2010-11 Catalog

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2010-11 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days of Week Multiple Standings Start Quarters
500 Years of Globalization

Jeanne Hahn

geography history international studies political science sociology 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter The world is undergoing unprecedented flux and transformation. Some argue we are in the midst of a passage to a qualitatively different world. How do we understand this, historically and in the present? What is the future of the nation-state in the face of the hypermobility of capital, the re-emergence of nationalism, the increasing disparity and similarity between the "first" and "third" worlds, and the attempt of the U.S. to assert global military dominance? Is the public sphere disappearing in the face of privatization and neoliberal policy? Or is neoliberalism dissolving under the impact of the current global economic crisis? What might take its place? These are big questions; every person on earth has a stake in the answers. In the fall, we will focus on a study of the evolution of historical capitalism and the international political economy to understand the process by which over the past 500 years Europeans (and later Euro-Americans) created capitalism and the nation-state, redrew the world map through colonialism and imperialism, established the rules of the international system, and initiated the process by which the rest of the world generally became poor and powerless. In the winter, we will focus on the post-World War II period to the present and assess the rapidly changing global political economy and recent geostrategic developments. We will explore the relationship between transnational corporations and multilateral institutions, investigate the neoliberal agenda as expressed through public policies in the first world and structural adjustment programs in the third world, and examine changing structures of power under the current crisis in global capitalism and apparent crumbling of its neoliberal policy apparatus. We will look directly at the rise of revolutionary nationalism and the nature of global social movements and change. Students will write frequently, engage in a major research project, and analyze world developments through the daily and one foreign newspaper. the social sciences, history, law, globalization, political economy, geography, education, historical sociology, and informed citizenship. Jeanne Hahn Junior JR Senior SR Fall
A People's Geography of American Empire

Lawrence Mosqueda and Zoltan Grossman

American studies community studies geography international studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring This program will look at U.S. expansion -- from "Manifest Destiny" and overseas imperial expansion, to present-day resource wars. It will focus on the place-making processes inherent in each stage of expansion, and on the imprints they have left on the human and physical landscape. It will examine "imperial places" that have been shaped by each era of expansion, and in turn have shaped each era. In addition to the origins and rationales underlying each stage of expansion, we will examine how and to what extent the world's landscape reflects and helps to (re)produce imperial power. The program will aim to interconnect global and local scales, "foreign" and "domestic" policies, and past histories and present-day legacies. It will examine the lasting effects of imperial control on real local places, in particular the expanding network of U.S. military bases around the world. Fort Lewis and other Northwest military installations will be examined as local case studies of military land acquisition, place-making, and internal G.I. dissent (including a possible one-day field trip). The program will identify the disproportionate role of small places such as Wounded Knee (Lakota Nation), Subic Bay (Philippines), Vieques (Puerto Rico), Okinawa (Japan), Diego Garcia (Indian Ocean), Guantanamo Bay (Cuba), Cabanas (El Salvador), Fallujah (Iraq), Bagram (Afghanistan), and Khuzestan (Iran), and locate them within a typology of imperial places. Such a typology could include internal colonies, emptied or erased places, ground zeros, poisoned places, places of resistance, and places of justice. As their class project, students will focus on a single local-scale case study, writing separate papers on its past history, present-day landscape, and a resident interview (of activists, refugees or veterans). Students will also turn in a discussion page on the readings--with specific questions or comments--in each seminar. The program will make a geographical contribution to the study of American Empire, by examining the making and remaking of "imperial places," and using place-based approaches to learning about imperialism. Book and article authors could include Cynthia Enloe, Catherine Lutz, Michael Klare, Arundhati Roy, Howard Zinn, Patricia Limerick, Dahr Jamail, Richard Drinnon, Jean Bricmont, Michael Ignatieff, and Barack Obama. community studies, geography and international studies. Lawrence Mosqueda Zoltan Grossman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Abnormal Psychology

Susan Cummings

psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined as well and the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology will be studied. Susan Cummings Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Academic Writing as Argument

Emily Lardner

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend WWinter In this course, we will focus on arguments—the ways that writers take positions and the ways they support those positions. Our overarching question is related to Evergreen's expectation that graduates will participate collaboratively and responsibly in our diverse society: why is that a reasonable expectation, and what does that look like in practice? We'll look at arguments related in a broad way to this expectation, from a variety of contexts. Each student will also select a topic of their own to investigate and to make an argument about. Emily Lardner Mon Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Academic Writing as Inquiry

Emily Lardner

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall Academic writing begins with questions, even if the questions are implied. The nature of the question and the context in which it is posed determine how it will be "answered." Patterns for organization, appropriate forms of support, even the degree of formality required, all depend on the context of the inquiry. This course is structured as a series of in-class workshops with required practice time out of class. Emily Lardner Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Action for a Sustainable Future cancelled

Ted Whitesell

communications community studies environmental studies geography history political science sociology sustainability studies writing 

Signature Required: Fall Winter Spring 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring Students will work as part of a network of college students sharing in-depth, local case studies to generate understanding of strategic and tactical options for effective intervention in complex social-ecological issues to foster sustainability and justice. This program will train students for advocacy in government, private and non-profit organizations; support them in living fulfilled lives in difficult circumstances; and build communities of mutual support. Students will research and write a book for their peers on the topic of effective political action, for print and web publication. In addition they will create a web site housing a database of case studies in the policy, strategy and tactics of sustainability and justice. This web site will also serve as a communications center for activists and for those studying activism. Attention will focus on ethical, personal and social consequences of choices about how to think and act in situations of uncertainty, complexity, conflict and stress, and how to live effectively in potentially despair-inducing times. Students will examine local, contentious, ongoing issues with complex ecological, social and political aspects. They will attend meetings of organizations and legislative committees, interview participants, research issue history, and study interactions of biophysical, social and political components. Analysis will be informed by interdisciplinary readings on political theory, practical and ethical aspects of individual and collective action, complex systems, and environmental analysis. During fall quarter, we will gain the needed factual and theoretical foundation, outline the book and web site, and establish communications with peers elsewhere. Winter quarter will center on field work, researching and drafting. Spring quarter will involve extensive editing, rewriting and assembly of the final products. Students will gain skills in writing, including editing; oral, written and web-based presentation; qualitative social science research; complex social-ecological systems science; oral history; understanding political organizing, negotiation, mediation, lobbying and decision making; and collaborative work on a large-scale project. There will be the opportunity to explore conflict, engagement and reconciliation. environmental studies, sustainability studies, policy studies, and environmental and social advocacy. Ted Whitesell Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Activist Art: Comics

Amaia Martiartu

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring Through drawing, writing, and discussion, this course will study comics as a tool for political and social activism (not superheroes). The class will learn and practice basic skills for script writing and drawing and will develop students' creativity through applied projects. Amaia Martiartu Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Adolescent Literature

Terry Ford

education literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer Adolescent literature differs from children's literature to meet the developmental needs of middle and high school ages.  Participants will learn about adolescent literature in an historical perspective, young adult development in reading, and genres with representative authors and selection criteria.  Participants will read and critique a variety of genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses.  Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts. Terry Ford Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Advanced Audio Recording and Production Techniques I

Terry Setter

music 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening FFall This is the first in a sequence of advanced audio production courses designed to support students who are interested in recording music for various media and contexts. Students will become familiar with advanced multitrack audio production techniques, their various applications, history and aesthetics. Time will be spent each quarter developing the students’ ability to listen critically and providing instruction and exercises in the use of the advanced audio recording studio. In fall, students will train to pass the related proficiency test and develop an understanding of the technical and aesthetic history of audio production. Topics and activities will include basic acoustics, microphone design and placement, the use of compressors, limiters, and console block diagrams, and the theory of digital audio recording, with a strong emphasis on Digidesign’s Pro Tools software. Terry Setter Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Advanced Audio Recording and Production Techniques II

Terry Setter

media arts music 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening WWinter This is the second in a sequence of advanced audio production courses designed to support students who are interested in recording music for various media and contexts. Students will become familiar with advanced multitrack audio production techniques, their various applications, history and aesthetics. Time will be spent each quarter developing the students' ability to listen critically and providing instruction and exercises in the use of the advanced audio recording studio. In winter, students will be provided with increasingly advanced instruction and exercises in the use of recording technologies with an emphasis on Pro Tools software, a number of plug-ins, and the creation of mixes, including those for inclusion in the Evergreen Student CD Project. Topics and activities will include techniques for recording a rock band, mixing techniques, and applications of various signal processors. Terry Setter Thu Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Advanced Audio Recording and Production Techniques III

Terry Setter

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day SSpring This is the final quarter of a sequence of advanced audio production courses designed to support students who are interested in recording music for various media and contexts. Students will become familiar with advanced multitrack audio production techniques, their various applications, history and aesthetics. Time will be spent each quarter developing the students’ ability to listen critically and providing instruction and exercises in the use of the advanced audio recording studio.  In spring, students will work to create well-balanced, innovative tracking and mixing. There will be an emphasis on mastering techniques, a field trip to four of Seattle’s most active recording studios, and a three-day intensive workshop with a leading industry professional. Terry Setter Thu Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend FFall Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend SSpring Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend WWinter Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend SSpring Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend WWinter Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Janelle Campoverde

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend FFall Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu. Janelle Campoverde Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Age of Irony: 20th Century America

Susan Preciso, John Baldridge and Sarah Ryan

American studies cultural studies geography history literature writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening FFall WWinter SSpring What is history for? This year-long investigation of 20th Century American history and culture will be organized around the pivotal roles of wars and social movements as shapers of American life and thought, especially the development of our sense of irony as reflected in politics and culture. Fall quarter's work will focus on World Wars I and II and the Vietnam War. During winter quarter, we will study three key movements for social change: the Progressive movements of the early 20th century, the African American Civil Rights Movement of the mid-century, and the second wave of feminism of the 1960s and 1970s. Students will write articles based on their own historical research and will publish them in a program web-zine. During spring quarter's study of culture as history, we will see how these turning points were and are reflected in our cultural lives.This is an all-level program, ideal for returning and transfer students, especially those pursuing the "Upside Down" BA degree. It is a broad liberal arts program designed for students who want to improve their historical knowledge, research skills and (multi)cultural literacy. We especially encourage those who would like a supportive atmosphere for senior-level project work to attend. education, library science, geography, history, and literature. Susan Preciso John Baldridge Sarah Ryan Mon Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Algebra to Algorithms

Richard Weiss

computer science mathematics philosophy of science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring We rely on mathematics as a powerful language for understanding the natural world and technology. Mathematical models allow predictions of complex systems, and modern computing has both magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence our lives. Computer science, as a constructive branch of mathematics, relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving, and it also enables the construction of both deterministic and statistical mathematical models. Patterns that appear in the natural world and are expressed in mathematical models can also be applied to the visual arts. We rely on mathematics as a powerful language for understanding the natural world and technology. Mathematical models allow predictions of complex systems, and modern computing has both magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence our lives. Computer science, as a constructive branch of mathematics, relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving, and it also enables the construction of both deterministic and statistical mathematical models. Patterns that appear in the natural world and are expressed in mathematical models can also be applied to the visual arts. In this program, we will explore connections between mathematics, computer science, the natural sciences, and graphic arts.  We will develop mathematical abstractions and the skills needed to express, analyze and solve problems arising in the sciences. In addition, we will explore how to program interesting visual shapes using simple geometry. The regular work of the program will include seminars, lectures, problem solving workshops, programming labs, problem sets, and seminar papers. The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical and statistical thinking and expression along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, algorithms, programming and problem solving, with seminar readings about the role of mathematics in modern education and society. This program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or before pursuing further work in the sciences or the arts. college algebra, introductory computer programming, problem solving, and mathematics and computing in society. Richard Weiss Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Algebraic Thinking

Miranda Elliott Rader

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter Algebraic Thinking develops problem solving and critical thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems. Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically and verbally. Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry and data analysis. Collaborative learning is emphasized. Miranda Elliott Rader Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Algebraic Thinking

Vauhn Foster-Grahler

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day FFall Algebraic Thinking develops problem solving and critical thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems. Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically and verbally. Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry and data analysis. Collaborative learning is emphasized. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Algebraic Thinking

Miranda Elliott Rader

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring Algebraic Thinking develops problem solving and critical thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems. Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically and verbally. Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry and data analysis. Collaborative learning is emphasized. Miranda Elliott Rader Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Alternatives to Capitalism

Peter Dorman

economics political science 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Is there a viable alternative to capitalism as a system of economic organization? Does the collapse of communism mean that there can be debates only within capitalism, rather than between different systems? This program will provide a one-quarter survey of potential alternatives, as they have been written about and experimented with on a small scale. We will read detailed proposals and fictional visions, visit local non-capitalist institutions, and weigh the arguments on all sides. This is, above all, a program for people who need to clarify for themselves the economic dimension of their political commitments. Because it takes economic feasibility seriously, the program will consider the nuts and bolts of capitalism and anticapitalism: the role of markets and money, the organization of production, and the problem of incentives and coordination. Prior work in economics is essential; some of the readings will be technically demanding. In addition to evaluating current proposals, we will also cover the socialist calculation debate of the 1930s in some detail, since it represents the most sustained examination of the potential for systematic economic planning. Further readings will update this controversy through the eyes of modern proponents and critics of socialism. The program will include field trips, visiting speakers and films. There will be one major piece of writing, either analyzing an existing vision or experiment, or constructing a new one. In order to practice what we preach, student governance will be an essential feature of this program. economics, history, and political economy. Peter Dorman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
The American Civil War and Modern Memory

Thomas Rainey and Geoffrey Cunningham

history 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening SuSummer This program will explore, in detail, the causes, course, legacy for modern times, and world historical consequences of the American Civil War, "the defining moment" in the history of the United States. Many highly respected historians of this great civil conflict and its aftermath argue that it must be regarded as a Second American Revolution. Participants in the program will study the war as it is described, portrayed, interpreted, mythologized, and remembered in a variety of historical texts, personal accounts, and films. The program will also examine the promises and failures of post-civil-war Reconstruction and its subsequent impact on race relations in America.   humanities, history, social science, teaching Thomas Rainey Geoffrey Cunningham Mon Tue Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
American Sign Language I

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day WWinter In this course, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign and ASL grammar. Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader, and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee, and attend the Deaf Club. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
American Sign Language I (A)

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day FFall In this course, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign and ASL grammar. Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader, and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee, and attend the Deaf Club. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
American Sign Language I (B)

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall In this course, students will learn finger-spelling, cardinal numbers, vocabulary, conversation sign and ASL grammar. Introduction to deaf culture includes a reader, and invitations to participate in Deaf Coffee, and attend the Deaf Club. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
American Sign Language II

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter Students will focus on broadening their vocabularies, conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar, with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication. There is a continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
American Sign Language II

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SSpring Students will focus on broadening their vocabularies, conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar, with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication. There is a continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
American Sign Language III

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring Students will continue to focus on broadening their vocabularies, conversation skills and using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar, with emphasis on the non-manual aspect of communication. There will also be continued study of deaf culture and invitations to deaf events in this area. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
American Sign Language III

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer In ASL III, students will focus on broadening their vocabulary and conversation skills while using appropriate and accurate ASL grammar with emphases on the non-manual aspect of communication and classifier development. There is a continued study of deaf culture. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
American Sign Language IV

Anne Ellsworth

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer In ASL IV, students will continue the study of the grammar of ASL, the functional application of ASL, classifiers, locatives, and vocabulary. The course will include an introduction to ASL idioms, multiple-meaning words in both ASL and English, and conceptual/contextual signing. Students will also work with ASL literature in an in-depth study. Anne Ellsworth Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Anatomy of Abjection

Laura Citrin and Shaw Osha (Flores)

aesthetics art history cultural studies gender and women's studies psychology sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring “These gestures, which aim to establish matter as fact, are all associated with making something dirty. Here is a paradox: a fact is more purely defined if it is not clean….the truth of things is best read in refuse.”-Roland Barthes on Cy Twombly In Julia Kristeva’s (1982), she introduced the concept of the , that which is situated outside the symbolic order, that which breaks down the boundaries between self and other, and that which is repellent and simultaneously desirous.  Utilizing the abject as a rich source for aesthetic and psychological inquiry into the body and embodiment, we will explore the ways that seemingly opposing dualisms—such as normal/dysfunctional, inside/outside, order/disorder, dirty/clean, raw/cooked, black/white, citizen/alien —function in our lives.  These dualisms will enable a discussion of such social psychological themes as cultural alienation, marginalization, stigma, disgust, purity, and moralization.  Through the study of art, visual culture, and art history, we will work to translate a larger narrative on these themes into material form through visual art. The program will explore notions of epistemology (ways of knowing, ways of producing knowledge) and consider as a form of epistemology.  Utilizing a social psychological approach, we will explore connections between the psychology of the individual and the larger historical, cultural, political and social context in which she resides (looking and seeing broadly); and utilizing an aesthetic/visual culture approach, we will examine art and art history via close reading (looking and seeing very closely).  In this interdisciplinary program, all students will learn the fundamentals in 2D representation and figure drawing, as well as the fundamentals of social psychological research methodology.  A final project will engage both practices/approaches by creating art that is informed by psychological research, and research that is informed by aesthetic/visual ways of seeing and knowing. Potential readings include: Julia Kristeva’s, ; Craig Houser, Leslie Jones, Simon Taylor, and Jack Ben-Levi’s ; William Miller's ; social psychological experiments by Paul Rozin on disgust; Freud's ; Sander Gilman's ; Mary Douglas' ; Victoria Bynum’s, ; and Barbara Creed’s, the arts, cultural studies, and social sciences. Laura Citrin Shaw Osha (Flores) Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Andean Roots: Biocultural Diversity Conservation in Highland Peru cancelled

Steven Scheuerell

biology cultural studies environmental studies sustainability studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend SuSummer This study-abroad program to highland Peru will combine studies of biocultural diversity, cultural ecology, conservation biology, and sustainable development to learn how people are working to conserve cultural landscapes in the face of globalization and climate change. The Cusco region of Peru provides an ideal place to immerse in these studies. Here the headwaters of the Amazon flow from glacial covered peaks of the Andes to tropical rainforest, passing through radical changes in flora and fauna and thousands of years of continuous human habitation and domestication. Globally recognized as one of the origins of agriculture, these cultural landscapes hold an immense wealth of cultural knowledge and agricultural and ecosystem diversity that has developed and endured through pre-Incan, Incan, Spanish, and Peruvian rule. Yet these people, knowledge, culture, biodiversity, and landscapes, summed up as biocultural diversity, are straining from rapid development of resource extraction industries, industrial agriculture, globalization, and climate change. To study this we will base out of the town of Pisac in the Sacred Valley of the Incas, from which we will make day and overnight visits to highland Quechua communities, valley locations, and high jungle tropical sites. We will participate in local projects that support diversity while providing for sustainable human development in order to understand the complexities of global initiatives such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Millennium Development Goals. Participating in this program will require the ability to travel independently and as a cooperative member of our learning community. We will have orientation meetings on the Evergreen Olympia campus preceeding summer session, but students will travel independently to Cusco, Peru, where we will gather together at a designated hostel June 20-21. Each participant will have to purchase their own plane tickets, which minimizes cost to you and maximizes flexibility in travel routes and timing. Faculty will arrange all lodging and local group transport during the stay. We will study together from June 21 to July 22; this includes evaluation writing and conferences. Students are encouraged to consider further independent study at one of the local language schools or independent travel to local communities, Incan sites such as Machu Picchu, and diverse ecosystems. Please understand the following about costs and travel conditions. A non-refundable deposit of $150 is due by May 1 to secure your space. Students will be required to pay an $800 student fee that covers lodging, group transport, program site visits, and a fraction of faculty travel costs. Lodging costs are calculated on youth-hostel like conditions with same-sex shared rooms and shared bathrooms. Private accomodations can be arranged in advance at approximately double the price, contact faculty if you prefer this option. Students will pay out-of-pocket for their own food and meals in order to meet dietary needs and different budgets; $7 per day gives you ample options at restaurants, shops, and outdoor markets. Students will pay out-of-pocket for any personal items and independent outings during free time to local areas of interest including museums, artisan markets, and Incan archeological sites. ATM machines are easy to access in the region. Students will arrange and pay for their own plane flights to Cusco, Peru. Faculty can provide advice on travel options. Students need to have sufficient Spanish language ability to greet people, ask and understand directions, work with currency, and purchase food. Much of what we do will require extensive walking, sometimes at high elevation and on uneven ground. You will have to carry everything you bring, so pack light and know that you can buy just about anything you need. Contact faculty for a suggested packing list. Please email any questions to faculty member Steve Scheuerell at (scheuersevergreen.edu) with Andean Roots in the subject line. conservation biology, agricultural diversity conservation, biocultural diversity studies, ecology, cultural studies, sustainable development Steven Scheuerell Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Animal Behavior and Zoology

Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying

biology ecology field studies philosophy of science zoology 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring What do animals do, how do they do it, and why? In this year-long investigation of animal behavior, students will answer these questions through extensive use of the scientific literature, in-depth discussions of the evolutionary and ecological theories that are fundamental to the study of behavior, independent research projects, and several weeks in the field, including two weeks in the Pacific Northwest during fall quarter. Animals hibernate, forage, mate, form social groups, compete, communicate, care for their young, and so much more. They do so with the tools of their physiology, anatomy, and, in some cases, culture, for reasons having to do with their particular ecology and evolutionary history. In this program, we will begin with a review of animal diversity, and continue our studies of behavior from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Students will be expected to engage some of the complex and often contradictory scientific predictions and results that have been generated in this field, through lectures, workshops and take-home exams, as well as to undertake their own, intensive field research. In fall quarter, students will conduct short-term field projects, and become skilled in library research. In winter quarter, we will continue to learn theory and statistics, and will continue field work as well. In spring quarter, having studied the methods, statistics and literature frequently used in behavioral research, students will generate their own hypotheses and go into the field to test them through extensive, independent field research or internships. Field work might be in a variety of locales from the Pacific Northwest to Central America. Any field work outside the United States will be organized as independent learning contracts. Students will return to campus for the last two weeks of spring quarter to complete their data analysis and present their research. Some topics covered in this program will include mating systems, territoriality, female mate choice, competition, communication, parental care, game theory, plant/animal interactions and convergent evolution. Several readings will focus on one group of animals in particular: the primates, including Homo sapiens. field biology, evolution, ecology and other life sciences. Bret Weinstein Heather Heying Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Applied Research: Biomass, Energy, and Environmental Justice

Ted Whitesell

Native American studies environmental studies health sustainability studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day WWinter SSpring Through this program, students will make important contributions to current decision-making on issues of critical importance for sustainability and social justice.  In the winter quarter, students will gather and analyze information on current and proposed biomass energy production in western Washington, focusing primarily on the biomass gasification now being considered (fall 2010 - winter 2011) for The Evergreen State College.  Since this form of energy production has generated a great deal of controversy, student research at this time can make a critical contribution to informing these debates and helping the college come to the best decision about whether or not to proceed with such a project.  In the spring quarter, students will work closely with AP high school science students on the Spokane Indian Reservation, to study the contamination of the Spokane River system from a decommissioned uranium mine.  Evergreen student researchers will serve in a mentoring capacity with the high school students. Students must already have good research and writing skills.  They will improve those skills through practice, using research to help answer questions such as the following:  What are practical alternatives to fossil fuels for Evergreen and Centralia?  Can biomass be a carbon-neutral energy source?  What forest practices would be compatible with Evergreen's stated sustainability goals and values?  What is known about the human health impacts of bioenergy and coal energy production in our region?  How may Evergreen's decision-making process be improved as it works to attain its sustainability goals and commitments?  How have ecosystems and human health been affected by uranium mining near Native American communities, specifically on the Spokane Indian Reservation?  What can be done to address such contamination?  Students will employ a variety of research methods, based on their educational background and skills.  Research results will be widely shared through the Internet, in public presentations, and through publications, including periodicals and books. renewable energy and environmental remediation. Ted Whitesell Mon Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Approaches to Healing

Cindy Beck

consciousness studies health physiology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening SSpring Approaches to Healing is a guest lecture series designed to help students explore the theory and practice of the many types of healing arts that our regional wealth of outstanding practitioners provide. Throughout the quarter, students will be asked to look at broad health care questions and policy, as well as personal healing practices, stress management, and the importance of thoughtful critical analysis at all levels of approaches and outcomes. Guest speakers representing body work , complementary medicine, Chinese medicine, bacteriophages as antibiotics, and plant medicine will be featured. Students will also spend time each week outside of class exploring new activities that could contribute to their own health, as well as reading current literature to help expand their understanding of health and wellness. Cindy Beck Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Arabic, Beginning I

Joe Fahoum

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall In this first course of a year-long sequence, students will learn the Arabic alphabet and to read and write in modern standard and classical Arabic, the language spoken in all of the 22 Arab states and all Islamic countries (all Muslims are instructed to pray in Arabic). By the end of the year, students will be able to speak at a novice level. Students will also learn some short poems and stories, as well as Arabic culture and some conversational Arabic. Joe Fahoum Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Arabic, Beginning II

Joe Fahoum

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter In this second course of a year-long sequence, students will continue their studies of modern standard and classical Arabic, the language spoken in all of the 22 Arab states and all Islamic countries (all Muslims have to pray in Arabic). By the end of the year, students will be able to speak at a novice level. Students will also learn some short poems and stories as well as Arabic culture and some conversational Arabic. Joe Fahoum Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Arabic, Beginning III

Joe Fahoum

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring In Beginning Arabic III, the objectives are to increase vocabulary and learn suffixes, pronouns, and verbs for personalization. Other objectives are to conjugate verbs; to improve grammar and sentence structure; to learn definite, root, and pattern verb forms; and to recognize proper and inverted sentences as well as those starting with infinitive verbs and indefinite nouns. Students are required to master verbs tenses, superlatives, sentence analyzing, and subject-verb agreement as well as all other areas of grammar. Songs and culture studies will be covered. By the end of the quarter, students should be reading and translating paragraphs. Joe Fahoum Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Arabic for Beginners and Above

Steven Niva

language studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer This program is designed to introduce students to both written Arabic and basic conversational Arabic in order to provide the foundations for further study in the Arabic language.  Students will learn Arabic script and basic grammar rules, expand their vocabulary, and practice conversational Arabic used in everyday encounters.  They will also watch films, listen to music, and discuss cultural topics related to language use.  This program prepares students for language-based area programs. Steven Niva Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Art, Culture, and Spirit

Hirsh Diamant

consciousness studies cultural studies education literature somatic studies visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8, 12 04 08 12 Evening and Weekend FFall WWinter All human societies and cultures express their relationship to spirit through art. Art is the earliest and most enduring expression of humanity. For community and the individual, art can be a practice of connecting with higher consciousness and with the spirit. In today's global community it is important to understand art of other cultures and by so doing to awaken art within oneself while learning to understand the "other." All children naturally understand the importance of art and are creating art constantly in their play. All children are artists and all can paint, play, sing, and dance. Children also have an instinctive sense of right and wrong. In the modern, industrial world these natural abilities often become suppressed and lost. Modern educators need to be confident in their own artistic abilities and grounded in their own moral core; they need to be trained in communication across cultures and able to support children's healthy development. The students in this half-time, interdisciplinary program will immerse themselves in study and practice of art and in cultural experiences that are vastly different from the Western dominant culture by studying Native American, Muslim, Hebrew, and Chinese cultures. Students will make art, study myths and world religions as they have been shaped by cultures and landscapes of the past, and examine cultural and ethical norms. Students will also examine cultural influences and pressures of today's global society and will investigate the importance of preserving and developing cultural, artistic, and ethical traditions. Students will engage in traditional academic study such as reading, writing, and seminars and will also engage in art making, meditation, community events, and the practice of Tai Ji. Students will participate in their community's spiritual practices and will cultivate their own spiritual, meditative, ethical, and artistic life. In addition to classroom study, students will participate in mediation retreats and will go on field trips to explore art and spiritual resources in the community. In winter quarter students will be able to work on community service projects, in schools, and on Native American reservations. Students will also have the option to travel to China in March of 2011 to study in important Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian centers.  Students who wish to participate in this travel option should register for either 4 credits (just the trip) or 12 credits (8-credit program plus the trip). community, culture, and consciousness studies; art; education; literature; and writing. Hirsh Diamant Wed Thu Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Art for Art Therapists

Gail Tremblay

health visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This course is designed to explore art projects that can be used in therapeutic settings with patients and clients. It will include readings and films about art used as therapy along with hands-on art projects that explore a variety of media. Students will be required to create at least five works of art using various media and to write a summary at the end of the summer session that explores what they have learned. art therapy Gail Tremblay Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Art History I: Temples and Tombs

Nancy Bishop

art history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend WWinter If you have always wanted to know what a ziggurat is for, you should take this class. Art History I is an exploration of the surviving art and artifacts of the most ancient Western civilizations: the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. The European middle ages will also be covered. In addition to a text students will critically read primary source documents to facilitate their understanding of the cultures, religions, and the role of visual art. Nancy Bishop Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Art History II: Order and Chaos

Nancy Bishop

art history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend SSpring The second half of this overview of Western art examines the major movements from the Renaissance on. Tension between strong oppositional forces drive a stylistic evolution from the calm order of the structured perfection of the Van Eycks and Leonardo to the diversity of our post modern and deconstructivist world in the 21st century. Nancy Bishop Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Art History: The Middle Ages

Nancy Bishop

art history visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer This course presents a comprehensive survey of the art traditions of Western Europe from roughly 300 to 1400.  A principal goal is to deepen student appreciation for the complexity of the visual expressions of so many art forms and to understand how they reflect medieval thought and life.  Class time will involve lecture and discussion with an occasional film or other activity. Previous study in art history is helpful but not required. Nancy Bishop Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Art, New Media, and the Science of Perception

Richard Weiss and Naima Lowe

computer science mathematics media studies moving image physics psychology visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter What is an image? How do we form them? What factors influence our perception of images? How are the history and practices of New Media related to social and cultural phenomena surrounding robotics, cybernetics, and networked culture? Cybernetics and reproducible images emerged almost simultaneously in the Western world and became markers of the post-modern era. The result was a rich interaction that developed between art, video and photography, robotics and image processing. The culture and history of New Media, visual perception and cognitive science will form the landscape for our explorations. In this program, we will investigate how images are formed and how we perceive them, as well as the theoretical underpinnings of reproducible images and the history of New Media. Both cultural and technological aspects will guide our examination of the entire sequence of events from how images are produced in a camera to how we perceive and react to images as informed by both our personal and social experiences. We will explore digital and non-digital images and image processing, as well as the cognitive science of how our eyes and brain process patterns of light. In the fall, we will study the concepts of editing, video production and photography, as well as the influences of culture and technology on art, printed media and electronic media in the age of the Internet. Robotics and image processing will lead us to geometric optics and color. Students will learn how to work with digital and non-digital images, image reproduction, the pinhole camera model, lenses, filtering images, and programming a simple mobile robot to take pictures. In winter, we will continue to develop and expand much of the work we started in the fall. We will expand our view of robotics to include more general, computer processor-based interactive art and the cognitive science of visual perception. Winter quarter will culminate in public presentations of student projects that integrate our studies. video production, media arts, computer science, mathematics, and cognitive science. Richard Weiss Naima Lowe Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Art of Helping

Mary Dean

sociology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall Doing well while doing good is a challenge. Whereas some kind of help is the kind of help that helps, some kind of help we can do without. Gaining wisdom to know the paths of skillful helping of self and others is the focus of this four-credit course. We will explore knowing who we are, identifying caring as a moral attitude, relating wisely to others, maintaining trust and working together to make change possible. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Art Since 1500

Olivier Soustelle

art history visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This class surveys world art history since 1500 from the High Renaissance to the 20th century.  We will focus on paintings, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts in Europe, North America, and Asia.  Credit possible in either art history or world cultures/civilizations.  This is a companion class to "Europe Since 1500." art history, teaching, visual arts, world cultures Olivier Soustelle Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Art, Time and Narrative

Shaw Osha (Flores) and Marilyn Freeman

aesthetics art history cultural studies media studies visual arts writing 

  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day FFall WWinter "The wall between artist and audience is very thin, all you have to do is walk through."- PICA on Portland’s Time-Based Art Festival Contemporary art considers maker and audience, it can be materially based and conceptually based, and it can be multi-media and interdisciplinary. How do the various practices relate and inform us as both makers and audience? In this program we will consider the relationship of drawing and writing to other media as a means of examining basic ideas around time and narrative. What is our relationship as art makers and viewers to our perceptions of time? This visual art and writing program will explore concepts of time and artistic practices with references to temporal space by developing foundational skills in critical thinking, drawing and 2-D art, creative non-fiction and analytical writing, audio recording, basic photography and multimedia editing in the context of contemporary visual culture and art history. We will use personal narratives to explore time, memory, and perspective through words and images; and we will consider the relation of moving and still images, drawings and sound and what happens when we confound the senses by juxtaposing them. The context of art history and critical theory will be integral to our inquiry. The curriculum will include studio practice, writing, workshops, lectures, readings, research, seminar, screenings, gallery and museum visits, multimedia production and presentations, and critiques. There will be one field trip each quarter to either Seattle or Portland. In fall quarter we will develop personal narratives in essay form and drawing. Students will be introduced to theories and practices relative to time- and process-based art. Fall quarter work will culminate in collaborative word/sound/image projects on everyday time. In winter quarter we will advance the study of relationships between art, time and narrative through a comprehensive integration of writing and drawing in the mode of graphic creative nonfiction.  We will start working immediately on creative and research projects that will culminate in a final edition of works on paper and multimedia presentations. This quarter will include additional theory-based texts and figure drawing instruction as well as in-depth studio and writing workshop time. There will be an overnight trip to Portland for First Thursday gallery openings. This rigorous program is designed for students who are ready for an immersive college experience—academically, creatively, personally. Students are expected to join field trips and attend off-campus film screenings, to participate fully in all program activities, and to work about 40 hours per week including class time. visual arts, media arts, creative and critical writing, cultural studies and art history. Shaw Osha (Flores) Marilyn Freeman Freshmen FR Fall
The Artist as a Business

John Robbins

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring When an artist decides to pursue a professional career, a major change in perspective must happen, a change from a “hobby” mentality to a business model that serves their professional career goals. This raises many financial, technological, promotional and legal topics such as: Contracts? Social networking and websites? Intellectual property rights? Technology? Taxes? Privacy? Join this learning community of artists as Evergreen's Managing Director of Performing and Media Arts leads the class to identify and discuss the major issues that will confront an emerging artist in the coming years as each student creates his/her own personal career action plan as professional musicians, visual artists, actors, dancers, writers, photographers, or media artists. John Robbins Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Arts in New York

Ariel Goldberger

architecture art history dance music theater visual arts 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring The program will immerse students in studying the intense and lively cultural life of New York City, the most active arts production center in the United States, and perhaps the world. Classes will meet weekly in different cultural institutions to participate in art events as active audience members, to develop an educated and critical appreciation of the richness, complexity and current trends of artistic production in New York. The class will spend two weeks on campus doing preparatory research in areas of the student's interest in order to create the structure for an individual project or practicum. Students may choose to create a project by engaging in artistic work, research, or both. Students will be responsible for making all necessary arrangements for room and board, as well as budgeting for individual event tickets. All students will be expected to present a final report of their experience and project by week ten in Olympia, unless specifically negotiated in advance with the faculty. After the initial two weeks research and preparation, participants in the program will fly to New York City for six or seven weeks, where they will engage in group and individual activities, depending on each student practicum or project. Students will attend a mix of both all-program events and events related to each student's project. The class will attend events in a wide range of sites, from established world renowned institutions to emergent art spaces. Depending on the season, performance events may include events in places such as PS 122, La MAMA, The Kitchen, HERE Art Center, off-off-Broadway small theaters, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Broadway productions, and Lincoln Center. Regular dance events may include modern dance performances, experimental works, festivals at the Joyce Theater, and more traditional ballet events in venues such as the New York City Ballet. Specific visual arts events may consist of trips to the gallery "scene" in Chelsea, PS1, MOMA, DIA Arts Center, The Met, under the radar spaces, and other sites. We may attend poetry readings at places such as The Bowery Poetry Club, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, The St. Marks Poetry Project, The Academy of American Poets, The New York Public Library, other spaces. The class will also endeavor to attend other culturally relevant institutions such as the Japan Society, the Asia Society, The Jewish Museum, The Schomburg Center, The Dwyer Cultural Center and El Museo del Barrio to experience a wide range of cultural diversity. Most weekly group activities will be followed by a discussion or seminar. The final week of the quarter will be spent back on campus in Olympia, completing final report presentations for the whole class. humanities, cultural studies, arts, social sciences, and the leisure and tourism industry. Ariel Goldberger Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Asian Studies: Education, Culture and Contemporary Life

Helena Meyer-Knapp and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

cultural studies international studies language studies sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 10 10 Evening and Weekend WWinter In this program we will be focusing on language, culture, history, and social relations, using them to examine relations across Asia today. Our central focus will be Japan and Korea, exploring how they are both similar and different and how each one explains the other in textbooks, newspapers, and popular media. Japan and Korea each existed for centuries quite isolated from global trade and politics. Both underwent industrial modernization at a rapid pace under pressure from external powers. They co-existed for half a century in a colonizer-colonized relationship. These days they compete head-to-head on the skating rink at the Olympics and on the soccer field. Many Japanese are devoted to Korean soap operas and film stars. Inter-Korean conflicts between North and South are tangible threats to Japan. And all of these issues circulate through the daily lives of Korean and Japanese young people in school textbooks and the popular media, affecting everything from recreation to their views of the wider world. Each time we meet in this intensive weekend program, we will take up a distinctive cross cultural theme.  Topics will include modernization, colonization, and cosmology. Individual student research projects will take up similar issues, using them to explore relations today between either Japan or Korea, and one other nation in Asia or on the Pacific Rim. This program is designed for students considering careers in education, business, international relations, or public life with a focus on Asia and the Pacific. Students considering a year abroad teaching English as a Second Language in Asia are particularly encouraged to take this course. Helena Meyer-Knapp Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Astronomy and Cosmology: Stars and Stories

Rebecca Chamberlain

astronomy literature philosophy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8, 12 04 08 12 Day, Evening and Weekend SuSummer From sacred stories to fundamentals of astronomy, this intensive course will explore a variety of cosmological concepts from mythology, literature, philosophy, and history, to an introduction to astronomy, archeo-astronomy, and theories about the origins of the universe. We will employ scientific methods of observation, investigation, hands-on activities, and strategies that foster inquiry-based learning and engage the imagination. Activities are designed for amateur astronomers and those interested in inquiry based science education as well as those interested in doing observation-based research or in exploring literary, philosophical, cultural, and historical cosmological traditions. Students will participate in a variety of activities from telling star-stories under the night sky, to working in a computer lab to create planetarium programs. Through readings, lectures, films, workshops, and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of the principles of astronomy and refine their understanding of the role that cosmology plays in our lives through the stories we tell, the observations we make, and the questions we ask. Students will develop skills and appreciation for the ways we uncover our place in the Universe through scientific theories and cultural stories, imagination and intellect, qualitative and quantitative processes. Field studies include visits to an observatory and The Oregon Star Party. We will use a variety of techniques to enhance our observation skills including the use of star-maps and navigation guides to identify objects in the night sky, use of 8” and 10” Dobsonian telescopes to find deep space objects, and the use of binoculars and other tools. Students registering for 12 credits will participate in binary star research at an invitational gathering at Pine Mountain Observatory. This is strongly recommended for those who want do scientific analysis, writing, and research.  It is a wonderful opportunity to connect with an active community of amateur and professional astronomers engaged in citizen science. inquiry-based science education, scientific research, writing, journalism, literature, philosophy, cultural studies, storytelling Rebecca Chamberlain Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Audio Recording I

Zenaida Vergara

media arts 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This is the first of a full-year sequence in which students are introduced to the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media. Fall quarter will focus on analog mixers and magnetic recording with some work in digital editing. Main topics will include field recording, digital audio editing, microphone design and application, analog multi-track recording and audio console signal flow. Students will have weekly reading assignments and weekly lab times. Zenaida Vergara Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Audio Recording II

Zenaida Vergara

media arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter The second quarter of this two-quarter sequence will continue the study of audio production. Students will continue their work with analog recorders and mixing consoles while starting to work with computer-based multitrack production. Additional topics will include acoustics, reverb and digital effects processing. Class time will be spent on lectures and recording exercises. There will be weekly lab assignments outside of class. Zenaida Vergara Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Audio Recording III

Zenaida Vergara

media arts 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This is the quarter of a sequence in which students are introduced to the subject of audio production and its relation to modern media. Students will continue to work with analog and digital recording while expanding on their production techniques. Additional topics will include sound design for film with sync sound production for dialogue, Foley, sound effects and music composition. The other topic will be an interview style production meant for radio broadcast. Class time will be spent on lectures and recording exercises. There will be weekly lab assignments outside of class. Zenaida Vergara Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
The Authentic Self: Becoming an Instrument of Change

