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Current Year's Catalog 2005-06

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Environmental Studies

Expressive Arts

Native American and World Indigenous Peoples' Studies

Scientific Inquiry

Society, Politics, Behavior and Change

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Sacred Monsters: Insiders and Outsiders in French-Speaking Cultures of Africa and the Americas
Science Seminar
Sculpture: Site Specific
Seeing the Light
So You Want to Be a Psychologist?
So You Want to Be a Teacher? Exploring Issues of Development, Learning and Schooling
The Sociology of Children's Literature: Understanding Social Life through Children's Fiction
Student Originated Software: Designing and Implementing Real-World Systems
Student Originated Studies: Humanities
Student Originated Studies: Internships in the Public Service
Student Originated Studies: Media
Student Originated Studies: Music
Student Originated Studies: Political Economy, Topics in Globalization and Contemporary India
Student Originated Studies: Tacoma
Student Originated Studies: Visual Arts
Symbiosis
Symmetry in Nature

Sacred Monsters: Insiders and Outsiders in French-Speaking Cultures of Africa and the Americas

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
75
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Students must have knowledge of French so they can join a French class already in progress.
Faculty Signature:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.
Special Expenses:
Approximately $5,500 for an optional trip to Martinique during spring quarter.

Plunge your gaze into the mirror of the Marvelous: your tales, your legends, your songs-you'll see inscribed, luminous, the sure image of your Self.

-Aimé Césaire

We plan an intensive study of the literature, arts, history, folklore, religions and film of French-speaking, or Francophone, cultures: Senegal, in West Africa; Morocco and Algeria, in North Africa; Haiti and Martinique, in the Caribbean; and the Creole and Cajun (Acadian) cultures in Louisiana. These cultures share not only a language-whether imposed by the colonizer or bestowed as a gift by generations past-but also a reverence for ancestral traditions that have come up through lines of blood, stories and ritual celebration. They also share the experience of French colonialism, and a major interest for us will be its devastating impact on these cultures and their remarkable response: the enormous postcolonial work of restoration and of the creation of social, artistic and religious forms. In addition, we will trace the multiple influences of these former colonies on French arts, thought and society.

A central theme for our work will be identity: How can myth, folklore, ritual and art guide a process of self-discovery or self-transformation? How do memory and historical crises shape individual and cultural identities? How does our language influence our sense of self, and how do Francophone cultures continually remake French in their own images? Inside/Outside, Self/Other, are metaphors imaging the tenuous, often violent dialogue between the Francophone world and France. This dialogue between Insider and Outsider is a motive force of cultural change: each culture perceives its Others with mixed awe and horror. Insiders and Outsiders hold up a mirror to one another, define themselves against one another, and take from one another in far-reaching mutual influence.

The Sacred Monsters, or monstres sacrés, much as the legendary all-knowing fool, stand on the threshold between Inside and Outside and hurl their invectives. Genius shields their impunity; they are taboo: scandalous, powerful, sacred. In the French tradition we think of a Voltaire, a Sade, a Genet. The monstres sacrés of today raise their voices from within postcolonial cultures, their critique aimed both at France and the Western world, and at neocolonial remnants in their own societies. Fanon and Sembene exposed the colonial lie of the "civilizing mission," just as Sade and Voltaire contested reigning structures of God and King. Césaire and Depestre reject Western reason's sufficiency and deconstruct its language; artists of Africa and the Caribbean reject an art that has become profane and open their works to possessing spirits, drawing Western artists, like Picasso and the Surrealists, in their wake. Similarly, immigrants in today's France have challenged the authenticity of French humanism, much as slavery in the French Caribbean put the lie to ideals of the French Revolution.

In this program, using multicultural sources, students will practice literary and symbolic analysis, investigate the historical roots of social conflicts, and read and discuss postcolonial, aesthetic and philosophical discourse. We will focus, on the one hand, on texts, events and individuals and, on the other, on cultural entities and processes, such as voodoo, immigration and négritude. Students will also have the opportunity to study the French language at the beginning, intermediate or advanced level.

During spring quarter, students may elect to travel as a group to Martinique for field study and further language work. Students who do not choose to travel can pursue an independent project on campus and continue their study of beginning or intermediate French.

