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This Year's Catalog 2006-07

Undergraduate Studies

A-Z Index

Programs for Freshmen

Culture, Text and Language

Environmental Studies

Expressive Arts

Native American and World Indigenous Peoples' Studies

Scientific Inquiry

Society, Politics, Behavior and Change

Tacoma Campus Programs

Evening and Weekend Studies

Evening and Weekend Class Listing

Summer Studies

Summer Class Listings

Graduate Studies

Graduate Electives

Master of Environmental Studies

Master of Public Administration

Master in Teaching

 

 


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Advanced Research in Environmental Studies
African-American Literature, 1773 to the Present
Algebra to Algorithms: An Introduction to Mathematics for Science and Computing
American Experiences: American Dreams
American Literature: The Presence of Place
Analyzing the World
Animal Behavior
The Art of the Book: History, Form & Content
Art, Media, Praxis
The Arts of the Sailor
Atlanta, 2007: Social Forums and Social Movements
Awareness

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
areas of student work.
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors.
Prerequisites:
Negotiated individually with faculty.
Faculty Signature:
Students must contact individual faculty to work out arrangements.

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

The research conducted by the student will generally last multiple quarters and function as a capstone to the student’s academic work at Evergreen. Students can also take advantage of this opportunity to write a senior thesis. The following faculty are seeking advanced students to assist with their research projects.

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

Dylan Fischer studies ecology and ecosystem function in forests. His research program includes a combination of field/lab work in riparian areas throughout the western United States, and field/lab research in southwest Washington. Much of this work focuses on genetic and/or evolutionary implications. Lab-based activities include image analysis of tree roots, analysis of plant materials, and meta-data analysis (analysis of previously collected data sets in a variety of ecosystems). Field work includes studies on species interactions, fluxes of nutrients, water and energy through ecosystems, carbon balance, global climate change, and restoration ecology.

Martha Henderson studies the ways in which humans transform Earth’s surfaces. She is particularly interested in cultural and social ideas that become evident in landscapes. Students interested in cultural landscapes, ethnic studies, environmental history, land-use patterns and urban agriculture are encouraged to develop projects. Qualitative research methodologies will be taught.

John Longino studies insect taxonomy and ecology, with specific research focus on ants. His research program is a combination of field work in Costa Rica and collections-based research at the Evergreen campus. Students may become involved in local or neotropical fauna studies, with field- and/or collections-based activities.

Lin Nelson is a social scientist who has worked with national and regional organizations doing research and advocacy on the linkages among environment, health and community. Students who would like to assist in developing case studies of environmental health in Northwest communities (with a focus on environmental justice and environment-labor connections) can contact her. A related area, for students with sufficient preparation, is the examination of Washington state’s plan to phase out selected persistent, bioaccumulative toxics.

Erik Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to estuarine hypoxia. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry.

Total:
4 to 16 credits each quarter. Students will negotiate credit with faculty sponsor.
Special Expenses:
Transportation costs may be needed for field work.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, geology, land-use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy and zoology.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2007–08.

Program updates:

04.04.2006:
Nalini Nadkarni will not be sponsoring contracts in Advanced Research in Environmental Studies.
05.16.2006:
Dylan Fischer has joined the group of faculty offering advanced research opportunities for students.
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African-American Literature: 1773 to the Present

cancelled



Spring quarter

Faculty:
Babacar M’Baye
Major areas of study include:
African-American literature, African and African-American studies, cultural studies, history, folklore, popular culture and American studies.
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.

This program will survey the history of African-American literature from its inception in African oral traditions and African-American slave narratives to its manifestation in contemporary genres such as rap and hip-hop poetry. We will read and discuss the poetry, fiction, folktales, short stories and historical autobiography or narratives written by Black authors from different generations. We will analyze the aesthetics and social, political and economic concerns in these writings in an attempt to uncover the fundamental role that literature has played in African-American struggle for freedom and equality.