Marcella Benson-Quaziena and Marla Elliott

communications music psychology theater 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Weekend FFall WWinter You are the most powerful and versatile tool you have. Do you know who are you and what you stand for? Is that who you want to be? How can you use your presence as an instrument of change? How do you know what you evoke/provoke in others? How do you move in the world with awareness of your authentic self? The ability to communicate and influence is crucial to our effectiveness as we move through many systems. This program is designed for students who want to develop skills of self-knowledge and "use of self" as an instrument of social change. psychology, performing arts, and communications. Marcella Benson-Quaziena Marla Elliott Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Autobiography

Steve Blakeslee

literature writing 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening WWinter SSpring "Could a greater miracle take place," writes Henry David Thoreau, "than for us to look through each other's eyes for an instant?" This two-quarter program will approach autobiography (literally, "self-life-writing") as a powerful way to make sense of human experience, particularly in times, places, and social and political settings that differ from our own. In seminars, students will delve into the rich and intricate issues of memory, authority, persona, and truth that face every self-portraying writer. In "writing marathons," they will learn to write freely and fearlessly about their memories, thoughts, and emotions. Finally, students will develop substantial memoir-essays of their own. humanities and education. Steve Blakeslee Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Awakened Heart: Stories to Build Strong and Healthy Communities cancelled

Jana Dean and Rebecca Chamberlain

communications literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend SuSummer This weekend-intensive course will explore the power of stories to shape and change the world.  We will learn to use the ancient art of storytelling to build bridges, generate healing across differences, and create community.  As we listen for the elements of oral narrative in everyday events, we will learn to interpret experiences and frame narratives that heal and nourish ourselves, our relationships, and our communities.  We will examine ways that the media and political and social structures use stories to shape popular consciousness. We will trace the development of narrative technologies through speech, print, and modern digital media. Participants will practice and refine a story for oral performance and will each focus on an in-depth exploration of the forms, strengths, and uses of storytelling as a practical art for transformative leadership, healing, and learning.  This intensive course is for those with an interest in education, political discourse, administration, medical and healing arts, public and human services, political and environmental activism, counseling and psychology, public advocacy, folklore, communication, and the arts. Jana Dean Rebecca Chamberlain Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Ballet (A)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day FFall In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Ballet (A)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day WWinter In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Advanced or continuing students are encouraged to register for Section B. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Ballet (A)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening SSpring In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Ballet (B)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day WWinter In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Section B is designed for advanced or continuing students. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Ballet (B)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day FFall In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Ballet (B)

Jehrin Alexandria

dance 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day SSpring In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Pilates and visualization exercises, and learn to apply them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class. Jehrin Alexandria Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Basque Language and Culture cancelled

Amaia Martiartu

cultural studies history language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This course will introduce the basics of the Basque language, history, politics, and culture. The course will include readings, film, food, and discussion with a focus on the Basque conflict. The instructor is a native Basque and Basque language teacher from Mondragon (the center of the world's largest system of worker-owned cooperatives). Amaia Martiartu Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Biodiversity Studies in Argentina

Erik Thuesen

biology botany ecology field studies language studies marine science natural history study abroad 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter In the 19th century, well-known European scientists such as Darwin, d'Orbigny and Bonpland traveled in Argentina and brought their knowledge of the flora and fauna back to Europe. The marine, desert and alpine environments of the Southern Cone harbor flora and fauna very different from similar environments in North America. In this two-quarter program, we carry out intensive natural history studies of the unique organisms and ecosystems of Argentina, focusing on those of Patagonia. After an introductory week in Olympia at the start of fall quarter, the study abroad portion of the program will commence with a 4-week intensive study of Spanish language in Buenos Aires to prepare us for our travels and studies in Argentina during fall and winter quarters. We will begin to study the flora and fauna of the Southern Cone through preliminary readings, lectures and class work in Buenos Aires. We will take a short trip to the sub-tropical province of Misiones during October, then move to the coastal and mountain regions of Patagonia in November. We will study the natural history of Patagonia, beginning with field studies on the Atlantic coast and then moving to the Andean Lakes District, taking advantage of the progressively warmer weather of the austral spring. Students will conduct formal field exercises and keep field notebooks detailing their work and observations. We will read primary literature articles related to the biodiversity of Argentina and augment our field studies with seminars. During winter quarter (summer in the southern hemisphere), students will reinforce their language skills with two weeks of intensive Spanish studies in Patagonia, examine montane habitats, then work in small groups on focused projects examining biodiversity topics. It will be possible to conduct more focused studies on specific ecosystems or organisms, including those in more southern parts of Patagonia, at this time of the year. Clear project goals, reading lists, timelines, etc., will be developed during fall quarter in order to insure successful projects in winter quarter. Examples of individual/small group projects include: comparisons of plant/animal biodiversity between coastal, desert and alpine zones; comparative studies on the impacts of ecotourism activities on biodiversity; or examining community composition of intertidal habitats along a gradient from north to south, among others. The total estimated cost for this program (including expenses incurred over Thanksgiving and winter breaks) for food, lodging, transportation, Spanish language instruction and fieldwork activities (whale watching, national park fees, museum fees, etc.) is $7,575. The college’s current total estimated cost for food, lodging, etc. per quarter in Olympia is $4,005. With the low cost of living and traveling in Latin America, participating in this two quarter program will actually be less expensive than living in Olympia. biodiversity, conservation, field biology, Latin American studies, natural history and Spanish language. Erik Thuesen Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Biology I

Jennifer Calkins

biology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Weekend WWinter Jennifer Calkins Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Biology II

Jennifer Calkins

biology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Weekend SSpring This is the second of a two-quarter sequence in general biology that will introduce students to biological science using evolution as an organizing lens. In spring quarter, thematic questions include the following: What is the pattern of life over the last 2+ billion years, what are the processes that have led to this pattern, and what is the value inherent in and the risks faced by the great variety of life on earth? Students who successfully complete this sequence will have a basic knowledge and understanding useful both for further study in biology and as part of being a biologically literate citizen who can engage with current issues with knowledge and understanding. Jennifer Calkins Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Black and White Photography: Summerwork

Bob Haft

visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer Summerwork is an intensive, hands-on program for students of all skill levels wishing to learn the basics of the 35mm camera (or larger format), darkroom techniques, aesthetics, and a short history of photography. A final project involves production of a book of photographs; each student will receive a copy at quarter’s end. Emphasis is placed on learning to see as an artist does, taking risks with one’s work, and being open to new ideas. Bob Haft Mon Tue Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Bodies: Medical and Literary

Sara Huntington and Bill Arney

health history philosophy of science sociology writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter Jean-Jacques Rousseau, , 1762 Sapphire, Push We ground our studies in representations of the body, medical and literary. Our aim is the recovery of common sense. Fall quarter will be devoted to the medicalized body, which is represented through statistics, specialized imaging technologies, and myriad tests. We will study the effects of people being taught to think of living in terms of "risk factors," and the effects of mapping ourselves onto grids of probabilities instead of, for example, paying attention to one's body. As a group, we will pursue the medicalized body through case studies: the recent revision of recommendations on screening for breast cancer; and Huntington's Chorea, a neurodegenerative disease that can be diagnosed with a definitive genetic test and that, as such, presents a human dilemma, extending beyond medical ways of knowing and being. We will read critiques of "gene talk," the way "genes" have "reshaped not only political, social, or medical concepts, but the very perception of the self," as the German historians of medicine, Barbara Duden and Silja Samerski, put it. Throughout the quarter, we will pursue Rob Crawford's argument that "health" has become the modern locus for one's understanding of the moral self. (Just think about the commonplace, "I've been pretty good. I'm eating better, exercising; I've kept my cholesterol down..."). This quarter will introduce students to library research, compositional rhetoric, scientific logic, basic topics in the philosophy of science, the history of medicine, and socio-historical critiques of modern scientific medicine. Each student will complete an independent project on a medical/biological topic of personal concern, resisting the urge to write a fair and balanced research paper and, instead, producing a legitimate piece of writing. Winter quarter will be devoted to satire as a literary form that focuses relentlessly on the messy reality and moral presence of the body. While students are immersed in the rhetorical strategies employed by canonical masters such as Jonathan Swift, we will investigate the methods of more contemporary works- and Sacha Baron Cohen's -asking: how is the satiric attack embodied? As we examine the ways in which satire interrupts human folly, we share the possibility of making room for common sense. By producing satires of our own, we will locate the body-our own more or less lively lumps of flesh-not in a professional scientific or pedagogic discourse but in a common lot. Authors like Ivan Illich, Martin Buber, Martha Nussbaum, Michel Foucault, H.H. the Dalai Lama, Wendell Berry will complement our explorations in satire and will assist in our search for the story that binds us in a moral order that makes us human. Again, students will pursue a significant independent project, a satire, and should be prepared to push the boundaries of their own depravity, all for the sake of becoming more moral and more whole, more human. The program will involve contemplative practices- , walking meditations-and students may decide to enroll in an extracurricular weekly yoga class offered only to members of this program. The yoga class is not required, but if you choose to enroll a fee will be payable to the instructor. compositional rhetoric, philosophy of science, history of medicine, independent research, satire, humanities and social sciences, writing, education, and medicine. Sara Huntington Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Bodies of Knowledge

Rita Pougiales, Joseph Tougas and Donald Morisato

anthropology biology consciousness studies history literature philosophy 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring The human body has long been a natural locus of study, interpretation, and storytelling. Corporeal existence has been conceptualized and experienced in radically different ways across time and across cultures, conceived as an irreducible whole by some, and as an amalgam of separate systems or individual elements by others. How has our philosophical and biological conception of the body changed over time? How is the body used to find or express meaning? What is the relationship of the body to the mind and the soul? In this program, we will explore the nature and essence of the body, and reflect on the experience of being human. Knowledge about the body and our lived experiences within our bodies have been created from the culturally distinct perspectives of biologists, social scientists, artists, philosophers and storytellers. We will read philosophical and historical texts, and closely analyze some of the ideas that have helped shape our conception of the body. We will study the genetic development and biological function of the body, carrying out experiments in the laboratory to get a direct sense of the process of scientific investigation. Finally, we will read novels and look at and create art as other ways of engaging with the body, particularly the physical manifestation and representation of emotion. Throughout our inquiry, we will attentively ask how we have come to know what we claim to know. Our investigations will follow a particular progression. In fall quarter, we will consider the body: the history of the conception of the body, images of the body and notions of beauty, the body as the site of meaning-making, medical imaging and genetic approaches to deciphering the development of the human organism. In winter quarter, we will examine aspects of the mind: the Cartesian dualism, the functional organization of the brain, processes of cognition, measuring intelligence, use of language and the importance of emotions. In spring quarter, we will explore the notion of the soul: death and burial rituals in different cultures, philosophical and literary investigations of the soul, ethics and religion. Over the year, we anticipate reading such authors as Michel Foucault, Rene Descartes, Martha Nussbaum, Barbara Duden, Anne Fadiman, Oliver Sacks, Antonio Damasio, Stephen Jay Gould, Henry James and Marcel Proust. epistemology, cultural anthropology, genetics, neurobiology, history of medicine, and the liberal arts and natural sciences. Rita Pougiales Joseph Tougas Donald Morisato Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Botany: Plants and People

Frederica Bowcutt

botany field studies natural history writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter Our focus in this program will be on developing an understanding of both natural and cultural dimensions of plants. We will work through a botany textbook learning about plant anatomy, morphology, systematics, and ecology. Lectures based on the textbook readings will be supplemented with laboratory work. We will explore how present form and function informs us about the evolution of various groups of plants. Students will get hands-on experience studying plants under microscopes and in the field. Students will also learn basic plant identification of common species. To support their work in the field, students will learn how to maintain a detailed and illustrated field journal. Seminar readings will be on the general theme of plants and people. In fall we will celebrate the 90th anniversary of national suffrage for American women and the 100th anniversary of women's right to vote in the state of Washington, by exploring women and their relationships with plants. We will explore the cultural history of American women's use of plants for medicine making, food, and aesthetic purposes. We will examine women's contributions to horticulture, botany, environmental activism, and biodiversity preservation. Students will learn how to identify and grow herbs through service learning in the Medicinal Herb Garden at the Organic Farm. Through a series of workshops, students will learn traditional medicine making practices. A significant amount of time in this program will be dedicated to honing our ability to write an expository paper. In winter students will also learn library research methods, which they will apply to a research project of their choosing related to plants and people. Time will be spent helping students improve their ability to write a research paper that is thesis-driven and supported with evidence from the scientific literature. conservation; ecological agriculture; ecological restoration; ethnobotany; forestry; herbology; natural resource management; plant biology, ecology and taxonomy; women's studies; and writing. Frederica Bowcutt Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
British Literature, 1000-1800

Trevor Speller

literature writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This all-level course will offer a broad survey of British literature from the years 1000 to 1800. We will read Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration, and Eighteenth-century poetry, novels, nonfiction, and drama. The course will pay particular attention to religious and political changes in the period. A major component will be traveling to a play at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Major authors will likely include Geoffrey Chaucer, Margery Kempe, William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, John Milton, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Horace Walpole, and Jane Austen. Students are expected to write two papers, participate in peerediting workshops, and complete quizzes and other in-class writing assignments.  Preparatory for further studies and careers in literature, writing, and the humanities. Trevor Speller Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
British Literature, 1800-Present

Trevor Speller

literature writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This all-level course will offer a survey of British literature from 1800 to the present. We will be reading poetry, novels, nonfiction, and drama through the Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Post-Modern periods, focusing especially on the relationship between realism and the supernatural.  Major authors will likely include Samuel Coleridge, Jane Austen, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll, Samuel Beckett, T. S. Eliot, Chinua Achebe, and Salman Rushdie. Students are expected to write two papers, participate in peer editing workshops, and complete quizzes and other in-class writing assignments.  humanities, literature, writing Trevor Speller Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Buddhist Psychotherapy

Ryo Imamura

cultural studies philosophy psychology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend SuSummer Western psychology’s neglect of the living mind, both in its everyday dynamics and its larger possibilities, has led to a tremendous upsurge of interest in the ancient wisdom of Buddhism which does not divorce the study of psychology from the concern with wisdom and human liberation.  We will investigate the study of mind that has developed within the Buddhist tradition through lectures, readings, videos, workshops, and field trips.  Students registering for 12 credits will attend a meditation retreat. Buddhist Studies, Asian psychology, consciousness studies, psychotherapy, social work Ryo Imamura Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Business Foundations

Allen Jenkins

business and management leadership studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening FFall WWinter SSpring This program is an introduction to management, leadership, and the basic concepts of entrepreneurship (starting, financing, growing, and running a successful business). It provides theoretical and practical frameworks for the realities of starting and running a business in a global economy. Topics include business structure, financial management, financing operations, growth and leadership, business practices and protocol, and cultural aspects of doing business in today's world. The program will explore how organizations are defined, legally and financially, and advantages and disadvantages of each type. Using seminar, case studies, simulations, guest speakers, discussions and assigned tasks, we will focus on strategic planning, organizational development, forecasting, budgeting, startup funding, and financial management. Students will build the foundations for a solid understanding of how businesses work and how to manage and lead. These foundations are essential for developing the confidence, objectivity, and vision necessary to make effective decisions both as an individual and as a leader. In fall, the program covers basic concepts and practices of entrepreneurship small business management, and leadership. Winter covers financial and managerial accounting, financial statement analysis, and internal control systems and the significant roles they have in making sound business decisions, and in the management of a business. Students will learn how to use QuickBooks accounting software. In spring, the program continues its quantitative focus covering financial statement and ratio analyses to access company performance and to find the real cost of raising money (cost of capital) in the debt equity (stock) markets. This program promotes financial intelligence and quantitative reasoning using case studies as a way to "look through" nicely ordered numbers for clues to potential problems and to interpret and convey financial data clearly, concisely, and accurately. Excel is used for assignments, so the complexities of calculation will not be an impediment to learning and will allow students to concentrate on analytical thinking. business, management, marketing, and entrepreneurship. Allen Jenkins Tue Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Business in a Global Context

Theresa Aragon

business and management 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Weekend SuSummer The world as we know it has changed immeasurably during the past ten years.  Our horizon has been expanded through quantum advances in communication and computer technology.  We are members of a global society and as such have an intellectual responsibility to attempt an understanding of globalization.  Globalization has created both opportunities and challenges for international business and will serve as the organizing framework for our study of business in an international context.  We will inform our understanding through the perspective of politics, economics, social science, culture, and history.  international business, foreign services Theresa Aragon Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Business Law

Natividad Valdez

business and management law and public policy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend SuSummer Students will learn about the legal system including sources of law, the framework of the U.S. court system, and legal considerations with the current economy. The class will explore intellectual property (trade secrets/patents) in business, the employer-employee relationship, contracts, and how to apply current law to popular conflicts. Reading assignments will be supplemented with presentations by legal professionals. Natividad Valdez Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Calculated Fiction

Steven Hendricks and Brian Walter

literature mathematics writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring -Hamlet Mathematical principles can provide the basis for creative writing, from the chance operations that generated the quote above to plot structures, themes, content, and even style. Author Italo Calvino views writing as a combinatorial game, an all but random process of associations and layers of implications that can lead to great works of literature as surely as nonsense. Calvino and others reveal that writing guided by abstract principles, particularly mathematical concepts and constraints, can lead to some of the most wondrous and provocative work. Jorge Luis Borges's stories provide numerous examples. In , the narrator attempts to describe a location from which all places can be seen simultaneously: "Mystics, faced with the same problem, fall back on symbols: to signify the godhead, one Persian speaks of a bird that somehow is all birds; Alanus De Insulis, of a sphere whose center is everywhere and circumference is nowhere; Ezekiel, of a four-faced angel, who at one and the same time moves east and west, north and south." Works like not only reflect mathematical concepts but also give them flesh, rendering those abstractions poetic and tangible. Informed by the work of writers such as Borges and Calvino, we will construct fictional narratives that reflect or are governed by mathematical concepts. Students will be introduced to a wide range of mathematical and literary principles and practices. Using those tools, students will produce creative works rigorous in their literary content and thorough in their mathematical precision and depth. The program will also include book seminars, short papers, and workshops in literature, writing, and mathematics. Readings will introduce students to relevant historical and philosophical ideas, numerous examples of writing that fuses math and literature, and provocative mathematical concepts. Coursework will emphasize foundations and skill development in mathematics, creative writing, critical reading, argumentative writing, and literary theory. mathematics, literature, fiction writing and literary theory. Steven Hendricks Brian Walter Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Calculus I

Vauhn Foster-Grahler

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day WWinter This course will provide a rigorous treatment of differential calculus appropriate for students who are planning to teach mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics. In particular we will cover concepts, techniques, and applications of differentiation including related rates and optimization. We will approach the mathematics algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Student-centered pedagogies will be used and collaborative learning will be emphasized. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Calculus I and II

Allen Mauney

mathematics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6, 12 06 12 Day SuSummer Calculus I and II is a complete first-year calculus class in eight weeks. All of the appropriate ideas and techniques of calculus are covered from numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal points of view. The emphasis of the class is to learn content in context and to connect the subject to broader topics. Group work and presentations are essential to the class. This class is ideal for students going on to study the physical sciences and for teachers. Allen Mauney Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Calculus II

Vauhn Foster-Grahler

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SSpring This course will provide a rigorous treatment of integral calculus appropriate for students who are planning to teach mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics. In particular we will cover concepts, techniques, and applications of integration including area, arc length, volume and distribution functions. We will approach the mathematics algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Student-centered pedagogies will be used and collaborative learning will be emphasized. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Caribbean Cultural Crossings

Tom Womeldorff

cultural studies economics history 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall cultural studies, political economy, international relations, and economic development. Tom Womeldorff Tue Tue Wed Fri Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Caribbean Tourism: A Critical Analysis

Tom Womeldorff

cultural studies economics international studies study abroad 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter Escaping to paradise on a tropical island has been a part of the Western psyche for centuries. Exotic plants and animals, sunshine, coconut palms, turquoise waters and romance all form part of a modern day fantasy to be lived out on a Caribbean tropical island. The tourism industry has developed to fulfill the fantasy, offering packaged deals at resorts, island hopping on cruises and local cultural entertainment. More recently, the market has expanded, catering to "non-tourists" who want to experience the authentic, wild and untouched. While not perceiving of themselves as tourists, they are driven by very similar desires and images. The collective fantasies are reinforced and shaped by countries seeking to attract needed tourist dollars, and the tourism industry carefully constructing resorts and tours to cater to the tourist's preconceptions. While tourism provides an important source of jobs and income for Caribbean peoples, it comes at a cost. Fulfilling tourist fantasies constrains self-determination. Caribbean peoples become commodified; they themselves are consumed by the tourist. In this program, we will study the evolution of Caribbean tourism with particular focus on economic impacts, the shaping of the tourist experience, impacts on the local people, changing Western perceptions of the region and the tourism mentality. In the first four weeks, we will analyze the development of Caribbean tourism and its economic role, how the tourist experience is marketed, and what happens when cultures cross and mix through the tourist experience. In week five, each of us will begin an in-depth individual investigation of tourism.  The quarter will culminate in the sharing of our individual projects, comparing and contrasting the impact of tourism across the region. With approval, students previously enrolled in (Fall 2010) will have the option to travel to the Caribbean during weeks 5, 6 and 7 as part of their independent project.  All other students will complete their investigations on the Evergreen campus.  The regular class schedule will continue throughout the quarter. economics, economic development, Caribbean studies, and the social sciences and humanities. Tom Womeldorff Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Cell Biology cancelled