Credit awarded in:
literature, history, folklore, cinema, comparative religions, art history and French.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2007-08.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the humanities, French and Francophone studies, history, folklore, graduate studies, careers in diplomacy, international business and organizations, and cultural studies.

Program Updates

11.11.2005:
Prerequisites: Students must have knowledge of French so they can join a French class already in progress. Faculty Signature: New students are welcome. To obtain a faculty signature, contact Stacey Davis, (360) 867-6761.
02.17.2006:
No new students will be accepted into this program for spring quarter.
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Science Seminar

Winter and Spring quarters

Faculty:
E. J. Zita
Enrollment:
20
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Good writing skills.

Each quarter, we will read, discuss and write about diverse topics in physics, astronomy, mathematics and related areas. We assume no background in mathematics or physics. We will explore observations and ideas about the nature, history and philosophy of science, as well as the methods of physics and mathematics. We will investigate questions such as: What are the newest ideas in physics and astronomy? How is knowledge created or discovered? How can new ideas develop into testable theories? How does scientific understanding change? Past topics have included string theory, relativity, chaos, quantum mechanics, infinity and cosmology. Readings and themes vary each quarter. Details are available online at http://192.211.16.13/z/zita/scisem.htm.

Our learning goals include improved critical thinking, deeper qualitative understanding of science and improved communication skills, both oral and written. Quantitative investigations are possible for interested students, but are not required. Science Seminar students will work with science students to discuss key points and questions before each seminar. Students will earn 4 or 8 credits by participating in one or two seminars each week and completing short essays and online assignments. Students are encouraged to work with the Writing Center tutors and to attend occasional writing workshops.

Credit awarded in:
the history and/or philosophy of science and/or math.
Total:
4 or 8 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the sciences, mathematics, physics, and the history and philosophy of science.
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Sculpture: Site Specific

Fall quarter

Faculty:
R. T. Leverich
Enrollment:
21
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Foundations of Visual Art or the equivalent (one year of study in drawing, painting, art history and introduction to sculpture).
Faculty Signature:
Students must present their portfolios, including 3-D work, drawings and a writing sample, at the Academic Fair, May 11, 2005. For information contact Bob Leverich via email. Students who cannot attend the Academic Fair may mail their slide portfolios, writing samples and statements of interest and qualifications to R. T. Leverich, The Evergreen State College, Lab II, Olympia, WA 98505. Portfolios received by May 11, 2005, will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses:
Approximately $150 for art supplies.

How can sculpture define, activate and enliven a space, turning it into a place? How can sculptural objects interact to become a sculptural experience? What is the role and responsibility of the sculptor working in the environment and in the community? How does studio work inform a sculptor's work in other contexts? Sculpture students who wish to advance their skills by making work for specific locations will examine these basic questions throughout the quarter.

Students will be asked to make a daily commitment to sculpture and drawing practices in the studio, and to produce a cohesive body of three-dimensional works, combining them in one or several site-specific installations. This work will be supported by technical demonstrations in steel, stone and other media, workshops on site documentation and access issues, work discussions and seminars. Readings will address issues around contemporary sculpture history and theory, place making, art and environmental issues, public art issues and professional practice. Students will be asked to write short papers clarifying their thinking about their own work and process, and an independent research paper and presentation on a contemporary artist working in public sculpture, craft or installation.

The goals of the program include understanding and mastery of selected materials and processes in making sculpture, experience in conceiving and constructing site-specific works, three-dimensional expression, and a well-informed, reasoned and rigorous approach to art making.

Credit awarded in:
sculpture, drawing and critical writing.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
art, environmental design and humanities.
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Seeing the Light

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Bob Haft
Enrollment:
20
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This sophomore or above program accepts up to 20 percent sophomores.
Prerequisites:
At least one quarter of college-level photography.
Faculty Signature:
Students must present an academic and photographic portfolio and schedule an interview with Bob Haft via email or call (360) 867-6474. Portfolios received by the Academic Fair, March 8, 2006, will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Special Expenses:
$200 to $300 for photo materials.

This is a one-quarter program designed for intermediate- and advanced-level photography students. Students will work with medium- and large-format cameras, as well as 35mm cameras. Students will study the work of historical and contemporary photographers, view and analyze films, and read texts dealing with the history and critical analysis of the medium. In addition to classroom work, field trips will be taken to galleries and museums to view exhibits and/or collections of photographs of particular interest. There will be a series of assigned projects designed to further technical and aesthetic skills. As a final project, students will work in teams to produce a theme-centered document combining images and text. All of the projects will be formally presented and critiqued.

