Site Index

2004-2005 Catalog

Undergraduate Studies 2004-05

Programs for Freshmen

Culture, Text and Language

Environmental Studies

Expressive Arts

Native American and World Indigenous Peoples' Studies

Scientific Inquiry

Society, Politics, Behavior and Change

Tacoma Campus Program

Evening and Weekend Studies

Evening and Weekend Class Listing

Summer Studies

Summer 2005 Class Listing

Graduate Studies

Graduate Electives

Master of Environmental Studies

Master of Public Administration

Master in Teaching

 

 


 
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Ready Camera One

Cancelled
Spring quarter
Faculty: Sally Cloninger
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This program is designed for 50 percent freshmen and 50 percent sophomore students.
Prerequisites: Two quarters of college-level work.
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for videotape and supplies.

This program is designed for first- and second-year students interested in exploring visual literacy, video production and media criticism. Students will be introduced to both media deconstruction and media production skills through a series of lectures, workshops, seminars and design problems that focus primarily on studio video. We will focus our work on the development of a critical perspective on contemporary media. In both theoretical discussions and production workshops we will consider the parameters and influences of television, video art, video activism, music videos and video documentaries.
We will investigate the politics of representation, i.e., who gets the camera, who appears on the screen and who has the power. Therefore, students who choose to enroll in this program should be vitally and sincerely interested in the issues and ideas concerning the representation of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation in the media. Activities will include training in the multi-camera TV studio, instruction in basic digital field production and editing, an introduction to media research techniques and a survey of visual design principles.
Credit awarded in: media studies, media literacy, communications and television production.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in media arts, humanities, social sciences and communications.
This program is also listed under Expressive Arts.
Program Updates: (4/29/04) Cancelled


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Reality Check: Indian Images and [Mis]representations

New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Frances V. Rains, George Freeman, Jr.
Enrollment:
37
Class Standing:
Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.

This program will address the images and mis-representations of Indians in a variety of mediums. Indian images from films, team mascots and commercial interests will be deconstructed and analyzed for meaning, significance, power and representation. Euro-American colonialism, U.S./Indian history, geo-politics and economics will be decolonized through the lenses of Native resistance, Native sovereignty and Native political and economic issues. Essential to this exploration will be an investigation of the dynamics of “self” and “other.”

Learning will take place through readings, seminars, lectures, films, workshops and guest speakers. Students will improve their research skills through historical document review, observations and critical analysis. Students will also have opportunities to improve their writing skills through written assignments. Students may be required to meet weekly with a writing tutor to strengthen their writing skills. Oral speaking skills will be improved through seminar discussions and through small group and individual presentations. Options for the final project will be discussed in the syllabus and in class.

Credit awarded in: art, history, geography, political science, education, and Native American studies, media studies or psychology depending on the successful completion of the 8 credit or 16 credit option.

Total: 8 or 16 credits. The 16-credit option includes an independent research project to be proposed by the student, that meets established criteria, APA style and deadlines in syllabus.

Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in Native American studies, the humanities and social sciences.

Program Updates: (02/01/05) New, not in printed catalog


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Religion, Race and Law in America

Cancelled
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Lance Laird, Babacar M'Baye, José Gómez
Enrollment: 72
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.

Prayer in the classroom, federal agents inside mosques, ritual peyote use, animal sacrifice, homosexuality, Roe v. Wade, polygamy, the Waco tragedy, the Christian Coalition, the Nation of Islam, the Faith-Based Initiative and the Patriot Act all have raised issues of what it means to live in a religiously plural, secular democratic nation. This program will introduce students to the historical religious diversity in what is now the United States and examine the ways that shifting constructs of religion, race and liberty have interacted dynamically in shaping culture, literature and politics. We will follow the major constitutional conflicts that have arisen from making real the First Amendment's guarantees of both freedom of religion and freedom from religion. To examine the entanglement of government and religious entities in a variety of contexts, students will analyze landmark cases, prepare legal briefs and present oral arguments.
We will also examine the historic and present role of religion among ethnic and racial groups and analyze the interaction of religion, racism and the movements for abolition, civil rights, social justice and equality under the law. Particular attention will be devoted to religion in the African American community and to American Muslims within the larger narratives of American religious and racial history. Through documentary, literary and ethnographic study, students will consider how American culture, law and racial classifications shape the practice and public presence of both dominant and non-dominant religious traditions. They will consider how these forces shape the various narratives of American national identity.
Credit awarded in: Constitutional Law, American religious history, legal advocacy, ethnography, comparative religion, American literature and expository and argumentative writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in religion, public policy, law, ethnic studies, literature, American studies and cultural anthropology.
Planning Unit(s): Freshmen Programs and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates: (12/2/03) Cancelled


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Renaissance Studies: Literature and Identity

Fall quarter
Faculty: Thad Curtz
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Two years of college, including some work in literature.
Special Expenses: Approximately $75 for theater tickets, depending on available performances.

During the 16th and 17th centuries, with the spread of the printing press, the Reformation's emphasis on the written word, and a new scholarly interest in classical poetry, there was an explosion of new writing that resulted in what we now consider some of the richest literature in the western tradition. Many historians believe that people's psychological experience also changed during this period with the formation of a new humanist sense of "self," one that seems so natural to us today that we can hardly see it. How did Shakespeare and his contemporaries reflect this shift toward modern subjectivity? Did the sudden outpouring of drama and the invention of the public stage affect or reflect this new "self"? Why were there such fervent protests against the new theater: what was so threatening about it, and perhaps about literature more broadly, during what we now call the early modern period? How did the regular cross-dressing of male actors on stage challenge and reflect the culture's sense of gender identity?
These are some of the questions we'll explore as we read Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser, Donne and several other Renaissance writers, as well as secondary historical sources on the Protestant Reformation, the rise of scientific thought, the culture of the royal court, and the rise of the public theater. Students should be prepared to engage and struggle with the unfamiliar language and ideas presented in a variety of early modern genres, including lyric and epic poetry, drama, and some early fiction. We will view and analyze adaptations of Shakespeare, some historical films about the culture out of which this rich literary tradition arose, and thematically related contemporary films about shifts in media technology and identity.
Students can continue in winter by enrolling in The Novel: Life and Form; it will explore what happens to fiction and the self from the 1800s to the present.
Credit awarded in: literature, history and film.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, social science, psychology, business, law and teaching.
Program Updates: (4/26/04) Hilary Binda has left this program. The enrollment limit has been reduced.


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Russia: Empires and Enduring Legacies

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Pat Krafcik, Robert Smurr
Enrollment: 48
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No faculty signature for spring quarter. This program will accept new students for spring quarter. Prospective students should talk with the faculty at the Academic Fair, March 2, 4-6 p.m.. For information contact Pat Krafcik, (360) 867-6491 or Robert Smurr, (360) 867-5056 .

Join us on an extraordinary journey as we explore the diverse peoples, cultures, and his-tories of the region that was once demarcated by the borders of the Russian and Soviet empires. While we focus on the Russians, we will take a multicultural approach in our examination of other peoples who from ancient times have populated the vast expanses of Eurasian and Siberian steppelands and forests.
In fall quarter, we will investigate Slavic, Turkic and Scandinavian contributions to early Russian society up to Russian imperial expansion in its 19th-century zenith and the rise of the Russian Empire's radical revolutionary intelli-gentsia. Winter quarter will emphasize the great transformations of 20th-century Russia-the Bolshevik Revolution, the Stalin terror and the unanticipated collapse of the Soviet Union. Readings will include historical texts, epics and the literature of Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, Akhmatova, Pasternak, Rasputin and Petrushevskaya.
Spring quarter provides an opportunity to pursue individual research and to explore in depth selected topics from Russia's Eurasian culture through a series of workshops. These may be determined in part by the students and may include a study of the following: the cultures of distinctive ethnic groups, such as the Vikings, Mongols or Cossacks; Russian folklore; the Soviet Union in World War II; the Cold War; Soviet environmental practices; and the literature of one writer of the student's choice.
Credit awarded in: Russian history, literature, culture and writing. Upper-division Credit awarded: for upper-division work.
Total: 12 credits each quarter. Students may enroll in a separate and optional four-credit course in Beginning Russian through Evening and Weekend Studies.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006-07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the diplomatic service, international business, graduate studies in international affairs, and Russian studies.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs.
Program Updates: (4/5/04) Robert Smurr has joined this program.
(11/15/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. By January 3, new students must read Geoffrey Hosking, Russia and the Russians: A History, pages 1-352; Richard Pipes, Russia Under the Old Regime, pages 1-170 (skim); review the program Web site at http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/russia and read any additional materials from the fall term; read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment for seminar on January 3.
(1/27/05) This program will accept new students for spring quarter.


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Rhythmic Meditations

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Mukti Khanna, Terry Setter, Sarah Williams
Enrollment: 68
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Terry Setter, (360) 867-6615 or Sarah Williams, (360) 867-6561 or Mukti Khanna, (360) 867-6752.
Special Expenses: $25 each quarter for art supplies; $25 each quarter for yoga workshop; $25 for drumming workshop.
Internship Possibilities: With faculty approval.

This interdisciplinary, yearlong, intentional learning community will explore rhythm in relation to mind, consciousness and creativity. Half our work will take place in experientially based, all-program studio sessions. Individual and small group work including seminar and student-originated research projects will comprise the other half of each student's credits.
This program will explore and is committed to alternative pedagogues including person-centered learning, open space technology, emotional and spiritual literacies, transformative education and somatic studies. Students will select an appropriate faculty and research focus each quarter.
Mukti Khanna studies transpersonal psychology, expressive arts therapy and image theater. She is interested in the relationship between personal transformation and social change.
Terry Setter studies music and its tribal, contemporary and historical practice. He is interested in studying rhythm, particularly drumming, in relation to human behavior.
Sarah Williams studies feminist theory, cultural studies and yoga. She is interested in exploring rhythms of the energetic body including vibrations of heart, thought and breath.
Credit awarded in: cultural studies, psychology, women's studies, somatic studies, music history, theory and composition and education.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter. 16 credit option: no faculty signature; 12 credit option: faculty signature required.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, cultural studies, expressive arts, psychology, women's studies, music and somatic studies.
This program is listed under Expressive Arts and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates:

(12/30/03) Students will select an appropriate faculty and research focus each quarter. Refer to the specific faculty's course reference number when enrolling.
(5/11/04) The 12 credit option requires a faculty signature. For information contact Mukti Khanna, (360) 867-6752; Terry Setter, (360) 867-6615 or Sarah Williams, (360) 867-6561.
(11/17/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.
(1/27/05) This program will accept new students for spring quarter.