Maria Bastaki

biology health 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This course will provide a survey of the structure and function of cells and the foundations of cell biology. You will learn about the cell compartments and their organization, formation, and functions. You will also learn about some of the large and small molecules that make up the amazing orchestra that is responsible for making a cell a living unit and one that responds to signals from its environment. The materials will discuss macromolecules such as DNA, the genetic code that preserves vital information from one cell to the next; proteins, the machines that perform the cell functions; and lipids, the gatekeepers of cell integrity and organization. You will also learn about the small molecules that shuttle across cell compartments carrying messages to coordinate cell function, or between cells to coordinate cell communication in a tissue and throughout an organism.  The course includes a laboratory component covering basic techniques and skills.  This is a lower-division, introductory biology course. It is preparatory for advanced programs related to cell and molecular biology, such as Molecule to Organism, Environmental Health, or related upper-division programs. Biology; health studies; Maria Bastaki Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Ceremony: Relating Hospitably to the Land

Yvonne Peterson, Gary Peterson, David Rutledge and Raul Nakasone

Native American studies communications community studies education environmental studies leadership studies sustainability studies writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring This program is for learners who have a research topic (with a major focus on spirituality and community) in mind, as well as for those who would like to learn how to do research in a learner-centered environment. Learners will be exposed to research methods, ethnographic research and interviewing techniques, writing workshops, computer literacy, library workshops, moving River of Culture Moments to documentary, educational technology and the educational philosophy that supports this program. Yvonne Peterson will offer theory-to-praxis workshops to support the particular academic needs of first and second-year participants. We ask participants to take a personal stake in their educational development. Within the program's spirituality and community theme and subjects, learners will pay special attention to what individual and group work they plan on doing, how they plan to learn, how they will know they learned it, and what difference the work will make in their lives and within their communities. Learners will be encouraged to assume responsibility for their choices. Faculty and learners together will work to develop habits of worthwhile community interaction in the context of the education process and liberation. We are interested in providing an environment of collaboration where faculty and learners will identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics. Learners will develop individual projects (with an academic focus on ceremony, hospitality and community in close relationship to the land) to examine what it means to live in a pluralistic society at the beginning of the 21st century. Through each learner's area of interest, we will look at a variety of cultural and historical perspectives and use them to help address issues connected to the program theme. Work will be concentrated in cultural studies, human resource development, and ethnographic studies to include historical and political implications of encounters, and cross-cultural communication. We shall explore Native American perspectives and look at issues that are particularly relevant to Indigenous people of the Americas. In the fall, participants will state research questions. In late fall and winter, individually and in small study groups, learners will develop the historical background for their chosen questions and do the integrative review of the literature and data collection. Ongoing workshops will allow participants to learn the skills for completing their projects. Late winter and into spring quarter, students will write conclusions, wrap up projects and prepare for a public presentation. The last part of spring will be entirely dedicated to presentations. Depending on their individual projects, learners will develop, use and explore some of the following areas: Bloom's Taxonomy; the theory of multiple intelligence; curriculum development, assessment and instruction and Choice Theory; expectations of an Evergreen graduate and the five foci; quantitative reasoning; self- and group-motivation; and communication (to include dialogue, e-mail, resources on the Web and our moodle site). They will also develop skills in creating interactive Web pages, blogs and documentaries, as well as iMovie editing and presentations using PowerPoint or YouTube. education, social sciences, the arts, multicultural studies, social work, human services and the humanities. Yvonne Peterson Gary Peterson David Rutledge Raul Nakasone Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Chemistry for Everyone

Peter Pessiki

chemistry 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening WWinter Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background. Learning experiences will focus on the states of matter, ionic bonding, and energy. Each learning experience will consist of lectures, workshops, presentations, labs, and discussions. All students will be given the opportunity to make physical measurements, handle chemicals and glassware, perform chemical reactions, and learn how to put a calculator to use. Peter Pessiki Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Chemistry for Everyone (A)

Peter Pessiki

chemistry 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening SSpring Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background. Learning experiences will focus on organic chemistry. Every learning experience might consist of lectures, workshops and labs. Students will be given the opportunity to handle glassware and chemicals, distill essential oils, and perform some organic synthesis. Peter Pessiki Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Chemistry for Everyone (B)

Peter Pessiki

chemistry 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening SSpring Through a series of learning experiences, this course will relate chemistry to everyday life in a manner suited for those with no science background. Learning experiences will focus on organic chemistry. Every learning experience might consist of lectures, workshops and labs. Students will be given the opportunity to handle glassware and chemicals, distill essential oils, and perform some organic synthesis. Peter Pessiki Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Chemistry of the Body

Rebecca Sunderman

chemistry 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer Your body is a chemical factory.  In this program we will explore several of these chemical systems including biochemical families, vitamin uptake and storage, blood chemistry, and immunochemistry.  No previous science courses are required, but do come ready to explore the amazing world of chemistry within the human body. health-related fields, teaching, chemistry, nutrition Rebecca Sunderman Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Children's Literature

Jon Davies

education literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer To prepare for a reading endorsement or to understand more about children's literature, participants will engage in readings and workshops that address literacy and informational books for children from birth to age 12. Topics include an examination of picture and chapter books, multicultural literature, literature from a variety of genres, and non-fiction texts across a range of subject matter. Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in reading and elementary education. Teaching, education, further studies in children's literature Jon Davies Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Children's Literature: Special Topics cancelled

Carolyn Dobbs

education literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This class focuses on modern fantasy and multicultural genres.  Multicultural will include African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino/a, and Asian American writers and illustrators.  The class is predominantly online. Children's Literature and teaching Carolyn Dobbs Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
China: Its Language and Culture

Lin Crowley

ethnic and cultural studies foreign languages 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Day, Evening and Weekend SuSummer This unique, study-abroad program allows you to experience China, the second largest economy in the world.  Through a short-term study in Shanghai, a renowned international metropolis, students will participate in a three week summer program at the International School of Tongji University.  The university experience will offer Chinese language classes, insight into Chinese culture: modern, traditional, urban, suburban, and rural life.  In addition, students will travel to Nanjing, known as the Capital City of Ten Dynasties in China's history, and then on to the city of Xian, a treasure house of cultural relics where Qin Shi Huang’s tomb resides, guarded by terra cotta warriors.  Travel continues to the city of Luo Yang, the Cradle of Buddhism and the location of the Shaolin Temple—renowned for its Shaolin martial arts that are so popular in China and the rest of the world—and finally to Beijing, the current capital of China, to visit the Great Wall, National Palace Museum, and the Summer Palace. All students will travel during first session. Students enrolling for 12 credits will continue to meet during second session to reflect and continue to learn through seminars, readings, and films and through work on video or photo journals documenting the trip. More information and application procedures are available online at or by contacting faculty by April 1. culture studies, Chinese studies, teaching, international relations, media, and global business, trade, or politics Lin Crowley Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
China, Then and Now

Wenhong Wang

cultural studies international studies sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day FFall WWinter What is China? How has China changed, and how is it changing today? This program will attempt to answer these questions by exploring some thematic topics in Chinese history, society, and culture, from the classical to the contemporary. Fall quarter, we will emphasize the foundations of Chinese culture in classical China with a focus on "Three Teachings" of Daoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism and its manifestations in the Chinese people's deep connection with the land and China's natural environment, and their practical and creative strategies in social and economic development "with Chinese characteristics." Winter quarter we will focus on China's modern period from the Chinese Diaspora to present-day China. We will start in the 17th century when internal ethnic disharmony and interventions by Western powers destabilized its centuries-old monarchy and continue through the 20th century when China was transformed into a republic and then into a Communist state, concluding with China's transformation since the late 1980s, with its "reform and opening up." We will study the cultural, social, economic, and political ramifications of these changes, paying close attention to China's current image as a dynamic economic powerhouse and enigmatic, ambitious world political presence. Students interested in this program are strongly encouraged to register concurrently for a Chinese language course. This program would serve as good preparation for students who plan to travel to China via independent learning contracts or in study abroad programs. social sciences, and China, Asian, and international studies. Wenhong Wang Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Chinese, Advanced Beginning I

Lin Crowley

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This course is designed for students who have some background in Mandarin Chinese. The course will begin with a review and assessment from which the starting points for new learning will be determined. The overall goal is mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Chinese, Advanced Beginning II

Lin Crowley

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This course is designed for students who have some background in Mandarin Chinese and builds on work from fall quarter. The overall goal is mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Chinese, Advanced Beginning III

Lin Crowley

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This course continues work from previous quarters. The overall goal is mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. The class is fast-paced with use of internet and computerized software to accelerate the learning. Chinese culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Skills in the use of photographic and video equipment may be incorporated to prepare for those who plan to join the summer study abroad program. Lin Crowley Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Chinese, Beginning I

Wenhong Wang

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This introductory Chinese course will emphasize the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with little or no prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Wenhong Wang Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Chinese, Beginning II

Wenhong Wang

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This course will build on work from fall quarter, emphasizing the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with little or no prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Wenhong Wang Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Chinese, Beginning III

Wenhong Wang

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This course will build on work from winter quarter, emphasizing the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students will continue to learn modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Wenhong Wang Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Cities: Real and Imagined

Steven Hendricks and Stephanie Kozick

American studies cultural studies history literature sociology visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter The city, however, does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a hand, written in the corners of the streets, the gratings of the windows, the banisters of the steps, the antennae of the lightening rods, the poles of the flags, every segment marked in turn with scratches, indentations, scrolls. -Italo Calvino Students who select this program must have a passion for a variety of literature and writing about the topic of cities. This program takes on stories that form a literary map of urban centers. Works such as Tulli’s engage city imagery as metaphor, while Auster’s places us squarely in the streets of New York City. Learning activities will also include responding to narratives with visual representation work in the field of book arts. Students will consider the city through literature rich in historical and cultural contexts, practice creative and non-fiction city writing, create urban visual representations, and become familiar with important urban studies. What does it mean to know a city? Urban studies writers such as William Whyte and Jane Jacobs tell us that cities have distinctive landscapes, movements and sounds. Sociologists and literary writers give form to the abstract patterns of city work, consumption, growth and collapse and seek to link these patterns to the unique lives of individual city dwellers. Cities abound with layered stories that, through the imaginative lens of literature, make up a modern mythology and allow us to locate, within the urban tumult, quarters of quietude, woven communities, and patterns of migration and change. Cities have provoked fantasies of heavens and of hells—utopias and dystopias—and provided a modern image of the monolithic impenetrability of history and civilization against which or within which the individual must carve out a meaningful life. Through an aesthetic exploration of the order and chaos of cities, we’ll ask how narratives in literature, film and art construct our sense of place and sense of self. During fall quarter, we’ll study the concept of sense of place, employing works such as (Harmon) to guide us in determining how a sense of place emerges in city writing. Fall will illuminate USA and European cities, deepening our inquiry through partnered fiction and nonfiction readings, such as (Toole) coupled with (Codrescu). In winter quarter we’ll move on to narratives that come out of Africa, Japan, and beyond. Naguib Mahfouz’s , part of his Cairo Trilogy, coupled with Golia’s offer a look at the largest city in Africa, one preserved with a medieval cityscape. Students who wish to continue their study of cities during spring quarter are invited to enroll in the field-based program, . literature, writing and social studies. Steven Hendricks Stephanie Kozick Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Civic Intelligence: Theory and Practice

Douglas Schuler

communications community studies political science sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend SSpring This program is open to any motivated student who is interested in understanding and cultivating civic intelligence—the capacity for groups and societies to respond effectively and equitably to the challenges they face. Civic intelligence informally describes how "smart" a society is. Although we know that it integrates social imagination, memory, cognition, learning, and engagement, we also know that civic intelligence lacks an established or precise definition. For that reason we will be working to understand what "it" is, including how to recognize or even measure it. More importantly, however, this exploration should help us better understand our current and potential capabilities to address shared problems related to climate change, food security, environmental degradation, militarism and war, and economic inequity. This program will incorporate theoretical foundations and analytic frameworks in addition to examining concrete historic and contemporary examples. Using theoretical tools and practical knowledge, students will develop a case study that analyzes a project, campaign or event that they've identified as relevant. The case-study work can focus on media, public policy, education, electronic resource, or other relevant themes. Students will also work in teams to develop one or more social change games or workshops using the pattern language. Via our program wiki we will develop concepts for the Fall 2011 to Spring 2012 program and begin the development of an open source text book on civic intelligence. Credits will be primarily awarded in social sciences although two credits may be awarded in other areas. Douglas Schuler Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Classics of World Cinema

Greg Mullins

media studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend SuSummer From the silent films of the 1920s to the French New Wave, in this course you will study classics of world cinema. We will watch films by directors such as Wiene, Eisenstein, Welles, Hitchcock, De Sica, Godard, and Kurosawa. We will focus on styles, movements, influences, and historical contexts. Please visit for more information. Greg Mullins Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Climate Solutions cancelled

Rob Cole

ecology law and public policy sustainability studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring This program will explore the causes of global climate change and study the many actions and social behaviors that we can take to minimize human contributions to it. We will examine the scientific evidence for global warming and the efforts to discredit that evidence. We will study the role of multinational corporations in global climate change and how they influence public opinion. We will focus on how to respond to global warming in a fashion that works toward sustainability and equity in the ecosystems that support life on the planet. We will pay particular attention to issues of justice between humans, and how humans interact with other species. In order to understand actions we can take, this program will explore sustainable lifestyle strategies as well as how to resist corporate influence on consumer consumption. We will study the approaches of biomimicry, sustainable architecture, renewable energy generation and the smart grid, equitable distribution of food and shelter, minimal-impact industrial processes, local food production, less toxic methods of producing, using and disposing of products from clothing to computers, and a variety of low-impact lifestyles. We will examine the methods advocated by visionary groups like Second Nature, Climate Solutions, Slow Food, and Cradle-to-Cradle. Students will complete a series of audits of their personal consumption and waste-generation patterns, and we will examine similar audits for the campus, the local region and the nation. We will study methods of computing carbon dioxide budgets including carbon sequestration methods, the intricacies of carbon capping and offsetting strategies, and opportunities to reduce net carbon dioxide production. Students can expect to do research on emerging technologies and strategies that move us to carbon neutrality while fostering sustainability and justice. In addition to gaining an understanding of how we can all lessen our impact on global climate change and move toward equity, students can expect to sharpen their critical reasoning, writing and speaking skills, as well as their ability to work with quantitative methods and to interpret quantitative data from a variety of sources. carbon budgeting, climate change, ecosystems dynamics, environmental studies, public policy, sustainability and justice studies, and systems science. Rob Cole Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
The Cold War

Robert Smurr

cultural studies history international studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SSpring This workshop investigates the Cold War. The Cold War, or more properly "the Long Peace," is characterized by a worldwide ideological conflict dominated by the USSR and the USA. We will analyze the causes, the peak(s), the demise, and the consequences of this half-century global struggle. (Students from the Russia and Eurasia program will meet jointly with students in this course.) Robert Smurr Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Collaborative Autobiographics: Interrogating Representations of Self and Other in Media, Writing and Storytelling

Naima Lowe, Joye Hardiman and Marilyn Freeman

media arts media studies moving image theater writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring How do we reconcile the needs and voice of the individual with the greater good of the group? How can a focus on collectivism lead us to greater individual understanding? How can we create collaborative art projects that combine strong individual voice with a collective sense of identity, and how do we do that with integrity and respect for one’s self, others and the creative work? This program is an interdisciplinary arts practice program that explores the complexities of telling personal stories across various mediums and within the context of the collaborative process. The purpose of the program is to explore cross-cultural and cross- disciplinary approaches to autobiography, to investigate the role of collectivism and collaboration in autobiographical storytelling, and to develop analytical and practical skills related to media, creative non-fiction literature and writing, and performance. The program will have four major components: Through collaborative work and through experiments intersecting creative nonfiction writing, electronic media, and performance, this program will explore the complex or multiple elements of identity and truth drawn upon or discovered in acts of self-representation.  This interdisciplinary arts program emphasizes collaborative learning and the importance of working generatively in an increasing diverse world. Students should come ready to take creative risks, to work hard, to work respectfully, and to practice initiative while serving the greater good of the program. If you’re a divergent thinker looking for opportunities to explore the possibilities of collaborative creative production, this is absolutely the program for you .  writing, media studies, and the arts. Naima Lowe Joye Hardiman Marilyn Freeman Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
College Physics

David McAvity

physics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer This is an algebra-based physics course introducing fundamental topics in physics including kinematics, dynamics, electricity, and magnetism. Conceptual understanding and problem solving skills will be developed. There will be one lab a week. The course will provide a good foundation for those wishing to pursue careers in medicine, engineering, or the physical sciences. Those students who need a full year of college physics will be able to do so in the second session through contracts. David McAvity Mon Tue Wed Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
The (Colonial) Rise of the British Novel

Trevor Speller

literature 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring What is a novel? How did this art form come to be? It is perhaps hard for us to imagine a world without novels, where poetry, drama, and non-fiction ruled the literary world. Grounded in British literature, this upper-division program will explore the rise of the novel. We will read examples ranging from speculative prose fiction in the seventeenth century to established and reputable examples of the novel in the mid-nineteenth century. We will consider the novel as both an art form that establishes a genre, and one that breaks genre boundaries. One of the secondary considerations of the program will be what makes a novel "British." To what extent does this art form represent the values of particular people in Britain? Can the British novel be called a national - or nationalist - art form? Although we call these works "British novels," we might equally view them as an international art form, one concerned with the politics of colonialism, an emerging global empire, and the shadowy figures of those who live outside the British Isles. This intersection of colonialism, nationalism, and the emerging novel will be an important focus of our attention, as well as conflicting contemporary views around the rise of the novel. In order to accomplish this, we will likely be reading works by Henry Neville, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, William Beckford, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, and Charlotte Brontë. In addition to these novels, we will read excerpts from other novelistic works, critical views on the rise of the novel, and contemporary theory concerning literature and colonialism. By the end of the program, students will have a firm foundation in British literature, exposure to significant strands of literary theory, and experience with upper-division literary research. Requirements: In this one-quarter, upper-division course, students will be asked to prepare a 20-minute in-class presentation, to lead class discussions, and to produce a long (15+ pp.) critical paper, in addition to regular minor assignments. Film versions of the texts will be shown as required. There is no signature requirement, but students are strongly encouraged to have taken previous courses in literature and/or the humanities, and to have previously written a paper of significant length (10 pp.) on a literary or historical topic. The best work in this course will be useful for graduate school applications. advanced studies or careers in literature, writing, and the humanities. Trevor Speller Tue Tue Wed Thu Thu Fri Fri Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Communication and Conflict

Lori Blewett

communications psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer Conflict is an integral and often necessary part of interpersonal, group, and organizational relationships. In this class students learn to identify obstacles to conflict resolution, to analyze conflict using a variety of theoretical frameworks, and to practice integrative problem-solving and conflict management strategies for strengthening relationships. The course blends contemporary conflict theory with communication skill building. It satisfies prerequisite communication credit for selected MIT endorsement areas. Lori Blewett Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Community Connections: Living and Learning At Evergreen

Elizabeth Williamson

  Course FR ONLYFreshmen Only 2 02 Day FFall This two-credit course is designed to be taken ; it will provide you with extra academic support, but should not interfere with the schedule of your 16-credit program. One of the most important things Evergreen can teach you is how to take responsibility for your own education. Community Connections is designed to facilitate the transition to college, and to Evergreen in particular, by helping first year students identify pathways for self-directed learning. This set of goals will be framed by the idea that every Evergreen student participates in multiple circles of community, both at the College and in the broader Olympia area, and that these circles of community are what sustain adventurous educational endeavors.  Each student will have the opportunity to meet one-on-one with a peer mentor on a regular basis; these sessions, along with weekly group meetings, will help the student begin to address his or her particular learning needs. Students will also be invited to participate in various community-based learning activities. The primary focus, however, will be on identifying the student’s individual strengths and interests. This work will culminate in a detailed educational map, outlining the student’s academic aspirations. For some students, this will mean finding out how to pursue a career path at a non-traditional college; for others, it will mean articulating a broad set of principles. All students must turn in an educational map in order to earn full credit in this course. the liberal arts. Elizabeth Williamson Freshmen FR Fall
Computability and Language Theory

