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Current Year's Catalog 2005-06

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Environmental Studies

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Advanced Floristic Research
Advanced Management Topics
Advanced Research in Environmental Studies
Algebra to Algorithms: An Introduction to Mathematics for Science and Computing
Alternatives to Capitalist Globalization
America, to 2006
American Frontiers: Critical Histories
Animated Visions: Allegories of Resistance
Anti-Indian Movements: Origins, Images and Responses
Applied Hydrology
Arendt and Camus
Art of Conversation
Art's Sources
Asian Culture and Art
Atoms, Molecules and Reactions
Awareness

Advanced Floristic Research

Winter quarter

Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome. Interested freshman and sophomores should contact Frederica Bowcutt, (360) 867-6744 to discuss qualifications.
Special Expenses:
Approximately $150 for field trip.
Internship Possibilities:
With faculty approval.

Floristics is the study of the plant species of a particular area. Is there value in doing this kind of alpha taxonomy in temperate regions where most plants are known, named and classified? This question will be explored through praxis and theory. In addition, we will ponder the following questions: Historically, what has motivated collectors to gather plant materials for a herbarium? How has the information generated from such endeavors been used? What value do plant collections serve today?

In this program, students will form an advanced research community focused on processing specimens from two locations: Sun Lakes State Park in eastern Washington and Glacial Heritage County Park in western Washington. Students will collect prairie plants in the field. Students will also learn how to make pressed plant specimens and maintain a herbarium. Several visits will be made to local herbaria in the region to make final determinations of previously collected specimens. In the context of this practice of creating and maintaining collections, students will explore the history of collecting.

Credit awarded in:
history of science, herbarium curation and floristic research. Upper-division credit awarded for upper-division work.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future study in the history of science and plant sciences.

Program updates:

01.06.2006:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome. Interested freshman and sophomores should contact Frederica Bowcutt, (360) 867-6744 to discuss qualifications. The following prerequisites have been removed: Advanced plant systematics. Students must be skilled at using technical dichotomous keys.
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Advanced Management Topics

cancelled

Contact Academic Advising for options

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Faculty:
John Filmer
Enrollment:
10
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Significant background in management or prior management course work.
Faculty Signature:
Contact John Filmer, (360) 867-6159, to discuss background and coursework in management
Internship Possibilities:
Winter or spring quarters with faculty approval.

This program provides a rare and outstanding opportunity to work closely with local community organizations and businesses on a direct personal basis, helping successful professionals in many aspects of management. Students will work in self-directed project teams developing strategic plans for local non-profit and business organizations. This hands-on career enhancing experience will help students develop marketable skills, acquire professional training, build core competencies in organizations (performance measurement), analyze organizations and businesses, build professional networks, sharpen executive skills, learn strategic planning, project planning, marketing strategies, learn how to develop business plans, and learn scenario and contingency planning. Students will also be able to explore opportunities for future internships.

At the end of the quarter, the project teams will present their research and recommendations to the managers of the collaborating organizations and an interested group of community leaders.

Credit awarded in:
business, organizational management, project planning, strategic planning, organizational development and advanced marketing.
Total:
8 or16 credits.
Program is preparatory for:
management, business, leadership and organizational development.

Program updates:

09.16.2005:
New, not in printed catalog.
01.10.2006:
This program has been cancelled.
top

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors.
Prerequisites:
Negotiated individually with faculty.
Faculty Signature:
Students must contact individual faculty to work out arrangements. Graduate students must also get signature of Master in Environmental Studies director. Special Expenses: Transportation costs may be needed for field work.

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This program is designed to give advanced students the opportunity to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills-all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, and for graduates who are already in the job market.

The research conducted by the student will generally last multiple quarters and function as a capstone to the student's academic work at Evergreen. Students can also take advantage of this opportunity to write a senior thesis.

The following faculty are seeking advanced students to assist with their research projects:

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

Martha Henderson studies the ways in which humans transform Earth's surfaces. She is particularly interested in cultural and social ideas that become evident in landscapes. Students interested in cultural landscapes, ethnic studies, environmental history, land-use patterns and urban agriculture are encouraged to develop projects. Qualitative research methodologies will be taught.

John T. Longino studies insect taxonomy and ecology, with specific research focus on ants. His research program is a combination of field work in Costa Rica and collections-based research at the Evergreen campus. Students may become involved in local or neotropical fauna studies, with field- and/or collections-based activities.