The initial questions of this program will be inspired by critic William L. Andrews’s statement in the introduction to the Six Women’s Slave Narratives (1988) that “The birth of the Afro-American literary tradition occurred in 1773, when Phillis Wheatley published a book of poetry” (vii). This assertion begs the questions: “Does 1773 actually mark the beginning of African-American literary tradition?” “What continuities and transformations have developed in the tradition since its inception?” These questions suggest the difficulty of tracing the beginning of African-American literary tradition to one specific date when, as numerous scholars have shown, the African oral traditions that slaves brought to the Western world were already autonomous and fully-fledged literary forms of expression. By analyzing African-American literature through the lens of the scholarship about both racial struggle and African cultural retentions in America, this program intends to validate the various experiences and customs that shaped African-American culture.

Total:
12 or 16 credits.
Enrollment:
24
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in literature, cultural studies, ethnic studies, multiculturalism, history, social studies, folklore and popular culture, American studies and journalism.
This program is also listed under:
Programs for Freshmen and Cultural, Text and Language

Program updates:

06.29.2006:
This program has been cancelled.
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Algebra to Algorithms: An Introduction to Mathematics for Science and Computing

Spring quarter

Faculty:
TBA
Major areas of study include:
intermediate algebra, geometry, mathematical modeling, problem solving, computer programming, and history and philosophy of mathematics.
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
High school algebra.

Western science relies on mathematics as a powerful language for expressing the character of the observed world. Mathematical models allow predictions of the behavior of complex natural systems, and modern computing has magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence 21st-century decisions. Computer science relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving and also enables the construction of mathematical models. In fact, computer science is the constructive branch of mathematics.

This program explores connections between mathematics, computer science and the natural sciences, and will develop mathematical abstractions and skills needed to express, analyze and solve problems arising in the sciences, particularly computer science. The emphasis is fluency in mathematical thinking and expression, along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics include concepts of algebra, functions, algorithms and programming; and calculus, logic or geometry; all with relevant historical and philosophical readings.

We will also address psychological, pedagogical and development aspects of mathematics teaching and learning to broaden our own and others’ understanding beyond where some of us got “stuck” in our earlier involvement with mathematics.

The program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or pursuing further work in the sciences.

Total:
16 credits.
Enrollment:
24
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in the sciences, mathematics, computer science and education.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2007–08.
This program is also listed under:
Programs for Freshmen and Scientific Inquiry

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American Experiences, American Dreams

new


not in printed catalog

Fall and Winter quarters

Faculty:
Nancy Koppelman, Nelson Pizarro, Sam Schrager,
Major areas of study include:
American literature, history, sociology and folklore.
Class Standing:
This Core program is designed for freshmen.

"Speaking from my own special area of American culture, I feel that to embrace uncritically values which are extended to us by others is to reject the validity, even the sacredness, of our own experience." -Ralph Ellison

This program will ask how peoples historically consigned to the margins of the American social order have managed to be highly influential in shaping the culture of the nation, and how the character of American society has, in turn, shaped them. We will consider a range of groups, with special attention to Black, Jewish, and Hispanic experiences. They, like many of America's peoples, have shared legacies of geographical dispersion from the Old World, discrimination and a sense of otherness, and the creation of rich identities and communities based on identification with older worldviews and folkways that preceded life in the United States.

We will ask: How have members of these and other groups, building on the validity of their own experiences, remade themselves? How did they figure out how to make a living, participate in the arts and in political life, raise families, practice religious traditions, build bridges with their neighbors, and deal with hostility and oppression? How did they innovate, challenge, and transform American culture? And how have they embraced and conformed to its values?

In exploring these questions, we will look closely at the different ways these Americans have understood the "American Dream." In 1901, for example, Booker T. Washington, born a slave and founder of one of the first African American colleges in the United States, wrote: "I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed." In the 20th century, this ethic of hard work was challenged by a new range of values associated with financial success, entertainment, and participation in a rapidly expanding consumer culture. According to historian William Leach, the American Dream of overcoming obstacles was eclipsed by the "democratization of desire": the right to want anything and everything regardless of hard work. What has the American Dream meant for people still working to achieve basic rights associated with American citizenship? For their children's generation? And their children? For example, we will examine the emergence of varied forms of entrepreneurship across generations, which both served transplanted peoples and drew them into the broader contours of American society.

This program offers students an intensive focus on writing, interpretation and research. Student projects will involve library and ethnographic work, including opportunities to explore the ethnic and/or religious heritage of a community, family or acquaintances. We will read novels, histories, folklore, essays, and cultural studies, listen to music and watch films, and hear from an array of guest speakers. We will be constantly attentive to matters of gender, race, class, ethnicity and religiosity.

Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
60
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
Approximately $90 for overnight field trips and theatrical tickets each quarter.
Program is preparatory for:
the humanities and social sciences; interpersonal, multicultural and community work; business, education, journalism and law.
This program is also listed under:

Programs for Freshmen and Culture, Text and Language

Program updates:

06.12.2006:
This program replaces the program Blacks, Catholics and Jews.
06.29.2006:
Revision of the program narrative.
10.23.2006
This program is also listed under Programs for Freshmen and Culture, Text and Language
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American Literature: The Presence of Place

Fall and Winter quarters

Major areas of study include:
American studies, 19th-century American literature, 20th-century American literature, essay, fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction writing.
Class Standing:
This lower-division program is designed for 25 percent freshmen and 75 percent sophomores.

All writing comes from somewhere, emerges through authors, and inscribes upon our consciousness stories of who we are and where we come from. American letters have both reflected and constituted the world we, diverse peoples, have created for ourselves on this continent. American writing provides a panoply of accounts, narratives, poems and fictions that capture and create the place(s) of America. The narratives of slaves, the poems of Gary Snyder, the journals of Lewis and Clark, the novels of Leslie Marmon Silko help us to think about what sort of place we have written into existence. This program expects participants to think about the place we have created through an intensive survey of our literature. What is distinctly American about these experiences? How have these accounts been instrumental in the making of these American places?

In the fall quarter, we will investigate how the twin forces of democracy and industrialization, coupled with romanticism, underlie narratives of the exploration/exploitation of the land and peoples of America. Cooper, Melville and Twain can help us see how the romantic and industrial intertwined to become an American culture. As we engage these narratives, we will simultaneously work on creating life history narratives of 20th- and 21st-century experience through interviews and creative non-fiction writing.

Winter quarter, as we move into the 20th century, the complexity of American’s self-understanding, the diversity of experience and the multi-ethnic writing of the American story become critical. The struggle for a place in America and the American imagination, the revoicing and creation of the modern world forge a whole new reading of the place of Americans within their country and in the world.

This program will take very seriously readings in a wide survey of American letters from the 18th through the 20th century, and will take equally seriously writing about reading, about experience and about imagination. We believe that good writing is the product of serious reading of and reflection on excellent writing. The program will provide instruction in essay, creative nonfiction, fiction and poetry. This will require us to develop both our imaginative grasp of the world around us and the experiences that have brought America into being.

Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
48
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
Field trip costs, approximately $110 for fall quarter and $70 for winter quarter.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in literature, humanities, law, writing, education, social work and American studies.
This program is also listed under:
Programs for Freshmen and Culture, Text and Language.
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Analyzing the World

Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
scientific analysis, introduction to scientific instrumentation, introductory research methods, introductory forensic science, scientific writing and science laboratory.
Class Standing:
This lower-division program is designed for 50 percent freshmen and 50 percent sophomores.
Prerequisites:
High school algebra.

Are you curious about the world around you? Have you ever wondered why a particular event did or did not occur, and how the circumstances leading up to it may have changed the outcome and the future? How has scientific analysis changed how we view the world over time? How has forensic evidence affected the outcome of court trials, currently and in the past? How can we more fully understand our environment and predict changes that will occur in the future? These are the types of questions we will address in this two-quarter program.

We will use scientific approaches to examine both historical and current events. As an example, few historical events are as popular with conspiracy theorists as the JFK assassination. Also, prior to DNA fingerprinting and other modern forensic analytical techniques, the outcomes of many court trials would likely have been different. We will analytically study and review historical and current data and use scientific approaches to come to our own conclusions. We will also examine our environment, such as local water use and pollution issues.

We will learn modern methods of scientific analysis used in cutting edge scientific research and forensic science and we will critically evaluate our data. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques will be emphasized, including learning the use and application of state-of-the-art scientific instrumentation (scanning electron microscopy, gas and thin-layer chromatography, ultra-violet and infra-red spectroscopy) and equipment used in fieldwork. Scientific analysis will be the basis for our work, not conjecture, gut feeling and/or supposition. In science “data is king.”

In winter quarter, we will learn how to define scientific questions and critically evaluate data, and we will learn fundamental lab and field techniques. Spring quarter will focus more on project work using the skills we develop in winter quarter. We will work predominantly in the lab and in small group problem-solving workshops; group work and student presentations will be significant components of the program.