Sheryl Shulman, Jeffrey Gordon and Neal Nelson

computer science mathematics 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring The computer is a tremendously useful tool. Is there anything it can't do? Through studying topics in advanced computer science, this program will explore what computers can do, how we get them to do it, and what computers still can't do. It is designed for advanced computer science students and students with an interest in both mathematics and computer science. Topics covered will include formal computer languages, systems of formal logic, computability theory, and programming language design and implementation. Students will also study a functional programming language, , learn the theoretical basis of programming languages and do an in-depth comparison of the properties and capabilities of languages in the four primary programming paradigms: functional, logic, imperative, and object-oriented. Program seminars will explore selected advanced topics in logic, language theory and computability. Topics will be organized around three interwoven themes. The theme will cover the theoretical basis of language definitions, concluding with a study of what is computable. The theme will cover traditional logic systems and their limits, concluding with some non-traditional logic systems and their applications to computer science. In the theme we will study both the theoretical basis and practical implementation of programming language definitions by comparing the implementations of the four programming language paradigms. Students will have an opportunity to conclude the program with a major project, such as a definition and implementation of a small programming language. computability theory, computer science, education, formal language theory, mathematical logic, mathematics, and programming language design. Sheryl Shulman Jeffrey Gordon Neal Nelson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Computer Science Foundations

Sheryl Shulman, Jeffrey Gordon and Neal Nelson

computer science consciousness studies mathematics 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring The goal of this program is to learn the intellectual concepts and skills that are essential for advanced work in computer science. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving, and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics and programming in a liberal arts computer science curriculum. In both quarters the program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to operating systems. The theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions and problem solving skills needed for computer scientists. The theme explores social, historical or philosophical topics related to science and technology. Students who take the program Data and Information: Computational Linguistics in fall quarter, or who have equivalent experience, will be well prepared for this program. computer science and mathematics, including computer programming, discrete mathematics, algorithms, data structures, computer architecture, and topics in technology and society. Sheryl Shulman Jeffrey Gordon Neal Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Computers and Cognition

Ab Van Etten

computer science consciousness studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening SSpring What types of problems can be solved by computers? How do humans and computers differ in the types of problems they can solve? What is the future of computing, and will computers evolve an intelligence that includes what we would define as human thought? Can computers learn or create on their own? This program will explore the basics of computer science, how computers work, and their possibilities and limits. The program will include basic programming in Javascript, Web development, introductory computer electronics, and other computer science topics. We will contrast this with human cognition. We will then look at how computers will likely affect the way we live, work, and relate in the future.  In seminar we will explore the issues surrounding machine vs human consciousness and strong artificial intelligence. Ab Van Etten Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Conceptual Physics

Mario Gadea

physics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Evening FFall This course is designed for non-science, non-math students who wish to explore how physics—the study of matter and energy and their relationships—affects our daily lives. We will study topics from classical mechanics through electricity and magnetism and into modern physics. We will touch on work from Galileo through Newton to Maxwell and Einstein. We will apply these concepts to hands-on laboratories, demonstrations,and real life situations. With this foundation, students will be equipped to better understand the equations and formulas of more advanced physics and to better understand the physical world in which they live. Conceptual physics is the qualitative study of the central concepts of physics with emphasis on conceptual rather than a mathematical viewpoint. We will explore real-world situations and emphasize comprehension rather than computation. However, calculations are still needed, and students should review basic algebra before beginning this course. Mario Gadea Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Constructing the Individual/Deconstructing Education

Laura Citrin and Leslie Flemmer

American studies education history psychology sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter How do kids learn about our social world? How are individuals constructed to be members of society? In an interdisciplinary exploration of social constructionism and socialization, with a primary focus on the interconnections between developmental psychology, social psychology, education, and learning theory, we will examine how children develop as individuals in their social-cultural context. We will explore a range of changes that shape early learning-advancement in motor skills, cognitive development, language acquisition, moral stages, and emotional growth-with an interest in how these are historically and culturally interpreted and patterned. We will consider education as a complex field of knowledge and practice intertwined with psychological theories about the self and society. The contradictions of creating critically minded individuals in the context of assessment-based educational institutions will offer a productive realm of inquiry into the philosophy, purpose, and structure of educational systems. Specifically, we will look at the institutional mechanisms and psychological processes for teaching kids how to be "good" members of society-individualistic, competitive, and "civilized"-via parenting and formal education. We will also explore radical pedagogical approaches and social psychological theories that understand individuals as enmeshed within dominant relations of power. We will have weekly films, lectures, workshops, and seminars, as well as opportunities to observe educational contexts in the community. Some of the theorists we will read and study include Albert Bandura, Jean Piaget, Carol Gilligan, Sandra Bem, Lev Vygotsky, Paulo Freire, Peter McLaren, Barbara Rogoff, and Henry Giroux. psychology, education, social work, and social justice. Laura Citrin Leslie Flemmer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Cornerstone Seminar

Hirsh Diamant

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter For beginning, continuing and returning students, this class will reawaken the joy, adventure and wonder of learning. Students will learn about human development, identify their educational goals and create an academic plan of study. Students will explore the five foci of the Evergreen curriculum: personal engagement in learning, interdisciplinary study, collaboration with faculty and peers, bridging theory and practice, learning across significant differences. Students will participate in a 3-day Tai Ji workshop. Tai Ji is an ancient health, movement, meditation system of centering. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Cornerstone Seminar

Hirsh Diamant

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall For beginning, continuing and returning students, this class will reawaken the joy, adventure and wonder of learning. Students will learn about human development, identify their educational goals and create an academic plan of study. Students will explore the five foci of the Evergreen curriculum: personal engagement in learning, interdisciplinary study, collaboration with faculty and peers, bridging theory and practice, learning across significant differences. Hirsh Diamant Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Creating Dance cancelled

Jehrin Alexandria and Kabby Mitchell

dance history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2, 4 02 04 Evening SuSummer This class is designed to allow students to explore the roots of dance and its progression into structure.  We will look at what dance was originally used for and how we utilize it in our present culture.  There is a componant of classical ballet and contemporary dance within the program that may be taken separately for 2 credits.  performance production, directing, dance, choreography, teaching Jehrin Alexandria Kabby Mitchell Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Creating Sustainable Businesses in the 21st Century

Paul Horton and Rob Cole

business and management economics environmental studies law and public policy sustainability studies 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring What does it take to create and run businesses in an era of increasing resource scarcity and global climate change? The world stands on a threshold, where the reconciliation of human and natural systems is moving from an important consideration to an urgent necessity. Whether one is a protagonist or a skeptic, in many undeniable ways, business is one of the largest engines of change today. The trajectory taken by business in the first half of the 21st century will determine in many important ways the quality of life of the earth’s inhabitants for centuries to come. Students entering or returning to the workforce face have an unprecedented opportunity to participate in and shape the future direction of business either as new business owners, social entrepreneurs,sustainability consultants, or external advocates for change.  Through a systems view of the interactions between humans, commerce and the environment, we will examine the need for change by looking at the key drivers of non-sustainability which include: growing consumer, regulatory and financial pressure; population increase; rising global affluence; and in particular, global climate change. We will explore the scientific evidence for global warming and the efforts to discredit that evidence. We will study the role of multinational corporations in global climate change and how they influence public opinion. We will focus on how to respond to global warming in a fashion that works toward sustainability and equity in the ecosystems that support life on the planet. We will also explore issues of justice between humans, and how humans interact with other species.  We will take a critical look at the traditional business model and the changing role of business today. We will examine more sustainable alternatives, paying particular attention to the vision necessary to make a successful sustainable business. We will spend a significant portion of the quarter learning about and putting into practice cutting-edge strategies and methods to create sustainable business models. We will focus on ways to identify and prioritize sustainable business practices, and will explore several case studies and examples. This will also include an examination of the ideas and methods advocated by visionary groups like The Natural Step, Cradle-to-Cradle, Climate Solutions, and Slow Food.  As part of this process, we will survey carbon dioxide mitigation strategies, study carbon budgeting and accounting, as well as the intricacies of carbon capping and offsetting strategies, and opportunities to reduce net carbon dioxide production. We will study the impact these strategies might have on sustainable business practices. Students can expect to do research on emerging technologies and business strategies that move us to carbon neutrality while fostering sustainability and justice.  In addition to gaining an understanding of how we can all lessen our impact on global climate change and move toward equity, students can expect to sharpen their critical reasoning, writing and speaking skills, as well as their ability to work with quantitative methods and to interpret quantitative data from a variety of sources. Students will be expected to make a small-group presentation on a case study of a sustainable business, and complete a sustainability plan for a business as a term project.  sustainability studies, resource managment, and business. Paul Horton Rob Cole Mon Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Creating Truly Sustainable Businesses and Organizations cancelled

Paul Horton

business and management environmental studies sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer The twentieth-century business model has given rise to complex and interrelated challenges. These include a global water shortage, rapid resource depletion, climate change, and growing social dis-ease. Largely in response to these pressures, more and more businesses have launched sustainability initiatives. Despite the increased activity, most experts would agree that progress toward sustainability has been, at best, modest. How do we drive businesses (and thereby society) faster towards true sustainability? Is the twentieth-century business model still valid? Are there other models that are better suited to address the challenges of the 21st century? What skills and capacities are needed today(and tomorrow) in order for us to succeed? Throughout this program students will explore different human and social capabilities in the business context including moral and ethical leadership and communicating a positive vision of change.  Students will also look at a variety of analytical and strategic planning tools such as systems mapping, life-cycle cost analysis, climate action plans, and the Environmental Management System (EMS). Paul Horton Mon Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Creative Environments: Entrepreneurship cancelled

Nelson Pizarro

business and management consciousness studies sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall The faculty of the Creative Environments programs have joined together to offer in fall quarter and in winter and spring. Please refer to those program descriptions in the catalog for more information. business, drawing, environmental art and design, environmental science, public and non-profit work, sculpture, social work, visual art, and woodworking. Nelson Pizarro Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Creative Environments: Shaping cancelled

Robert Leverich

architecture sustainability studies visual arts 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring The faculty of the Creative Environments programs have joined together to offer in fall quarter and in winter and spring. Please refer to those program descriptions in the catalog for more information. visual art, sculpture, woodworking, environmental art and design. Robert Leverich Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Creative Environments: Shelter and Movement cancelled

Robert Knapp

architecture chemistry community studies environmental studies physics sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter The faculty of the Creative Environments programs have joined together to offer in fall quarter and in winter and spring. Please refer to those program descriptions in the catalog for more information. applied physical sciences, architecture, civil and mechanical engineering, community studies, conceptual architecture, environmental physics, sustainable building and transportation, and sustainability and engineering. Skills include quantitative reasoning, basic drafting, sustainable design methods, group discussion and decision-making. Robert Knapp Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Critical Reasoning

Stephen Beck

philosophy writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall In this intensive writing course, students will learn how to critically evaluate persuasive writing as well as how to write well reasoned persuasive writing of their own. Students will study both formal and informal reasoning, apply what they learn to selections of writing drawn from popular and academic sources, critique the arguments in those sources, read and critique each other's writing, and develop their own abilities to give good reasons in writing for their own views. Credit will be awarded in critical reasoning. Stephen Beck Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Critical Reasoning

Stephen Beck

philosophy writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter In this intensive writing course, students will learn how to critically evaluate persuasive writing as well as how to write well reasoned persuasive writing of their own. Students will study both formal and informal reasoning, apply what they learn to selections of writing drawn from popular and academic sources, critique the arguments in those sources, read and critique each other's writing, and develop their own abilities to give good reasons in writing for their own views. Credit will be awarded in critical reasoning. Stephen Beck Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
CSI: Re/Defining Crime

Anthony Zaragoza

economics education history media studies sociology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer We'll examine how crime is defined, who defines it, who's labeled a criminal, and who receives what punishment. We'll discuss meanings of “justice,” social justice, and criminal justice. We'll address questions about how justice is carried out and could be served: Why is there a disparity in investigation and incarceration between white-collar and blue-collar criminals? Is economic inequality a crime against democracy? Are environmental catastrophes crimes? Who are the criminals? Finally, we'll explore the tools need to indict such “criminals.” social work, education, political economy, criminal justice, journalism, media, community organizing, political science, environemental studies, public administration, law and public policy, sociology Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Cultivating Voice: A Writing Tutor's Craft

Sandra Yannone

writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day SSpring This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors in the Writing Center. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor and develop effective tutoring practices. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. The course also will address working with unique populations of learners. Students considering graduate school in related fields will benefit from this course. Sandra Yannone Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Cutting Through the Clamor: Writing for Change

Suzanne Simons and Nancy Parkes

communications writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend FFall WWinter As writers, we search for opportunities to create the space needed to nurture our creativity and create forms of expression. We also insert our creations into a noisy world crowded with blaring messages competing for our attention. How do we craft our creative work effectively to cut through the clamor? In this program, students will select a theme they are passionate about and explore that theme through multiple genres including journalism, personal essay, oral history, readers theater, and poetry. Examples of themes might include food sovereignty, workers rights, immigration, identity, religion/spirituality, community organizing for a specific cause, or a specific environmental/sustainability movement. We will also explore how being awash in the information age affects us in body, mind, and spirit. Absorbing and producing vast quantities of information doesn't necessarily make us smarter or more engaging, effective writers. By examining fields such as media theory, brain development, and health, we will gain an understanding of how we move through this information-saturated world and of techniques for uncovering our creativity and intuition that can lead to effective writing for change. Students enrolled for 12 credits in the fall will engage in additional work to study theories and practices of community journalism. Students will choose and write for specific community publications about issues within their chosen themes. We will also engage in readings about the history of journalism and the metamorphosis of alternative presses while considering the repercussions to community and oversight of government. In winter, the additional work for 12-credit students will focus on advocacy writing for college, agency, and nonprofit publications. We will profile the unspoken heroes, problems, and potential of the communities in which we live. Our readings will focus on helping to create movements and organizational change through writing for these groups. journalism, education, and public service. Suzanne Simons Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Dada and Surrealism: Art as Life - Life as Art

Bob Haft and Marianne Bailey

aesthetics art history literature visual arts 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring – , Friedrich Nietzsche This program is designed for serious, advanced students with an interest in the artistic and literary movements of Dada and Surrealism. Like the Surrealists, you must have a strong work ethic and total commitment to our independent and group work; you must also be fearless in the face of disturbing and even dangerous ideas to which we will be exposed. Our goals are to introduce students to the depths of the creative, philosophical and psychological levels of the movements, and to show the profound effects that the movements and their continuing metamorphoses have had on the arts and humanities since the 1920s. In winter quarter we will study works of the Dadaists and of antecedents, beginning our studies with an intensive look at both the bourgeois society into which Dada erupted, “la Belle Epoque”, and the fringe thinkers and artists who had prepared the way. Dark Romantic poets longed for the Abyss, imaged a chaotic inner sea, and flirted with Mephistopheles. Friedrich Nietzsche unmasked God, Truth and Self. Painters and psychologists were obsessed with altered states of being, with madness, dream and hallucination. And thinkers spoke of Flux or Will as underlying all apparently solid constructs, from space and time to identity and language. We will look at the devastating blow World War I struck to humanism, to Western society, and to individual psyches of artists themselves, and at the weird birth of Dada, the wild child, in the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland, a quiet eye in a raging storm. To assist in our creative endeavors, students will learn the basics of drawing and photography. Students will work in small groups on projects that arise from our studies and will present or perform them at the quarter’s end. Spring quarter will find us concentrating our studies on Surrealism. We will explore the movement as a theory, state of mind, a gift and a world view. We will attempt to participate in that world view through studying, interpreting and critiquing works by the Surrealists, and by creating (both as individuals and groups) art objects and artistic spectacles. We will follow the Surrealist example by keeping dream journals and using them as a source for hypnagogic imagery. We will seek the Marvelous, as Surrealists did, expanding our concepts of the real. We will explore chance or synchronicity, attempt to live creatively, and to create ourselves/our lives as works of art. We will ask what values Surrealists created when commonly accepted values had been negated. We will delve into the relationship between ritual and Surrealist arts, drawing upon Surrealists’ reactions to medieval arts and to Haitian, West African and Pacific Island arts. Students will collaborate to create, print and edit Dadaist and Surrealist literary/artistic journals and performances. In addition, each student will be responsible for an individual research project of their choosing, exploring evidence of Surrealist tendencies in contemporary arts and thought. 20th century art history and literature, drawing,  photography, teaching, and the arts and humanities. Bob Haft Marianne Bailey Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Dance of Consciousness

Sarah Williams, Donald Middendorf and Ratna Roy

anthropology consciousness studies cultural studies dance gender and women's studies religious studies somatic studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring –Isa Upanishad The “it” that defies definition in this 2nd century BCE sacred text has become an equally perplexing focus of study—a “question that towers above all others” according to —in the contemporary life sciences. What is consciousness? Our inquiry will hold open this question within an intentional learning community for nine months as we explore dance as metaphor and practice for how mystics, as well as scholars, artists and scientists, experience the movement of consciousness. If you want answers, especially answers that someone else can provide, this program isn’t for you. "If you want to think about consciousness, perplexity is necessary—mind-boggling, brain-hurting, I can't bear to think about this stupid problem any more perplexity...” advises Susan Blackmore. Furthermore, she says, “if you do not wish your brain to hurt (though of course strictly speaking brains cannot hurt because they do not have any pain receptors—and, come to think of it, if your toe, which does have pain receptors, hurts, is it really your toe that is hurting?), stop reading now or choose a more tractable problem to study." This program is an invitation to explore the movement of consciousness in relationship to Indian and Greek wisdom traditions. We’ll practice Orissi dance, study our dreams as science and science as dream, and read postcolonial Indian English literature as manifestations of the dance of consciousness. Our work will include lectures, book seminars, films, workshops (dance and yoga), introspective journaling (dreams), and what an Evergreen faculty elder named “autobiomythography” in order to explore the multidimensional movements of consciousness. We'll consider anew mythic texts that bridge beliefs about East and West, mysticism and science, such as Gary Zukav’s and Fritjof Capra’s , that have formed consciousness studies from such fields of inquiry as transpersonal psychology, ecofeminism, somatics, ecopsychology, neurobiology and quantum physics. Students should expect to work 40 hours per week and will benefit most from a full-year commitment. During spring quarter students will have the opportunity to focus more intensely on specific program themes and practices by developing research projects, workshops, in-program internships, and individual studies. All students should expect to use intensely experiential methods to explore the dance of consciousness in a collaborative manner that creates and sustains a yearlong intentional learning community. anthropology, feminist studies, consciousness studies and dance, mythology, psychology, yoga, and postcolonial literature. Sarah Williams Donald Middendorf Ratna Roy Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Dance Ritual: Ancient and Contemporary cancelled

Joanna Cashman

dance psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer What can we learn about ourselves from the multi-cultural history and practice of dance ritual? How can we reclaim the ancient wisdom of ancestors who honored the powerful need for expressive body movement, community cohesion, and transcendence. American dance icon Anna Halprin, author of Moving Towards Life: Five Decades of Transformational Dance, reminds us that “We are in need of exorcising the societal and personal blocks that interfere with the celebration and spirituality of the life force.” We will explore the ancient dance ritual practices of our ancestors as a foundation for understanding how dance rituals meet fundamental human needs. This foundation will carry us into the work of contemporary dance choreographers and inspire the creation of our own personally meaningful dance/movement rituals. No prior dance experience required. dance therapy, psychology, choreography, expressive arts therapy Joanna Cashman Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Dangerous Ladies: A History of Significant Women of Color in the 20th Century

Barbara Laners

cultural studies gender and women's studies history sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer This class will examine the role of women of color in the development of America's social, economic, legal, and political history. It will focus on issues ranging from suffrage to the civil rights movement and beyond; all aspects of the gender/racial gap in those spheres will be explored. history, law, teaching, sociology, political science, social services Barbara Laners Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Data and Information: Computation and Language