Nalini Nadkarni is a forest ecologist and studies the ecological interactions of canopy-dwelling plants and animals in tropical and temperate rainforests. She is the president of the International Canopy Network, headquartered at Evergreen. She welcomes students who want experience in nonprofit organizations to work with her on communicating scientific information about forest canopies to other researchers, educators and conservationists. She is also interested in communicating her work to nonscientists, and working with artists on collaborative ways of understanding trees and forests.

Lin Nelson is a social scientist who has worked with national and regional organizations doing research and advocacy on the linkages among environment, health and community. Students who would like to assist in developing case studies of environmental health in Northwest communities (with a focus on environmental justice and environment-labor connections) can contact her. A related area, for students with sufficient preparation, is the examination of Washington state's plan to phase out selected persistent, bioaccumulative toxics.

Erik V. Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to estuarine hypoxia. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry.

Credit awarded in:
areas of student work.
Total:
4 to 16 credits each quarter. Students will negotiate credit with faculty sponsor.
A similar program is expected to be offered:
in 2006-07.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
botany, ecology, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, geology, land-use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy and zoology.

Program updates:

12.14.2004:
Ken Tabbutt will not sponsor Advanced Research in Environmental Studies contracts.
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Algebra to Algorithms: An Introduction to Mathematics for Science and Computing

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Neal Nelson
Enrollment:
24
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
High school algebra proficiency.

Western science relies on mathematics as a powerful language for expressing the character of the observed world. Mathematical models allow predictions (more or less) of complex natural systems, and modern computing has magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence 21st-century decisions. Computer science relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving, and also enables the construction of mathematical models. In fact, computer science is the constructive branch of mathematics.

This program will explore connections among mathematics, computer science and the natural sciences, and will develop mathematical abstractions and the skills needed to express, analyze and solve problems arising in the sciences, particularly in computer science. The program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or pursuing further work in the sciences. The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical thinking and expression, along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, functions, algorithms, programming and, depending on interest, calculus, logic or geometry.All topics will include relevant historical and philosophical readings.Credit awarded in algebra, geometry, mathematical modeling, programming, and the history and philosophy of mathematics.

Credit awarded in:
algebra, geometry, mathematical modeling, programming, and the history and philosophy of mathematics.
Total:
16 credits.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006-07.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the sciences, teaching and mathematics.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Scientific Inquiry.

Program updates:

07.25.2005:
Neal Nelson will teach this program.
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Alternatives to Capitalist Globalization

Fall and Winter quarters

Enrollment:
75
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
New students must complete the required reading for admission into the program.
Faculty Signature:
New students are welcome. For information and the required reading list, contact Steve Niva, (360) 867-5612 or Lin Nelson, (360) 867-6056 or Peter Bohmer, (360) 867-6431.

At the beginning of the 21st century, a great number of global and national elite, intellectuals and international financial institutions, such as the World Trade Organization, International Monetary Fund and World Bank, claim that there are no alternatives to capitalist globalization. They claim that the world must be restructured according to "free market" and "free trade" principles that open up countries to the products, services and investment of multinational corporations; reduce social relations to commercial transactions; and impose Western development models on diverse cultures.

In this program, we will study diverse social movements, organizations and thinkers who are offering alternative visions for organizing global society and meeting human needs. Many of these alternative visions have developed within the emerging global justice movement, and many draw upon historical precedents and various traditions of resistance. Still others have been influenced by socialist, anarchist, ecological, feminist or Southern perspectives. We will explore these and other alternatives to capitalist globalization that have developed around the world. We will also examine selected case studies of attempts to create alternative social systems. These range from small-scale intentional communities, cooperatives and permaculture communities to contemporary movements such as the Brazilian MST (landless peasant movement) and European autonomous movements to larger-scale cases such as Swedish social democracy, Cuban socialism, the Indian state of Kerala and Argentina's barter and trading networks. This program will critically analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each alternative, and students will formulate their own views on the possibility and desirability of developing new visions of a global society.

A central feature of the debate about globalization is how "free trade" principles and practices are affecting the environment, public health and community life. We will examine the growing literature and many organizations and voices that are depicting a range of effects, from the impact on worker health in relocated and unregulated industries to the broad changes in local food systems. Workers, farmers and consumers provide vantage points on how things are changing in communities around the globe, and they offer ideas and experiments in resisting unregulated global production and trade. Environmental advocates offer frameworks for critically examining how globalization affects regional ecosystems, environmental health and natural resources. We will examine how environmental and public health concerns connect with broad social justice movements and alternative visions. We will do this in part through studying conditions and alternatives around selected products and production activities, such as the current debate about the production, distribution and disposal of computers. Throughout our analysis, we will pay special attention to the conditions facing women in their changing roles in the global system of production and consumption. Women's social justice visions for strengthening community life and self-determination will help guide our work.

