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Current Year's Catalog 2005-06

Undergraduate Studies

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Expressive Arts

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Imaging the Body
The Incisive Line
Indigenous Peoples and Ecological Change
Individual Studies at Evergreen
Information Landscapes: Mapping the Invisible
Introduction to Environmental Studies: Land
Introduction to Natural Science
Inventing Systems with Music and Movement Theater

Imaging the Body

Fall and Winter quarters

Enrollment:
46
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent freshmen; it offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
Qualified students should have taken a class in basic anatomy and introduction to life drawing or the equivalent.
Faculty Signature:
New students are welcome. Prospective students are strongly encouraged to attend the Academic Fair, November 30, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym, and bring a portfolio of life drawings (slides or a few original works). Faculty will also ask prospective students to indicate their prior educational experience with anatomy and with drawing from life. For information, contact Lisa Sweet, (360) 867-6763 or Paul Przybylowicz, (360) 867-6476
Special Expenses:
$60 for Ropes Course; $150 for art supplies.
Imaging-"To form a mental picture of; to make a visible representation of."

Imaging the Body will explore the many ways we develop mental pictures and visible representations of the human body. This exploration will be multi-faceted-studying the body, depicting the body and being in the body. By blending a scientific understanding of how the body functions with visual representation and movement, students will gain an integrated awareness of the human body.

We will learn how the body is constructed through anatomical studies and will also explore the body's underlying physiological processes. Some of the questions that will shape our inquiry include: How does a scientific understanding of the body inform an artistic understanding of the body? How does the body manifest movement as a mechanism? What is physical "beauty" according to our culture? How can artistic work inform a physiological understanding of the body? What is our relationship to science as it seeks ways to treat or adapt human bodies? What are the physiological changes that occur as the body ages? How do our perceptions of the body change with age? Weekly practice in yoga and life drawing will help students experience and visualize the subject matter first-hand. Moving beyond these skills, we will consider how the body looks and works; the possible consequences of valuing physical appearance and function (or dysfunction) in Western culture.

This program has three structural elements: (1) anatomy and physiology, (2) drawing and (3) movement. Students will be expected to devote equal amounts of energy to each part of the program. Expect to work 50 hours a week, including class meetings.

Fall quarter will focus on gaining basic skills in anatomy including learning the musculo-skeletal system, life drawing, basic biology, basic physiology and visual literacy. "Body image" will be a broad theme that guides our work in the fall. Winter quarter will capitalize on skills developed in fall, and our exploration of the body will broaden to investigate additional themes around the body including birth, disease, dysfunction and death. Also in the winter, students will initiate independent research projects on a particular subject and express their findings through both scientific and artistic research.

Half of the learning community will be freshmen. Everyone else will be expected to take an active role in mentoring students who are new to Evergreen, both through a one-on-one peer-mentoring program, and through student-designed workshops and presentations.

Credit awarded in:
anatomy, physiology, life drawing, art appreciation and expository writing.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
science, the arts and movement studies.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen; Environmental Studies; and Expressive Arts.

Program Updates

11.11.2005:
Prerequisites: Qualified students should have taken a class in basic anatomy and introduction to life drawing or the equivalent. Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. Prospective students are strongly encouraged to attend the Academic Fair, November 30, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym, and bring a portfolio of life drawings (slides or a few original works). Faculty will also ask prospective students to indicate their prior educational experience with anatomy and with drawing from life. For information, contact Lisa Sweet, (360) 867-6763 or Paul Przybylowicz, (360) 867-6476
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The Incisive Line

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Lisa Sweet
Enrollment:
22
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent freshmen; it offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
Basic drawing skills will be helpful, but not required.
Special Expenses:
$250 for art supplies.

Historically, printmaking has been aligned with revolutionary ideas, political and religious reform, and the democratization of artistic practice and production. This is an arena in which artists have the potential to reinvent not only the way two-dimensional images look, but also the manner in which they are made. For instance, consider the popular notion of the Modernist artist-genius working in isolation to express him- or herself. In contrast to this creative practice, printmakers have traditionally collaborated to create works of art-often these works have a social message. Artists and printers confer with and influence each other while making work in their community. Printmaking can counter the idea of works of art as being precious, one-of-a-kind commodities by permitting the artist to create multiple copies of images. These are a few of the ways we will address the practice and history of printmaking.

This one-quarter program will focus on printmaking as an expressive and conceptual art form. But be forewarned-this will be an intensive 10 weeks that will require enthusiasm and a strong work ethic. Expect to work 50 hours a week.

Our artistic practice will focus on relief and intaglio techniques: the incised lines of woodcut, drypoint and etching. Emphasis will be placed on developing artistic practice and research: How do we develop artistic ideas? How do we revise and refine ideas and works of art? What is the benefit of working in series? How does an artist generate and communicate intellectual content through images?