Sheryl Shulman, Jeffrey Gordon and Neal Nelson

communications computer science language studies mathematics philosophy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Have you ever wondered how web searches work? It is often claimed that one can successfully search for web sites, maps, blogs, images...just by entering a few "key words". How do they do it? More generally, how can computers be programmed to interpret texts and data? This program will bring together faculty and students with interest and expertise in language and computer science with the goal of exploring these questions: When we (or Google's computers) read a text, how do we (or they) understand what the text means? We humans bring to our reading of the text three critical things: 1) knowledge of the language in which the text is written—its grammar and the meanings of the words, and how words are put together into sentences and paragraphs, 2) our understanding of how the world works and how humans communicate, and 3) our natural human intelligence. Even with these abilities, however, we often misinterpret text (or data) or are faced with too much information. The help a computer gives us, however, is sometimes different from how we naturally think about the words, images, maps or other information that we encounter. In this program we will explore how to use computing to understand language. Although the task is complex, an understanding of the abstract structure, logic and organization of language will guide us to successful computational processing of the more complex human languages. In logic, our work will include looking at the structure of words, sentences, and texts (syntax) as well as their meanings (semantics and reasoning). We will examine the underlying grammatical structure of language and its close connection to computing and computer programming. In addition, we will learn to program in Python and study how computers are used to "understand" texts and data. Lectures, seminar and case studies will examine how to make data from text and text or meaning from data. computer science, formal language study, mathematics, library science, information science and web development. Sheryl Shulman Jeffrey Gordon Neal Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Death Considered

David Marr

literature philosophy 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall -Albert Camus Scheherazade, who told the Sultan stories in order to live another day, would agree. She had to get the words right, or else. This program considers the words—the forms—writers and philosophers use when they breathe life into the problem of human death. The inescapability of death can concentrate the mind. The contemporary philosopher Odo Marquard argues that from the facts of life's brevity and death's finality it follows that absolute personal choices are senseless. From other philosophers come perplexing questions: Given that the human being knows he or she will die, how does he or she know this? Is it even possible to imagine one's own death? If my death is not one of my experiences, in what sense is it mine? Some would answer: in the same sense that your birth is yours. But what sense is that? In this program we will read the following works of prose fiction and philosophy: Melville, ; Dostoevsky, ; Tolstoi, ; Hawthorne, ; James, ; Joyce, ; Mann, ; Conrad, ; Faulkner, ; Camus, ; Thoreau, ; and Marquard, . Death Considered is for the intellectually curious, diligent student eager to practice the craft of close reading. There will be weekly in-class exams and seminars on the literary works, exercises in conceptual analysis, seminar reports on authors' lives and times, one essay on an assigned topic and a comprehensive final exam. any field requiring competence in the uses of language, conceptual analysis and interpretation, especially literature, philosophy, history, law and public service. David Marr Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Decolonization in Communities: Thinking Globally, Reflecting Locally

Jon Davies and Savvina Chowdhury

community studies economics education field studies gender and women's studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12, 16 08 12 16 Day SSpring This program builds on Imperialism, a full-time fall/winter program that examines the unequal relations of power purveyed through the discourse of neoliberal globalization. Students interested in examining resistance to neocolonialism are invited to explore the prospects for decolonization in the context of the Puget Sound area through this one-quarter full-time program. Working in conjunction with community-based institutions, schools, advocacy groups, veteran's rights groups and other non-profit organizations, Decolonization in Communities will examine resistance strategies such as popular education, immigrant rights advocacy, gay/lesbian/transgender advocacy and community-based economics. What strategies are employed by these institutions to counter the effects of oppression along the lines of gender/race/class/sexual orientation? How have neoliberal policies affected the economy in the Puget Sound area? How has neoliberalism affected public education and what community-based initiatives are contesting the commodification of education? The eight-credit classroom component for this program will focus on decolonization, education, globalization, feminist economics and political economy. For the other eight credits, students will complete a 20-hour-per-week internship related to program themes. This program is open, without faculty signature, to qualified and motivated students who wish to examine these program themes in a local community setting. community-based social action, economics, education, gender and women's studies, law, politics, non-profit organizations and social services. Jon Davies Savvina Chowdhury Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Designing Green

Robert Leverich, Anthony Tindill and Robert Knapp

architecture community studies environmental studies physics sociology sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring Sustainable design imagines landscapes, buildings and objects of use that are responsive and responsible to environments and communities, that reuse and renew materials and energy, that draw lessons from natural systems and forms, and that use and build on the native design intelligence of human cultures. This program digs intensively into these topics, building on the background developed in Designing Green Futures (Fall 2010) or equivalent study elsewhere. This program pays special attention to buildings—their history and traditions, design challenges and potentials, modes of construction, life cycles—within a general framework of sustainable design. Students will read, attend lectures, engage in hands-on workshops and do field research addressing ecological impacts, materials, building science, graphics and design process (including computer methods) and environmental design history. They will bring lessons from these disciplines to an integrative design studio—the pivotal activity of the program. Studio projects will address drawing and design fundamentals, thinking in three dimensions, programming, user involvement, ecological design responses, materials choices and construction systems, energy use and presentation skills. Readings, seminars and writing will ground students in current issues and ideas in sustainability, and enrich their design efforts. Work will build toward application projects on campus or in the surrounding community during Spring Quarter. These projects will involve students in real-world processes, constraints, and trade-offs—essential experience for those who wish to make a difference. architecture; environmental affairs, design, and studies; government and non-profit organizations; and sustainable technologies. Robert Leverich Anthony Tindill Robert Knapp Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Designing Green Futures

Nelson Pizarro, Anthony Tindill, Robert Knapp and Robert Leverich

architecture business and management environmental studies government physics sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall “We are in the midst of a great turning and it is an auspicious time to be alive,” says writer John Malkin. All over the world, attitudes toward the earth and its resources are changing; new means of stewardship are arising, new ways of doing business and of building and shaping environments. This program is for students who want to get informed, and to rethink, re-envision, and reinvent how we use resources, build, and make a living in ways that are ethical, sustainable and beautiful. It sets the stage for winter and spring programs in sustainable building and business by providing an overview of key ideas and movements in sustainability, and by introducing students to Design as a thinking, innovating, and communicating process that can bridge disciplines, including architecture, community design, environmental technologies, and entrepreneurship. Program work will center on studio-based projects involving documentation, drawing and modeling of environments and ideas, as well as research, calculation, writing, and various modes of presentation. Workshops and lectures, along with readings and seminars, will address knowledge and skills from Design (graphic means of expression and idea generation, modeling, sources of form), Business (systems thinking, entrepreneurship), Sustainable Technologies (environmental flows, building systems, energy), and Community Studies (assessment and allocation of resources, public dialogue and decision making). We will emphasize individual preparation and collaborative effort in the work, seeking opportunities and commonalities of approach between disciplines. Typical projects might include a consideration of solar access and how it could shape building form and zoning regulations; the possible distribution of vehicle recharge stations in a community and the resultant small business opportunities; the production, marketing and distribution of emergency shelters; a marketing plan for toys that promote awareness of natural cycles and flows; resource efficient packaging design; architectural interventions to humanize public spaces; or the design of graphics to effectively explain green ideas. Dedicated students will leave this fall quarter program with solid preparation for more focused studies in designing green futures. They will gain a broader understanding of current approaches to sustainability; new and emerging environmental technologies and the basic science behind them; green entrepreneurship; and design as a creative linking and envisioning process. They will build skills to develop and communicate their ideas verbally, visually, and quantitatively, and cultivate the awareness needed to create more sustaining and sustainable ways of living, building, and working in a greening world. architecture; business and management; entrepreneurship; environmental design; environmental studies; government and non-profit organizations; and sustainable technologies. Nelson Pizarro Anthony Tindill Robert Knapp Robert Leverich Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Designing Languages cancelled

Susan Fiksdal and Brian Walter

communications computer science cultural studies international studies language studies linguistics writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter Have you wondered about the ways languages work? How do our thoughts get translated into language? Have you explored differences between natural languages (such as English, Spanish, or French) and artificial languages (such as computer programming languages or Esperanto)? Do you know in what ways computer languages are similar to natural languages and the ways in which they differ? Are there differences between languages that have written records and those that do not? Have you ever invented your own language? In this two-quarter program, we will explore these questions by learning one natural language and one programming language, studying language evolution, artificial languages, language and culture, and designing a language. Specifically, you will study the structure and function of human language through an introduction to the field of linguistics. This will involve a study of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, discourse, metaphor, and pragmatics. This work on language structure will inform your study of either French or Spanish, both of which will be taught within the program. Besides these natural languages, you will learn a programming language. We will work on the connections between natural and artificial languages, and consider the implications of language design. In our seminars we will discuss theories of language evolution and the interrelationship of culture and language. Finally, you will work collaboratively on a language design project over the two quarters, culminating in a final symposium on language design. Some students already at an intermediate level in French or Spanish should take the Evening/Weekend course fall and winter quarters. computer science, education, French, language and culture, law, linguistics, programming languages, Spanish, and writing. Susan Fiksdal Brian Walter Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Developing Management Skills

Cynthia Kennedy

business and management 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Evening and Weekend SuSummer This weekend-intensive program is designed for students who either are, or plan to be, in the position of managing their own work groups, heading up large companies, starting businesses that change society, managing the world's most important non-profits, or serving in government. The program will introduce basic language, concepts, tools, and problem-framing methodologies that are needed to develop management skills. The first half of the program focuses on motivating others, team-building, developing self-awareness, and communicating supportively. The second half of the program focuses on leadership, decision-making, understanding power and influence, and solving problems creatively. Students may attend either the first half, the second half, or both. Cynthia Kennedy Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Developmental Movement Therapy

Jehrin Alexandria

health psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend SSpring This class is an in-depth study of movement and its role in the reorganization of the human brain.  Students will learn to recognize normal neurological organization by studying specific developmental milestones as well as recognize gaps and abnormalities in brain development and how they impact growth, learning, and psychological well-being.  This class will be deeply experiential as well as theoretical.  Come prepared to move. Jehrin Alexandria Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Digital Audio and Music Composition

Arun Chandra

computer science music 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer This course will focus on using the computer to create and manipulate waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming language to synthesize waveforms, while learning about their mathematical origins.  Students will create short compositions using FM, AM, granular, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a short paper on synthesis techniques.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system. The overall emphasis of the class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment, and find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, along with readings in synthesis techniques and programming.  Students of all levels of experience are welcome.    music composition and computer science Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Dionysia: Enlivening Greek Theater

Rose Jang and Andrew Reece

classics theater 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring Twenty-five centuries ago, in Athens, Greeks would gather excitedly at dramatic festivals honoring their gods and introducing the latest productions by their tragic and comic poets. The theater was for these Greeks a spectacle, a rite, a source of wisdom. It helped them figure out who they were: it showed them situated precariously between civilization and savagery, between the bestial and the divine, between the sublime and the ridiculous. In tragedy, Greeks relived their aspirations for nobility and justice and their despair at their all too human fragility. In comedy, they laughed at their politicians, their gods, even the playwrights themselves. In ancient comedy, nothing was sacred, perhaps because everything was. Twenty-five centuries later, on the other side of the world, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes still invite us to answer the call of Dionysus, to gather round the stage and to join our stories with those of Orestes, Oedipus, Phaedra, and even Athenian war widows of the fifth century BCE. In his festivals, the Dionysia, the god taught Greeks to see themselves more clearly by standing outside themselves, whether on stage or in the audience. In the schools since then, the poetry of the plays continues to illuminate; the centuries have scarcely dimmed or softened the harsh light to which, and by which, we are exposed by theater’s first masters. At the same time, that poetry has too often been left on the page, while the poets meant it to be spoken and sung. In this program, we intend to study Greek drama but also to perform it, to understand it and to enliven it. In winter quarter, we will read and interpret selected works of the three ancient Greek tragedians, and their one contemporary comedian, who are represented by plays that survive in their entirety. These will include, among others, Aeschylus’ Oresteia trilogy; Sophocles’ and ; Euripides’ , , and ; and Aristophanes’ . Students will also learn about the history of Athenian drama. We will write extensively about the texts and discuss them in seminar. Students will also begin to learn to act, to use their voices and bodies to interpret the characters and embody the poetry. In spring quarter, we will devote ourselves to full-scale productions of one tragedy and one comedy. During both quarters, we will view and discuss local theater performances as the opportunities arise. ancient Greek tragedy and comedy, acting, play production, theater, literature, and other studies and careers demanding good written and oral communication skills. Rose Jang Andrew Reece Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Discovering the Unknown Russia

Elena Smith

cultural studies history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer The objective of this course is to inspire a better understanding of today's Russia and its people through a study of their history, art, technology, and culture.  Anyone who has an interest in exploring Russia beyond the stereotypes of mainstream headlines or history textbooks are welcome.  The students will be introduced to certain dramatic events of Russian history through film, literature, and personal experiences of the Russian people. Besides the traditional academic activities, the students will have hands-on experience of Russian cuisine, song, and dance.  Armed with an open mind and lead by a passionate native Russian professor, you should find Russia irresistibly attractive and learn to appreciate the similarities of American and Russian cultures. Elena Smith Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Diversity in the Workplace: Understanding Cultural Competence

Pamela Peters

  Course GR ONLYGraduate Only 4 04 Evening and Weekend SuSummer Managing in today's workplace can be challenging, and creating a respectful workplace where all employees feel valued is one of those challenges.  Diversity in the workplace is as real today as it ever was.  It impacts the way employees interact and communicate with one another, and when that communication fails or is misunderstood the result can undermine morale, teamwork, and productivity.  To gain a better understanding of cultural competence, students will engage in active learning experiences designed to improve awareness and knowledge of their own cultural worldviews and gain intercultural communication skills.  This course is designed to introduce ways to increase cultural competency in the workplace, leading to a more inclusive work environment where every employee feels valued. Pamela Peters Fri Sat Sun Graduate GR Summer
Doing Thinking: Working Wood, Crafting Ideas

Gillies Malnarich and Daryl Morgan

aesthetics art history cultural studies education sociology visual arts 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend FFall WWinter What do we know about how people learn "something" well? What is the relationship between thinking and doing, between the work of the mind and the work of the hand? Why does working through "the hard parts" move us closer to the elusive nature of mastery? How do novices become experts and apprentices turn into artisans? We will explore these questions in a learning environment which intentionally cross-fertilizes workshop and classroom learning experiences. The practice of begins with conceptualizing something and understanding its purpose. We choose a shape, size and structure; we select the material from which to make it; we assemble tools appropriate to the task. But, to actually make the object we must possess the necessary skills. requires a similar level of discipline: the process is as imaginative, intentional, and skill-based as . Intellectual work turns into tools for analysis. invites us to re-conceptualize our understanding of tools as instruments of both the hand and the mind as we address the program's overarching questions. Throughout the program, we will develop both our abilities to make things of consequence from wood and our abilities to work with ideas that matter in the world and that are worth understanding. education and art-related fields. Gillies Malnarich Daryl Morgan Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Drawing a Life

Marilyn Frasca

visual arts writing 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer Drawing images from one's own life in both writing and drawing are activities that will form the center of our work together.  Students will have the opportunity to develop skill at drawing from posed models and will use journal writing sessions to identify the unique events, situations, and experiences that have formed their life context.  Students will be expected to present a final project at the end of the session that will document their effort at Drawing a Life. Activities will include weekly figure drawing sessions, journal writing workshops, work-in-progress critiques, and individual conferences with faculty. visual arts, creative writing, psychology, humanities Marilyn Frasca Tue Wed Thu Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Drawing From Place

Lucia Harrison

art history field studies natural history visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Rather than viewing the landscape as an object of conquest or consumption, Drawing from Place explores the role of art and artists in helping people develop a deep personal relationship with a place. This all-level program is designed for beginning artists who would like to learn to draw and to make artworks that are inspired by their connection to a specific landscape. In the first half of the program, as a case study for place-based research and inspiration, students will study the Nisqually River Watershed. Through reading and field study, students will learn the history of the watershed and its communities, study its basic ecology, and learn about current conservation efforts. They will develop beginning drawing skills and practice techniques for keeping an illustrated field journal. Through lectures and readings, students will study artists, including environmental artists, whose work is inspired by their deep connection to place. In the second half of the quarter, students will create a series of drawings inspired by their own relationship with a particular place. art and environmental education. Lucia Harrison Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Drawing Marathon

Shaw Osha (Flores)

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This intensive, all-day drawing program runs for two weeks.  Open to all levels, this immersive drawing class will address the importance of drawing as the basis of understanding one's experience in the world and as a language integral to all visual art. Specifically, we will study the figure as a structure in space. There will be some reading and writing as well as critiques. The Drawing Marathon will push artists to a new level of working. Shaw Osha (Flores) Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Drawing Practices: Contemporary Applications

Judith Baumann

visual arts 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring Designed for intermediate to advanced drawing students, this course will focus on contemporary applications of traditional drawing practices. Building upon observational drawing skills, students will work with invented compositions and alternative materials, investigating mark making, collage methods and color theory. Class time will be devoted to presentations, critiques, demonstrations and in-class exercises. Students will be expected to work outside of designated class time to complete all work. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Drawing Practices: Figurative Studies

Judith Baumann

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This course focuses on the traditional life drawing practices of observing and drawing the human figure from live models. Students will use a variety of media ranging from graphite to pastels as they learn to correctly anatomically render the human form. Homework assignments will supplement in class instruction and visual presentations. While previous drawing experience is not required, it is recommended. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Drawing Practices: Foundations

Judith Baumann

visual arts 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This course is an introduction to the principles and techniques in drawing. Students will gain a working knowledge of line, shape, perspective, proportion, volume and composition. Using both wet and dry media, students will experiment with the traditions of hand drawn imagery. Students will work toward the development of an informed personal style, aided by research of various artistic movements and influential artists. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time. Presentations on the history and contemporary application of drawing will contextualize studio work. A final portfolio of completed assignments is due at the end of the quarter. Judith Baumann Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
East-West Culture, Commerce, Art, and Spirit (A) cancelled

Hirsh Diamant

communications economics ethnic and cultural studies teaching and education visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Summer

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day SuSummer This course will compare and contrast foundations of Western and Eastern cultures and the implications that these foundations may have on life, commerce, and art in contemporary society. The course is designed for Chinese students that are interested in exploring education in the United States and particularly at Evergreen State College. In addition to learning about Evergreen resources and pedagogy, students will learn about the unique cultures of Pacific Northwest, will spend time on a Native American Reservation, and will visit colleges in Portland and Seattle. Chinese students will also be involved in meetings and cultural sharings with U.S. students, and learning about college requirements in the U.S. Assignments and support in section A of this course are designed for students who have less mastery of English. More fluent English speakers are encouraged to register for section B. Cultural studies, Education, International studies Hirsh Diamant Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
East-West Culture, Commerce, Art, and Spirit (B) cancelled

Hirsh Diamant

communications economics ethnic and cultural studies teaching and education visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Summer

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day SuSummer This course will compare and contrast foundations of Western and Eastern cultures and the implications that these foundations may have on life, commerce, and art in contemporary society. The course is designed for Chinese students that are interested in exploring education in the United States and particularly at Evergreen State College. In addition to learning about Evergreen resources and pedagogy, students will learn about the unique cultures of Pacific Northwest, will spend time on a Native American Reservation, and will visit colleges in Portland and Seattle. Chinese students will also be involved in meetings and cultural sharings with U.S. students, and learning about college requirements in the U.S. Assignments and support in section A of this course are designed for students who have less mastery of English. More fluent English speakers are encouraged to register for section B. Cultural studies, Education, International studies Hirsh Diamant Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
East-West Psychology: Afflictive/Destructive Cognition/Emotion

Jamyang Tsultrim

philosophy psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend FFall Are destructive emotions innately embedded in human nature? Can they be eradicated? A growing body of Western research has examined these and other questions through the perspectives of Eastern psychology and philosophy, which view destructive emotions, perceptions, and behaviors as the primary source of human suffering. To alleviate this suffering, Eastern psychology has developed a rich and varied methodology for recognizing, reducing, transforming and preventing these destructive forms of mind and emotion. After examining the nature and function of the afflictive mind/emotions, students will choose one emotion to study in-depth and develop effective East/West interventions to transform this emotion/state of mind. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
East-West Psychology: Constructive Cognition/Emotion

Jamyang Tsultrim

philosophy psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend WWinter In what ways do our constructive emotions/perceptions enhance our ability to see reality? Are there effective methods for training the mind to cultivate positive thought/emotions? Students will analyze the nature of constructive emotion/thoughts, their influence on our mental stability and brain physiology, and methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function. Students will explore the correlation between mental training of the mind and physiological changes in the brain. We will also examine the nature of the genuine happiness from Eastern and Western psychological models of mind/emotion as well as from a traditional epistemological model of cognition based on Indo-Tibetan studies. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Ecology

Karen Hogan

biology ecology field studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend FFall Ecology is the study of the processes of interactions among organisms and of organisms with their physical environment. Our study of ecology will be based on an evolutionary perspective. We will study processes ranging from the physiological ecology of organisms, to life history theory, modes of reproduction, ecology of plant and animal communities, biodiversity and conservation, and ecosystem processes. The goal of this program is to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of ecological and evolutionary processes, and to be able to analyse and critically read about issues in basic and applied ecology. ecology and environment. Karen Hogan Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Effective Action for Sustainability and Justice cancelled