Credit awarded in:
intermediate photography, history of photography, aesthetics, art theory and criticism, and individual research projects.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
art history, photography and the humanities.
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So You Want to Be a Psychologist?

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Carrie Margolin
Enrollment:
24
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent freshmen.
Special Expenses:
We will attend the Western Psychological Association annual convention, April 27-30, 2006, in Palm Springs, CA. Students will need to travel there on April 26, and will return on April 30. The approximate cost of the field trip fee is between $286 and $439, depending upon the type of accommodations you require; this includes WPA membership/registration and hotel at the convention site. Transportation and food are additional, and on your own. All fees must be paid by April 10, 2006. For more information contact contact Carrie Margolin via email, or (360) 867-6518.

Students will investigate theories and practices of psychologists to enhance their understanding of counseling, social services and the science of psychology. Students will explore careers in psychology and the academic preparations necessary for these career choices. We will cover the typical activities of psychologists who work in academia, schools, counseling/clinical settings, social work agencies and applied research settings.

Among our studies will be ethical quandaries in psychology and the ethics of human and animal experimentation. We will cover history and systems of psychology. Students will read original source literature from the major divisions of the field, covering both classic and contemporary journal articles and books by well-known psychologists. Library research skills, in particular the use of PsycINFO, Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index, will be emphasized. Students will gain expertise in the technical writing style of the American Psychological Association (APA). The class format will include lectures, guest speakers, workshops, discussions, films and a field trip.

There's no better way to explore the range of activities and topics that psychology offers, and to learn of cutting edge research in the field than to attend and participate in a convention of psychology professionals and students. To that end, students will attend the annual convention of the Western Psychological Association, which is the western regional arm of the APA. This will prove to be the single most important learning experience of the program!

Credit awarded in:
the history and systems of psychology, social science ethics, career explorations in psychology, foundations of psychology, and one discipline within psychology (of the student's choice): developmental, cognitive, social or physiological.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in psychology and social work.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates

04.27.2005:
This program description has been revised.
02.10.2006:
We will attend the Western Psychological Association annual convention, April 27-30, 2006, in Palm Springs, CA. Students will need to travel there on April 26, and will return on April 30. The approximate cost of the field trip fee is between $286 and $439, depending upon the type of accommodations you require; this includes WPA membership/registration and hotel at the convention site. Transportation and food are additional, and on your own. All fees must be paid by April 10, 2006. For more information contact contact Carrie Margolin via email, or (360) 867-6518.
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So You Want to Be a Teacher? Exploring Issues of Development, Learning and Schooling

Fall and Winter quarters

Enrollment:
60
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
This lower-division program is designed for 46 freshmen and 14 sophomores.
Faculty Signature:
No new students accepted winter quarter.

This program is for people who are interested in pursuing teaching as a career choice or who are interested in schooling and equity. An introduction to theories of learning, language acquisition and child development is the focus of fall quarter. The guiding question for the quarter is: What is the role of development in the learning process?

During winter quarter, we will investigate the relationships of learning, schooling and diversity. Students will select a particular model of schooling (e.g., home-schooling, public school, Waldorf, Sudbury); research its origins, beliefs about learning, development and teaching practices; and then complete an analysis of which groups of learners these structures serve and why. Students in this program can expect to use writing as a tool for learning; to develop a research-based understanding of child development; to investigate the historical, sociocultural and organizational contexts of schools; and to develop skills in formulating and pursuing a research question, analyzing schooling practices and making public presentations.

Throughout the program, we will be concerned with the politics and economics of schools and schooling. We will address school governance and finance, particularly as these topics relate to issues of equity and diversity.

Program activities will include interactive lectures and workshops, seminars, weekly writing, small group investigations and a long-term project exploring and critiquing a particular approach to schooling. Participants' work in the program will be assessed through written papers, participation in all activities, projects and a final portfolio.

Credit awarded in:
history, the philosophy and theory of education, current issues in education, expository writing, quantitative skills and academic planning.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
education and the social sciences.

