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Common Knowledge: Information Technology and Human Understanding
Community Design and Community Action
Computability: The Scope and Limitations of Formal Systems
Computer Science Foundations
Creating a Conceptual Framework for Images: Strategies for Using Photographic and Digital Processes in Art Installation
Culture and the Public Sphere: Studies in Literature and Law

Common Knowledge: Information Technology and Human Understanding

new



Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
Research methods, media literacy, library history, history of technology, digital imaging and Web design, library practica and chosen areas of academic research.
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above; transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Students are encouraged to contact Jules Unsel in advance of the program for an informal interview.

Libraries collect, conserve and share human knowledge; the Web provides a new technology for the collective representation of human expression. Through the academic disciplines of history, rhetoric, cultural studies, library and information science and through applied work in libraries and Web publishing, we will explore the history, promise and pitfalls of information technologies, especially as they might influence common beliefs and understandings. In particular, we will consider current developments and future prospects for academic libraries and information technologies within the larger context of information literacy, scholarly expression and knowledge creation.

The major learning objectives include effective research methodology, information technology literacy, multi-media production skills and Web publishing with an emphasis on effective models for scholarly writing on the Web. The classroom component of this program includes reading seminars focused on intellectual questions about knowledge production, a film series, and two weekly workshops/practica on Web design, digital imaging and other multi-media production. Students will apply their developing information technology literacy by assisting with workshops for other academic programs and will negotiate individual work assignments in the library based upon their intellectual interests and the types of skills they wish to develop. Potential areas of work include library reference, the sound and image library, government documents, media loan, library technical services, archives and rare books. Beginning to advanced computer users are encouraged to enroll.
Total:
16 credits per quarter.
Enrollment:
12
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Program is preparatory for:
media and cultural studies, library and information science, Web development, public administration and education.
This program is also listed under:
Culture, Text and Language and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Academic program Web page:
Common Knowledge

Program updates:

04.26.2006:
New, not in printed catalog.
05.31.2006:
Jules Unsel has joined this program. She will be the program coordinator.
10.23.2006:
Jules Unsel in the now the contact person for prospective student interviews for admission to the program.
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Culture and the Public Sphere: Studies in Literature and Law

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
constitutional law, legal advocacy, American literature, cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies and expository writing.
Class Standing:
This Core program is designed for freshmen.

Democracy in the United States, as a social practice and political ideal, has been a work in progress since the Revolution. Given the linguistic, religious, ethnic, and regional diversity of the U.S. population, and given differential hierarchies assigned to race, gender, sexuality, and social class in this country, institutions that aspire to promote democratic ideals have become sites of debate and struggle around such questions as how to define citizenship, how to define equality, how to protect minority populations against majority prejudices, and how to promote individual liberties while safeguarding the common good.

In this program we will study political institutions and legal frameworks such as those established by the U.S. Constitution, and cultural forms such as film and literature that organize national belonging and exclusion. Focusing on the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries, we will be centrally concerned with citizenship and the public sphere as they have emerged in mass society. We will study the way that ideas of "public" and "private" are shaped and enforced in American civic culture. As an example, we will examine the regulation of human sexuality and the ways that recent debates about same-sex marriage have played out in courtrooms, legislatures, and the media.

We will also consider how the U.S. Constitution defines civil rights in comparison to international standards of human rights, and will inquire whether rights frameworks offer appropriate recourse in the face of injustice. As examples of rights frameworks, we will examine equal protection and free speech, and consider forms of inequality and censorship exercised both by the state and by the media. Throughout these and additional case studies, we will persistently ask this question: What is the role of law and literature in shaping the various "publics" and the forms of "citizenship" that ground national belonging and political activity in the United States?
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
69
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
Up to $200 for field trips.
Program is preparatory for:
law, cultural studies, media, gender and sexuality studies, literature and American studies.

Program updates:

03.23.2006:
Julia Zay has left the program.
04.18.2006:
The media and art components of this program have been removed. This program will focus on literature and law.
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Community Design and Community Action

Spring quarter

Major areas of study include:
community development, design, political studies and applied science, according to the nature of projects chosen.
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work. This program is designed for both full-time and part-time students.
Prerequisites:
No specific subject requirements, but existing background in community development, design, political studies, or applied sciences is desirable.