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Russia: Empires and Enduring Legacies

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Pat Krafcik, Robert Smurr
Enrollment: 48
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No faculty signature for spring quarter. This program will accept new students for spring quarter. Prospective students should talk with the faculty at the Academic Fair, March 2, 4-6 p.m.. For information contact Pat Krafcik, (360) 867-6491 or Robert Smurr, (360) 867-5056 .

Join us on an extraordinary journey as we explore the diverse peoples, cultures, and his-tories of the region that was once demarcated by the borders of the Russian and Soviet empires. While we focus on the Russians, we will take a multicultural approach in our examination of other peoples who from ancient times have populated the vast expanses of Eurasian and Siberian steppelands and forests.
In fall quarter, we will investigate Slavic, Turkic and Scandinavian contributions to early Russian society up to Russian imperial expansion in its 19th-century zenith and the rise of the Russian Empire's radical revolutionary intelli-gentsia. Winter quarter will emphasize the great transformations of 20th-century Russia-the Bolshevik Revolution, the Stalin terror and the unanticipated collapse of the Soviet Union. Readings will include historical texts, epics and the literature of Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, Akhmatova, Pasternak, Rasputin and Petrushevskaya.
Spring quarter provides an opportunity to pursue individual research and to explore in depth selected topics from Russia's Eurasian culture through a series of workshops. These may be determined in part by the students and may include a study of the following: the cultures of distinctive ethnic groups, such as the Vikings, Mongols or Cossacks; Russian folklore; the Soviet Union in World War II; the Cold War; Soviet environmental practices; and the literature of one writer of the student's choice.
Credit awarded in: Russian history, literature, culture and writing. Upper-division Credit awarded: for upper-division work.
Total: 12 credits each quarter. Students may enroll in a separate and optional four-credit course in Beginning Russian through Evening and Weekend Studies.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006-07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the diplomatic service, international business, graduate studies in international affairs, and Russian studies.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs.
Program Updates: (4/5/04) Robert Smurr has joined this program.
(11/15/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. By January 3, new students must read Geoffrey Hosking, Russia and the Russians: A History, pages 1-352; Richard Pipes, Russia Under the Old Regime, pages 1-170 (skim); review the program Web site at http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/russia and read any additional materials from the fall term; read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment for seminar on January 3.
(1/27/05) This program will accept new students for spring quarter.


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Science of Fat

New, not in printed catalog
Winter quarter
Faculty: Sharon Anthony, Brian Walter
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Special Expenses: $20 for the challenge course fee.

What is all the fuss about fat in our diets? In what ways is fat a necessary nutrient and how is it harmful to us? What's the difference between a saturated fat and a trans fatty acid? Why should we care? Are fats really a problem or is a high-fat diet the key to becoming slim? How do researchers use data to create dietary recommendations for the public? In this program, we will investigate the role of fat in our diets from a chemical perspective and study how to use statistics to draw conclusions about health and diet. With chemistry and statistics as the disciplinary backbones, we will investigate what types of fat we should eat as well as whether fat replacements such as Olestra are a healthy alternative. Seminar texts will discuss a range of issues including healthy diets, causes of obesity, perceptions and stereotypes about fatness and media presentation of diet and health issues.

Credit awarded in: statistics and chemistry.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in chemistry, statistics and public health.
This program is listed under Environmental Studies and Scientific Inquiry.

Program Updates: (11/16/04) New, not in printed catalog


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Science Seminar

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: E. J. Zita
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Prerequisites: Good writing skills assumed. Students should read the Science Seminar Web page http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/energy0405/home.htm#seminar. Students should take the Web survey at http://grace.evergreen.edu/inqsit/, and order the texts in advance.

Each quarter, any student is welcome to join this seminar to learn about the history and philosophy of science and math; we assume no background in mathematics or physics. We will read, discuss and write about the diverse works of science and math. We will explore observations and ideas about the nature, history and philosophy of science, as well as the methods of physics and mathematics. We will investigate questions such as: How is knowledge created or discovered? How can new ideas develop into testable theories? How does scientific understanding change? Past topics have included chaos, quantum mechanics, infinity and cosmology. Past readings have ranged from Kuhn's classic, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, to lighter works such as The Physics of Star Trek and Alice in Quantumland. Readings and themes vary each quarter. Details for each quarter are available online at http://192.211.16.13/z/zita/scisem.htm.
The learning goals include improved critical thinking, deeper qualitative understanding of science, and improved communication skills, both oral and written. Quantitative investigations are possible for interested students, but are not required.
Seminar students work together with beginning to advanced science students to prepare key points and questions before each seminar. Students earn four or eight credits by partici-pating in one or two seminars each week and completing short essays and online assignments. Students are encouraged to work with Writing Center tutors and attend occasional writing workshops.
Credit awarded in: history and philosophy of science and math.
Total: 4 or 8 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the sciences, mathematics and physics.
Program Updates: (11/10/04) Additional prerequisites have been listed.  Refer to prerequisite section above.
(1/27/05) This program will accept new students for spring quarter. Science Seminar will meet on Monday and Wednesday, 5-7 p.m.


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Seeing the Light

NOTE: See Listing Below (Spring offering cancelled – moved to Winter quarter)
Spring quarter
Faculty: Bob Haft
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Intermediate-level
photography.
Faculty Signature: Students must present an academic and photographic portfolio and schedule an interview. For more information contact Bob Haft, (360) 867-6474. Academic and photographic portfolios will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses: Approximately $200 - $300 for photo materials and $12 for museum admissions.

This program is designed for intermediate- and advanced-level photography students. They will work with medium- and large-format as well as 35mm cameras. Students will study the work of historical and contemporary photographers, view and analyze films and read texts dealing with the history and critical analysis of the medium. In addition to classroom work, field trips will be taken to galleries and museums to view exhibits and/or collections of photographs of particular interest. There will be a series of assigned projects designed to further technical and aesthetic skills. As a final project, students will work in teams to produce a theme-centered document combining images and text. All the projects will be formally presented and critiqued.
Credit awarded in: intermediate photography, history of photography, aesthetics, art theory and criticism, and individual research projects.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art history, photography and/or the humanities.

Program Updates: 10/13/04 Cancelled/Quarter Changed
This program is now offered Winter quarter. Refer to Seeing the Light below.


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Seeing the Light

Quarter changed Now offered Winter quarter instead of Spring
Winter quarter
Faculty: Bob Haft
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Intermediate-level photography.
Faculty Signature: Students must present an academic and photographic portfolio and schedule an interview. For more information contact Bob Haft, (360) 867-6474. Academic and photographic portfolios will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses: Approximately $200 - $300 for photo materials and $12 for museum admissions.

This program is designed for intermediate- and advanced-level photography students. They will work with medium- and large-format as well as 35mm cameras. Students will study the work of historical and contemporary photographers, view and analyze films and read texts dealing with the history and critical analysis of the medium. In addition to classroom work, field trips will be taken to galleries and museums to view exhibits and/or collections of photographs of particular interest. There will be a series of assigned projects designed to further technical and aesthetic skills. As a final project, students will work in teams to produce a theme-centered document combining images and text. All the projects will be formally presented and critiqued.
Credit awarded in: intermediate photography, history of photography, aesthetics, art theory and criticism, and individual research projects.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art history, photography and/or the humanities.

Program Updates:

(10/13/04) New, not in printed catalog.
This is a replacement for the cancelled, Spring quarter Seeing the Light program.


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Self and Culture: Studies in Japanese and American Literature and Cinema

Winter quarter
Faculty: Harumi Moruzzi
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Special Expenses: Approximately $30 for a field trip.

It is often said that American and Japanese cultures represent the mirror images of human values. For instance, while American culture emphasizes the importance of individuals over groups, Japanese culture dictates group cohesion. Certainly, the reality is not as simple as these stereotypes indicate; nevertheless, this dichotomized comparative cultural frame presents an interesting context in which we can explore many human issues. Thus, in this program we will explore the concept of self through the critical examination of American and Japanese literature, cinema and popular media.
At the beginning of the quarter, students will be introduced to the major literary theories to familiarize themselves with varied approaches to literature. Then, students will examine representations of individuals and cultures in American and Japanese literature through seminars and critical writings. Films and seminars will accompany our study of literature, which will facilitate a deeper exploration of the topics and issues presented in the literary works. Students will also be introduced to the rudiments of film analysis in order to develop a more analytical and critical attitude to the film-viewing experience.
Credit awarded in: Japanese literature, American literature, cultural studies, film studies and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in cultural studies, film studies and the humanities.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs.
Program Updates:  


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Self Determination, Indian Education and Native Art in the 20th Century

New, not in printed catalog.
Winter quarter
Faculty: Frances V. Rains
Enrollment: 12
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.

This program will address the changes that take place in Indian education during the 20th century, beginning with 1928 and leading up to present day educational issues in Indian education. Seminars will focus on the complexities and subtleties affecting Native Nations wrought by 20th-century legislation, as well as issues of Native resistance and efforts to protect Native sovereignty as a means of delving into Indian education and issues of curriculum. The shifting federal Indian policies to deal with the “Indian problem” will be pivotal to our examination and critical reflection of the Native road to self-determination, especially affecting Indian education. Readings will guide us along that road, including the ethnographic study of the first tribally designed Indigenous school.

Additionally, throughout the quarter, the evolution of Indigenous art of the 20th century will be explored. Expressive and visual representations, as well as articles written by Native leaders, activitsts, artists and musicians will be the crux of this portion of the program. Examining the power of Native arts to reflect “continuity and change,” as well as acts of resistance and renewal through artistic expression and voice, including contemporary Native music and guest speakers will serve as a vehicle for critical reflection.

Learning will take place through readings, seminars, lectures, workshops and guest speakers. Students will improve their research skills through historical document review, observations and critical analysis. Students will also have opportunities to improve their writing skills through written assignments. Students may be required to meet weekly with a writing tutor to strengthen their writing skills through written assignments. Oral speaking skills will be improved through seminar discussions and through small group and individual presentations. Options for the final project will be discussed in the syllabus and in class.

Credit awarded in: expressive arts, history, geography, political science, education and Native American studies.
Total: 8 or 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, expressive arts and Native American studies.

Program Updates: (10/29/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Seven Generations: 200 Years of Japanese and American Art

New, not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Bob Haft, Makoto Okawahara
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Special Expenses: $200-$300 for art materials

This program is designed for students with an interest in the arts and culture of Japanese and American societies. We will learn the art of textile dyeing from a master dyer from Japan. Makoto Okawahara, artist in residence, is the seventh generation dyer from Takamatsu on the island of Shikoku, who also has a master’s degree in art from the prestigious Kyoto Art University. His quarter-long workshops on “tsutsugaki”, rice-paste resist dyeing, will be one of the major components of our comparative study of Japanese and American art and aesthetics.