Program Updates

04.07.2005:
This lower-division program is designed for 46 freshmen and 14 sophomores.
11.11.2005:
No new students accepted winter quarter.
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The Sociology of Children's Literature: Understanding Social Life through Children's Fiction

cancelled


This class has been cancelled. Contact Academic Advising for more information.

Fall quarter

Faculty:
Toska Olson
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.

This program will examine what children's literature teaches young people about society and culture. Even though children may not be aware of the mechanisms by which individuals are linked to their society, they do have experience with social issues such as identity formation, peer pressure, conformity and inequality. As members of a very individualistic society, American children may not realize that their experiences, opinions and behaviors are shared by many others and shaped by the larger culture around them. Elementary and middle school children are going through significant developmental changes and experiencing social pressures that can make them feel isolated and confused. Meaningful children's literature that brings to the forefront our existence as social and cultural beings may help ameliorate some of our children's confusion and loneliness, and may help them understand the basis behind some of the social rules they encounter every day. In this program, we will learn how to analyze children's literature and evaluate how it reflects significant social issues and cultural contexts.

The program involves extensive student-initiated research that puts a heavy emphasis on advanced group work, sociological interviewing and oral presentations. Students will be expected to produce a research paper that represents a culmination of their college writing and thinking abilities.

Credit awarded in:
sociology, children's literature, public speaking, library research and sociological fieldwork.
Total:
16 credits.
This program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
social sciences and the humanities.

Program Updates

04.20.2005:
This program has been cancelled.
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Student Originated Software: Designing and Implementing Real-World Systems

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
New students must have a software project going and can show that it is feasible to complete it by the end of spring quarter, or are interested in taking either of the two part-time options. New students must be at the upper-division level.
Faculty Signature:
New students are welcome. To obtain a faculty signature, contact Judy Cushing at the Academic Fair, November 30, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym, or Judith Cushing, (360) 867-6652.
Internship Possibilities:
Only if in conjunction with the software project, or for 4 credits in spring quarter with faculty approval.

Critical problems with software systems remain despite the best efforts of many very smart people over the last 50 years to resolve or avoid them. Software is often late, over budget, socially irresponsible, unable to perform according to user needs, or some combination of these. The "software engineering" problem is not just a matter of science and technology, but a problem of organization, psychology, group dynamics and culture. In addition, considerable knowledge and understanding of the relevant domain is required to design and implement a successful system. Student Originated Software is intended to prepare students to face these problems.

This program gives students with advanced programming skills, or some programming skills and considerable domain expertise, the ability to identify and carry out viable software projects. Students will work in groups to identify a software project, prepare a feasibility study, identify a client (or class of clients) and write software specifications. They will conduct systems analysis and design, implementation, product testing and validation. They will write user documentation and system maintenance plans, and (where appropriate) conduct or plan system installation, deployment and user training. Students will evaluate their software project according to technical, legal and social criteria.

Domains of successful past projects include the sciences, music, visual arts, automobile tuning, education, computer security, databases for small businesses and local and state agencies. The program seminars will address the history and culture of the software industry, writing verifiably correct programs, programming languages, ergonomics and human-machine interaction, and the psychology of computer programming and other topics as relevant.

Credit awarded in:
computer science and software engineering: object-oriented analysis, design and programming*; relational databases*; distributed computing*; software tools* and other topics based on areas of student work*.
Total:
8 or 16 credits fall and winter quarters; 4, 8 or 16 credits spring quarter. The 8-credit option is for part-time students only; spring quarter 4-credit option is for students who are only doing the internship.
Program is preparatory for careers and future study in:
computer science and software engineering or technology use and development in an application area.

Program Updates

04.27.2005:
The enrollment limit has been reduced to 37 students.
06.06.2005:
The enrollment limit has decreased to 25 students.
07.11.2005:
Sheryl Shulman will not teach in this program during winter and spring quarters.
11.11.2005:
New students are welcome. To obtain a faculty signature, contact Judy Cushing at the Academic Fair, November 30, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym, or Judith Cushing, (360) 867-6652.
02.17.2006:
New students must have a software project going and can show that it is feasible to complete it by the end of spring quarter, or are interested in taking either of the two part-time options. New students must be at the upper-division level.