Ted Whitesell

communications community studies environmental studies geography history political science sociology sustainability studies writing 

Signature Required: Fall Winter Spring 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring Students will work as part of a network of college students sharing in-depth, local case studies to generate understanding of strategic and tactical options for effective intervention in complex social-ecological issues to foster sustainability and justice. This program will train students for advocacy in government, private and non-profit organizations; support them in living fulfilled lives in difficult circumstances; and build communities of mutual support. Students will research and write a book for their peers on the topic of effective political action, for print and web publication. In addition they will create a web site housing a database of case studies in the policy, strategy and tactics of sustainability and justice. This web site will also serve as a communications center for activists and for those studying activism. Attention will focus on ethical, personal and social consequences of choices about how to think and act in situations of uncertainty, complexity, conflict and stress, and how to live effectively in potentially despair-inducing times. Students will examine local, contentious, ongoing issues with complex ecological, social and political aspects. They will attend meetings of organizations and legislative committees, interview participants, research issue history, and study interactions of biophysical, social and political components. Analysis will be informed by interdisciplinary readings on political theory, practical and ethical aspects of individual and collective action, complex systems, and environmental analysis. During fall quarter, we will gain the needed factual and theoretical foundation, outline the book and web site, and establish communications with peers elsewhere. Winter quarter will center on field work, researching and drafting. Spring quarter will involve extensive editing, rewriting and assembly of the final products. Students will gain skills in writing, including editing; oral, written and web-based presentation; qualitative social science research; complex social-ecological systems science; oral history; understanding political organizing, negotiation, mediation, lobbying and decision making; and collaborative work on a large-scale project. There will be the opportunity to explore conflict, engagement and reconciliation. environmental studies, sustainability studies, policy studies, and environmental and social advocacy. Ted Whitesell Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Emotions cancelled

Laura Citrin

psychology sociology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer In this course, we will examine the way that emotions—emotional experience and expression—are connected with cultural ideologies and assumptions about gender, race, and class.  We'll cover the "big five" emotions: anger, sadness, joy, disgust, and fear, as well as the socio-moral emotions like embarrassment, contempt, shame, and pride.  We will also discuss the field of positive psychology and its analysis of the positive emotions and the role they play in what positive psychologists refer to as "the good life."  Underlying all of this discussion will be an analysis of the ways that power operates on and through us to get under our skin and into what feels like our most personal possessions—our emotions. Laura Citrin Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Energy Policy

Howard Schwartz and Anthony Usibelli

  Course JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening SuSummer This course will look at American energy policy as a jumble of choices among energy resources.  Therefore we will need to understand the characteristics of fossil fuels and their alternatives as well how the policy process works. While there will some lecture and discussion to provide overviews and ensure that the class has a common knowledge framework, most of the work will involve  critical analyses of ongoing policy controversies.  The policy discussions may the US Senate's "White Paper on a Clean Energy Standard," the fight over EPA's regulation of greenhouse gases, whether  biofuels are renewable and goals and policy "realities" of the  Washington State Energy Strategy.  The final choices will depend on the interests of students and faculty and the status of the issues when the class meets.  For each policy arena, students will be challenged to investigate how science, economic and policy analysis, ideology, financial interest, geography, partisanship and other factors influence the outcome.   Howard Schwartz Anthony Usibelli Thu Summer
Environmental Analysis

Clyde Barlow, Carri LeRoy and Abir Biswas

chemistry ecology environmental studies 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring Well-designed and accurate chemical, ecological and geological measurements are required to conduct baseline assessments of natural ecosystems and determine environmental contamination. The Environmental Analysis program will focus on investigations in ecology supported with analytical chemistry. Instrumental techniques of chemical analysis will be developed in an advanced laboratory. Quality control procedures and technical writing will be emphasized. During fall and winter quarters, topics in freshwater ecology, analytical chemistry, GIS, statistics and instrumental methods of chemical analysis will be addressed. Students will participate in group projects studying water quality, trophic structure, organic matter and nutrient cycling processes of local watersheds. Analytical procedures based on EPA, USGS and other guidelines will be utilized to measure major and trace anion and cation concentrations, to analyze concentrations of species of a single element, and to measure analytes and phytochemicals critical to quantification of leaf-litter decay processes and marine-derived nutrients. Computers and statistical methods will be used extensively for data analysis and simulation as well as for work with GIS. Field trips will expand the diversity of ecosystems examined. Spring quarter will be devoted to extensive project work continuing from fall and winter, and to studies of other lakes and rivers in Washington. Studies of statistics and analytical chemistry will be completed in spring quarter. Presentation of project results in both oral and written form will conclude the year. analytical chemistry, ecology, environmental analysis, environmental fieldwork, statistics, chemical instrumentation and group projects. Clyde Barlow Carri LeRoy Abir Biswas Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Environmental Challenges and Solutions

Ted Whitesell

environmental studies sustainability studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day SuSummer Today, college graduates should be knowledgeable about the history, science, and politics of the unprecedented environmental challenges we face, such as global climate change; record human population levels; pollutants in our air, freshwater, oceans, and soils; and the decline of species everywhere.  This summer course surveys these environmental challenges, looks at how natural and social sciences help us understand and address them, and surveys how citizens can make significant contributions individually and through collective action. ecological restoration, sustainable agriculture, conservation, resource management, environmental health, climate impacts analysis, environmental justice, environmental advocacy, environmental education, and much more! Ted Whitesell Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Essentials of Energy: Economics, Politics, Ethics

Howard Schwartz

government sustainability studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring Our interest in Essentials of Energy is learning about what it means to make the "right" energy choices. The first part of the course will cover the energy resources that are currently available. These include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and many kinds of renewable energy. We will study the availability of each (How much is there? How is it obtained? What does it cost?), their advantages and disadvantages, and their environmental consequences. We will then be in position to study policy: what mix of energy resources should we have? While we will look at the policies of other countries and the international politics of energy, our focus will be on current US policies and how to evaluate options for change. Since policy is created and implemented through politics we will then spend much of the class looking at how political and governmental institutions (and the cultures they are embedded in) produce energy policies. For the United States, we will focus on climate change and proposed responses to it. Internationally, we will look at various examples of "Petropolitics" and the "resource curse," why countries that are rich in oil find it hard to use that wealth to modernize their economies or raise their citizens out of poverty. Howard Schwartz Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Europe Since 1500

Stacey Davis

cultural studies history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 6, 8 04 06 08 Day SuSummer This class surveys the social, cultural, political, intellectual, and religious history of Europe since 1500, including the Reformation, the Dutch Republic, 18th-century Enlightenment and absolutism, the French Revolution, 19th-century imperialism and industrialization, the Russian Revolution, the two World Wars, and decolonization.  Social, gender, and intellectual topics will be stressed. Credit is possible in European history or world cultures/geography.  Students enrolled for 6 credits will complete a library research project.  This is a companion class to "Art Since 1500."    history, teacher endorsements and teaching Stacey Davis Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
The Evergreen Singers

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening WWinter The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production, and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.  In winter quarter, we will learn shape-note singing, an American folk choral tradition. Marla Elliott Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
The Evergreen Singers

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening FFall The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production, and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills.  Marla Elliott Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
The Evergreen Singers

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening SSpring The Evergreen Singers is a continuing choral ensemble of The Evergreen State College community. No auditions are required. We will learn the basics of good voice production, and rehearse and perform songs from a range of musical idioms. Members of the Evergreen Singers need to be able to carry a tune, learn their parts, and sing their parts with their section. This class requires excellent attendance and basic musicianship skills. Marla Elliott Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Evolution

Karen Hogan

biology ecology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend WWinter SSpring This program considers both the process of evolution and the biodiversity that results from evolution.  In winter quarter we’ll focus on the fundamentals of evolution by natural selection.  We’ll discuss the history of evolutionary thought from classical typological thinking to modern concepts, including the fundamentals of Mendelian and molecular genetics.  We’ll consider the social context in which evolutionary thought developed, with particular attention to the life and work of Charles Darwin. Evolution has produced millions of species and a great diversity of life forms and physiologies.  In spring quarter we will study the evolutionary adaptations and phylogenetic relationships of major groups of organisms and discuss the methods by which these relationships are elucidated, including both morphology and genetics. We’ll investigate how organisms have responded adaptively to natural selection by the physical circumstances of life on Earth, from single-celled aquatic organisms to large terrestrial organisms. Students will be expected to approach the topics rigorously from a scientific perspective.  Karen Hogan Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Experience Japan cancelled

Setsuko Tsutsumi

cultural studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend SuSummer The program offers first-hand experience of Japanese life through a three-week home stay in two contrasting settings: rural Toyooka or urban Tokyo. Participants will choose one of the locations. The Toyooka program will offer Japanese language classes, cultural workshops, and field trips. The Tokyo program will participate in regular classes of the Comparative Culture Department of Tamagawa University in Tokyo, and work closely with their students both in and outside of classes. The classes were tailored for the interest and needs of Evergreen students, and this program prepares students for advanced Japanese studies programs. Japanese language, culture, and society Setsuko Tsutsumi Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Experimental Animation Techniques

Angela Gallo

media arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer While all creative animation has elements of innovation, experimental animation is sometimes purely exploratory. Students will work independently and in teams exploring different experimental animation techniques by completing a series of short exercises including cut-out, pixilation, and 3-D stop motion. Other exercises will include storyboards, lighting design, and sound design.  Final projects will be produced in groups. No prior art or media production experience is necessary, just a desire to learn the art of animation. multi-media production/post-production, television, animation, art, project management Angela Gallo Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Experimental Music

Ben Kamen

music 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SSpring The aesthetic and technological experiments of 20th century American composers and performers opened the door to new modes of thinking about music. Their explorations into silence, noise, extended techniques, and electronics contributed to a fertile area of research within the musical lexicon that continues among composers and performers to this day. In this 8-credit program, students will examine the music and writing of experimental composers, perform their works, and respond through composition, performance, and writing. Students will explore the boundaries of musical materials through musicianship exercises and the investigation of notational systems. Composers considered will include John Cage, Pauline Oliveros, James Tenney, Alvin Lucier, Morton Feldman, Steve Reich and David Tudor. Classes will feature in-house performances, listening, seminars, and workshops on electronic and experimental music practices. Students of all levels of musical experience are welcome. Ben Kamen Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Experimental Video Techniques

Angela Gallo

media arts 

Signature Required: Summer

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer Explore the infinite possibilities of video as art. Students will work independently and in pairs as they take Final Cut Pro beyond basic editing and learn how to utilize After Effects to create extraordinary motion graphics and visual effects. Basic understanding of Final Cut Pro and Mac OS is helpful but not required. multi-media production, television, film, animation, marketing Angela Gallo Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Experiments in Text: Reclaiming Public Spaces

David Wolach

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend SSpring In this course, we will focus on creating "landscapes of dissent" through creative writing while examining other art forms that are concerned with the reclamation of public, lived spaces in the wake of increasing privatization and corporatization. We'll ask whether art and poetry can, as poet and critic Thom Donovan writes, "provide experiments in the practical organization against anti-democratic social hierarchies and the expropriation of labor, land, and natural resources?" We'll respond to this and similar questions by building individual text arts portfolios and by collaborating in small groups on more sustained text arts projects that seek to experiment, dissent and intervene.  We will interrogate the 'artistic' and 'poetic' in relation to the 'political,' stretching our understanding of both activism and creative writing. We will do this both by making our own creative works and by looking at the examples provided by other contemporary writers, visual artists, and scholars. David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Experiments in Text: Transgressive Art and Transgressive Bodies

David Wolach

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend WWinter This course explores some of the complex cultural, personal, aesthetic, and political relationships between "transgressive" bodies and "transgressive" writing and art. What does it mean, in the West, for a body or for an artwork to trans-gress societal norms? We will look at contemporary work that takes the transgressive body—deemed sexually dangerous or deviant, for instance, or "dis-abled" and so "unfit" for work—to be a crucial site for social resistance, an "invisibility to be made visible" through collaborative/collective artistic practices, practices occurring often alongside or as protest. Though this is primarily a creative writing class, our writing will push itself outside its comfortable zones and usual modes of operation. Emphasis will be put on experiments in breaking genre and mixing media, collaborating on pieces as well as making individual works, developing a poetics in relation to the social. We will discuss and critique the rich tradition of "somatic" practices in the world of performance and live art, including the work of artists such as Marina Abramovic, but we will also explore important recent experiments in poetry and prose by authors such as Hannah Weiner, Kenneth Gaburo, and CAConrad. Students will work both individually and collectively to investigate the radical potential of the transgressive body through making several pieces of art-writing. Our end goal will be to curate a show and live reading that complicates our thinking and breaks down barriers of many kinds: formal barriers of the work itself, social barriers within the Evergreen campus, as well as that between Evergreen’s campus and the broader Olympia community. This work will be an extension and reimagining of PRESS, a reading series devoted to the intersection of text arts and radical politics. For more on PRESS, check out the blog at: And for more on David’s poetic and pedagogical experiments, check out his public website at . David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Experiments in Text: Writing, Radical Pedagogy, and Social Change

David Wolach

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend FFall David Wolach Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Experiments in Theatre and Dance

Walter Grodzik and Robert Esposito

aesthetics art history consciousness studies cultural studies dance linguistics literature somatic studies theater 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring How do literal and non-representational gestures combine to create a unique poetics of action? How are emotions and ideas rendered in movement? How does the abstract design of space, time and motion support or subvert the spoken word? This two-quarter program will engage students in an active exploration of theater, movement and modern dance. Winter quarter will be devoted to building competency in separate modern dance and theater workshops, with two collaborative performance projects aimed at developing a final concert project in spring quarter. Students will continue building performance and collaborative skills through theater, movement and dance workshops, improvisation and composition in spring quarter. We will explore how verbal and non-verbal performance works contextualize and enhance each other by reading and analyzing various texts on theatre and dance. We will explore theories of dance theatre through structured solo and group improvisation, by creating original compositions, and in seminar discussions. Spring quarter will culminate in a public, collaborative concert. : Theater emphasis-20083 (Freshmen), 20084 (Sophomores-Seniors) Dance emphasis-20366 (Freshmen), 20367 (Sophomores-Seniors) theatre, dance, and the performing arts. Walter Grodzik Robert Esposito Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Field Ecology

Dylan Fischer and Alison Styring

biology botany ecology environmental studies field studies mathematics natural history sustainability studies zoology 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring This year-long program will focus on intensive group and individual field research on current topics in ecology. Students will be expected to intensively use the primary literature and student-driven field research to address observations about ecological composition, structure and function in natural environments. Students will participate in field trips to sites in the Pacific Northwest and the Southwest (U.S.). Students will be expected to develop multiple independent and group research projects in local forests in the south Puget Sound, the Evergreen campus forest reserve, national forests, national parks, state forests and other relevant natural settings. During each quarter, we will work as a community to develop and implement multiple field projects based on: 1) rapid observation and field data collection and analysis workshops; 2) participation in large multi-year studies based in Washington and more distant field sites; and 3) student originated short and long-term studies. In fall quarter, students will focus on field sampling, natural history, library research and scientific writing skills to develop workable field data collection protocols for field trips. In the winter, students will learn to analyze ecological data using a variety of laboratory and statistical analytical approaches, and they will further refine their research and scientific writing skills through the development of research proposals for team-designed field projects that will be implemented during spring quarter. In spring quarter, students will demonstrate their research, natural history and analytical skills via group and individual research projects. Student manuscripts will be "crystallized" through a series of intensive multi-day paper-writing workshops in which group and individual papers will be produced. Research projects will also be formally presented by groups and individuals in the final weeks of the quarter at a public research exposition. Finally, all written research projects will be reviewed by external experts, revised and bound together in a single printed journal-format volume. Specific topics of study will include community and ecosystem ecology, plant physiology, forest structure, ecological restoration, riparian ecology, fire disturbance effects, bird abundance and monitoring, insect-plant interactions, disturbance ecology, and the broad fields of bio-complexity and ecological interactions. We will emphasize identification of original field research problems in diverse habitats, experimentation, data analyses, oral presentation of findings, and writing in journal format. biology, botany, ecology, environmental studies, field ecology, forest ecology, ornithology, and zoology. Dylan Fischer Alison Styring Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Field Plant Taxonomy

Frederica Bowcutt

botany ecology field studies natural history 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring In this program students will learn how to use Hitchcock and Cronquist's , a technical key for identifying unknown plants. We will spend time in the field and laboratory discussing diagnostic characters of plant families. Seminar readings will be focused on floristics, biogeography and vegetation ecology. Students will learn how to collect and prepare herbarium specimens and apply this knowledge to a collaborative research project. Students will also learn about herbarium curation. Several daylong field trips will give students an opportunity to learn about Pacific Northwest plant communities in the field, including prairies, coniferous forest, wetlands and coastal dunes. Students will be expected to maintain a detailed field journal and will be taught basic botanical illustration skills to support this work. One multiple-day field trip will give students an opportunity to learn about high desert vegetation and paleobotany. Through the field trips, students will learn basic vegetation sampling methods that they will apply to a field project. This project will allow students to develop data analysis and presentation skills in addition to learning about field methods. All field trips are required. conservation, ecological restoration, floristic research methods, forestry, natural resource management, plant ecology, plant taxonomy, and vegetation ecology. Frederica Bowcutt Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Film and Gender

Elizabeth Williamson

gender and women's studies media studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend SuSummer This course offers an introduction to narrative film through the lens of gender studies. We will focus primarily on women directors working within the Hollywood system and talk about how their films interrogate existing conventions. Students will watch films at home and post weekly screening reports. We will meet once a week to discuss the thematic and formal elements of the films. More advanced students may pursue a research or screenwriting project in lieu of weekly reports. Elizabeth Williamson Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Financial Heartland

Zoe Van Schyndel

business and management 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Do you have a strong interest in finance, business and history, as well as the role finance will play in climate change? Join us for a historical tour of the forces that molded and shaped the financial centers of Boston, Chicago, and New York City that are now money management, commodity and capital-raising hubs of the global economy. Students will have the option to travel to one of these U.S. financial centers for a week of research. For those students unable to travel to the financial heartland cities, an alternative is to conduct a similar type of analysis on three cities in Washington State looking at the role finance played in their growth and evolution. We will also explore how the existing financial infrastructure will impact the emerging Emissions Trading Markets.The first part of the quarter will involve a discussion of the evolution of money management/mutual funds, commodities, and the capital-raising process. Students will work in groups to research the role that finance played in the history of a financial center city, both financially and culturally, and present their findings. We will conclude the program with a discussion of Emissions Markets and where they might fit into the existing market structure. business history, finance and public policy. Zoe Van Schyndel Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
First Peoples - Americans From the Ice Age to 1500 AD

Dennis Hibbert

geology 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend SSpring We will study the whole span of time for which we have good evidence that people lived in the Americas before European contact. We want to know about when people reached the Americas and where they came from, where they traveled and settled, the societies that developed, the responses of these societies to ongoing environmental changes, and human impacts on the landscape. We will draw on genetic studies, archaeology, palaeobotany, geology, palaeoclimatology, and liguistics. Emphasis throughout will be on learning what kinds of evidence tell us about our past and how that evidence is obtained and interpreted. Dennis Hibbert Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Food, Health and Sustainability

Amy Cook, David Shaw, James Neitzel and Martha Rosemeyer

agriculture biology chemistry ecology environmental studies sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring What should we eat? What is the difference between conventional and organic foods? Why is there an outcry over genetically modified foods? What is local food? Why does journalist Michael Pollan call this the American "Age of Nutritionism?" Why is there hunger? This program takes a scientific approach to food and cooking. Topics span a broad range, from molecular biology to ecology of agriculture and marine foodstuffs. We'll examine the coevolution of humans and food, Pacific Northwest Native foodways, the connection between diet and health, and the transformation of food through the processes of cooking, baking and fermentation. Throughout history, food and cooking have not only been essential for human sustenance, but have played a central role in economic and cultural life. This interdisciplinary exploration of the biology and chemistry of food takes a broad ecological systems approach, while also incorporating political, historical, cultural and anthropological perspectives. Structural issues of food security and sovereignty both local and global will also be explored. Students will directly apply major concepts learned in lectures to experiments in the laboratory and kitchen. Field trips will provide opportunities for observing food production and processing in the local community, as well as edible landscapes of the Pacific Northwest. Workshops and seminar discussions will focus on topics addressed by such authors as Michael Pollan, Gary Paul Nabhan and Harold McGee. Fall quarter focuses on the production of foods such as vegetables, fruits, grains, fish and shellfish. We'll explore the biochemistry of food, beginning with basic chemical concepts, before moving onto the structure of proteins, carbohydrates and fats. We'll also consider the role of evolution in the selection of plant and animal species used as food by different human populations, as well as systems of Native American Pacific Northwest coastal food procurement and production. Winter quarter concentrates on cooking and nutrition. We will study food quality issues, and examine what happens at a biochemical and biophysical level during the process of cooking and processing. We will discuss how factors like nutritional content, heavy metal, and parasite and pesticide contamination affect food quality. We explore how our bodies digest and recover nutrients, and consider the physiological roles of vitamins and antioxidants, as well as the complex relationship between diet, disease and genetics. Finally, we will study the physiology of taste and smell, critical for the appreciation of food. Spring quarter focuses on the biochemistry of fermentation, and the production microbiology and chemistry of fermented foods. Specific topics include yeast varieties (e.g., "killer yeast"); bacterial, yeast, and mixed fermentations (e.g., malolactic fermentation, lambic fermentation); and aging and extraction methods. the biological fields, including ecological agriculture, ecology, biochemistry, nutrition, food science, and food and agriculture policy. Amy Cook David Shaw James Neitzel Martha Rosemeyer Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
For the Common Good: Community-Based Learning and Action