Improving communities is collective work. New parks, the restoration of old buildings, strengthening public services and enlivening arts projects depend on the committed efforts of people with a variety of talents, agendas and temperaments. This program is for students with strong interests (and preferably with some background) in community development, design, political studies or applied science who want to join real world projects engaged in the social or physical improvement of communities in or near Olympia. With faculty as guides providing supporting tools to aid in analysis and research, student teams will link up with public or public-interest organizations who are in either the design or action phases of new projects. Each team and its faculty advisor will define a substantive contribution to its organization’s work and complete it by the end of the quarter.

Students will spend a portion of their study time directly on their community project and the rest in background-building. There will be opportunities to become more experienced in the analysis of community values and institutions, in understanding organizational development and conflict resolution, and in creating appropriate information graphics and public consultation projects, as well as deepening design or science background as appropriate to specific projects.

Students in this program need to be willing to tackle open-ended problems, work in teams, respond with insight to real-world needs and obstacles and produce carefully finished work.

Total:
8 or 16 credits each quarter. The 8-credit option consists of weekend classes, taught by both faculty, as well as evening or weekend time with the project’s host organization, while the 16-credit option adds 8 credits of study during the weekdays, as well as additional project-related time.
Enrollment:
24 maximum for each credit option.
Internship Possibilities:
With faculty approval.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in community development, public interest science, community design or government.
This program is also listed under:
Programs for Freshmen; Scientific Inquiry; and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
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Computability: The Scope and Limitations of Formal Systems

(Fall - Cancelled) available Winter and Spring quarters

Math in the History of Science. Students who were planning to take Computability: The Scope and Limitations of Formal Systems in the fall should enroll in the program Math in the History of Science instead.

Major areas of study include:
mathematical logic, computer programming, formal language theory, theory of computability, and other topics as covered during the year. Upper-division credit will be awarded for upper-division work.
Class Standing:
Sophomores or above, transfer students welcome.
Prerequisites:
Data to Information or equivalent; knowledge of programming languages, data structures, computer architecture and discrete math. Some of these prerequisites may be waived for students with a strong mathematical background. Please consult the faculty.
Faculty Signature:
The faculty will assess student eligibility to join the program. For more information contact Brian Walter, bwalter@evergreen.edu or (360) 867-5435. Qualified students will be accepted until the program fills.

The computer is a trememdously useful tool with ready application to a stunning variety of tasks. Is there anything it can't do? Through the lens of advanced computer science, this program will explore what computers can do and how we get them to do it. Using mathematical tools, we'll also look at some surprising things that they actually can't do. In addition, we'll develop some deep results in computability theory, including Godel's Incompleteness Theorems.

This program is designed for advanced computer science students and students with an interest in both mathematics and computer science. The program will be built around a nucleus of formal languages and mathematical logic, including automata theory and grammars, algorithm analysis, formal logic and computability theory with possibilities for special projects in operating systems, concurrency and neural networks. Students will program in one or more programming languages. Program seminars will deal with philosophy related to math and computer science as well as the relevance of computer science and mathematical logic to modern society.
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
25
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in mathematics, computer science and education.
A similar program is expected to be offered in:
2008–09.

Program updates:

03.24.2006:
Richard Weiss, Ph.D., Mathematics, has joined this program.
04.14.2006:
The fall quarter component of this program has been cancelled. This program is now a winter and spring quarter offering.
04.21.2006:
For an alternative program to replace the cancelled fall quarter component of this program, student may refer to the program Math in the History of Science. The program narrative has been updated.
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Computer Science Foundations

Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
introductory programming, computer organization, data structures, operating systems, mathematics and various topics on science, technology and society.
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.
Prerequisites:
High school algebra proficiency.

The goal of this program is to lay a firm foundation for more advanced work in computer science. Students in the program will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving, programming and the fundamental structures of hardware and software systems. The program covers standard material in a core liberal arts computer science curriculum such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics and programming.

The program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The computational organization theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to operating systems. The programming theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The mathematical theme will help develop theoretical abstractions and problem solving skills needed for computer scientists. An on-going seminar theme will explore social, historical or philosophical topics of science, technology and society.

Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
48
Special Expenses:
Unusually expensive textbooks.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in computing, science, mathematics, and education.

Program updates:

03.24.2006:
Richard Weiss, Ph.D., Mathematics, has joined this program.
04.18.2006:
This program has changed from sophomore standing to all-level. All-level programs offer appropriate support for freshmen as well as those ready for advanced work. The enrollment limit has increased to 48 students.
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Creating a Conceptual Framework for Images: Strategies for Using Photographic and Digital Processes in Art Installations

Fall and Winter quarters

Faculty:
Gail Tremblay, Erica Lord
Major areas of study include:
Major areas of study include: photography, digital imaging, mixed media and installation art, art history and English composition.
Class Standing:
This all-level program offers appropriate support for freshmen as well as supporting and encouraging those ready for advanced work.