Students will be encouraged to explore related issues in stheir own communities through internships, organizing and projects, in order to deepen their understanding of the relationship between theory and practice. Students will be evaluated on their ability to address and critically examine historical and contemporary issues in relation to political, social and economic theory and practice. A strong emphasis will be placed on developing skills in critical thinking, reading, writing and public speaking. We welcome students with a social science background, but invite all students interested in our work to join us.

Credit awarded in:
political economy, the theory and practice of social movements, comparative social systems, globalization studies, gender studies, environmental studies and political theory.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in graduate school in the social sciences, working for international nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, organizing, environmental and social justice advocacy and public interest law.
This program is listed in:
Culture, Text and Language; Environmental Studies; and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates

11.21.2005:
Prerequisites: New students must complete the required reading for admission into the program. Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. For information and the required reading list, contact Steve Niva, (360) 867-5612 or Lin Nelson, (360) 867-6056 or Peter Bohmer, (360) 867-6431.
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America, to 2006

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
50
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors. Exceptions may be made on the basis of a writing sample and interview with faculty prior to registration. For information contact Sam Schrager or David Marr.
Prerequisites:
Students will be accepted who are prepared to undertake a major research and writing project involving (1) literary or historical texts or (2) ethnographic fieldwork. The research will span winter and spring quarters, with the proposal developed during the first five weeks of winter quarter. Internships can be combined with fieldwork projects. Sophomores who wish to be considered need to submit a writing sample.
Faculty Signature:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.
Special Expenses:
Approximately $75 for three-day field trip.
Internship Possibilities:
Mid-winter to mid-spring quarter with faculty approval.

In a new look at the civil rights movement, historian David Chappell shows that Martin Luther King, Jr., and his compatriots led and were inspired by an ethos of religious revivalism. He also shows that white evangelical Christianity undermined white Southerners' resistance to integration by refuting claims that the Bible sanctioned white supremacy. The liberal creed, it turns out, was much less significant to both sides in this struggle for equality than conventional wisdom takes it to be. American experience is full of such complexities as these, which confound canned assumptions.

It is in this spirit of the fresh look that we undertake our inquiry into America, to 2006. We will study history, literature, criticism, ethnography, reportage, film, and philosophy, focusing on works that are so well attuned to the felt lives of Americans in particular times, places, and conditions that they have the capacity to change how Americans think about themselves. Through careful reading and viewing, we will examine how these works have portrayed the present and understood the past. We will mine them to form our own grasp of the historically shifting and contested shapes of American consciousness. We'll give close attention to what Ralph Ellison calls "the agonizing mystery sponsored by the democratic ideal . . . that of our unity-in-diversity, our oneness-in-manyness."

Among the topics America, to 2006 expects to cover are conquest, slavery, immigration, family, community, religion, politics, education, law, social class, gender, nature, progress, work, entertainment, food, cities, cultural identity, sexuality, postmodernism, and democracy. A sampling of works we are likely to study includes fiction by Melville, Stein, Faulkner, DeLillo; poetry by Dickinson, Frost, Alexie; essays by Emerson, Ellison, Early, Ozick; political thought by Madison, Lincoln, Douglass, Addams; ethnography by Hurston, Mitchell, Paredes, Didion; history by Fischer, Hofstader, Chappell, Cohen; philosophy by James, Dewey; and films by Griffiths, Ford, Scorcese, and Morris.

Each quarter's studies will connect the past with contemporary life. The main emphasis in fall will be on the colonial period to the mid-19th century; in winter, the Civil War to the early 20th century; in spring, mid-century to the present. Students throughout will develop their own abilities to look imaginatively and critically at the American scene. With faculty guidance they will practice the crafts of writing and research, including both library-based and field-based (observing and interviewing) work. The culmination, in spring, will be an advanced project, on a subject and using methods of their own choice. The program as a whole is the equivalent of a major in American Studies.

Credit awarded in:
American history, American literature, anthropology, popular culture, community studies, philosophy and writing.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences, law, journalism, media, teaching, community service and government.

