paul Celan and Theodore Adorno. We will address the strategies of avant-garde and radical poetics and evaluate several contemporary approaches, including the contemporary Poets Against the War project. We will examine realist and anti-representational forms of fiction for their political effects, including the writings of Franz Kafka, J.M. Coetzee and Arundhati Roy. We will also examine how political events and public policies are constituted by various postcolonial discourses, including how “Orientalist” representations of the Middle East as backwards and violent shape U.S. foreign policy and how the discourse of “underdevelopment” has guided Western economic policies towards the Third World.
The work of the program will be analytical as well as creative. In addition to intensive reading and theoretical analysis, students will be expected to experiment in creating poetry, prose poetry, metafiction and non-fiction.
Credit awarded in: poetics, poetry, literature, political science, cultural studies and creative writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, social sciences, cultural studies, poetry, journalism and politics.
This program is listed under: Culture, Text and Language and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:

(1/8/04) New, not in printed catalog
(11/17/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.


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Political Ecology of Land

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Ralph Murphy, Carolyn Dobbs
Enrollment: 50
Faculty Signature: No new students.
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.

This upper-division program will provide an interdisciplinary, in-depth focus on how land has been viewed and treated by humans historically and in contemporary times. We will pay special attention to the political, economic, social/cultural and environmental contexts of land use. We will also look at land ethics, concepts of land ownership and efforts to regulate land uses and protect lands that have been defined as worthy by society.
To understand the context, role and purposes of land policy and regulation, several social science disciplines will be explored. Selected aspects of the following topics will be used to evaluate human treatment of land primarily in the United States: history and economic development; the structure and function of American government and federalism; public policy formation and implementation; land-use planning and growth management; elements of environmental and land-use law and economics; fiscal analysis of state and local governments; and selected applications of qualitative and quantitative research methods. Taken together, these topics examine the diversity of ideas and skills required for developing an in-depth analysis of land issues.
Our goal is to have students leave the program with a comprehensive understanding of the complexity of issues surrounding land. The program will include lectures, seminars, guest speakers, research workshops, field trips in Western Washington, and individual and group research projects and presentations.
Credit awarded in: land-use planning and growth management*, policy analysis*, natural resource management*, statistics, principles of economics, American government and federalism, literature, case studies in environmental policy and implementation*, research methods and projects*.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in land use and environmental planning, policy development and fiscal analysis, environmental and natural resource management.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates: (11/10/04) This program will not accept new students.


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Political Economy, Social Change and Globalization

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Alan Nasser, Steven Francis
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Faculty Signature: No new students.

We will study the political, economic and philosophical developments that set the stage for the global spread of Thatcherism/Reaganism. These developments contributed to the present dominance of Neoliberal Globalization.
We will study Hobbes, Locke, Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, Rousseau and Marx, their place in the history of capitalism, and their notions of freedom, liberty, equality and the state. This classical tradition was transformed over time by two world wars, the Great Depression, a global American empire, a robust period of economic growth, the rejection of the welfare state, and the current period of economic crisis and permanent war. How did this come about? Where might it go?
We will scrutinize the workings of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the World Trade Organization, and their effect upon relations between the poor and rich countries. We conclude with an examination of a working model of a democratic socialist market economy. Students can expect a heavy workload.
Credit awarded in: classical liberal political philosophy, the Marxian critique of classical liberalism, the origins of capitalism, the rise and fall of the welfare state, the theory and practice of neoliberal globalization and the theory and practice of democratic socialism.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in politics, economics, philosophy, labor studies, sociology, teaching and the social sciences.
Program Updates: (9/21/04) Steven Francis will replace Priscilla Bowerman.
(11/17/04) THis program will not accept new students.


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Pooled Sovereignty and Corporate Management: The Impact of Globalization on American Business Strategy

New, not in printed catalog
Fall quarter

Faculty: Dean F. Olson
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Students should make an appointment for an interview. Call or e-mail Dean Olson, (360) 280-0115 or (360) 867-6433.

This program examines the impact of broad changes in global trading and investment patterns, regional integration agreements, and the export-oriented policies of less developed countries on business strategies and government policies in the United States. For example, seminar texts will examine the implication of expansion of the European Union to 25 countries with a total population of over 450 million and a GDP nearly as large as the United States. China's entry into the WTO in 2001, India's adoption of export oriented policies and liberal market regimes over the past decade, and regional trade agreements in North America and elsewhere will also be examined. We will explore attempts by less developed countries, now joined by China, to press WTO members for greater access to markets in developed countries. Cases will be used whenever possible to design and discuss implementation of corporate strategies to confront these challenges, to explore government trade policies and attempts by special interest groups to shape these policies. Written assignments will include several case reports and a 25-30 page term paper.

Credit awarded in: business management, economics, international trade and political science.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in business, political economy and international relations.

Program Updates: (4/26/05) New, not in printed catalog


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Popular Economics

Spring quarter
Faculty: Peter Bohmer
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.