The Japanese are adept at wrapping things. Indeed, they have a piece of cloth (called a “furoshiki”) that is used to wrap and carry everything from eggs to watermelons. In addition to dyeing textiles, we will also address the idea of “wrapping” both literally and metaphorically. Just as our cultures wrap themselves around us, hiding and protecting us all at once, art too is a form of wrapping, taking an idea, a dream, or a feeling and enclosing or encoding it within a visual language. We will look at various forms of wrapping (clothing, architecture, packaging of merchandise, social interactions and idioms in language to name a few) in both Japanese and American societies.

In the course of the program we will study the aesthetics of both Japan and America, one country steeped in tradition and dealing with rapid social change, and one steeped in social change and desperately seeking tradition. More specifically, we will be discussing how the aesthetics of the two countries have manifested themselves differently in the two cultures during the past 200 years and how, on occasion, they have either run parallel courses or cross-pollinated one another.

We will also discuss the role that traditional arts and crafts play in the two countries and how, in the face of the contemporary world’s rapid pace of social change, they might survive or be transformed in the future.

Total: 16 credits.
Credit will likely be awarded in:
art history, aesthetics, art theory and criticism, and individual research projects.
Program is preparatory for: careers or future studies in the Arts and the Humanities.

Program Updates: (01/13/05) New, not in printed catalog.


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Shadowlands

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Ariel Goldberger
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact Ariel Goldberger, (360) 867-6729 to discuss entrance to the program.
Prerequisites: New students must read Dream and the Underworld by James Hillman, Shamanism, a Reader, and Dancing in the Flames by Marion Goodman.
Special Expenses: Approximately $50 for workshop materials fee and $40 for theater tickets each quarter. Other expenses depend on specific student projects.

The main goal of this exciting program is to investigate the nature of the Shadow, the Shadow archetype and journeys through the mythic Shadowlands, while simultaneously building a learning community of scholars and artists engaged in multidisciplinary studies. Our exploration will include the following questions: What can we learn about, and from, mythic journeys through the Shadowlands? What is the Shadow aspect of the human psyche? What does the Shadow reveal about our psyche and the human condition? How can we reveal and explore some of its nature through artistic and multidisciplinary projects?
In the fall, we will study the Shadow as it appears in literature, art, Archetypal and Jungian psychology and myth, through short projects and performances. Faculty and guests will offer demonstrations and workshops in shadow puppetry, design and technical issues. Students will develop skills in performance, shadow-puppet theater and other explorations of the artistic process. Individual and collaborative projects will offer opportunities for delving into individual interests related to the themes of the class.
Exploration of experimental performance and innovative materials, techniques, imagery and tools will be a primary focus. As part of the program, we will go on field trips to see relevant theatrical and performance productions in Seattle and Portland.
In the winter these skills will be directed toward the production of a large-scale experimental shadow puppetry performance. Expect a full workload and room for self-direction.
Credit awarded in: archetypal psychology, cultural studies, expressive arts, experimental art, Jungian psychology, myth studies, performance studies, performance, theater, puppet theater and shamanism, depending on student's independent work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in archetypal psychology, cultural studies, expressive arts, experimental art, Jungian psychology, myth studies, performance studies, performance, theater, puppet theater and shamanism, and any career that requires imagination, collaborative skills, resourcefulness and cross-disciplinary skills.
Program Updates: (11/10/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.


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Slavery in Africa and the Americas

Spring quarter
Faculty: Babacar M'Baye, Michael Pfeifer
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.

Between 1619 and 1863, the "peculiar institution" of slavery profoundly shaped American cultural, social, economic and political institutions. Almost 244 years after the Dutch merchants brought the first African slaves to Virginia, African Americans transformed America's institutions by making the Civil War into a war for freedom, thereby compelling the Union Army and President Abraham Lincoln to recognize their emancipation. Perhaps slavery's most important legacy was how it shaped racial ideologies and racist notions and practices that have profoundly influenced American history. These ideologies and concepts of "race" are traceable to the transatlantic slave trade that radically transformed institutions and societies in the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, Europe and other places in the world.
Taking a comparative approach, we will study the history of American slavery through cultural and social lenses by examining West African cultures and history. We will explore the rise of the transatlantic slave trade and the Africans' experience of the Middle Passage, slavery in the northern and southern colonies, the formation of American racism, slavery in the American Revolution, slave folklore and cultural expression, slave resistance, the slave-holding class in Antebellum America, the abolitionist movement, and the process of the emancipation of the slaves. At times, we will also compare the experience of the African diaspora in slavery and emancipation in North America with that in the Caribbean and Latin America.
We will read intensively in historical studies, folklore, slave narratives and oral history, travel narratives and literary expression. Employing an approach that is thoroughly analytical and historically contextualized, we will discuss these readings and write about them. We will also listen to music that reflects the hybridity of the African American and American cultures that resulted from the encounter of African and European American cultures in slavery.
Credit awarded in: West African history, American history, African American literature, African American folklore and the history of American music. Upper-division Credit awarded: for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, teaching, law and other professions.
Program Updates:  


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Smart and Healthy

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Susan K. Finkel
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. New students should contact Susan Finkel, (360) 867-5345 to discuss entrance to the program.
Prerequisites: Ability to write.
Special Expenses: Possible theater trip each quarter.
Internship Possibilities: With faculty approval.

This program will cover topics in the fields of education and philosophy of education, psychology, education and health policy, and foods and health. Using original works in literature, psychology, philosophy and education by authors such as William James, John Dewey, Jean Piaget, Erik Erikson, B.F. Skinner, we will explore the connection between psychology and education through seminars, workshops and faculty and guest lecturers. A film series that explore food and society (e.g. Babette's Feast, Big Night, Mostly Martha), seminars, writings and readings will give us background to understand how food relates to the health, disease and well-being of different societies. Each student will be required to complete an in-depth research project on a topic of his or her choice in one of the above areas. Students are expected to participate fully in all parts of the program and develop and hone their critical reading, writing, research and analytical skills.
Credit awarded in: psychology, education, research skills and education and health policy.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in teaching, education, social work, health care, government policy and state and federal administration.

Program Updates: (8/17/04) New, not in printed catalog.
(11/11/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program.


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So You Want to Be a Psychologist?

Spring quarter
Faculty: Carrie Margolin
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.
Prerequisites: Knowledge of statistics is helpful but not required.
Special Expenses: Membership in Western Psychological Association (WPA) plus WPA convention registration fees total approximately $65 (payable to WPA before March 31, 2005. Contact Carrie Margolin for exact fees and deadline); shared hotel lodging at convention plus food, approximately $175.
Travel Component: Travel to WPA Annual Convention, Portland, Oregon, April 14-17, 2005.

This program is designed to be an exploration and preparation for those students planning a career in psychology or social work. We will cover typical activities of psychologists who work in academia, schools, counseling/clinical settings, social work agencies and applied research settings. We will look at the academic preparations necessary for these careers.
We will discuss ethical quandaries in psychology, and the ethics of human and animal experimentation. We will cover history and systems of psychology. Students will read original source literature from the major divisions of the field, covering both classic and contemporary journal articles and books by well-known psychologists. Library research skills, in particular the use of PsycINFO and Science and Social Science Citation Indexes, will be emphasized. Students will gain expertise in the technical writing style of the American Psychological Association (APA). The class format will include lectures, guest speakers, workshops, discussions, films and a field trip.
There's no better way to explore the range of activities and topics that psychology offers, and to learn of cutting-edge research in the field, than to attend and participate in a convention of psychology professionals and students. To that end, students will attend the annual convention of the Western Psychological Association, the western regional arm of the APA.
Credit awarded in: history and systems of psychology, social science ethics, career explorations in psychology, foundations of psychology, and one discipline within psychology (student’s choice to study either developmental, cognitive, social, or physiological psychology). All credit is lower division.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in psychology and social work.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates: (8/2/04) The credit equivalencies have been changed.
(11/12/04) Six seats have been reserved for sophomores.


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Student Originated Studies: American Studies and Humanities

Cancelled
Spring quarter
Faculty: David Marr
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior or for sophomores prepared to carry out advanced study.
Faculty Signature: Students must draw up an Independent Learning Contract in consultation with David Marr. Contract proposals received between January 10 and March 1, 2005, will be given priority. For more information contact David Marr, (360) 867-6751, or The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students to do research in American literature, American history and American philosophy, as well as other area of the humanities.
Previous SOS projects by Evergreen students have been centered on such topics as Utopia, the Blues, comedy and tragedy, George Orwell, the sense of place in American writing, the concept of ideology, American pragmatism, the Harlem Renaissance and the Emerson-Ellison axis in American thought.
Credit awarded: will reflect the students' individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in the humanities, American studies, teaching, law, business and the arts.
Program Updates: (1/21/04) Cancelled


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Student Originated Studies: Humanities

Fall quarter
Faculty: Marianne Bailey
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: Students must be prepared to carry out advanced study or wish to write a senior thesis in the humanities.
Faculty Signature: Students must submit individual contract proposals to Marianne Bailey. Contract proposals received by May 10, 2004, will be given priority.
Additional contract proposals will be accepted until the program fills. For more information contact Marianne Bailey, (360) 867-6438, or The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of fall quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students to do research in world literatures (sponsor is expert in French, German, African and Caribbean literature and thought), continental philosophy, theater, comparative religions and mythology and ritual studies.
Credit awarded: will reflect the students' individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, theater, language and cultural studies, teaching, law, business and the arts.
Program Updates:  


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Student Originated Studies: Humanities

New, not in printed catalog.
Winter and Spring quarter
Faculty: Nancy Taylor
Enrollment: 15
Class Standing: Junior or senior or for sophomores prepared to carry out advanced study.
Faculty Signature: Students must draw up an Independent Learning Contract in consultation with Nancy Taylor. Contract proposals received by Dec. 10, 2004, for winter quarter and March 1 , 2005, for spring quarter will be given priority. For more information contact Nancy Taylor, (360) 867-6398, or The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505 (preferably by email).

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of winter quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students to do research in three areas: Shakespeare and Early Modern England; women's history, particularly European and American; and in Victorian studies. Students will be expected to do some work in common and meet weekly in small groups, as well as work on their own individual projects.

Credit awarded: will reflect the students' individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, theater, cultural studies, teaching and the arts.