This program is designed for all students who want to gain a more analytical and scientific approach to the world around them, using historical and real world situations.

Students will be evaluated based on their laboratory and fieldwork, laboratory reports, class presentations and homework assignments.

Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
46
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in the sciences, the liberal arts and education.
This program is also listed under:
Programs for Freshmen and Scientific Inquiry.
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Animal Behavior

Spring quarter

Faculty:
Heather Heying
Major areas of study include:
behavioral ecology, evolution, zoology and statistics.
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
At least one year of college-level biology required, and one year of college-level writing. Students should also have background in evolutionary and ecological theory, or be prepared to quickly catch up with substantial readings from the texts that we will not be discussing in class.
Faculty Signature:
Students must submit an application containing: 1) A short essay addressing your background in ecology and evolution, and why you are interested in the program. 2) A copy of an evaluation from a previous science program. 3) The name and telephone number of a previous instructor. 4) Contact information (telephone number and e-mail address). Assessment will be based primarily on writing skills and background knowledge in organismal biology. Submit applications by e-mail to Heather Heying, heyingh@evergreen.edu. Applications received by March 7, 2007, will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

What do animals do? How do animals achieve these things? Why do animals do what they do? In this program, students will begin to answer these questions with extensive use of the existing literature and by generating their own data in independent research projects. Animals hibernate, forage, mate, form social groups, compete, communicate, care for their young, and so much more. They do so with the tools of their physiology, anatomy, and, in some cases, culture, for reasons having to do with their particular ecology and evolutionary history. By focusing on the interplay between ecology and evolution, we can understand animal behavior.

In this program, we will begin with a review of animal diversity and continue our studies of behavior from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Students will be expected to engage some of the complex, and often contradictory, scientific predictions and results that have been generated in this field, as well as undertake their own intensive field research. After studying the methods, statistical tests, and literature base frequently used in behavioral research, students will generate their own hypotheses, and go into the field to test them over several weeks of research. Research will be written up into scientific papers and presented to the entire program in a mini-conference in the final week.

Some topics that we will focus on include mating systems, territoriality, female mate choice, competition, communication, parental care, game theory, plant/animal interactions and convergent evolution. Seminar readings will focus on one group of animals in particular: the primates, including Homo sapiens.

Total:
16 credits.
Enrollment:
25
Special Expenses:
Approximately $100 for overnight field trips; plus additional costs as necessary to conduct research for independent projects.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in field biology, evolution, ecology, and other life sciences.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2008–09.

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The Art of the Book: History, Form & Content

new


not in printed catalog

Winter quarter

Major areas of study include:
aesthetics and design, creative writing, techniques in mixed media, history of the book, and book arts.
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.

Books hold a place in our imaginations paralleled by few other daily objects. They symbolize the intellect, the vast resources of fantasy, the whole of human history, and they can contain, in some manner, almost anything we wish them to. The rise of digital and internet technology has made at least a theoretical threat to an established culture of the book. It is in this potentially transitional moment that we, as writers, artists, and book-lovers, can articulate both old and new relationships to the book as a creative form, as an institution, and as the material container of consciousness.

We will take a creative approach to understanding the cultural and material history of the book. The first half of the quarter will be devoted to developing techniques in image production and creative writing practice through workshops and critique. Our study of writing and art will be consistently grounded in the idea of the book and the relationship between visual art and language. We'll develop a basic understanding of the cultural and material history of the book; we'll consider what it means to regard the book as an artistic medium by making books with our hands using ancient and alternative techniques. Students will practice skills for merging images and texts into this unique and singular form and examine the emerging discourse of artists' books as a revitalization of the book's potential.

The second half of the quarter will be focused on studio work and each student's completion of their own project in book form. Students should expect to read and write critically, to participate actively in seminars, workshops, and demonstrations, and to develop independent projects to be completed by the end of the quarter.


Total:
16 credits
Enrollment:
40
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
$150 for fieldtrips, tools, materials, & studio fees
Program is preparatory for:
writing, literature, visual arts, and book arts.
This program is also listed under:
Expressive Arts, Programs for Freshmen and Culture, Text and Language.