Program updates:

05.19.2005:
The independent research project will go from mid-winter to mid-spring. Students doing field projects can combine them with an internship. Students can do their research project at a distance from the college with faculty approval. Each quarter's studies will move back-and-forth across time periods.
11.11.2005:
Prerequisites: Students will be accepted who are prepared to undertake a major research and writing project involving (1) literary or historical texts or (2) ethnographic fieldwork. The research will span winter and spring quarters, with the proposal developed during the first five weeks of winter quarter. Internships can be combined with fieldwork projects. Sophomores who wish to be considered need to submit a writing sample.
Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. Contact faculty for interview and signature at the Academic Fair, November 30, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym. If unable to attend the fair, contact Sam Schraeger.
11.11.2005:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.
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American Frontiers: Critical Histories

Fall and Winter quarters

Faculty:
Kristina Ackley, Michael Pfeifer, Zoltan Grossman
Enrollment:
72
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
New students must read Gary B. Nash," Red, White and Black: The Peoples of Early North America," (2000 ed., on reserve and at the bookstore), Frederick Jackson Turner, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History," (on reserve at the library), and the introduction of Patricia Limerick's, "The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West," (pp. 9-32; on reserve at the library and at the bookstore. "The Legacy of Conquest" will be one of the winter quarter texts.
Faculty Signature:
New students are welcome. For more information and to acquire a faculty signature, contact Kristina Ackley, (360) 867-6020 or Michael Pfeifer, (360) 867-6009

In recent years, many have challenged the frontier thesis first articulated by Frederick Jackson Turner-that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"-as racist and rife with imperialism. Turner delivered the thesis in 1893, amid rapid industrialization and urbanization following American westward expansion to the Pacific Coast; it summed up decades of American understanding and influenced several generations of American historians. Now, Native Americans, Western historians and others have challenged many aspects of Turner's thesis and have offered alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion, colonization and settlement in North America.

Focusing on culture, land and gender, we will explore many of these histories. Considering the points of view of the colonized and the colonizer, we will examine the role of power and power relations in the encounters of diverse peoples on American frontiers. We will analyze the experiences and perspectives of indigenous peoples; women; Anglo-American explorers, entrepreneurs and settlers; African Americans; Latinos; and Asian immigrants. During fall quarter, we will explore the initial encounters of Europeans and indigenous peoples; the culture and society of the American backcountry and of Native peoples in the 18th and early 19th centuries; the development of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy and the consequent transformation of Native American society; slavery, Africans, Native Americans and the transplantation of slave society to the Southwestern cotton frontier; and the Gold Rush and the American conquest of California.

In winter quarter, we will explore events after the Civil War, including Indian-fighting and the American conquest of Indian nations in the West; the society and culture of the "Old West," including the experiences of women, African Americans, Latinos and Asians; federal Indian policy and Native American experience in the West since the late 19th century; the social transformation of the American West in the 20th century; and images of the frontier and the West in American culture since the early 20th century. We will do much reading and writing on these topics, and listen to music and watch films that reflect important aspects of frontier experiences and encounters.

Credit awarded in:
American history, American studies and Native American studies.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen, Culture, Text and Language and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.

Program updates:

12.14.2004:
Zoltan Grossman, Ph.D. Geography, has joined this program.
11.11.2005
New students must read Gary B. Nash," Red, White and Black: The Peoples of Early North America," (2000 ed., on reserve and at the bookstore), Frederick Jackson Turner, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History," (on reserve at the library), and the introduction of Patricia Limerick's, "The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West," (pp. 9-32; on reserve at the library and at the bookstore. "The Legacy of Conquest" will be one of the winter quarter texts.
Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. For more information and to acquire a faculty signature, contact Kristina Ackley, (360) 867-6020 or Michael Pfeifer, (360) 867-6009
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Animated Visions: Allegories of Resistance

Spring quarter

Enrollment:
69
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent freshmen, 25 percent sophomores and 25 percent juniors or seniors; it will offer appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Special Expenses:
$100 for art and animation supplies.

An apple struggles to fall from a tree, desiring to experience gravity, even if it means death. A man must navigate through endless bureaucratic channels in order to recover his nose, which has assumed a life of its own. People enter and exit an apartment house in every way they can, except the front door. We come upon these strange and seemingly nonsensical images while viewing or reading works of animation and literature from Russia and East European countries that experienced Soviet domination. What do they mean?

In this program, we will explore the historical and cultural contexts of animated films and poetic and prose texts from Russia and the Soviet-bloc countries to find how, and to what extent, they express resistance to totalitarian political and social oppression. As we screen works by animators such as Jan Svankmajer, Yuri Norstein, Nina Shorina and Michaela Pavlatova, students will learn how to "read" them in light of the historical events and cultural influences their makers experienced. Readings of the poetry of Arkady Dragomoschenko, Alexei Parshchikov and Elena Shvarts, and the prose of Milan Kundera, Václav Havel and others will further inform and expand students' understanding of the uses of metaphor and allegory to express the inexpressible, to outwit censors, to reach like-minded souls and to subvert dominant ideologies.