Program Update: (7/12/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Student Originated Studies: Media

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Sally Cloninger (FS), Ruth Hayes (W)
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:This is an advanced media group contract. Students should have completed Mediaworks as well as have completed other more broadly interdisciplinary work.
Faculty Signature: This group contract will accept new students by faculty signature after submitting an application, portfolio and completing an interview with the faculty. For more information contact Sally Cloninger, (360) 867-6059, or The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: Depends upon project.
Internship Possibilities: With faculty approval.

Students are invited to join this learning community of media artists interested in media production, design, writing, history or theory, and to collaborate with media faculty. Students will work with faculty during the first few weeks of fall quarter to design small group contracts, collaborative projects or critique groups that will be supported by this year's SOS program. In addition to the student-centered curriculum, we will explore different themes each quarter. In fall, our focus will be Building Media Communities. The theme for winter will be the Dynamics of Creative Processes. In spring, we will focus again on Building Media Communities in regard to audience and distribution.
This is not the place to do beginning studies in media. It should be seen as an opportunity for students who share similar skills and common interests to do advanced work that may have grown out of previous academic projects and programs. To be considered for this advanced program, you should have successfully completed Mediaworks (the entry-level program in media studies at Evergreen) or its equivalent (i.e., approximately one year of media skill training, media history and media theory), or completed another interdisciplinary media program at Evergreen, and submit a portfolio that includes copies of recent faculty evaluations and a VHS tape that contains two examples of your best work in film or video.
Credit awarded in: media studies and production.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in media arts.
Program Updates: (5/25/04) Sally Cloninger will be in this program during fall and spring quarters.
(1/28/05) This program will accept qualified students for spring quarter.

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Student Originated Studies: Science and Education

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall 2004 quarter

Faculty: Dharshi Bopegedera
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior. Sophomores ready for independent work.
Prerequisites: Interest in science education in K-12 is desired but not required. Ability to work in a general chemistry laboratory with minimal supervision will be an asset.
Faculty Signature: Interested students who have a project in mind must draw up an Independent Learning Contract and arrange for an informational discussion with Dharshi Bopegedera before the first week of the fall quarter. Students must submit a ten-week plan of their intended work. For more information contact Dharshi Bopegedera at (360) 867-6620, or The Evergreen State College, Lab I, Olympia, WA 98505. This learning contract is intended to provide opportunities for students who are interested in science teaching in K-12. Students may decide on science concepts they wish to investigate with the intention of teaching those concepts to schoolchildren, learn them thoroughly, and demonstrate their understanding of the concepts to the instructor. Students will then design hands-on science activities to be conducted in a classroom setting. Students need to demonstrate these activities to the instructor and fellow students. There may be opportunities to conduct the activity with local schoolchildren. Students are expected to meet with the instructor once a week to check progress and discuss any questions they may have. Students must keep complete records of all their work, which will be evaluated for awarding credit. Students can take this contract to help improve their laboratory skills and teaching skills. The faculty sponsor will support students interested in any area of science (chemistry, physics, biology, geology, etc.).

Credit awarded will reflect the students' individual course of study and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, natural sciences and environmental studies.

Program Updates: (4/22/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Student Originated Studies: Visual and Media Arts

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Paul Sparks
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: One year, or the equivalent, of preparatory college work in the visual arts and/or media arts. For visual arts students this should include substantial work in drawing. These requirements may be waived for students with strong portfolio work.
Faculty Signature: No new students.
Special Expenses: Students should expect above-normal expenses for materials and supplies, as well as lab fees.

Student Oriented Studies: Visual and Media Arts is aimed at those individuals who are thinking about graduate school or hands-on professional work in one of the visual or media arts. This program combines several features typical of an intensive graduate-level studio workshop and of the traditional conservatory master class. Students will pursue self-defined project work in an environment that is characterized by intensive critique and demanding real-world standards in a PC-free environment. Expect a heavy workload. A capacity for tolerance and a sense of humor are desirable but not absolutely necessary.
Credits may vary depending upon student work.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the arts: digital imaging, painting, photography, sculpture and video.
Program Updates: (11/11/04) This program will not accept new students.


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Sustainable Design: Green Furniture

Spring quarter
Faculty: R. T. Leverich
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.
Prerequisites: Sustainable Design: Green Means or two quarters of environmental design, 3-D design or sculpture and one quarter of ecology.
Faculty Signature: Students must present a portfolio containing a minimum one-page writing sample and photos of six to eight examples of 2-D and 3-D work at the Academic Fair, March 2, 2005.
For information contact Bob Leverich, or The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505. Portfolios received by March 2 will be given priority. Portfolios will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses: $250 for woodworking tools and supplies and approximately $125 for field trip to Eugene, Oregon.

Can a table that wastes wood in its construction be beautiful? Is an uncomfortable chair wasteful? Is it ethical to use sustainably harvested hardwoods for high-powered rifle stocks? This program will explore the challenges of designing furniture and functional woodworking projects using sustainable means and materials.
Students will study and do research in sustainable forestry practices, recycled and man-made wood products, furniture and industrial design history, and ergonomics. They'll use what they learn in an integrative wood studio where they will design and build one piece of furniture and one small production-run prototype. Students will be introduced to design and technical drawing, wood characteristics and selection, the care and safe use of hand and power tools, joint design and cutting, lamination and bending, assembly and gluing, sanding and finishing.
Work discussions, readings, seminars and writing assignments will address issues around materialism, reuse and recycling, craft and workmanship, user and designers, and sustaining work and life styles.
Credit awarded in: drawing, design history and theory, environmental design, and furniture design and construction.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, crafts, architecture and environmental design.
This program is also listed under Expressive Arts.
Program Updates:  


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Sustainable Design: Green Means

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: R. T. Leverich, Peter Impara, Gretchen Van Dusen
Enrollment: 48
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.
Prerequisites: Sutdents must have background experience in ecology and/or 2-D art and read Cradle to Cradle by William McDonough and Green Architecture by James Wines prior to the first class of winter Quarter.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Robert Leverich, (360) 867-6760.
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 each quarter for design studio equipment and supplies; $125 each quarter for overnight field trips.

What means do we use to shape the Earth and its living systems, and to live, work and move about? Are these means ethical, sustainable and beautiful? Ecological design proposes means that are responsive and responsible to place and community, that reuse and renew materials and energy, and that draw lessons from natural systems and forms and longstanding human responses to them.
Students will study and do research in landscape ecology, energy systems and environmental design history, and bring lessons from these disciplines to an integrative design studio-the locus of activities for the program. Studio projects will address drawing and design fundamentals, thinking in three dimensions, site survey and analysis, programming, user involvement, ecological design responses, building-science basics, energy use, and presentation skills. Projects may range in scale and focus, from a comic strip promoting safe disposal of hazardous household wastes to portable, self-sustaining shelters for disaster victims, or from a strip-mine restoration plan to an energy conserving hairdryer. Students will augment their graphic means of study and expression with computer workshops. Work discussions, readings, seminars and writing assignments will address how we, as individuals and as communities, can design spiritually and physically sustaining means of coexisting with the living systems of our home planet.
Credit awarded in: environmental design, ecology and natural sciences, visual art and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, environmental design, architecture and the visual arts.
This program is also listed under Environmental Studies; Expressive Arts; and Scientific Inquiry.

Program Updates:

(4/14/04) Peter Impara (Geography) and Gretchen Van Dusen (Architecture) have joined this program.
(8/4/04) The enrollment has been increased to 48 students.
(11/16/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. Students must have background experience in ecology and/or 2-D art and read Cradle to Cradle by William McDonough and Green Architecture by James Wines prior to the first class of winter quarter.


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Sustainable Development Imperative, The: From Local to Global and Back Again

New, not in printed catalog.

Spring quarter
Faculty: Steven Francis
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sopohomore or above, transfer students welcome.

Political, social and economic events over the last 30 years have highlighted the imperative for pursuing a development process within the global political economy that is sustainable from a variety of perspectives. With one quarter of the world’s population living on less than $2 a day in the South and wages stagnant in much of the North, sustainable development has become critical to our future. The events of September 11, 2001, and resistance to the neo-liberal agenda have underscored the dire need to evaluate development alternatives. Sustainable development is not solely related to environmental issues or growth within resource limits but also requires us to measure development and growth more broadly than growing per capita incomes, to create economies that meet human needs, and to understand the historical evolution of political and social institutions and processes that promote or impede sustainable development. This program will investigate various models of political, economic and social development, which have been promoted in the past and are used today. Import substitution, export promotion, strategic trade policies, market-led and state-centered development are all historical approaches that have relevance today.

Sustainable development will be viewed within an interdisciplinary framework which includes the need to promote economic development, job creation and income generation while at the same time understanding the impact on cultural values, political institutions, the natural environment and social cohesion. Tradeoffs are unavoidable. Questions that we will explore will include: How do we pursue development policies that are economically empowering and sustainable over time? What are the implications of the neo-liberal agenda of privatization and open trade on broad-based development? How can poverty and inequality be lessened within a global system of international markets and trade? What are our individual and community responsibilities to craft sustainable development alternatives? Are democratic processes necessary requirements for sustainable development? We will ask these questions in terms of international development as well as the development of local communities and economies. Development strategies which address global inequalities, poverty, productive efficiency, environmental problems, externalities, and market failures will be central to our investigation. The role of international organizations, such as regional development banks, the IMF, World Bank, WTO, trade regimes and development NGO’s will be covered as well.

The political economy approach of this program will include the role—both beneficial and problematic—of markets, the state, communities and individuals within a global system. If all politics are local, as a famous politician once said, then one can say that all economics are local as well. But since interdependent systems are involved, one can say that all politics, economics and social actions are simultaneously local and global in nature. That will be the operational thesis of this program.

After developing several theoretical frameworks from which to view sustainable development, we will look at specific development experiences in Latin America, Africa and Asia. The program will include a political economy lab that will introduce students to the political-economic models and theories underlying markets, international trade and alternative development paradigms.
Credit awarded in: economics, political economy, international studies, international trade and development studies.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in economics, political economy, social work, government, international agencies, Peace Corps work and non-governmental organizations.

Program Updates:

(4/29/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Teaching Gardens

Fall quarter
Faculty: Frederica Bowcutt
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Faculty Signature: Students must submit a portfolio of botanical illustrations or graphic arts work, a writing sample, and a letter of recommendation or evaluation from their last Evergreen program to Frederica Bowcutt, or The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505. Portfolios received
by May 5, 2004 will be given priority.
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 for field trips.