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Student Originated Studies: Humanities

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Robert Smurr
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; sophomores who are prepared to carry out advanced study.
Faculty Signature:
Students must develop an Independent Learning Contract in consultation with Robert Smurr. Contract proposals received by March 1, 2006, will be given priority. For more information contact Robert Smurr, (360) 867-5056

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students to do research in the following areas: History (preference given to topics investigating European and North Asian countries; and environmental history---local or global); Environmental Studies (environmental history, philosophy, ethics). Students will be expected to do some work in common and meet weekly in small groups, as well as work on their own individual projects.

Credit awarded in:
will reflect the student's individual course of study and research.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
history, environmental studies, cultural studies, the humanities and teaching.
This program is listed in:
Culture, Text and Language.

Program Updates

02.01.2006
New, not in printed catalog.
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Student Originated Studies: Internships in the Public Service

Spring quarter

Enrollment:
24
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of the program Public Works: Democracy and Design, or the equivalent.
Faculty Signature:
Students must contact Cheryl Simrell King to develop an in-program Internship contract. Proposals received before March 10, 2006, will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Internship Possibilities:
Students can expect to spend ten hours each week working in their interning agencies as well as six hours of scheduled classroom instruction.

In this program, we will build on the work of the fall and winter program Public Works: Democracy and Design. The internship program will also be open to students who have completed work in other similar programs and are sufficiently prepared to hold an internship in a public or nonprofit agency.

Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested students must consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed internship and/or course of study. In-program Internship proposals will be completed before the beginning of spring quarter and must follow the college protocol for internships. While students are encouraged to seek out their own internship possibilities, we will work with campus resources and the faculty member's contacts to identify internship possibilities in both public and nonprofit agencies.

Students will hold full internships and will come together as a class one day a week to study more about working in public agencies through seminars, lectures, guest speakers and films. The faculty member will work with the interning agencies, making at least one site-visit to each agency (assuming local internships) during the quarter and meeting regularly with students outside of scheduled class times.
Credit awarded in:
public and nonprofit administration, public policy, organizational and management theory, and other topics based on areas of student work.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
public and nonprofit administration, public works administration, community studies, civil engineering, environmental planning and design, public policy and city, county and regional planning.
This program is listed in:
Programs for Freshmen and Society Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program Updates

02.17.2006:
Students must enroll in the program, CRN 30605, as well as develop an in-program Internship with a public or nonprofit agency.
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Student Originated Studies: Media

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Faculty:
Laurie Meeker
Enrollment:
18
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
To be considered for this advanced program, students should have successfully completed the Mediaworks program or the equivalent (approximately one year of media skills training, media history and media theory), or completed another interdisciplinary media program at Evergreen.
Faculty Signature:
New students are welcome to join the program for spring quarter. Students must submit a portfolio and complete the written application, available from Carolyn Raines, the Program Secretary, located in the Communications Building, Room 303A. The portfolio must include copies of two recent faculty evaluations (unofficial copies accepted) and a VHS tape that contains two examples of your best work in film or video. For more information contact Laurie Meeker, (360) 867-6613 or write to The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505, or talk with Laurie at the Academic Fair, March 8, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym.
Special Expenses:
$100 to $500 each quarter, depending on projects.
Internship Possibilities:
With faculty approval.

Student Originated Studies (SOS): Media is a program for advanced media students interested in developing learning communities with others who share academic goals that may have grown out of previous academic projects and programs. This is not the place to do beginning studies in media. Students will work with faculty during the first few weeks of fall quarter to design their own curriculum. Their studies will be pursued in small groups that share common readings, research interests and/or production goals. Teams of six to eight students will develop reading/seminar schedules, assist each other with production tasks, and participate in critiques. The full group will also meet weekly for film screenings and seminars. Collaborative projects are encouraged, but students may also work on individual projects in the context of their SOS team. As in other Evergreen media programs, linking theory with practice is emphasized, and students should expect to develop research and writing skills along with achieving their media production goals. Screenings and critiques will provide a strong foundation for the development of skills in media production and analysis. There will, however, also be room for students who wish to pursue media history and criticism exclusively.

Here are some examples of possible SOS teams: a small group of students who work on individual documentaries and explore documentary film history through texts and screenings; a group of students who collaborate on a multimedia performance and explore the history of video art and performance; a group of students who study queer theory, examine queer film and video, and produce individual projects addressing these themes; a group of students who research the politics of representation in relation to gender and race and produce a collaborative film.