Economics is often mystified and used as a weapon to serve the powerful and the wealthy. The aim of this program is to make economics accessible; so our learning and teaching of it can be used to further economic equality and social justice rather than justify the status quo. We will study popular education as conceptualized by Paolo Freire; some of our learning will use this pedagogy. We will examine lesson plans that use popular economics methods and develop our own materials to share our learning with others.
Students will carefully study assumptions, logic, conclusions, public policy and social implications of neoclassical economics. In microeconomics, concepts such as scarcity, efficiency, demand and supply and opportunity cost will be analyzed. How labor markets function, and the determination of prices and output in differing market structures will be studied. In macroeconomics, concepts such as aggregate demand, investment, the consumption function the multiplier and fiscal and monetary policy will be studied. So will inflation, unemployment and economic growth. International trade will be introduced.
Political economy will be contrasted to neoclassical economics. We will analyze the nature and logic of capitalism. Concepts of power, the role of institutions and the need for historical and cultural specificity in determining economic behavior will be introduced. We will compare these approaches with regard to poverty, racial and gender discrimination, economic inequality, labor unions, globalization and health care.
This program will develop awareness about the values and assumptions inherent in the paradigms we study and in their own values. It will further quantitative reasoning and introduce students to economic history, changes and continuities in economic thought, and challenge them to consider alternative economic systems in the future.
Credit awarded in: micro- and macro-economics and political economy.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in political economy, economics, social sciences, organizing, social teaching and working for social justice.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:  


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Postmodernity and Postmodernism: Barth, Pynchon, DeLillo, Murakami and World Cinema

Fall quarter
Faculty: Harumi Moruzzi
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Special Expenses: Up to $30 for a field trip.

The 19th century was a heady century for the West and Japan that embraced the utopian notion of the perfectibility of human society through science and technology. By the beginning of the 20th century, however, this giddy sense of making human perfect was severely diminished by various iconoclastic ideas, such as Freudian psychoanalytical theory, Einstein's theory of relativity and Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. A sense of confusion, anarchy and dread, expressed in various art works in the early 1900s, is strikingly similar to that of our time. It suffers perhaps a more radical and real disillusionment regarding humanity and its future through the experience of the Nazi holocaust and the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Our time, at the dawn of the 21st century, is generally and vaguely called the postmodern time or postmodernity. But, what is post-modernity? What is postmodernism? We will examine the state of our contemporary world, postmodernity, as manifested in the literary works of John Barth, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and Haruki Murakami, as well as in the films directed by Godard, Bu-uel, and other contemporary filmmakers. We will explore the significance and implications of such literary and cinematic works through the various theoretical works of Baudrillard, Lyotard, Jameson, Habermas, and the like.
Credit awarded in: literary theory, cultural theory, Japanese culture, Japanese literature, American literature, film studies, psychology and sociology.
Total: 16 credits.
This Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in literature, cultural studies, film studies and sociology.
Program Updates:  


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Power in American Society

Fall quarter only; Winter quarter only
Faculty: Larry Mosqueda
Faculty Signature: Students must contact Larry Mosqueda, (360) 867-6513 or by email: Larry Mosqueda. Students who were on the wait list for fall quarter will be given priority. Students will be accepted until the program fills.
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.

This program focuses on the issue of power in American society. In the analysis we will investigate the nature of economic, political, social, military, ideological and interpersonal power. The interrelationship of these dimensions will be a primary area of study. We will explore these themes through lectures, films, seminars, a journal and short papers.
The analysis will be guided by the following questions, as well as others that may emerge from the discussions: What is meant by the term "power"? Are there different kinds of power and how are they interrelated? Who has power in American society? Who is relatively powerless? Why? How is power accumulated? What resources are involved? How is power utilized and with what impact on various sectors of the population? What characterizes the struggle for power? How does domestic power relate to international power? How is international power used? How are people affected by the current power structure? What responsibilities do citizens have to alter the structure of power? What alternative structures are possible, probable, necessary or desirable?
In this period of war and economic, social and political crisis, a good deal of our study will focus on international relations in a systematic and intellectual manner. This is a serious class for serious people. There will be a good deal of reading and some weeks will be more complex than others. Please be prepared to work hard and to challenge your and others' thinking.
Credit awarded in: U.S. history, U.S. government, U.S. foreign policy and political economy.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in government, public policy, history and advanced political economy.
Program Updates:

(12/30/03) This program does not continue into winter quarter. It will repeat during winter quarter. Students must enroll for one quarter only.

(9/21/04) This program requires a faculty signature. Students who were on the wait list for fall quarter will be given priority.