Program updates:

10.30.2006:
New, not in printed catalog.
 

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Art, Media, Praxis

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
art and media history and theory, studio arts, media production, critical writing, art/media proposal writing and independent projects in art/media installation.
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
One year college-level study in visual arts or media arts.
Faculty Signature:
Students will be selected on the basis of a portfolio review and interview beginning at the Academic Fair, May 17, 2006. The portfolio must include both visual and written work. Visual arts students must submit slides and/or art pieces while media students must submit a DVD copy of their work for review. Samples of written work may include a formal research paper or a critical analysis of visual arts or media work. Students must also submit one Evergreen Faculty Evaluation of Student Achievement or an unofficial transcript listing college courses taken. For more information contact Laurie Meeker, (360) 867-6613 or meekerl@evergreen.edu or Joe Feddersen, (360) 867-6393 or feddersj@evergreen.edu. Applications received by the Academic Fair will be given priority. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

Art, Media, Praxis is an intermediate to advanced interdisciplinary arts program examining current issues in contemporary visual and media arts. The program will engage both theory and practice (praxis) in the pursuit of a forum for interdisciplinary collaboration. We will focus on the intersections between visual arts and the moving image, examining installation and site-specific works. Students will develop their skills in critical writing as well as art/media production. Students entering the program will be expected to be proficient in one medium (e.g., painting, film, printmaking, video, animation, photography, drawing, digital media, sculpture, etc.) and will develop at least one interdisciplinary collaborative project in addition to the opportunity for pursuing individual work.

This program will include periods of intensive study in contemporary art/media theory with readings, film screenings, field trips and guest artists. During the fall, visual arts and media skills will be assessed, and supplemental workshops will be offered to build student skills in video, sculpture, film, printmaking, and/or photography (depending on needs). To build writing skills, students will produce at least four critical analyses of visual/media artworks. During winter, students will produce collaborative works that merge visual arts and the moving image. To inform this work, students will develop interdisciplinary research projects into a final paper and class presentation. Students will also develop their skills in proposal development, culminating in a proposal for spring project work that incorporates both visual and media arts.

Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
44
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
$300 to $400 each quarter for art and media supplies.
Internship Possibilities:
Spring only with faculty approval.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in visual arts, media arts, education, law and communications.
This program is also listed under:
Expressive Arts and Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies.

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The Arts of the Sailor

new


not in printed catalog

Fall OR Winter quarter

Faculty:
John Filmer
Major areas of study include:
critical reasoning, writing, coastal navigation, communication, leadership and seamanship.
Class Standing:
Juniors or seniors; transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature:
Students must submit a one-page summary of their goals and objectives, as well as their expectations of the program. Acceptance into the program will be based on the student's background and aspirations. For information and to schedule a faculty interview, contact John Filmer, (360) 867-6159 or write to The Evergreen State College, Seminar 2 A2117, Olympia, WA 98505. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

This program offers students an opportunity to learn basic seamanship, the sailing arts, and coastal navigation aboard the Yawl Resolute. Students will learn power cruise and sail seamanship, become part of a working crew, learn "the rules of the road," tides and currents, weather, boating safety and regulations, coastal navigation (not celestial) and various sailor's arts including knots, splices, hitches, reefs and the correct use of lines in docking and un-docking. The program will be demanding and include a reading and writing schedule covering the history and development of sail and Northwest maritime history. The development of leadership and teamwork skills is a primary goal. This program is intended for students who want to do more than just learn how to sail. Sailing days will generally consume a full day. Students must be willing to sail in any weather condition, work and study hard.

The S/V (Sailing Vessel) Resolute, NA3 (Naval Academy #3) is one of the original Annapolis 44's used at the U.S. Naval Academy to train midshipmen. Built in 1939, this historical boat, one of 12, was used as an ocean racer 100 miles off the Atlantic coast. Students will have an opportunity to recreate her gallant past.


Total:
8 credits. An additional 8 credits may be negotiated through an individual learning contract on a related topic.
Enrollment:
11
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
$500 non-refundable lab fee to be paid, for fall quarter, by the end of week one, September 29, 2006. During winter quarter, the lab fee deadline is January 12, 2007.
Internship Possibilities:
With faculty approval.
Program is preparatory for:
leadership, management, maritime industry and seamanship.