We will link theory and praxis in the creation of an arboretum on Evergreen's campus. We will reflect on the following questions: How might we increase the educational value of the "green fringe" around our buildings? How might an arboretum or botanic garden look that fosters values such as social justice and multiculturalism? To develop a historical context for understanding arboreta, we will consider the relationship between people and gardens, including the influence of Buddhism on Asian garden design; the influence of Persian gardens on Europeans; the impact of Christianity on garden design and land use; the link between imperialism and Renaissance collections of plants; the influence of Romanticism on European attitudes towards nature; the importance of social justice issues in relation to botanic gardens; and Native American approaches to gardening. To aid our inquiries, we will read about theory and praxis in landscape architecture, garden design and environmental education. We will visit local arboreta and botanic gardens, including Chinese scholar and Japanese gardens.
Students will learn about land-use planning for a public space. Each student will complete a major work in connection to the articulation of teaching gardens on Evergreen's campus. Students will present designs to the Campus Land-Use Committee for approval, give public oral presentations and help to publicize the opening of the teaching gardens. They will learn how to fund raise and write grant proposals. In addition, students will help to install the primitive plant garden or phase II of the water-wise pollinator garden.
Credit will be awarded in environmental education, garden design and history, and teaching garden practicum.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental education, environmental art and landscape architecture.
Program Updates: (4/21/04) The enrollment limit has been increased
(4/29/04) The enrollment limit has been reduced to 20 students.


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Teaching Through Performance: American Radical History

New, not in printed catalog.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Arun Chandra
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome. New students will be admitted each quarter.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Arun Chandra, (360) 867-6077.

There are many important events in American History that never make it into our history textbooks, or are only mentioned in passing, thus remaining hidden from students in many high-school history classes. In this program, we will study these hidden histories, create performances of theater and music about them, and, if possible, perform them for local high-school history classes as an alternative method of teaching about historical events. Each quarter will be divided into three parts. First, we will research hidden histories, such as Margaret Sanger and the legalization of birth control; Jane Addams and the Women's Peace movement; William Z. Foster and the American Communist Party; the trials of Sacco and Vanzetti, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and the Chicago Seven; the 1919 general strike in Seattle; and American involvement in overthrowing the democratically elected Chilean government. Second, we will compose scripts and music for short performances about these histories. Finally, we will rehearse and perform these events. If possible, we will perform in high schools in the local area. Each quarter, students will be expected to write a short paper about their historical research, write the scripts and music and help present the performances. Alongside the historical work of American political and social history, we will be reading plays and viewing operas from the 19th and 20th centuries that address and depict social problems. Some of the writers and composers we will examine include Bertolt Brecht, Bernard Shaw, Frank Wedekind, Alban Berg, Giuseppi Verdi, Ludwig van Beethoven, and W. A. Mozart. Each quarter will have its own cycle of research, composition and performance. New students can join the program in winter and spring quarters on a space-available basis.

Credit awarded in: 19th- and 20th-century American history, music composition, creative writing and performance.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.

Program Updates:

(4/29/04) New, not in printed catalog. This program is an alternative for the cancelled program Time Rhythm Music Theater.
(11/17/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program
(2/7/05) This program will accept new students on a space available basis. New students should talk with faculty about make-up reading material. For information contact Arun Chandra, (360) 867-6077.


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Telling the Truth

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: William Ray Arney, Sara Huntington (FW.5)
Enrollment: 36
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No new students.

Telling the truth is a matter of craft. Students will learn an approach to writing and reading (and talking and editing) that is guided by the idea that writing is a persuasive act. They will develop skills through constant practice and will strive to master well-defined rhetorical techniques and forms. We will ground our work in the conflicting ideas of truth in Aristotle and Plato. We will explore standards of discourse in fiction, history, and science, examining how realism has become the style most associated with truth, whether embedded in facts or narrative or synthetic analysis. We will confront the truth in different literary forms, from comedy and satire to science and sociology. Of every piece of writing, we will ask, How was this put together?
We will work against romantic notions of "voice"-which wrongly assume that there is a latent, essential self-and "inspiration"-which requires a heavy-breathing higher power-and against the Western metaphysics of truth. Students' writing will aim, simply, at telling the truth. In achieving mastery of rhetorical forms and developing their individual style, students will learn to fail well. They will know that telling the truth is hard work-more difficult than target practice, or other stochastic activities, and more exacting than self-analysis, or other therapeutic indulgences-and that notable failures are valuable. Students in this program may, at times, feel good about their work, but that will happen only when they have done work that everyone knows is good-because they have told the truth. Successful students will never again have to write a single word that is not their own.
We're not kidding around here. We are offering an un-ironic invitation to students who want to know what it takes to write well and thus to join serious conversations about truth, conversations that are guided by the idea that, even though it's not much, language is all we've got so it makes sense to use it well. If you're tough and smart and determined, we want you to join us in telling the truth. If you're longing for a life beyond relativistic maundering, sign up!
Credit awarded in: writing, rhetoric, philosophy, and sociology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies that require telling the truth.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs.
Program Updates: (12/11/03) Sara Huntington has reduced her time in the program to half-time status and the enrollment limit has been reduced to 36 students (9 freshmen) (27 Sophomores-Seniors).
(11/15/04) This program will not accept new students.


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The American Civil War in Modern Memory

Spring quarter
Faculty: Jerry Lassen, Tom Rainey
Enrollment: 48
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen students.

The American Civil War of 1860-65, was the first modern war in which an economically mightier, more populous, and more technologically advanced section of the country would overwhelm the other in a grinding war of attrition. It was a defining moment in the history of the United States. Indeed, it was a world historical event of such magnitude that it is still difficult for us to understand it even with the benefit of retrospect. Had the Southern states won the war, the history of the world would surely have developed very differently. The victorious Northern states went on to establish the economic and political foundations of the United States as a world power.
The war is of such historical significance that it still fascinates historians and lay people alike. Each year there are a multitude of books and articles written about the war. In addition, there are a number of excellent movies and documentaries that have recently been produced. Through historical texts, films and literature this program will explore the historical roots, the major causes, the long-term consequences and the enduring mystique of this great conflict.
Credit awarded in: American history, American economic history and American literature.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences.
This program is also listed under Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates: (02/10/2005) Tom Rainey has joined this program.


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The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Power, Narrative and Resolution

New, not in printed catalog

Spring quarter
Faculty: Steve Niva
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict encompasses many dimensions: identity, religion, land, water and historical injustices both within Europe, and as a result of European colonialism. It has become a complex conflict between contending narratives; primarily the Jewish/Zionist narrative of return and response to European anti-Semitism and the Arab/Palestinian narrative of continuity and anti-colonial self-determination. This program will seek to provide a thorough introduction to this 100 year conflict through a specific focus on these contending narratives-myths, attitudes, histories and facts-while recognizing that there are a diversity of views within each side. The first half of the program will examine the key historical claims to the land made by each side and learn about the key historical turning points in the conflict. We will also examine the religious, political and ideological composition of each side. The second half of the program will examine the contemporary nature of the conflict since 1967, focusing on the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the rise of Palestinian nationalism, the Israeli search for security and prospects for a peaceful resolution to the conflict. We will conclude by considering the role of the U.S. in the conflict, as well as the broader nature of U.S. foreign policy in the region. Students will write several historical and analytical papers, develop and perform classroom debates and role-plays, and undertake creative work in order to explore various dimensions of the conflict.

Credit awarded in: political science, history and cultural studies.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in international politics, diplomacy and conflict resolution, Middle Eastern studies and cross-cultural communication.

Program Update: (5/25/04) New, not in printed catalog.


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Novel, The: Life and Form

Winter quarter
Faculty: Thad Curtz
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Two years of college,
including some work in literature.

From its beginning in the 1700s, the novel has aspired to give the effect of real life, to serve as a mirror of reality. For almost as long, perhaps because of this ambition, sophisticated readers and novelists have felt dissatisfied with its artificiality-its exhaustion and imminent death have been proclaimed again and again. Nonetheless, its aspirations and its features have made it the literary form in which central issues about how to live modern life-issues of morality and politics and money and love-have been most extensively explored. In fact, some argue that novels have helped invent and shape our changing impulses about those issues.
In this program, we'll trace the history of the form by reading a major novel a week, including works by Defoe, Austen, Dickens, Eliot, James and Woolf, as well as looking closely at technique in selections from others. Novels are often long, and we will also be paying some attention to their social and historical contexts; students should be prepared to read relatively large amounts each week. However, a good deal of our attention will be devoted to careful analysis of short passages. We'll expect to spend at least as much time looking at and carefully discussing the language through which the stories create their worlds as we talk about what happens to the "people" in them.
Credit awarded in: literature, history and art history.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, social sciences, psychology, business, law and teaching.
Program Updates: (5/14/04) Hilary Binda has left the program. Enrollment limit has been reduced.


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Theatre Intensive: Stage Production

Cancelled. Walter Grodzik has joined the Puppet and Object Theater program for spring. Please see Puppet and Object Theater as an alternative choice.
Spring quarter

Faculty: Walter Eugene Grodzik
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for first-year students as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Faculty Signature: Admission by interview. Interviews will be conducted at the end of winter quarter (watch for notices.) For information contact Walter Eugene Grodzik, The Evergreen State College, Seminar 2 C4106, Olympia, WA 98505. This program will consist exclusively of participating in a faculty-directed stage production of a play chosen by the instructor. The audition, rehearsal and production work will follow an academic/professional theater model that students can expect in any Off-Broadway or regional theater. The play will be chosen from the realistic/avant-garde theater canon. This will allow us to work with acting and directing techniques that were specifically developed for each type of theater. For example, these techniques could include Stanislavski's sense memory, Michael Chekhov's psychological gesture, Meyerhold's biomechanics, or Bogart's viewpoints. Students will experience a rigorous training in movement and vocal techniques and will learn to utilize these techniques in the performance of the play. Participation in the production involves acting in the play, dramaturgical work, assistant directing, stage management, set, costume, lighting and sound design, set and costume construction publicity, and all the other areas related to a successful play production. For example, after a successful audition, a student will be cast in the play, she will spend maybe half to three quarters of her time in rehearsal, and the rest of the time she might work in the shop building the set. A student might present a portfolio of his lighting design, and he will become the lighting designer for the production as well as the publicity coordinator. In short, every student will participate in more than one area of the production process. While the production will be directed by the faculty, the process will be an interactive collaboration among all participants. The program will spend the first eight to nine weeks in rehearsal, and it will culminate in a fully mounted site-specific production or a production in the Experimental Theatre. In addition to rehearsals and production work, the program will meet at least once a week for an all-program seminar concerning dramaturgical matters closely related to the production. For example, if the production is a play by a 20th-century avant-garde writer, the seminars will deal with other plays by the same author, scholarship, and the social, political, economic and cultural environment of the play, and so on. Those weekly seminars will help us to understand the world of the play, as well as the world of the author.