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Practice of Sustainable Agriculture, The

New, not in printed catalog
Spring, Summer, and Fall quarters
Faculty: John Navazio
Enrollment: 16-25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Students must fill out questionnaire to assess motivation, maturity, communication, writing skills and background in agriculture and environmental studies. Transfer students must include a description of college courses taken, related work experience and letters of recommendation. To apply, contact Melissa Barker, The Evergreen Sate College, Lab I, Olympia WA 98505 or the Academic Advising Office, (360) 867-6312. For spring quarter, applications received by March 2, 2005, will be given priority.
Special Expenses: Field trips, approximately $70–$90.
Internship Possibilities: Eight-credits will be an internship on the Organic Farm.

This program will provide students with direct experience in the practices of sustainable agriculture. There will be weekly lectures, local field trips, a three-day extended field trip and an emphasis on practical skill development in intensive food production at the Organic Farm. The program’s eight-credit academic portion will cover a variety of topics related to practical farm management which include entomology, plant pathology, soil science, plant breeding/organic seed saving, crop botany and weed biology. The eight-credit internship on the Organic Farm will include instruction on a variety of farm-related topics which include soils, plant propagation, greenhouse management, production planning, composting, vermiculture, green manures, the use of animal manures, equipment operation, machinery and tool maintenance, irrigation system design and management, weed identification and control strategies, pest identification and control, livestock management, log mushroom cultivation, winter production, small farm economics, marketing, vegetable, herb, flower and small fruit culture and production systems, production of value added products including pesto, jam, salsa, lotion, salves, soap and lip balm. Spring and summer studies provide the foundation for fall quarter, so no new students will be admitted in fall, 2005.

 

Credit awarded in: history, philosophy, cultural competency, communication, writing, political science, cultural anthropology, literature, indigenous arts, technology, indigenous studies, Native American studies, education and individual project work.

Total: 8, 12, or 16 credits, includes a four- or eight-credit internship option.

Credit awarded in: horticulture, greenhouse management, plant pathology, soil science, crop botany, livestock management and organic farming practicum.

Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in agriculture, horticulture, community development and sustainability.

Program Updates: (1/20/05) New, not in printed catalog
(2/3/05) John Navazio has joined this program.
(3/1/05) 8 and 12 credit options have been added to this program.


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Protected Areas?

Spring quarter
Faculty: Carolyn Dobbs
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: At least two quarters in an intermediate- or advanced-level program in environmental studies.

The program will explore the histories of protected areas and issues of indigenous rights, use patterns within national parks and other protected areas, biodiversity and conservation, governance systems, transnational boundary issues, concepts and realities of ecotourism, and the role of domestic and international environmental organizations.
Class time will focus on lectures and discussions on these topics using books such
as Continental Conservation by Michael Soule, et al., Preserving Nature in National Parks by Richard Sellars, American Indians and National Parks by Robert Keller, et al., Parks in Peril, edited by Katrina Brandon, Ecotourism and Sustainable Development by Martha Honey, Biodiversity and Conservation by Michael Jeffries, and Our National Parks by John Muir. We will also have guest lectures by practitioners in the field such as representatives of Nature Conservancy, local land trusts, state agencies that administer protected areas and relevant federal agencies. Students will also develop at least two research projects. These will enable students to gain a fuller understanding of protected areas in other countries and to look in some depth at critical issues in the field such as indigenous rights and protected areas, community-based ecotourism, the relationship between endangered species protection and protected areas, or the impact of conflict and war on the protected areas.
Credit awarded in: environmental studies*, protected areas*, biodiversity* and conservation*.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies especially in areas of land-use planning and regulation, international conservation, ecotourism, biodiversity, comparative legal and administrative systems.
Program Updates:  


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Puppet and Object Theater

Spring quarter
Faculty: Ariel Goldberger, Walter Grodzik
Enrollment: 48
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for workshop materials; $40 for theater tickets; and project expenses depending on individual work.

The goal of this program is to investigate, through performance, the nature of experimental puppet theater and object theater. In this exciting community of artists and scholars, emphasis will be placed on imaginative risk-taking, experimentation and self-directed work. Participants will create their own scripts or storyboards, learn about construction and performance techniques, and design, direct and perform student-originated performances. Exploration of new and innovative materials and tools will be encouraged. The faculty will facilitate student-originated work, offer workshops and assist with technical questions.
The program will require weekly showing of works-in-progress to expose all participants to different artistic processes. Weekly presentations will focus on issues related to contemporary puppetry, technical issues and/or manipulation techniques. Depending upon student demand, a movement workshop will be offered. The work of established and emerging American and world puppeteers that work in an experimental approach will be discussed and examined through a variety of media.
Credit awarded in: puppet and object theater, performing arts, performance, design and other areas depending on student work.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in fields that require facility with collaborative processes, imagination, creative writing, research skills, artistic processes, intuitive and visual thinking, design and performing arts.
This program is also listed under Expressive Arts.
Program Updates: (2/22/05) Walter Grodzik has joined this program. This program will have a broader theater application


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Contact the Site Manager

 

Last Updated: May 11, 2011


The Evergreen State College

2700 Evergreen Parkway NW

Olympia, Washington 98505

(360) 867-6000