Students will do close readings of several poetic texts and animated films in written and oral presentations based on research about the contexts in which they were made. In two hands-on workshops they will learn either basic animation skills in techniques used by the animators studied, or translation and poetry techniques adapted from Russian and Eastern European literary strategies.

Credit awarded in:
animation; animation studies; Soviet, Russian and East European literary and cultural studies; comparative poetics; and translation: theory and practice.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
animation, media studies, and Soviet, Russian and East European studies.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen; Culture, Text and Language; and Expressive Arts.
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Anti-Indian Movements: Origins, Images and Responses

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Enrollment:
50
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Sophomore or above; transfer students welcome.

Challenges to Native American sovereignty, treaty rights and cultural autonomy have been an integral part of the interactions between natives and non-Natives throughout U.S. history. But in the past four decades, anti-Indian sentiment has emerged in a newly revitalized manifestation of organized social movements, stimulating a broad public backlash to Native rights. This program will examine the unfolding of modern anti-Indian movements on the local, regional and national levels, and the organized responses to them.

In order to provide historical context and link the contemporary movements with prior episodes of encounter, the program will look at the historical origins of Anti-Indianism. We will consider the constructed images of whites as superior or victimized figures, and of Native Americans as inferior or romanticized figures (often the scapegoat in populist frustration over economic conditions and government policies). We look at the ways in which ideas of authenticity and appropriation have been a major part in the making of an American identity.

The program will then focus on anti-Indian appeals to different constituencies-including white reservation residents battling tribal jurisdiction, sport hunting/fishing clubs (and anti-hunting groups) opposing Native treaty rights to natural resources, corporations challenging tribal control or protection of resources, "New Age" and sports clubs appropriating Native identities or sacred sites, and state officials obstructing tribal gaming rights.

The program will discuss strategies of Native nations and their allies both to counteract anti-Indianism, and to build bridges between communities based on common economic or environmental interests. A group project will review the history and current status of anti-Indian organizing in the Northwest (based on research, guest speakers, and visits/interviews with community members), and compile a report of its findings and recommendations. Students will become familiar with decolonization theory and its impacts on Indigenous communities.

Credit awarded in:
Native American studies, American studies and critical writing.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the humanities, social science and education.

Program Updates

01.27.2006:
New, not in printed catalog.
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Applied Hydrology

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Enrollment:
10
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Graduate standing only.
Faculty Signature:
Graduate students who are interested in the Grand Canyon dory field trip must enroll for an additional four-credit Individual Learning Contract with Paul Butler. Students must contact Paul no later than January 13, 2006. Note: due to the Grand Canyon field trip, the on-campus component of the class will not begin until week 3, April 18.
Special Expenses:
Optional Grand Canyon dory field trip, approximately $1,800, in addition to several other optional daylong field trips throughout the quarter.

This MES elective is offered to graduate students only. Water plays a critical role in the physical, chemical and biological processes of ecosystems. It is a dominant factor in landscape development and is a valuable resource, even in the water-rich Pacific Northwest. This elective will focus on the groundwater and surface water components of the hydrologic cycle. Students will learn quantitative methods of assessing the distribution and movement of water in these environments. Students are encouraged to attend local field trips (on alternate Fridays), which will provide an opportunity to observe local aspects of our hydrologic environment. This elective is offered in conjunction with the Hydrology undergraduate program. Required meeting times for graduate students are Tuesdays, 1:30-5:30, and either 10-12 or 2-4 on Thursdays.

Credit awarded in:
hydrology
Total:
4 credits.
Program is preparatory for:
water resource management.
This program is also listed under:
Environmental Studies and Scientific Inquiry.

Program updates:

12.07.2005:
New, not in printed catalog.
02.14.2006:
The enrollment limit has been reduced to 10 students.
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Arendt and Camus

cancelled

Contact Academic Advising for options

Fall and Winter quarters

Faculty:
Pris Bowerman
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Academic experience in closely reading and carefully developing analytical arguments is required. Knowledge of Western political philosophy and/or Western history, particularly of the 20th century, is recommended.

Albert Camus was born and raised in Algeria and maintained a strong identification with his homeland throughout his adult life in a France that continued to maintain strong colonial control over Algeria. Hannah Arendt was a Jewish émigré to the United States from Hitler's Germany. Both were prominent 20th-century intellectuals who wrote extensively on the political events of their day. Both also took part in those events directly: Camus edited the underground paper Resistance in France during World War II; in the 1930s Arendt worked for relocation programs in Europe to help all those persecuted by the Nazi regime to exit German lands, and, after the war, she led a major endeavor to recover properties stolen by the Nazis. Camus's written legacy includes novels, plays, essays and notebooks. Arendt wrote philosophic essays and had an extensive correspondence, which is now being published.