Credit awarded in: acting, directing, design, stage management, dramaturgy, costuming, lighting, sound, and publicity according to which function the individual student specializes in, and also in theater history, critical theory and dramatic literature for the seminar preparation and participation.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is also listed under: Programs For First-Year Students and Expressive Arts.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in teaching and theatre and the arts and humanities.

Program Updates: (4/30/04) New, not in printed catalog.
(2/22/05) This program has been cancelled. Walter Grodzik has joined the Puppet and Object Theater program for spring. Please see Puppet and Object Theater as an alternative choice.


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Thinking Straight

Spring quarter
Faculty: David W. Paulsen
Enrollment: 24
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.

Do you want to work on improving your critical reasoning skills? This program will focus on techniques of understanding and criticizing arguments and theories. It will emphasize a cooperative, dialogic approach to deciding what to believe. Thinking Straight will cover standard topics in informal logic including argument reconstruction, assessment of validity and fallacies. It will also explore reasoning in two domains: science and ethics. The core text will be Cederblom and Paulsen, Critical Reasoning: Understanding and Criticizing Arguments and Theories, 5th edition. We will apply critical reasoning techniques to a number of contemporary, contentious issues found in a variety of texts including full books as well as newspaper editorials and columns, Internet documents, and journal articles. We will also discuss the extent to which standards of reasoning are general and how patterns of reasoning might differ in different, specific domains.
Credit awarded in: informal logic, introduction to philosophy of science, introduction to ethics and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in philosophy, science and law.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs and Scientific Inquiry.
Program Updates:  


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Time Rhythm Music Theater

Program cancelled. See Teaching Through Performance: American Radical History as alternative program.
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Arun Chandra, Walter Grodzik
Enrollment: 50
Class Standing: Junior or senior, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: Foundations of Performing Arts, or other college-level performing arts courses.

This program explores experimental theater and music of the 20th century to the present. Both theater and music are time-based arts that address the structures of sequence, return, counterpoint, juxtaposition, non-sequitur and contradiction. For example, a plot has a "sequence," music has events that follow one another, music can have simultaneous events, and a play can have multiple themes running simultaneously.
Performing music and theater together suggests many intriguing possibilities. Must theater always be in the foreground and music in the background? Can music do more than establish a "scene" for the actors? What can music tell us about the characters that a dialog cannot? Can acting change the significance of the music? When is music "theatrical?" Can theater be "musical?" What has happened historically to change the relative functions of "music" and "theater"? What were the social and political antecedents and consequences to these attempts? How can we speak of these events such that they are not merely historical curiosities, of use only to the academic or the nerd?
During fall and winter quarters, shared concepts of theater and music will be discussed, experimented with and rehearsed. We will read plays, listen to music and read articles on aesthetic theory by many different playwrights, composers and philosophers, such as Gertrude Stein, Tony Kushner, Bertolt Brecht, Harry Partch, Anne Bogart and Walter Benjamin. In the winter, students will design creative projects that take off from the class readings, discussions, rehearsals and experiments.
In the spring, students will perform a full-scale play directed by the faculty, with music composed by the faculty.
Credit awarded in: 20th-century theater, 20th-century music, music composition, acting, directing and contemporary aesthetics.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in music, theater and the performing arts.
Program Updates: (4/21/04) Program cancelled. See Teaching Through Performance: American Radical History as alternative program.


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Transformational Literacies

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Willie Parson (FW), Gilda Sheppard, Tyrus Smith, Artee Young, Duke Kuehn, Carl Waluconis, Zhang Er, Allen Mauney (F), Barbara Laners (WS) Bracey Dangerfield, Peter Bacho (S)
Enrollment: 225
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Tacoma program. Prospective students must attend an intake interview. For information about admission and the application process call (253) 680-3000.
Special Expenses: Approximately $25-$50 lab fee.
Internship Possibilities: With program coordinator and faculty advisor approval.

This Tacoma Campus program is intended for students who are preparing for professional advancement, graduate or professional school and community leadership. It will address multiple ways of thinking, learning and doing, and is designed for those students interested in research and application experiences that focus on issues and challenges within their professional lives and communities.
In fall quarter, students will research and critically examine multiple intelligence, the social construction of knowledge and theories, and approaches to various literacies. These include but are not limited to the following types of interdisciplinary literacies: linguistic, media, logical-statistical, sociological, environmental, technological and legal.
In winter quarter, based upon work done in the fall, students will identify, explore and develop topics for further research and study using their acquired knowledge and literacies in situations designed to transform themselves and their communities.
In spring quarter, students will use various communications media to demonstrate the transformations that can occur through merging and applying multiple intelligence, literacy studies, professional competencies and community advocacy.
Credit awarded in: urban education, community and environmental studies, law and public policy, science and social science research, research methodology, literature, humanities, composition, media literacy, computer studies, multimedia and statistics.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, law and public policy, media arts, organizational development, community development, social and human service and environmental studies.
Program Updates: (5/14/04) Carl Waluconis and Barbara Laners have joined the teaching team.
(7/19/04) Zhang Er, Ph.D. in Molecular Pharmacology, has joined the Tacoma faculty teaching team.
(7/29/04) Allen Mauney, mathematics, has joined the program for fall quarter.
(8/6/04) Bracey Dangerfield, Ph.D. in physiology, has joined this program.
(2/23/05) Peter Bacho has joined this program.


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Tribal: Reservation-Based/Community-Determined

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Michelle Aguilar-Wells, Jeff Antonelis-Lapp, Michael Pavel, Allen Standing Bear Jenkins, Cynthia Marchand-Cecil, Virginia Cross, Jonelle DeCoteau, Mark Ramon.
Enrollment: 112
Class Standing: Junior or senior; Northwest Indian College Bridge students.
Faculty Signature: Students must be living on or working for one of the reservation sites. For information contact Michelle Aguilar-Wells, (360) 276-4598; Jeff Antonelis-Lapp, (253) 735-6647, ext. 120, or the Program Secretary Office, (360) 867-6600. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses: Travel expenses related to at least four weekend visits to the Olympia campus each quarter.

Leadership in the 21st century, the theme of this program, is designed for Indian students seeking a liberal arts degree. This reservation-based and community-determined program seeks tribal members and other students who work or live on a reservation. The program emphasizes community building at each of the reservation sites. Interactive workshops, student-led seminars, student-centered conferences to present program material and student-designed newsletters are ways program information will be presented. Students and tribal officials design the curricu-lum by asking what an educated member of an Indian nation needs to know to contribute to the community. The interdisciplinary approach allows students to participate in seminars and modules while also studying in their individual academic interest areas.
Within the framework of the identified curriculum, the premise is that an "educated person" needs to have skills in research, critical thinking, analysis and communication. Program material is taught using a tribal perspective and issues related to tribal communities are often the topics of discussion. Scholarship, academic gain and critical thinking skills are assessed as part of student evaluations.
Credit awarded in: history, political science, federal Indian policy, leadership studies and writing.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in human services, tribal government and management, law, natural resources, community development, Native American studies, cultural studies and K-12 education.
Program Updates: (4/5/04) Allen Standing Bear Jenkins has joined this program.
(6/01/04) Michael Pavel has joined the faculty team. Frances Rains has left the program.
(7/19/04) Cynthia Marchand-Cecil has joined this program.
(11/18/04) Virginia Cross, Jonelle DeCoteau and Mark Ramon have joined the program as site-based faculty.


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Turning Eastward: Explorations in East/West Psychology

Fall and Winter quartersNew, not in printed catalog

Faculty: Ryo Imamura
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites: College-level expository writing ability.
Faculty Signature: No new students.

So far, western psychology has failed to provide us with a satisfactory understanding of the full range of human experience. It has largely overlooked the core of human understanding—our everyday mind, our immediate awareness of being with all of its felt complexity and sensitive attunement to the vast network of interconnectedness with the universe around us. Instead, it has chosen to analyze the mind as though it were an object independent of the analyzer, consisting of hypothetical structures and mechanisms that cannot be directly experienced. Western psychology’s neglect of the living mind—both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities—has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of the East, particularly Buddhism, which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.
Eastern psychology shuns any impersonal attempt to objectify human life from the viewpoint of an external observer, instead studying consciousness as a living reality that shapes individual and collective perception and action. The primary tool for directly exploring the mind is meditation or mindfulness, an experiential process in which one becomes an attentive participant-observer in the unfolding of moment-to-moment consciousness.
In this program, we will take a critical look at the basic assumptions and tenets of the major currents in traditional western psychology, the concept of mental illness and the distinctions drawn between normal and abnormal thought and behavior. We will then investigate the eastern study of mind that has developed within spiritual traditions, particularly within the Buddhist tradition. In doing so, we will take special care to avoid the common pitfall of most western interpretations of eastern thought—the attempt to fit eastern ideas and practices into unexamined western assumptions and traditional intellectual categories. Lastly, we will address the encounter between eastern and western psychology as possibly having important ramifications for the human sciences in the future, potentially leading to new perspectives on the whole range of human experience and life concerns.
Credit will be awarded in: personality theory, abnormal psychology, Buddhist thought and practice, Taoism, communication skills and social psychology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
This program is preparatory for: careers and future study in psychology, counseling, social work and religious studies.
Program Updates: (11/21/03) New, not in printed catalog
(11/11/04) This program will not accept new students.


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Uncertain World, Uncertain Knowledge

Cancelled
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Donald Morisato, John Cushing, Nancy Taylor
Enrollment: 72
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.

How do human beings make sense of the complex and uncertain world in which we live? What conceptual frameworks do we use to impose order on our chaotic impressions?
In this program, we will present a series of case studies that explore different ways of apprehending the world. These cases will reveal how different ways of thinking ("disciplines") go about their work, often leading to quite different ways of seeing the same events.
The approach is illustrated by a case study on the emergence of modern physics in the first half of the 20th century, leading to the creation of the atomic bomb. We will examine the underlying physics, the social and political context surrounding the development and deployment of the bomb, the ethics of science, and the significance of this event for art and literature. Other cases will include topics chosen from the natural sciences (e.g., Darwin and the theory of evolution), the social sciences (e.g., the development and application of intelligence testing) and philosophy (e.g., the conflict between love and duty in different cultures). In the fall and winter quarters, students will read significant works, participate in seminar discussions, write research papers, and develop scientific and quantitative skills. Three weeks will be devoted to each case study. Beyond talking about the disciplines, students will learn how scientists think and work by doing simple biological and physical experiments. Similarly, they will learn how historians approach their work by doing history. During the spring quarter, students will undertake a significant research project of their own choosing, using the methods of several disciplines. This project will be the culmination of each student's work in the program.
Credit awarded in: history, literature, writing, history of science, science and other areas depending on the case studies selected.
Total: 16 credits per quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, social science and science.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs and Scientific Inquiry.
Program Updates: (12/11/03) Cancelled - Talk with Academic Advisors for program alternatives..