Program updates:

05.05.2006:
New, not in printed catalog.
05.22.2006:
This program has changed from a continuing fall and winter program to separate, repeatable, fall and winter offerings.

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Atlanta, 2007: Social Forums and Social Movements

new


not in printed catalog

Spring quarter

Major areas of study include:
race and labor studies, social movement history, political economy, and social movement theory.
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.

Atlanta, 2007, is designed to explore the relationship between the recent phenomenon of "world social forums" and the actual creation and development of domestic social movements.

The first World Social Forum was held in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in January, 2001. Organizers of this forum and subsequent forums in Porto Alegre, India and Venezuela saw these events primarily as a space for dialogue by those forces opposed to the neo-liberal policies of privatization, de-regulation and free trade promoted by the World Economic Forum centered in Davos, Switzerland. These World Social Forums have spawned numerous other national and regional forums throughout the world.

The first US Social Forum will be held in Atlanta, Georgia, June 27 through July 1, 2007. Unlike other forums, the organizers of the US Social Forum say that "the work to build the US Social Forum is not to build an event but to build a process that pushes a stronger movement forward."

We will take advantage of the organizing of the US Social Forum to explore the relationship between "events" and movements. We'll study theories and dynamics of social movements, the specific history and internal dynamics of the World Social Forum and its competitor, the World Economic Forum. And, in particular we will assess whether domestic social movements that oppose the neo-liberal policies of privatization, de-regulation and free trade have grown stronger as a result of participation in social forums and in the planning for the US Social Forum. We will also look at critiques of the World Social Forum, such as those provided by the organizers of the Mumbai Resistance, which was organized parallel to the WSF in Mumbai, India, as well as debates within the social forum about its future direction.

Students should be prepared for heavy reading in both social movement theory and history. In addition, students will write analytical papers dissecting contemporary social movements, as well as analytical papers critiquing the issues before the US Social Forum. Also, as part of the work of this class, we will organize or assist in organizing a "preparatory forum" for the Olympia community to discuss the main themes under consideration by the US Social Forum in Atlanta.

Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
50
Program is preparatory for:
labor and community organizing, education, public policy, US history and political economy.
This program is also listed under:
Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.

Program updates:

05.16.2006:
New, not in printed catalog.
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Awareness

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
somatic studies, philosophy, sociology, education, feminist theory and consciousness studies.
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.

The faculty and perhaps some students are continuing work begun in “Awareness” in winter and spring quarters, 2005. Any student is invited to join this program at the beginning of any quarter.

The modern university is based on a rupture, effected a millennium ago, between head and heart. This institution—the one in which we meet as teachers and students—is devoted almost exclusively to the technical and critical disciplines. Ascetic disciplines were left in the proverbial dust. Secularization rendered proverb and metaphor, even language itself, disenfleshed and idolatrized. Our task in this program is to become deeply aware of the devastation caused by this rupture, this loss. Because of what has been betrayed, we dare not simply imagine an alternative form of education, much less another new institution, devoted to the healing of this rupture or the recovery of any loss. Instead, we will, through disciplined, mutually supportive inquiry, become mindful of what we scholars participate in, here and now.

Students will begin their work by designing independent learning projects. These field studies, which will constitute half of each quarter’s work, can be anything (community service, sailing, midwifery, writing, gardening, Aikido, reading, etc.). We will begin our work together by answering these questions: What do you want to learn? How are you going to learn it? How are you going to know when you have learned it? How are you going to show others—faculty and colleagues—that you have learned it? And, what difference will it make?

As a learning community, we will participate in mind-body practices, as well as bookish study, that facilitate and enhance our ability to reflect on our current situation in historical, cross-cultural and gendered contexts.

Total:

16 credits each quarter.

Enrollment:
48
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
$30 yoga workshop fee each quarter. $75 for winter quarter program retreat.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in the visual arts, creative writing, education, social and cultural studies and somatic studies.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2007–08.
This program is also listed under:
Programs for Freshmen and Culture, Text and Language.
Academic program Web page:
Awareness

Program updates:

05.05.2006:
Special Expenses: $30 yoga workshop fee each quarter. In addition, $75 for winter quarter program retreat.
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Last Updated: March 19, 2008


The Evergreen State College

2700 Evergreen Parkway NW

Olympia, Washington 98505

(360) 867-6000