Perhaps for both, their "displaced" adult lives contributed to their idiosyncratic and iconoclastic views on politics and government; on war, personal responsibility and political resistance; and on justice. Neither can be easily identified by a particular political or philosophic leaning: Camus denied that he was, as so many thought, an existentialist, and few dared put any label on Arendt.

Because they resist labels, each shatters readers' conventional views of the world, be they liberal, conservative or radical, and each invites us to reconsider our own experiences and decisions about how to live.

We will study their work in depth, paying particular attention to their views of war and the political and personal responsibility to resist war and injustice, as well as to their views of the human condition as it appeared in the 20th century and what it promised for the future. The mix of literary and philosophic writing will add variety to the readings, and will be accompanied by films and secondary works on their lives and times that will provide both background and context for understanding their views and for developing our own thoughts on our political and personal responsibilities to act in today's world.

Close, attentive reading and critical analytical thought will be required, as well as a commitment to serious intellectual seminars focused on the texts. Writing assignments will include analytical essays on Camus's and Arendt's arguments and equally analytical arguments by each student defending their personal views of responsibility and justice.

Some of the books we will read are: by Camus, (novels) The Stranger, The Fall and The Plague; (essays) The Myth of Sisyphus, The Rebel and Resistance, Rebellion and Death; (plays) Caligula and State of Siege; by Arendt, The Human Condition, Responsibility and Judgment, Eichmann in Jerusalem, The Origins of Totalitarianism, On Violence and On Revolution.

Credit awarded in:
the political philosophy of Hannah Arendt, the literature and philosophy of Albert Camus, ethics, and World War II: the European experience.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
politics, philosophy, literature, history, government, law and social service.

Program Updates

04.07.2005:
This program has been cancelled.
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Art of Conversation

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Susan Fiksdal, Siri Mehus
Enrollment:
24
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen; it offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.

Conversation is fundamental to our learning processes and our interpersonal interactions. In this program we will take a sociolinguistic approach to understanding the way conversation works, how it is organized, how it constructs our social reality, and why we have misunderstandings. Using discourse analysis, we will look at various types of conversations-those between friends, on television, on film and in seminars. Many conversations we examine will be cross-cultural, and we will use this term in its broadest sense, looking at conversations between people of different linguistic cultures, as well as those between genders, classes and ethnicities in the United States. We will examine the ways speakers create identity, draw on power and solidarity, maintain face and construct a style.

Credit awarded in:
language acquisition, socio-linguistics, discourse analysis and communication.
Total:
16 credits.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2007-08.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
linguistics, communication, politics, law, medicine, teaching, television and radio.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen; Culture, Text and Language; and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program updates:

03.08.2006:
This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen; it offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work. Enrollment limit has increased to 24 students.
04.04.2006:
Siri Mehus, M.A., Linguistics, has joined this program.
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Art's Sources

Fall and Winter quarters

Enrollment:
43
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Eight credits of college-level literature; eight credits of college-level art and metalworking.
Faculty Signature:
New students are welcome. Contact Thad Curtz, (360) 867-6731 or Jean Mandeberg, (360) 867-6628.
Special Expenses:
Up to $25 for museum visits. Students in the visual arts should expect to spend $100 or more for materials, depending on the student's studio work.

Where does art come from? Its sources include inspiration, theft, the influence of other art, training, luck and life itself. Students in literature and the visual arts will work together exploring this question, as well as learn independently through advanced work in their respective fields. Together we will read, discuss and write about a wide range of artists' work, and how their work relates to the main question, by studying books like Visiting Emily: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Emily Dickinson and A Convergence of Birds: Original Fiction and Poetry Inspired by the Work of Joseph Cornell.

The visual arts students will do sustained three-dimensional work in the fine metals studio, with particular attention to art that is made in response to the human body, possibly art that is wearable. This subject addresses themes about beauty, repairable parts, sexuality, identity and many others. The literature students will do similarly ambitious work in European and American literature, with particular attention paid to issues about archetypes, the reworking of themes and the anxiety of influence. This strand will focus on a wide variety of lyric poetry (with some ongoing work on reading aloud and collaborative performance) and on the transformations of the epic tradition from Homer and Virgil through Shakespeare, Milton and Pope to Blake and Wordsworth.