In addition to the student-centered curriculum, we will explore different themes each quarter. In fall, our focus will be Building Media Communities. The theme for winter will be Creative Processes and Strategies. In spring, the focus will be determined by the students.

Credit awarded in:
areas of student work-e.g., media studies, film production, video production, audio production, digital film production, multimedia performance, installation, film history and theory.
Total:
12 or 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the media arts.

Program Updates

04.27.2005:
The enrollment limit has been reduced to 18 students.
11.28.2005:
New students are welcome winter quarter. Students must submit a portfolio and complete the written application, available at Academic Advising, online (see Academic Advising) or from the Program Secretary's Office, Communications Building, Room 301. The portfolio must include copies of two recent faculty evaluations (unofficial copies accepted) and a VHS tape that contains two examples of your best work in film or video. For more information contact Laurie Meeker via email, call (360) 867-6613 or mail to The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505, or talk with Laurie at the Academic Fair, November 30, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym.
02.28.2006:
New students are welcome to join the program for spring quarter. Students must submit a portfolio and complete the written application, available from Carolyn Raines, the Program Secretary, located in the Communications Building, Room 303A. The portfolio must include copies of two recent faculty evaluations (unofficial copies accepted) and a VHS tape that contains two examples of your best work in film or video. For more information contact Laurie Meeker, (360) 867-6613 or write to The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505, or talk with Laurie at the Academic Fair, March 8, 4-6 p.m., CRC Gym.
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Student Originated Studies: Music

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Terry Setter
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors who are prepared to carry out advanced work in music composition and/or production.
Faculty Signature:
Students who have a project in mind must meet with Terry Setter, Contact Terry via email, call (360) 867-6615 or mail to The Evergreen State College, COM 301, Olympia, WA 98505. Students are encouraged to cluster together around projects that reflect their shared interests. Students who have completed their appointments by the Academic Fair, March 8, 2006, will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Internship Possibilities:
With faculty approval.

Student Originated Studies (SOS): Music offers opportunities for students to do advanced work in music composition or advanced production techniques. Students will work independently on their own creative and research projects. SOS will be made up of individual students and small groups that will devise projects and meet in the weekly forum. In the forum, students will present works-in-progress to get feedback and advice. The forum is intended to provide a sense of community and support to students. All other contract obligations will be worked out individually with the faculty. Students will enroll for SOS, then design their quarter-long, contract-style work plans using input from the faculty member.

Credit awarded in:
areas of student work.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
music and media arts.
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Student Originated Studies: Political Economy, Topics in Globalization and Contemporary India

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Jeanne Hahn
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above who are prepared to carry out advanced study.
Faculty Signature:
Students must draw up an Independent Learning Contract in consultation with the faculty. For information contact Jeanne Hahn, (360) 867-6014 or hahnj@evergreen.edu. Contract proposals received before March 7, 2007, will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students consult with Jeanne about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. Under the SOS umbrella, I will sponsor student clusters for research and reading in political economy, U.S. history (especially the "founding period"), various topics in globalization, historical capitalism and contemporary India. I will also sponsor individual students to study these topics on Individual Contracts and sponsor internships and travel abroad contracts.

Credit awarded in:
topics based on areas of student work.
Total:
4 - 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in:
the social sciences.

Program Updates

04.20.2005:
New, not listed in printed catalog.
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Student Originated Studies: Tacoma

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Faculty:
Artee Young (F), Tyrus Smith (W), Gilda Sheppard (S)
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of at least two quarters of full-time enrollment in a Tacoma coordinated studies program.
Faculty Signature:
Students who have a project in mind must draft an Independent Learning Contract or Internship Learning Contract and meet with the assigned faculty to discuss their plans before the sixth week of the preceding quarter. The deadline for fall quarter: April 29, 2005; for winter quarter: October 28, 2005; for spring quarter: February 10, 2006. Students should bring their draft contract or internship agreement and a portfolio of writing (expository essays, research papers, and faculty and self-evaluations from Evergreen programs) to the meeting. Call the Tacoma Program Office, (253) 680-3000 to make an appointment. Students who make appointments by the dates above will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.
Internship Possibilities:
Local internships with reflective writing and seminar.

Student Originated Studies have a rich history at Evergreen and offer opportunities for students to create their own courses of study and research while enjoying some of the benefits of collaborative study. Working with the faculty sponsor, individual students or small groups of students design projects and then meet, weekly or biweekly, to present, discuss and reflect upon their work.