During the quarter, students will practice printmaking techniques, learn about print culture and the history of printmaking, and do research by examining both historical and artistic examples. Students will be expected to work collaboratively in community. Writing is a significant component of this program. Students will be responsible for developing a portfolio of printed works, presenting research on print history and participating in a print exchange.

Credit awarded in:
printmaking, print history and expository writing.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
visual arts, graphic design, art history and teaching.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Expressive Arts.
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Indigenous Peoples and Ecological Change

Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
48
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.
Faculty Signature:
Yes, no new students.
Special Expenses:
Up to $350 for field trips.

This introductory program is designed to provide knowledge of the fundamental aspects of general biology and ecology in order to understand the effects of increasing geo-political demands on diverse ecosystems and Indigenous cultures. We will cover topics of freshman college biology by studying ecological interactions in various environments. Our study of the intertwined history of European Americans and Native Americans will offer a context for an examination of contemporary Native eco-struggles, geography and the challenges of limited natural resources.

Focal topics in the social sciences will include the use and abuse of decision-making authority, particularly with respect to Native cultures. Seminars will focus on issues surrounding Indigenous examples of environmental sustainability, environmental racism, and Native resistance to cultural, political, economic and social injustices. Also, Indigenous social activism, its costs, its victories and its effects on the preservation of Native Treaty Rights will be explored.

Learning will take place through lectures, seminars, workshops and biology laboratory exercises. Students will improve their writing skills through reader response papers. Work in the field and a multi-day field trip in spring are also planned to gain first-hand exposure to various environments and peoples. Students will improve their research skills in social science through field observations and preparing for short group presentations.

Credit awarded in:
environmental studies, general biology, environmental science, environmental racism, social justice studies and Native American studies.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the biological sciences, environmental sciences, teaching, social sciences and Native American studies.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen; Environmental Studies; and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.

Program Updates

02.28.2006:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.

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Individual Studies at Evergreen

new



not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Prerequisites:
Negotiated individually with faculty.
Faculty Signature:
Contact individual faculty to make arrangements. Susan Aurand, (360) 867-6711; Jeanne Hahn, (360) 867-6014; Ryo Imamura, (360) 867-6148; Stephanie Kozick, (360) 867- 6493; John Longino, (360) 867-6511; Cheri Lucas-Jennings, (360) 867-6782; Babacar M'Baye, (360) 867- 5055; Kabby Mitchell, (360) 867-6336; Gary Peterson, (360) 867-6021; Terry Setter, (360) 867- 6615; Rob Smurr, (360) 867-5056
Special Expenses:
Dependent upon student's individual project.

Evergreen values providing students with the opportunity to engage in individualized study through Individual Learning Contracts and Internships. This option is designed primarily for students doing advanced work. Individual study is documented for one quarter at a time, although it is possible to conduct a study longer than one quarter by developing more than one contract that demonstrates progression of learning over a succession of quarters.

For students to engage in individual study, they must have the support of a faculty sponsor. Students interested in Individual Learning Contracts negotiate their course of study directly with the faculty sponsor. Internships need to be arranged through Academic Advising with the support of a field supervisor and a faculty sponsor. More information on Individual Learning Contracts and Internships (including how to find a faculty sponsor) is available at

http://www.evergreen.edu/advising/individualContract.htm.

Each quarter, some faculty's teaching assignment consists primarily of sponsoring student's individual study. During the spring, individual studies faculty are listed below. In addition, other faculty and many staff may sponsor individual study on a space-available basis.

Susan Aurand will sponsor students who are interested in the visual arts. For more details, see Student Originate Studies: Visual Arts. She will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.

Jeanne Hahn will sponsor students who are interested in political economy. For more details, see Student Originate Studies: Political Economy, Topics in Globalization and Contemporary India. She will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.

Ryo Imamura will sponsor individual and group contracts in psychology, counseling, social work, Buddhism, Eastern spirituality, Asian culture, Asian-American studies, peace studies, nonprofit organizations, deep ecology, international studies, ethics, death and dying, midwifery and aging. He will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.

Stephanie Kozik will review all proposed individual and small group cluster contracts or internships that are authentically based on student interest. She would be most helpful with the study of human development, social studies, education, movement studies, and Polish language and culture. She is also interested in student work in literature and writing. She will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.

John Longino will sponsor individual and group contracts in entomology, ecology, evolutionary biology, environmental studies, or natural history. Independent work can be carried out locally or in Costa Rica.