Credit awarded in:
literature, art history and 3-D art (visual arts strand only).
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in the arts and the humanities.
This program is listed in:
Culture, Text and Language and Expressive Arts.

Program updates:

05.13.2005:
Prerequisites: Six credits of work in literature or twelve credits in visual arts.
11.11.2005:
Prerequisites: Eight credits of college-level literature; eight credits of college-level art and metalworking. Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. Contact Thad Curtz, (360) 867-6731 or Jean Mandeberg, (360) 867-6628.
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Asian Culture and Art

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Faculty:
Sean Williams, Ratna Roy, Setsuko Tsutsumi (FW), Rose Jang, Masanori Tahira (FW)
Enrollment:
96
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
In order to be accepted into this program for spring quarter, new students must demonstrate intermediate-level language skills in Hindi, Mandarin, Japanese or Indonesian.
Faculty Signature:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter unless they can demonstrate intermediate-level language skills in Hindi, Mandarin, Japanese or Indonesian. For more information, contact Sean Williams, (360) 867-6623.
Special Expenses:
$100 for theater tickets, makeup and art supplies; $3,000 plus international airfare for optional travel to India during winter quarter or China during spring quarter.

This yearlong program will explore the expressive arts and cultures of four major Asian cultural regions: China, Japan, India and Indonesia. Our studies will include regional histories, philosophies and languages, and the theory and practice of Asian dance, music, theater, film, literature and other art forms. The ultimate goals of the program include an enhanced understanding of Asian expressive cultural traditions and the creation of performance pieces in the latter part of the year.

Weekly meetings will include lectures, hands-on workshops in the arts, presentations by visiting artists, films and seminars. Faculty members will offer lectures and workshops about each of the major cultural regions based on first-hand knowledge and experience, and the program will be supplemented with guest lectures and demonstrations.

Four workshops will be offered in the following Asian artistic traditions: Chinese opera, an ancient traditional Chinese theatrical performance style combining dance, music and theater; Japanese films and animation, their aesthetic, themes and techniques; Orissi dance, a 2,000-year-old classical dance tradition from eastern India; and Indonesian gamelan, a musical ensemble comprising bronze gongs, drums and metal xylophones.

Although each student will concentrate on one workshop, all students in the program will study all four cultural regions. Students will gain some experience in the major languages of each area (Mandarin, Japanese, Hindi/Oriya and Bahasa Indonesia). In general, the language instruction will place more emphasis on practical conversation in each culture.

Fall quarter will begin with an introduction to the four major cultural regions and will include both intensive reading and skill-building. In winter quarter, students will continue laying foundations in artistic skills while exploring some of the most important cultural concepts that underlie Asian expressive culture. Students will give a small program performance at the end of winter quarter to demonstrate their artistic skills and cultural understanding. The final work in the spring will vary by the chosen study. Students will spend the first two quarters gaining knowledge and skills to undertake self-initiated research projects that focus on any one or more of the studied cultures. These research projects will be the primary focus of the spring quarter for students who are not studying abroad.

The program will include two possibilities for study abroad. Those studying Orissi dance will have the opportunity to travel to Orissa (India) during winter quarter to understand the process of postcolonial reconstruction of the oral art form from the sculptures on temple walls, the palm leaf manuscripts in the museums, and the living tradition in the villages of Orissa. They will also study under the foremost masters themselves. Students will return with skills to write an ethnographic research paper and do presentations of their understanding of the recreation of Orissi dance.

Students who do not travel will continue their studies on the Olympia campus during winter quarter. In spring, students interested in China may travel to China. They will visit the major cities and cultural sites, as well as learn about the arts and performance of ethnic minority groups.Students who are a good match for this program bring an open mind, a willingness to explore aspects of the world beyond the parameters of their current understanding, and the ability to recognize the wisdom in using body, mind and spirit in combination to deepen their knowledge of expressive culture.

Credit awarded in:
Asian studies, Asian languages (Mandarin, Japanese, Hindi/Oriya and Bahasa Indonesia), Asian arts, Asian expressive culture, performing and media arts and expository writing.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in cultural studies, Asian studies, music, dance, theater, film, art, language and literature.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen; Culture, Text and Language; and Expressive Arts.