The sponsor will support Tacoma students who wish to do community and public service, research and/or creative production. Some examples of projects are: an internship at a local law firm, social service agency, nonprofit or education organization; creating a documentary or public service announcement; and researching the origins and contemporary issues around a current social problem (like hunger, homelessness, access to health care, unemployment, public health epidemics or how to combat violence).

Credit awarded in:
areas of student work.
Total:
2 to 16 credits each quarter. Students will negotiate credit with faculty.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in community development, organizational development, law and public policy, social and human services, public administration, communication and media arts, environmental studies and public health.

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Student Originated Studies: Visual Arts

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Susan Aurand
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Students must be prepared to carry out advanced study in the studio area they propose to work in.
Faculty Signature:
Students must submit individual contract proposals to Susan Aurand. Contract proposals received by March 3, 2006, will be given priority. Additional contract proposals will be accepted until the program fills. For more information contact Susan Aurand, or (360) 867-6711, or The Evergreen State College, Lab I 2022, Olympia, WA 98505.

Student Originated Studies (SOS) offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students to do advanced work in any of the following media: drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media, installation/performance, and poetry, as well as to do research projects in art history, public arts, mythology, and aesthetics. Students will be expected to meet weekly in small groups for critique/discussions, as well as work on their own individual projects.

Credit awarded in:
will reflect the student's individual course of study and research.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for:
the arts and humanities.

Program Updates

02.10.2006:
New, not listed in printed catalog.
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Symbiosis

new


not in printed catalog

Fall quarter

Faculty:
Erik Thuesen
Enrollment:
25
Schedule:
Class Schedules
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
One quarter of organic chemistry recommended. A minimum of one year of college-level chemistry with lab and advanced course work in either botany, microbiology, mycology or zoology is required. Prerequisites will be verified the first day of class.

Symbiosis can be defined as "the living together of differently named organisms." This program will look at the biology of symbiotic associations through lecture, readings, laboratory, field work and seminar topics taken from the primary literature. Although particular attention will be paid to mutualistic symbioses, parasitic associations will also be covered. Defining aspects of plant-animal, animal-animal, bacteria-plant, bacteria-animal, protozoa-animal and fungi-plant symbioses will be examined at the organismal, physiological, cellular, biochemical, molecular and ecological levels. Characteristics that define the integration between the host and symbiont of specific associations will be investigated through fieldwork and in the laboratory. Students will complete a take-home examination, keep a lab notebook and undertake a small research project that culminates in a poster with a short oral presentation.

Credit awarded in:
symbiosis, symbiosis seminar, parasitology, ecological physiology, symbiosis laboratory, and research. All credit will be designated as upper-division science.
Total:
16 credits.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in all life sciences, including botany, zoology, microbiology and human biology.

Program Updates

05.05.2005:
New, not listed in printed catalog.

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Symmetry in Nature

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Enrollment:
50
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Class Standing:
Sophomore or above; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
High school algebra.
Special Expenses:
Approximately $20 for math supplies such as a protractor, compass, etc.

Symmetry is ubiquitous in nature and readily observed in living organisms, the shapes of minerals and molecules, art, as well as in the buildings we construct. In this program we will study the mathematical concepts needed to understand and describe symmetry and use this understanding to explore the features of symmetry we find in nature. We will look at how the beauty and intricacy of the natural world relates to the beauty and simplicity of symmetry by building models to explore the many aspects of symmetry. Our studies will include symmetry in geometric forms, symmetry in elements, symmetry operations, introductory group theory, symmetry in molecular structure and crystallography, symmetry in art and living organisms (plants and animal morphology). We expect students to delve into both abstract and concrete topics in the pursuit of a deeper understanding of symmetry. Program activities will include lectures and workshops.

Credit awarded in:
introductory mathematics and science topics.
Total:
8 credits; 12 credit option is available for those who wish to design and conduct an independent project on some aspect of symmetry.
Program is preparatory for:
mathematics, natural science, biology and teaching.

Program Updates

02.08.2006:
New, not listed in printed catalog.
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Last Updated: December 21, 2007


The Evergreen State College

2700 Evergreen Parkway NW

Olympia, Washington 98505

(360) 867-6000