Cheri Lucas-Jennings is willing to consider sponsoring individual study in the areas of public policy, public law, environmental health, planning, water policy and the built environment, legislative and natural resource policy, the courts, international agriculture, sustainable development, Latin American cultural studies, and art: graphic, oils, pen and ink. She will consider other areas on a space-available basis.

Babacar M'Baye will sponsor individual or group contracts in one or more of the following topics: African American literature and history, African literature and history, African cinema, postcolonial theory, slavery, colonialism, imperialism, and theories of race, class, gender, and (or) sexuality. He will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.

Kabby Mitchell will review all proposed individual and small group contracts or internships that are authentically based on student interest. He would be most helpful with the study of dance, African American history, theater, music and culture. He is also interested in student work in film or anything dealing with media literacy. He will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.

Gary Peterson will sponsor contracts and internships in social work, human services, cultural competence, and Native American studies. He will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis, especially if the student has a sub-contractor.

Terry Setter will sponsor students who are interested in music. For more details, see Student Originate Studies: Music. He will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.

Rob Smurr will sponsor students interested in the humanities. For more details, see Student Originated Studies: Humanities. He will consider sponsoring study in other areas on a space-available basis.
Credit awarded in:
will reflect the student's individual course of study and research.
Total:
16 credits
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the humanities, arts, sciences and social sciences.
This program is listed in:
Culture, Text and Language; Environmental Studies; Expressive Arts; Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies; and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates

02.17.2006:
New, not in printed catalog.
02.28.2006:
John Longino has been added to Individual Studies At Evergreen. John Longino will sponsor individual and group contracts in entomology, ecology, evolutionary biology, environmental studies, or natural history. Independent work can be carried out locally or in Costa Rica.

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Information Landscapes: Mapping the Invisible

new


not in printed catalog

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
12
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature:
Students must contact Ernestine Kimbro, (360) 867-6715 for an interview. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

This program provides the opportunity and skills to explore and think about emerging information technologies, services and applications, as well as their effects. Using Evergreen's library as a laboratory, we will examine the role information technologies play in the interpretation and creation of knowledge. A main learning objective for the year is for every program member to develop sophisticated research skills, online and off. Throughout our study we will be examining the characteristics of library and internet landscapes .

Academic instruction includes a weekly reading seminar on intellectual questions about knowledge production, plus a technical skills class and computer practicum in Web design and digital imaging. During the fall quarter, seminar will focus on the ascendance and reach of print literacy. In Winter, we will focus on media literacy and history. Spring quarter, students will undertake significant research projects for presentation at the close of the year.

On site project work development involves affiliation with public services and computer operations in the library and other campus media centers. Students may negotiate work assignments based on intellectual interests and the types of skills they wish to hone. Areas of work include library reference, the sound and image library, government documents, media loan, library technical support, archives and rare books.
Credit awarded in:
areas of student work.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
research, library science, emerging technologies, history, and media literacy.
This program is listed in:
Culture, Text and Language

Program Updates

02.08.2006:
New, not in printed catalog.
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Introduction to Environmental Studies: Land

Fall and Winter quarters

Enrollment:
72
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
One quarter of basic statistics and quantitative field methods.
Faculty Signature:
New students are welcome. Faculty will interview upper-class students who have a workable research topic and who have covered the bulk of comparable work in another program. For information, contact Carolyn Dobbs, (360) 867-6860 or Alison Styring, (360) 867-6837 or Dylan Fischer, (360) 867-6509
Special Expenses:
$200 for possible overnight, in-state field trips.

Washington State is home to three national parks as well as several national historical parks, sites and reserves. Mount Rainier, Olympic and North Cascades National Parks were established between 1899 and 1968 because of the aesthetic beauty of their alpine peaks, but their fragile and unusual ecosystems have made their preservation even more important. National park employees who steward and manage these protected areas face an increasingly daunting task of maintaining ecosystem integrity while also keeping the parks accessible to an ever-growing number of visitors. We will explore this tension by looking at the history of national parks, funding and management strategies, science in the parks, planning efforts, and critical thinking about the future of national parks. We will also examine what the parks protect, both organic and inorganic, and how these systems interact. This program will focus on the physical, social and biological aspects of the ecosystems of these parks and the impact of both visitor use and park policy on these systems.

Fall quarter will introduce students to forest ecology, physical geology, political science and social science research. Comparisons will be made between the legal definition and management of various federally administered public lands, including Forest Service national forests and wilderness areas and national monuments, as well as national parks and other protected areas administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Historic and contemporary relations of Native Americans and national parks will also be discussed. Students will be introduced to the geologic processes that have shaped the parks and will learn about the regional geologic history that produced the Olympic and Cascade ranges. Forest botany and ecology will also be introduced.