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Undergraduate Research in Scientific Inquiry

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Clyde Barlow, Dharshi Bopegedera, Andrew Brabban, Judith Cushing, Jeff Kelly, Rob Knapp, Betty kutter, Stu Matz, Donals Morisato, Nancy Murray, Jim Neitzel, Neal Nelson, Paula Schofield, Sheryl Shulman, Rebecca Sunderman, E.J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: Negotiated individually with faculty.
Faculty Signature: Contact individual faculty to make arrangements.

A number of faculty in this planning group are engaged in research projects that offer collaborative research opportunities for advanced students. These provide an important aspect of advanced work in the sciences that take advantage of faculty expertise, Evergreen's flexible structure and excellent equipment. In general, students begin by working in apprenticeship with faculty and laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific program. These projects generally run 12 months a year; a signature is required from the faculty with whom students will be working.
Clyde Barlow and Jeff Kelly work with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment.
Dharshi Bopegedera would like to engage students in three projects. (1) FTIR spectroscopy of free radicals (2 students): This project is for advanced chemistry students who are interested in using infrared spectroscopy to understand molecular properties of free radicals synthesized in situ in a microwave discharge. (2) An interdisciplinary study of drinking water in the South Puget Sound (2 students): This is an ongoing study to investigate the quality of drinking water in the Puget Sound area. We will analyze the water and explore the connections between the minerals found in drinking water and the geological properties of the land. Students who have completed general chemistry with laboratory can carry out this project. (3) Science in Local Schools (2 students): We will work with local schoolteachers to develop science lab activities that will enhance the science curriculum in local schools. About four science labs will be taken to local schools each quarter. Students who have an interest in teaching science and who have completed general chemistry with laboratory would be ideal for this project.
Andrew Brabban (biotechnology) is interested in developing biological technologies for agriculture, industry and health care that improve the efficiency of a modern process, or generally improve the quality of life for society. Current student projects include technologies to produce pharmaceutical synthons, reduce the incidence of E. coli 0157:H7 in the human food chain (in collaboration with Betty Kutter and Dr. Callaway, Texas A&M University) and the role of DNA as an environmental pollutant (in collaboration with LOTT sewage treatment plant). Students will use techniques and receive credit in molecular biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry and microbiology.
Judith Bayard Cushing studies how scientists use distributed computing and data to conduct research. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or molecular biology, forest ecology, chemistry or physics, and a strong motivation to explore new computing paradigms, such as object-oriented systems and multi-platform computing.
Rob Knapp studies thermal and electric energy flows in buildings, as a contribution to ecologically conscious design of homes and workplaces. A National Science Foundation grant has provided instrumentation to measure heat loss, air flows, solar gains and related aspects of conventional and alternative buildings, by which to compare different approaches to energy conservation and renewable resource use. Students with backgrounds in physics, electronics or computer modeling can help with these explorations.
Betty Kutter (molecular biology) and Jim Neitzel (biochemistry) study Bacteriophage T4, which has been a key model organism in molecular genetics for more than 50 years. Its infection of E. coli leads to rapid cessation of host DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. These faculty members are working to clone and over-express the many host-lethal genes that purify and characterize their protein products, determine their specific functions, look at ways in which they can be used to better understand bacterial metabolism, and examine the infection process under a variety of environmental conditions. Evergreen is the center for genomic analysis and database development for these phages, and work with phage ecology and potential uses as antibiotics.
Stu Matz (biology) uses a variety of anatomical, molecular and developmental techniques to analyze the organization of various regions of the brain in order to understand the behavior of aquatic organisms. Currently, he is investigating the Pacific salmon brain. In the past, he has worked with zebrafish, cichlid fish and aquatic salamanders.
Donald Morisato and Nancy Murray are interested in the developmental biology of the Drosophila embryo, a model system for analyzing how patterning occurs. Maternally encoded signaling pathways establish the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Individual student projects will use a combi-nation of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial regulation of this complex process.
Neal Nelson and Sheryl Shulman are interested in working with advanced computer topics and current open-ended problems. Their topics include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing; advanced programming languages and compiler support for languages such as those that support parallel architectures; and embedded systems/microcontrollers and hardware modeling. Students should have a strong computer science background and successfully have completed the program Data to Information or the equivalent.
Paula Schofield (polymer chemistry, organic chemistry) is interested in the fields of bio-degradable and biomedical polymers. Efforts to use biodegradable materials have been initiated to reduce the environmental impact of plastic wastes. Several of these biodegradable materials are polyesters, and they have attracted much industrial attention as "green thermo-plastics." Biomedical polymers are widely used as replacements for heart valves, tissue, hip joints and blood vessels. Polyurethanes show potential as replacements for small diameter blood vessels, particularly required by patients suffering from vascular disease resulting from complications of diabetes. Suitable replacement vessels could prevent the thousands of amputations performed each year in the United States.
Today, research and development on biodegradable and biomedical polymers are expanding in both polymer and biological sciences. Students with a background in organic chemistry and biology will gain experience in the preparation and characterization of suitable polymers, and in biological procedures used to monitor biodegradation and biocompatability. Techniques students will use include SEM, DSC, GPC, FTIR, FTNMR and enzyme isolation and purification.
Rebecca Sunderman (inorganic/materials chemistry and physical chemistry) is interested in the synthesis and property characterization of new bismuth containing materials. The 6s2 electrons of Bi3+ are commonly referred to as the lone pair electrons. Hybridization of the 6s and 6p orbitals, and the resulting lone electron pair yields some very interesting stereochemistry and steric related properties. Ferroelectric and ferroelastic bismuth materials have been identified. Many bismuth oxides are good oxygen ion conductors. Bismuth containing compounds have also been characterized as electronic conductors, attractive activators for luminescent materials, second harmonic generators and oxidation catalysts for several organic compounds. Traditional solid-state synthesis methods will be utilized to prepare new complex bismuth oxides. Once synthesized, powder x-ray diffraction patterns will be obtained and material properties such as conductivity, melting point, biocidal tendency, coherent light production, and magnetic behavior will be examined when appropriate.
E. J. Zita
(physics) studies the structure and dynamics of magnetic stars such as the Sun. Like plasmas (ionized gases) in fusion energy research labs, stars can create and respond to electromagnetic fields. For example, the changing magnetic fields near the surface of the Sun can heat the solar atmosphere and increase the Sun's luminosity. One would expect the Sun's gas to cool as it moves away from the surface; nevertheless, the solar corona can be millions of degrees hotter than the photosphere. A NASA grant funds investigations into this puzzle and for collaborations with scientists in Boulder, Colorado, and abroad. Students can help Zita do analytic calculations of magnetic dynamics or compare numerical models with extensive data-sets from ground- and space-based observations.
Credit awarded in: areas of student work, e.g., lab biology* and chemistry*, computer science*, health sciences*, teaching and environmental sciences*, physics* and astronomy lab biology*.
Total: 4 to 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005-06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future study in chemistry, biology, computer science, health science, environmental sciences, physics, astronomy and teaching.
Program Updates: (4/23/04) Rebecca Sunderman has joined this program.


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U.S. Foreign Policy: Terrorism and the New American Empire

Spring quarter
Faculty: Alan Nasser
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Junior or senior.
Prerequisites: Background in political economy and/or 20th-century American history preferred but not required.
Faculty Signature: Students should submit copies of all their faculty evaluations and samples of all their most recent writing to Alan at the Academic Fair, March 2, 2005. Transfer students should bring transcripts and writing samples to the fair, or, if this is not possible, send them to Alan Nasser, The Evergreen State College, SE 3127, Olympia, WA 98505. Priority will be given to applications received by March 2, 2005. For further information call (360) 867-6759. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

From the United States' beginning, dominant groups have imagined the country to have a grand destiny. Woodrow Wilson portrayed the United States as a model of "freedom and democracy" for the entire world. Later administrations attempted to export this model globally, often aggressively. A prime example of this is the Cold War. The ensuing rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union was one of the powerful forces shaping both international and intranational policy over the course of the 20th century.
We will see how the U.S. elite was led to re-assert American global dominance more aggressively than ever after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the move to the political right here, the onset of global economic stagnation, and the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The result was the new foreign policy of the Bush administration. The test case for these policies was the 2003 U.S.-led invasion and occupation of Iraq. We will analyze in detail the origins and possible consequences, abroad and at home, of the above developments.
Credit awarded in: introduction to the Cold War, 20th-century international relations, 9/11, terrorism and the new American empire.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in government, political science, international relations, political economy and history.
Program Updates:  


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Visualizing Ecology

Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Amy Cook, Lucia Harrison
Enrollment: 46
Class Standing: This is a Core program designed for freshmen students.
Special Expenses: Approximately $250 for overnight field trip to the Friday Harbor labs on San Juan Island in late winter quarter; $150 for art supplies.

This program combines the study of visual art and ecology. We will explore the terrestrial and marine environments of the Pacific Northwest. Students will develop a basic understanding of ecological concepts, field identification of plants and animals and methods of field ecology. They will gain skills in beginning drawing, printmaking and book arts. Students will have a chance to express their ideas in expository and creative nonfiction essays. They will learn to represent ecological concepts visually as well as to use nature as inspiration for personal expression. The program combines on-campus lectures, seminars, labs and work discussions as well as off-campus field work.
Students will participate in a three- to four-day field trip to the Friday Harbor labs in the San Juans. We will examine the range of terrestrial and marine environments on San Juan Island, including second-growth Douglas fir forests (high and low elevation), cedar swamp, salt marsh, meadow, and rocky and sandy intertidal beaches. During the field trip, we will visit several of these to give students an opportunity to observe and draw a variety of plants and animals and their interactions in their natural environment.
Credit awarded in: ecology, field identification of plants and animals, field ecology, drawing, book arts and printmaking, expository writing and creative nonfiction writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, environmental studies, ecology, science, education, public policy and journalism.
Program Updates:  


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Water: The Universal Solvent

New, not in printed catalog

Spring quarter
Faculty: Andrew Brabban, Jim Stroh
Enrollment: 46
Class Standing: This is a lower-division program designed for freshmen and sophomores.