Program updates:

09.08.2005:
Masanori Tahira, Kobe exchange faculty, has joined this program.
11.11.2005:
Prerequisite: New students must demonstrate language capability at a beginning-level in Japanese, Mandrain, Hindi or Indonesian. Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. For interview and faculty signature, contact Sean Williams, (360) 867-6623.
02.17.2006:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter unless they can demonstrate intermediate-level language skills in Hindi, Mandarin, Japanese or Indonesian. For more information, contact Sean Williams, (360) 867-6623.
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Atoms, Molecules and Reactions

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
For a student to join this program, you must have one year of college-level chemistry, at least one quarter of college-level physics, the ability to do inferential and differential calculus, and have completed some college-level science laboratory credits.
Faculty Signature:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.
Special Expenses:
$55 student fee for spring quarter field trip.
Internship Possibilities:
Spring quarter with faculty approval.

In previous chemistry work, you learned what the atomic orbital shapes were. In this program, we will learn why we know their shape. In previous chemistry work, you learned what a conductor was. In this program, we will examine the solid-state structural characteristics that indicate a material is a potential conductor. We will explore the "But why?" of chemistry by examining topics in thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, kinetics and materials chemistry. Many of the topics require a strong mathematical foundation. If you are struggling with calculus, this is not the program for you.

In the lecture component, students will learn about the laws of thermodynamics, enthalpy, entropy, chemical potential, phase diagrams, Gibbs free energy, reaction spontaneity, solid-state structure, solid-state bonding theories, point group symmetry, applications of symmetry, transition metal complexes, materials synthesis, Maxwell relations, the Schrodinger equation, atomic and molecular energy levels, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, unimolecular kinetics, biomolecular kinetics and current kinetic theories. During fall quarter, students will participate in physical chemistry and materials chemistry laboratory experiments. The laboratory component in the winter will train students to use and explain the theory of several instruments for chemical analysis. In the spring, students will focus on enhancing skills in experimental design and research methods with the incorporation of team research projects surrounding a historical experiment in chemistry. In addition, emphasis will be placed on the development of technical writing skills and on interpretation and integration of issues pertaining to chemistry and society.

Credit awarded in:
thermodynamics*, quantum mechanics*, kinetics*, advanced inorganic chemistry*, scientific instrumentation*, research methods*, experimental design* and scientific writing*.
Total:
4, 8 or 16 credits each quarter. The 4 or 8 credit option requires a faculty signature.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2007-08.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
chemistry, chemical engineering, chemical physics, medicine, biochemistry and teaching.

Program updates:

04.20.2005:
Special Expenses: A $55 student fee for the spring quarter field trip has been added to this program.
04.27.2005:
This program description has been revised.
12.14.2004:
Faculty Signature: Students who are interested in the 4- or 8-credit option must contact the faculty prior to enrolling. For information contact Rebecca Sunderman, (360) 867-6121.
11.11.2005:
Prerequisite: For a student to join this program, you must have one year of college-level chemistry, at least one quarter of college-level physics, the ability to do inferential and differential calculus, and have completed some college-level science laboratory credits.
Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. A student can obtain a signature by talking with the faculty prior to the end of fall qyuarter, or by the first day of winter quarter, January 9, 2006. Contact Rebecca Sunderman, (360) 867-6121.
02.17.2006:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.

 

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Awareness

new


not in printed catalog

Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
48
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
New students are welcome to join this program for spring quarter. Please review the program Web site at http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/awareness/, for program content, the syllabus and book list.
Special Expenses:
$25 each quarter for yoga.

Learning happens when you have an experience and then reflect on it. Our focus will be on the craft of reflection. Our interest is the relationship between conscious reflection-awareness-and learning.

Students will begin their work by designing their own learning experiences. These field studies, which will constitute half the work of each quarter, can be anything (walking, reading, hospice care, welding, cooking, meditation, etc.). We will begin our work together by having each person answer these questions: What do you want to learn? How are you going to learn it? How are you going to know when you have learned it? How are you going to show others-faculty and colleagues-that you have learned it? And, What difference will it make?

We will participate in mind-body practices that facilitate or enhance our ability to reflect on these experiences in historical, cross-cultural and gendered contexts. We will undertake an intensive study of work by, and inspired by, Ivan Illich, Luce Irigaray and Jean Klein.Credit awarded in somatic studies, philosophy, sociology, education, feminist theory and consciousness studies.

Credit awarded in:
somatic studies, philosophy, sociology, education, feminist theory and consciousness studies.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2006-07.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
education, consciousness studies, creative writing, social and cultural studies, women's studies and somatic studies.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Culture, Text and Language.

Program updates:

03.23.2006:
New students are welcome to join this program for spring quarter. Please review the program Web site at http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/awareness/, for program content, the syllabus and book list.

Contact the Site Manager

 

Last Updated: December 21, 2007


The Evergreen State College

2700 Evergreen Parkway NW

Olympia, Washington 98505

(360) 867-6000