The focus during winter quarter will be on geologic hazards, environmental geology, disturbance ecology, human communities and human ecology. These topics address the effect that humans have on the park and the effect, or potential effect, of the park on human communities. We will also focus on the cultural aspects of national parks, both for the general public and those who work and volunteer at the parks.

Quantitative problem solving, social science field research and writing will be stressed, with writing assignments ranging from field journals to research papers, and possible group projects. Service learning may also be an integral component of this program.

Credit will be awarded in:
political science, social science field research, writing, forest ecology, physical geology, environmental geology and applied Geographic Information Systems.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
environmental studies, environmental science, natural resource management, earth sciences and public policy.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Environmental Studies.

Program Updates

12.14.2004:
Ken Tabbutt has left the faculty team
11.11.2005:
Prerequisites: One quarter of basic statistics and quantitative field methods. Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. Faculty will interview upper-class students who have a workable research topic and who have covered the bulk of comparable work in another program. For information, contact Carolyn Dobbs, (360) 867-6860 or Alison Styring, (360) 867-6837 or Dylan Fischer, (360) 867-6509
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Introduction to Natural Science

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Faculty:
Lydia McKinstry, Mario Gadea, Donald Morisato
Enrollment:
72
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshman students.
Prerequisites:
This program is not accepting new students for spring quarter.
Faculty Signature:
No new students.

This program will offer students a conceptual and methodological introduction to biology, chemistry, math and physics. We will use an organizing theme that is based on the cycles and transformations of matter and energy at a variety of scales in both living and nonliving systems. As appropriate, we will use quantitative methods to gain additional insights into these processes. We will also explore some of the impacts on societies due to changes in science and technology.

Program activities will include lectures, small-group problem-solving workshops, laboratories, field trips and seminars. During spring, there will be an opportunity for small groups of students to conduct an independent scientific investigation designed in collaboration with the program faculty. Students will learn to describe their work through writing and public presentations.

This program is designed for students who want to take their first year of college science. It will be a rigorous program, requiring a serious commitment of time and effort on the part of the student. Students who simply want exposure to science will find this program quite demanding and should consult the faculty before the program begins. Overall, we expect students to end the program in the spring with a working knowledge of scientific and mathematical concepts, with the ability to reason critically and solve problems, and with hands-on experience in natural science.

Students who complete this program will be prepared for more advanced study in programs such as Molecule to Organism or Marine Life. Both programs will be offered in 2006-07.

Credit awarded in:
chemistry, biology, mathematics, physics and scientific writing.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2006-07.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
physical and biological sciences, medicine and health sciences, environmental studies and teaching.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Scientific Inquiry.

Program Updates

04.20.2005:
There has been a faculty reorganization in this program. The program description has been revised. Stu Matz has left the program; Donald Morisato and Mario Gadea have joined the program.
11.11.2005:
Prerequisite: Biology - familiarity with the material presented in Units 1 and 2 of the Biology textbook (Freeman). Math/Physics - solid understanding of Algebra and Precalculus. Chemistry - familiarity with the material presented in Chapters 1-4, 6-9 of the Chemistry textbook (Brown and LeMay). The textbook details can be found on the program page as well as fall quarter syllabi http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/ins2005. Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. To obtain a faculty signature, contact Lydia McKinstry, (360) 867-5262
02.28.2006:
This program is not accepting new students for spring quarter.
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Inventing Systems with Music and Movement Theater

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Arun Chandra, Jeff Glassman
Enrollment:
48
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent freshmen.
Prerequisites:
One quarter of college work in theater or music.
Special Expenses:
$30 for performances.

To look at things as a "system" simply means to notice how the change of a "part" can change the "whole." What implications does this have in the worlds of music and movement, social behavior and theater? How does looking at something as a system change the thing we look at? How does it influence our ideas and actions? This program invites students who are interested in investigating the idea of system, as well as creating systems of composition in sound and movement.

Students will collaborate on three to four group composition performance projects during the quarter. They will also participate in weekly readings, seminars and workshops in music and movement notation systems and scores, theater, and the study of systems including cybernetics. In addition, guest lecturers will present their ideas on divergent fields of study such as Butoh theater, cell biology, Orissi dance, computer science and environmental science.

Credit awarded in:
music composition, movement theater, music history and experimental theater.
Total:
16 credits
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
music and theater performance, liberal arts, writing, composition, and the politics of the arts.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Expressive Arts.

Program Updates

06.28.2005:
New, not in printed catalog.

11.28.2005:
Jeff Glassman, performer, writer, choreographer and teacher, has joined this program.
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Last Updated: December 21, 2007


The Evergreen State College

2700 Evergreen Parkway NW

Olympia, Washington 98505

(360) 867-6000