Students will develop a variety of skills using traditional and digital photographic techniques and computer software to manipulate photographic images as well as studying the techniques of assemblage and mixed media art. They will use those skills to build both individual and collaborative art installations that are conceptual in nature. Over the course of two quarters, students will be expected to do reading and attend slide lectures and seminars on photography and installation art. They will study the way artists around the world have combined these media to make complex and challenging works of art. As part of this study, students will examine works by a diverse group of artists including Alfredo Jaar, Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie, Shirin Neshat, Jolene Richard, Chen Shun-Chu, Felix Gonzales Torrez, Stan Douglas, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Corwin Clairmont, Miguel Fematt and Pat Ward Williams, among others.

This program is designed to support freshmen by developing their skills in English composition as well as basic skills in photography, digital imaging and mixed media art. At the same time, it is designed for students who have done previous work in a variety of artistic media and are ready to create intermediate and advanced work. Students will learn about a variety of strategies for developing both personal and political themes that create a rich visual language for viewers to interpret. All students must participate in art critiques and keep an intellectual journal that addresses the books and slide lectures. In addition, freshmen will be required to write a three-page paper on each of the books we read fall quarter, and write three five-page papers synthesizing materials from various sources we are studying during winter quarter. All students will produce a seven to ten page research paper on an artist whose work inspires them and prepare a ten-minute presentation for the class.

There will be a field trip to museums and galleries each quarter. During winter quarter, there will be an optional 11 day field trip to Merida in Mexico to attend the Encuentro de Performances, dealing with performance, video and installation art hosted by the Hemispheric Institute at New York University in conjunction with a new art school in Merida, Mexico. The faculty will help any students whose work is of professional quality and relevant to the conference theme to apply to exhibit their work at the conference. The conference will have numerous workshops that the students can attend. Students will be able to make excellent contacts with artists, scholars and students from other institutions.

Total:
16 credits per quarter.
Enrollment:
48
Schedule:
Class Schedule
Special Expenses:
$250 for art supplies and up to $25 for museum fees. Approximately $1,500 to attend an optional 11 day conference in Merida, Mexico.
Program is preparatory for:
careers and future studies in the arts and art history.
This program is also listed under:
Programs for Freshmen and Expressive Arts.

Program updates:

08.09.2006:
Erica Lord, MFA in Sculpture, Photography, Film and Video, has joined this program.
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Culture and the Public Sphere: Studies in Literature and Law

Fall, Winter and Spring quarters

Major areas of study include:
constitutional law, legal advocacy, American literature, cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies and expository writing.
Class Standing:
This Core program is designed for freshmen.

Democracy in the United States, as a social practice and political ideal, has been a work in progress since the Revolution. Given the linguistic, religious, ethnic, and regional diversity of the U.S. population, and given differential hierarchies assigned to race, gender, sexuality, and social class in this country, institutions that aspire to promote democratic ideals have become sites of debate and struggle around such questions as how to define citizenship, how to define equality, how to protect minority populations against majority prejudices, and how to promote individual liberties while safeguarding the common good.

In this program we will study political institutions and legal frameworks such as those established by the U.S. Constitution, and cultural forms such as film and literature that organize national belonging and exclusion. Focusing on the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries, we will be centrally concerned with citizenship and the public sphere as they have emerged in mass society. We will study the way that ideas of "public" and "private" are shaped and enforced in American civic culture. As an example, we will examine the regulation of human sexuality and the ways that recent debates about same-sex marriage have played out in courtrooms, legislatures, and the media.

We will also consider how the U.S. Constitution defines civil rights in comparison to international standards of human rights, and will inquire whether rights frameworks offer appropriate recourse in the face of injustice. As examples of rights frameworks, we will examine equal protection and free speech, and consider forms of inequality and censorship exercised both by the state and by the media. Throughout these and additional case studies, we will persistently ask this question: What is the role of law and literature in shaping the various "publics" and the forms of "citizenship" that ground national belonging and political activity in the United States?
Total:
16 credits each quarter.
Enrollment:
69
Special Expenses:
Up to $200 for field trips.
Program is preparatory for:
law, cultural studies, media, gender and sexuality studies, literature and American studies.

Program updates:

03.23.2006:
Julia Zay has left the program.
04.18.2006:
The media and art components of this program have been removed. This program will focus on literature and law.
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Last Updated: March 19, 2008


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