Water is the universal solvent, essential for life, critical in geological cycles, and simply put it makes Earth a very unique planet. Throughout history, water has been used and abused with little thought for where it comes from and where it goes. For example sewage, drinking water and disease were not considered interrelated problems; it was not until the 19th century that people considered dirty water unhygienic and that it could carry disease. Today however, we have a much more sophisticated view of water as we recognize it as one of the Earth’s most important natural resources. Here in the Pacific Northwest, where it sometimes seems like fresh water falls from the sky more days than it doesn’t, droughts occur, over-allocation is common, and contaminant concentrations can reach levels that impair wildlife.

This program will examine this simple compound in an integrated manner; introducing students to the scientific disciplines (chemistry, microbiology, and hydrogeology) that are needed to grasp a fundamental understanding of water. We will examine the roles water takes on the earth, from geologically processes to being a prerequisite for life. This will be an applied study of water with a strong emphasis on experimental techniques and methods, coupled with scientific reading, writing, quantitative skills and computation.

Credit awarded in: hydrogeology, chemistry, microbiology and biology (all at the introductory level).
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: the environmental sciences, hydrology, chemistry and biology.

Program Updates: (02/08/05) New, not in printed catalog
(2/16/05) This program has been changed from a Core offering to a lower-division program designed for freshmen and sophomores.


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Waste and Want: The Science, Psychology and Business of Consumption

Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Cynthia Kennedy, Sonja Wiedenhaupt
Enrollment: 46
Class Standing: This is a Core program designed for freshmen students.
Special Expenses: Approximately $125
for one overnight field trip per quarter. Fees are due during the first week of class each quarter.

Mmmm. Mmmm. Yeah! Boy was that good! Need a refill? Ever wonder what went into that 15 minutes of morning satisfaction? "I drink two cups a day. At that rate, I'll down 34 gallons of java this year, made from 18 pounds of beans. Colombian farms have 12 coffee trees growing to support my personal addiction. Farmers will apply 11 pounds of fertilizers and a few ounces of pesticides to the trees this year. And Colombia's rivers will swell with 43 pounds of coffee pulp stripped from my beans . . ." (Stuff: The Secret Life of Everyday Things, Ryan & Durning, 1997). Then there is the labor, the transportation, the water, the electricity, the cup, the sugar, the cream and, of course, all the resources that are involved in producing and caring for each of these items in turn. Is one dollar the right price for all that goes into that cup of coffee (and its refill)? And what, for that matter, are the social and environmental impacts of engaging in this daily ritual?
In this program we will address these issues through the lenses of business, psychology and environmental science to study both the upsides and the downsides of today's fast-paced, consumer society. We will also ponder how cultural and historical contexts have shaped our habits of consumption.
Case studies, student research and community service projects will provide a context for exploring the program's questions. Throughout the program we will develop a set of skills including: library research, information technology, quantitative reasoning, oral and written communication, leadership and group dynamics.
Beginning the Journey is a 2-credit component of this 16-credit program. It will introduce students to the tools, practical skills and connections needed to do college-level work, and increase their likelihood for success, well-being and persistence at Evergreen. The planned activities will enhance students in four key areas: (1) academic skills, (2) support services awareness, (3) life skills, and (4) community connectedness. The program will begin Orientation Week, and continue through the first five weeks of the Fall Quarter, with follow-up weekly workshops in the four areas listed above. Students will be required to participate in selected Orientation Week activities and events, and attend all subsequent workshops and activities to earn the allotted 2 credits within the program. More information about Beginning the Journey.
Credit awarded in: economics, environmental science, psychology, statistics, leadership and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, psychology, public policy, business and waste management.
Program Updates: (2/13/04) Sharon Anthony has left the program. The enrollment limit has been lowered.


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What Are Children For?

New, not in printed catalog
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Nancy Koppelman, Glenn Landram
Enrollment: 46
Class Standing: This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Special Expenses: Up to $30 per quarter for theater tickets and field trips.
Faculty Signature: The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For information contact Nancy Koppelman, (360) 867-6383 or Glenn Landram, (360) 867-5434.

Every generation of new parents shares a common concern: including children in the routines of daily life and preparing children for the future that awaits them. Every generation addresses this concern differently. Modes of discipline, for example, that were normal in 1600 are virtually unheard of today. The assumption that education is a human right was unknown to our forebears. How have ideas about children, practices of child rearing, philosophies of education and educational institutions changed over time? Is there a "right" way to think about children? Is education best thought of as an institutionalized, systematized mode of engagement, or is it possible to think of helping young people grow in other ways? This program will concentrate on the history, philosophy, literature and sociology of childhood and education, mostly in the United States. Until roughly 200 years ago, most children were economically necessary: they contributed labor to the maintenance of the family home, dressed in the fashion of adults, and were expected to reproduce the circumstances of their birth. The American Revolution disrupted virtually all social hierarchies, including those within the family. Inspired by Locke and Rousseau, educated people began to view childhood as a stage in life that was qualitatively unique. The relationship between children and adults changed. Nowadays, privileged children are often largely protected from the world they will eventually inherit. During fall quarter, we will learn about the many ways children have been viewed by adults from the 16th century forward, and learn how the meaning of childhood was transformed during the flowering of the range of philosophical ideas, literary forms and material practices associated with the Enlightenment. We will learn about the changing meanings of innocence and sin, labor and leisure, usefulness and sacredness, and how those meanings figured in how children were seen and treated. We'll examine books for and about children from different historical periods. Authors may include John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Viviana Zelizer, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Tom Perrotta, and J. D. Salinger. Guest speakers will include members of the Evergreen faculty and other professionals from the local community who have a special interest in children. We'll employ our developing understanding of childhood in examinations of our own childhood, reflecting on memories, favorite objects, role models and important rites of passage. Student writing will include both autobiographical pieces and analytical essays grounded in the program's texts. During winter quarter, the program will concentrate on the history of education, and on educational policy, philosophy, funding and governance. Authors may include John Dewey, John Holt, David Nasaw, Alex Molnar, and Lawrence Cremin. Guest speakers will include local professionals who work in all phases of education.

The American system of public schooling was invented in the 19th century to both democratize and homogenize a diverse, unpredictable and often unruly population. The educational system has always rested its legitimacy on an articulation of the relationship between knowledge and success. How has it done so? How has it been challenged? In March of 2004, Washington State Governor Gary Locke signed a bill into law to build 45 new public charter schools over the next six years. Student writing will focus on a research project in which groups of students invent charter schools based on their developing understanding of childhood and of education.
Credit awarded in: history, literature, sociology, education and economics.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, the social sciences, education, teaching, public policy and for being a parent.

Program Updates:

(4/14/04) New, not in printed catalog.
(11/15/04) A faculty signature has been added to this program. New students must read Steven Mintz's book, Huck's Raft: A History of American Childhood, published by Harvard University Press, 2004.


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Women's Voices and Images of Women: Studies in Literature and Cinema

Spring quarter
Faculty: Harumi Moruzzi, Stephanie Kozick
Enrollment: 48
Class Standing: This all-level program will offer appropriate support for freshmen students as well as supporting/encouraging those ready for advanced work.

This interdisciplinary program is designed for students who are interested in the cross-cultural exploration of the concept of woman and her voice/selfhood.
The heterogeneity of women that we encounter in literature, art and cinema, as well as in our daily lives, often makes us wonder if there is any such an entity as the universal woman. Each woman seems to possess her individual identity, even when she appears to conform to the socially prescribed women's role. We will explore the concept of woman and her selfhood by examining the voices of women in literature, art and philosophy, while comparing them with the images of women presented in cinema and media. These explorations will be conducted through lectures, workshops, film viewing, book and film seminars and through critical writings. Our study will adopt an international perspective, which will add breadth and depth to our investigations of women as autonomous human beings living in substantial social contexts.
Credit awarded: human development, gender studies, cultural studies, literature, film studies and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in human development, gender studies, cultural studies, film studies and literature.
This program is also listed under Freshmen Programs.
Program Updates:  


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Working the Waters: Leadership Under Sail

New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter

Faculty: Cynthia Kennedy
Enrollment: 20
Class Standing: This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Prerequisites: No sailing experience required. Two quarters of college-level academic writing recommended.
Special Expenses: One- to two-week sailing voyage, plus field trips in the college vans. Up to $800 for boating and field trip expenses.

This boat-based program will have a two-pronged focus. The first prong will explore the economic and social history and current conditions of the maritime trades and industry in the Pacific Northwest. Beginning with a brief introductory history to Puget Sound as an economic resource, we will then focus deeply on the contemporary economic and work climate in the maritime industries and trades with emphasis on the Northwest region. We will use the disciplines of economics, sociology, race and gender studies, as well as reading and analysis to gain an understanding of the nature of today’s maritime work and economy. An extended sailing expedition will include visits to a variety of maritime businesses, tribal communities, historical locales and ports where economic development issues are evolving. The second prong will focus on the experience of working as crew, the development of leadership within small groups and the creation of an intense and powerful learning community. Using systems thinking, current ideas in organizational behavior, and the personal experience of our sailing expedition, students will finish this program with a strong appreciation for the complex, dynamic power of working in a group. Students should expect to read and write extensively throughout the expeditions as well as at home. Workshops and practical application will develop students’ skills in mathematics, basic geometry, map reading and weather.

Credit awarded in: economics, leadership, math, Pacific Northwest cultural maritime studies and nautical science.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in economics, management, science, math, literature, maritime studies and trade.
This program is also listed in Programs for First-Year Students and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates: (11/12/04) New, not in printed catalog


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World Beyond: The Illusional and Grotesque in Japanese Literature, Cinema and Animation

New, not in printed catalog
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Setsuko Tsutsumi
Enrollment: 25
Class Standing: Sophomore or above.
Prerequisites: Core program or equivalent.
Faculty Signature: No new students.

Japanese literature tends to appreciate refined emotions in daily life, limiting itself within the range of daily realism. There are, however, some works, that strike us with brilliant imagination and illusions. They set us free from the limitation of time and space and let us play freely in the illusionary world. And yet, they show us profound depth of truth in life. This program will explore major fantasy works in Japanese literature, cinema and animation and analyze their nature and characteristics to understand their historical contexts.
In fall, we will examine works related to the pre-modern period, such as the apparition Noh plays, grotesque literature in Edo period and works of Izumi Kyoka. In winter, we will focus on the theme of urban fantasies in contemporary society. The demonic, grotesque and nonsense nature of megacities are well-reflected in contemporary literature, film and various genres of animations. We will examine the metamorphosis of literary themes in animation with increased eroticism and occultism.
Credit will be awarded in: themes and aesthetics of Japanese literature, Japanese film and animation, Japanese popular culture and Japanese history.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in Japanese studies, Japanese literature, Japanese history and Japanese popular culture.
Program Updates: (1/5/04) New, not in printed catalog
(11/11/04) This program will not accept new students.


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Last Updated: May 11, 2011


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