Ellen Shortt Sanchez and Suzanne Simons

communications community studies leadership studies sociology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening SSpring Why are some communities vibrant and others not? Who and what defines community? What is the common good and who decides? Who inspires us to participate in community and in what forms? Does reliance on volunteers continue an unjust economy? How can community engagement support social change? How can we work effectively as allies in communities that are not our own? What is higher education's role in supporting community? This one-quarter program will combine theory and practice through classroom study and applied field work. We will explore theories of community and the common good and combine this with the practice of community-based service learning. Students will choose a local organization to work with throughout the quarter and contribute 10 hours a week of community-based learning while spending time in and out of class examining issues such as immigration, literacy, housing, hunger, education, sustainability, health, environment, and poverty through lenses of class, race, and gender.  Community-based learning asks students to examine critical community needs and how best to contribute to addressing them. Program activities will include field trips to Shelton and downtown Olympia, guest speakers on public policy and community advocacy, lectures, critical reading of program texts and response papers, seminars, service learning journal based on weekly program themes, and final presentations of student work. human and social services, education, literacy, community advocacy, nonprofit organizations, and public service. Ellen Shortt Sanchez Suzanne Simons Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
For the Love of It: The Rewards of Volunteering

Marla Elliott

business and management community studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer The work you don’t get paid for can be the most rewarding. What does it mean to volunteer, and how do volunteers function in society? How do communities support and benefit from volunteers? Students in this class will study theories and history of volunteerism, work as volunteers for several weeks, and then synthesize theory and practice in a final paper that combines research and reflection. public service, social services, management Marla Elliott Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Forensics and Criminal Behavior

Rebecca Sunderman, Andrew Brabban and Toska Olson

biochemistry biology chemistry communications mathematics sociology 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring Why is crime such a central focus in modern American society? How is a crime scene analyzed? How are crimes solved? How can we prevent violent crime and murder? This program will integrate sociological and forensic science perspectives to investigate crime and societal responses to it. We will explore how social and cultural factors including race, class and gender are associated with crime and criminal behavior. In addition, we will consider theories of criminology and deviant behavior, and will explore how social scientists can help identify offenders through criminal profiling and forensic psychology. Through our forensics investigations, we will examine subjects including biology, chemistry, geology, odontology, osteology, pathology and physics. We will study evidentiary techniques for crime scene analysis, such as the examination of fingerprints, DNA, blood spatter, fibers, glass fractures and fragments, hairs, ballistics, teeth, bones and body remains. This program will utilize hands-on laboratory and field approaches to the scientific methods used in crime scene investigation. Students will learn to apply analytical, quantitative and qualitative skills to collect and interpret evidence. Students can expect seminars, labs, lectures, guest speakers and workshops along with both individual and group project work. criminalistics, criminology, education, forensic science, science, and sociology. Rebecca Sunderman Andrew Brabban Toska Olson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall
Foundations of Economics

Tom Womeldorff

business and management economics history 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day SSpring Neoclassical economic theory provides powerful tools for understanding most issues we face today as communities and nations as well as globally. This does not mean there is agreement among economists about what the theory tells us or what policies are appropriate. At the center of debates among economists, and in society as a whole, is the appropriate balance between relying on the marketplace and the government to solve economic problems. This question will be at the center of our inquiry. This program is designed to provide a broad and in-depth introduction to economic theory in the context of current economic issues. We will study introduction to micro- and macroeconomics with close attention to how these theories have evolved over time, and how they are applied across a broad spectrum of issues. We will critically assess both the usefulness and limitations of economic theories. We will study economics in the context of the major issues at the time the program is offered. Examples of previous foci include the environment and the global financial crisis. economics, political economy, environmental studies, public policy and social science. Tom Womeldorff Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring
Foundations of Health Science

Kevin Francis, Michael Paros and Paula Schofield

biochemistry biology chemistry health history philosophy of science 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring This program takes an integrated and thematic approach to the health sciences, exploring introductory concepts in biology and chemistry with a focus on health, medicine and disease. It is designed for students contemplating work in a healthcare field who want to learn about how the body functions on a macroscopic, microscopic and molecular level, as well as students interested in public health or public policy who want a solid foundation in biology and chemistry. It is also suitable for students who seek an opportunity to study rigorous science as part of a liberal arts education. Our organizational framework is a systematic examination of diseases that have a large impact on global health, based on the World Health Organization's list of the top ten causes of death. We will study cancer, maternal health and perinatal conditions in fall quarter; infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and influenza in winter quarter; and cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes and depression in spring quarter. Within this framework, students will explore basic chemical and biological concepts, as well as the role of the pharmaceutical industry in society and the role of the FDA in clinical drug testing. Students will also explore ethical, historical and public policy questions raised by each disease. Class activities will include significant laboratory and instrumentation work, lectures, workshops, seminars, group projects, textbook assignments and case studies. This program will develop critical scientific reasoning and quantitative skills. Communication skills, both written and oral, will also be emphasized. Students will work on their techniques of argumentative and scientific writing through essays, lab notebooks and reports, and participation in a writing workshop. Students will gain the hands-on skills that are essential for working in the health sciences. There will also be opportunities to carry out lab-based projects in spring quarter. This program will link students with clinics, hospitals, government public health departments or other health-related organizations for volunteer service. During fall quarter, students will select and research the work of a local agency. They will then design a part-time internship that allows them to contribute to the work of this organization throughout winter quarter. Completion of this program will give students many of the prerequisites they need for careers in the allied health fields and public health, as well as preparation for further upper division study in biology and chemistry. biology, bioethics, chemistry, education, epidemiology, genetics, health sciences, history of medicine, immunology, medicine, nutrition, physiology and anatomy, and public health. Kevin Francis Michael Paros Paula Schofield Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Foundations of Literacy

Jon Davies

education 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer To prepare for a reading endorsement or to understand more about literacy development, participants will engage in readings and workshops that address the major theories of language and learning regarding the development of best instructional practices for literacy instruction. In addition, the course will explore the relationship of first and second language acquisition to learning, as well as how oral language supports print literacy development. Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for a teaching endorsement in reading. Jon Davies Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
French, Advanced I

Susan Fiksdal

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day FFall This yearlong sequence of courses will be conducted in French, and focus on literature and grammar. In fall we will study the theater of the absurd, reading plays by Ionesco, Genet, and Beckett.  You should expect to read and discuss the plays, participate in readers’ theater, review grammar, and write essays. Susan Fiksdal Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
French, Advanced II

Susan Fiksdal

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2, 4 02 04 Day WWinter This yearlong course will be conducted in French and focus on literature, grammar, and film. In winter we will read contemporary fiction and watch films with the theme of identity. You should expect to review grammar, take exams, read and discuss literature and films, and write response essays. Susan Fiksdal Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
French, Advanced III

Susan Fiksdal

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2, 4 02 04 Day SSpring This yearlong course will be conducted in French and focus on literature, grammar, and film. In spring we will continue to read contemporary fiction and watch films with the theme of identity. You should expect to review grammar, take exams, read and discuss literature and films, and write response essays. Susan Fiksdal Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
French and Japanese Media: Culture Behind the Scenes I

Judith Gabriele and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

cultural studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Evening WWinter What kind of customs and beliefs are expressed in films and other media? Are there embedded aesthetic sensibilities and codes of conduct in social interactions? What kind of similarities and differences exist in French and Japanese societies? Join us as we use the lens of film to study relationships among individuals, gender, and social groups. Students will gain knowledge of French and Japanese history and will be introduced to the basic elements of both languages as we look at their roles in the expressions of culture. Judith Gabriele Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
French and Japanese Media: Culture Behind the Scenes II

Judith Gabriele and Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

cultural studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6 06 Evening SSpring How do modern and traditional elements coexist in centuries-old countries? What kind of similarities and differences exist in French and Japanese societies? How have their histories and cultures been intertwined? What kind of links existed between Paris and Tokyo, for example? Join us as we continue to examine films and other media to compare and contrast aesthetic sensibilities, customs and codes of conduct from an insider's viewpoint. Students will gain knowledge of French and Japanese history, and will be introduced to the basic elements of both languages as we look at their roles in the expressions of culture. Judith Gabriele Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
French, Beginning I (A)

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This introductory French course emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities. Students will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary and work regularly in small groups to develop conversational skills. The class is lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of fun and creative activities in music, poetry, videos and work with Internet sites. Students use additional activities in the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills. Judith Gabriele Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
French, Beginning I (B)

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This introductory French course emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities.  Students will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary and work regularly in small groups to develop conversational skills.  The class is lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of fun and creative activities in music, poetry, videos and work with Internet sites.  Students use additional activities in the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
French, Beginning I (C)

Olivier Soustelle

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This introductory French course emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and interactive oral activities.  Students will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary and work regularly in small groups to develop conversational skills.  The class is lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of fun and creative activities in music, poetry, videos and work with Internet sites.  Students use additional activities in the Community Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills. Olivier Soustelle Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
French, Beginning II (A)

Olivier Soustelle

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This is a continuing course from fall quarter. Classes are interactive with lots of practice speaking and in conversations. Students develop all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. There is emphasis on accurate pronunciation, useful vocabulary, looking at video clips and participation in situational role-play. Winter quarter will also focus on use of poetry and fables. Additional themes will include regional French traditions, cuisine and contemporary issues in France and the Francophone world. Classes are conducted primarily in French. Olivier Soustelle Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
French, Beginning II (B)

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This is a continuing course from fall quarter. Classes are interactive with lots of practice speaking and in conversations. Students develop all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. There is emphasis on accurate pronunciation, useful vocabulary, looking at video clips and participation in situational role-play. Winter quarter will also focus on use of poetry and fables. Additional themes will include regional French traditions, cuisine and contemporary issues in France and the Francophone world. Classes are conducted primarily in French. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
French, Beginning III

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This course continues from winter quarter with study that combines grammar acquisition, reading, and interactive conversation practice. Students will view several Francophone films and read a book of short legends and tales from Francophone countries with basic discussions of them. Students will expand vocabulary proficiency and accurate pronunciation as they engage in oral reading, situational role-plays, and skits from the legends. Class is conducted entirely in French and includes a multi-dimensional approach to learning styles. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
French, Intensive

Marianne Bailey

language studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer This course is appropriate for beginners and for low and high intermediate students who wish to improve oral proficiency.  All instruction is in French.  Be prepared to work hard both in class and outside class, and to learn more French than you might imagine possible in a short five weeks. Marianne Bailey Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
French, Intermediate I

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This class is designed to reinforce, practice and build upon previous skills. It will be fast paced, completely in French, with continued review of grammatical structures. Class is interactive, and emphasizes conversational skills through discussions with native speakers of video segments, music, poetry and Internet news clips. Students will be expected to interact completely in French in small groups related to particular cultural themes. Students will increase their reading and writing skills through study of selected literary excerpts and/or a novel. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
French, Intermediate II

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This is a continuing course from fall quarter for students who have already studied French. It will continue to emphasize grammatical review and mastery of conversational skills through discussions of culture, weekly films, art and literature. This quarter we will also focus on theater with performances of short scenes. Classes are interactive and conducted entirely in French. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
French, Intermediate III

Judith Gabriele

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This course is designed to develop language skills through exploration of film, literature, and discussion. Students will view a small selection of films and discuss questions of French identity, history, and culture. You will learn to analyse, compare, and appreciate certain aspects of film art, its form and style while speaking French. Part of the course will concentrate on reading a short novel, the original text for one of the films. The class will continue to integrate grammatical review, compositional writing, and expansion of conversational skills. All classes will be conducted entirely in French. Judith Gabriele Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Furniture Design and Furniture Making

Daryl Morgan

visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening SSpring This is an intensive program for those interested in exploring their own creative potential through the lens of twentieth-century furniture design. We will focus our inquiry on influential designers and makers representing the Arts and Crafts movement, the International Style, Art Deco, Mid-Century Modern, the Craft Revival movement, and others. Using the work of these artisan designers as inspiration, students will construct a piece of furniture of their own design. Daryl Morgan Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Games Marketers Play

David Shaw

business and management communications economics 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day WWinter This quarter-long program will examine the art and science of marketing, as reflected in the theories, models and techniques employed in the marketing discipline today. While this program builds on concepts and perspectives explored in the fall program , it can safely be taken as an independent program, especially by more advanced or experienced students. The focus of this program is on marketing as a contemporary, real-world practice, including the analytical tools and techniques used by professionals in the field. The primary theme will be segmentation, targeting and differentiation strategies for organizations, for-profit or non-profit, with an overview of topics related to product, distribution, communications and pricing issues. Students will participate in a complex interactive team-based simulation which will also serve as an experiential laboratory for students to apply their concepts and tactics to a simulated marketplace under competitive conditions. Students will also learn how to prepare and update their written marketing plans for the product or service they are marketing in the simulated environment. business, marketing, management, psychology, economics and consumer studies. David Shaw Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Games Marketers Play

David Shaw

business and management 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening SuSummer This full-session program will examine the art and science of marketing, as reflected in the theories, models, and techniques employed in the discipline today. In the first session, we will cover the basic concepts and theories of marketing, including the analytical tools used by professionals in the field. In the second session, the focus shifts to marketing as a contemporary, real-world practice, including segmentation, targeting, and differentiation strategies with an overview of topics related to product, distribution, communications, and pricing issues. While the program can be taken safely as an introductory course, the readings and assignments will be comparable to a second year marketing management course. marketing, business, nonprofits David Shaw Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Gateways: Popular Education, the Arts, and Activism

Chico Herbison

African American studies American studies community studies cultural studies education 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring This program is part of the Gateways for Incarcerated Youth program. A fundamental principle of Gateways is that every person has talents given to them at birth; it is our job to encourage each other to search out and find our passions and gifts. Our work is guided by ideas of popular education. We recognize and value the knowledge and experience of each participant. The program works to strengthen notions of self and community through cultural awareness and empowerment. In connecting and building with people from other cultures and class backgrounds, each person becomes empowered to share their knowledge, creativity, values and goals. This program offers Evergreen students the opportunity to be peer learners with incarcerated young men in a maximum-security institution. Students will address issues of diversity, equality and critical thinking, along with other issues that are chosen by the young men who are incarcerated. At the same time, the Evergreen students will deepen their understanding of the theory and practice of popular education. Students in this program will have the opportunity to reflect on how they themselves learn as well as how others learn, as they gain experience in the facilitation of discussions and workshops. Students will work on designing, implementing and assessing the workshops. In the process of collectively shaping the Gateways seminar, students will also learn how to organize productive meetings and work through conflict. Each week the Evergreen students will visit one of two institutions for a cultural diversity and equality workshop, and a college class book seminar. Through the workshops we will explore various aspects of culture in order to understand ourselves and others as an important part of analyzing contemporary society and building egalitarian relationships. In preparation for the workshop, each week the Evergreen students will meet to organize the workshop’s activities. We will also take time each week to reflect on the previous workshop to assess how it worked and draw lessons for the next one. Throughout our work we will read, share and learn about various kinds of relative advantage ("privilege"), while also exploring cultural diversity and continually working to foster a space committed to equality. We will begin fall quarter with an examination of the history, forms, and functions of popular education. We then will explore the complex ways in which popular education intersects with the arts and how that intersection has been, and continues to be, often at the heart of both personal activism and social movements. In winter and spring quarters, we will continue to deepen our understanding of the intersections among popular education, the arts, and activism, culminating in a capstone project and presentation at the end of spring quarter. Building on our experiences, reflections and studies, each quarter students will take increasing responsibility for designing, implementing, and assessing the program, workshops and seminars. This program requires that all participants be ready to fully commit themselves to our common work and show a willingness to help build a community of learners. Students should expect to spend approximately 11 hours per week in class on campus and 5 hours per week off campus (including time at, and travel to and from, the institutions). cultural studies, the humanities, the arts, education, law, community work, social work, and American studies. Chico Herbison Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Gateways: Writing Imprisonment, Writing Freedom

Chico Herbison

cultural studies education writing 

Signature Required: Summer

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 6, 12 06 12 Day SuSummer Gateways offers Evergreen students the opportunity to be peer learners with incarcerated young men in a medium/maximum-security institution. Through co-facilitated workshops, discussion, faculty presentations, and film screenings, students will explore—primarily through reading and writing creative literature—issues of race/ethnicity, class, gender, power, and the many meanings of imprisonment and freedom in U.S. history and society. Guided by the theories and practices of popular education, Evergreen students and incarcerated youth will collaborate on a variety of projects as they sharpen their critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students may register for either 6 or 12 credits, but must commit to the full 10 weeks of class. Program demands will be adjusted according to the number of credits for which students are registered: if 6, students will visit Green Hill on Wednesdays; if 12 credits, students will visit  Green Hill on Wednesdays and Thursdays. education, the humanities, writing, law, juvenile justice, social work,  community work Chico Herbison Tue Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Gender and Culture: Japanese and American Literature, Cinema and Popular Culture

Harumi Moruzzi

cultural studies gender and women's studies literature media studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Due to globalized communication, we have become increasingly aware that there may be multiple perspectives on reality. We now question the reality that we perceive as an absolute and universal reality. We wonder if that ultimate reality is or has ever been accessible to human consciousness. In short, we have begun to understand that the reality that we see is heavily colored by the social and cultural ideologies that have been instilled in us from birth by means of the language we use, the culture we are raised in, the education we receive and the mass media that bombards us. The concept of gender is no exception. It is ultimately a constructed reality. It is often said that American and Japanese cultures represent diametrically opposed values in many aspects of human behaviors and customs. While Japanese women are valued most as wives and mothers, the traditional gender roles, American women are valued as wage earners and sex partners. Needless to say, such a stereotypical view of gender is becoming rapidly outdated in Japan as well as in the United States. Nevertheless, this dichotomized cross-cultural frame presents an illuminating context in which we can explore gender issues. In this program, we explore the concept of gender through a critical examination of anthropological, sociological and psychological articles, as well as American and Japanese literature, cinema and popular culture. At the beginning of the quarter, students will be introduced to the rudiments of film analysis to develop a more critical attitude toward the film-viewing experience as well as major literary theories in order to become aware of varied approaches to literary analysis and interpretation. After familiarizing themselves with these analytical and theoretical foundations, students will examine representations of gender and culture, as well as their interrelationships, through lectures, workshops, book and film seminars and expository writings. gender studies, cultural studies, film studies, Japanese literature and American literature. Harumi Moruzzi Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
General Biology

Clarissa Dirks

biology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer Living systems will be studied on the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Topics that will be covered include the scientific method, biomolecule and cell structure and function, evolutionary biology, Mendelian genetics, and plant and animal physiology. The lab component will reinforce concepts and ideas explored in lectures, readings, and workshops. This biology course is excellent preparation for students interested in taking more advanced life science courses or for future work in the areas of environmental science. Clarissa Dirks Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
General Chemistry

Peter Pessiki

chemistry 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening FFall WWinter SSpring This three-quarter program in general chemistry provides prerequisites for many studies in science, health, and medicine as well as basic laboratory science for students seeking a well-rounded liberal arts education. Emphasis in fall quarter will be placed on calculations involving conversions, molar quantities, and thermodynamics. Understanding atoms in terms of subatomic particles, chemical reactivity of inorganic compounds, and the gas laws will also be covered. We will end with an in-depth investigation of atomic structure and periodicity. In the laboratory, students will routinely utilize a variety of scientific glassware and equipment and be taught how to handle chemicals safely. Students will also learn to be observant of chemical changes and to make precise physical measurements. Relevant scientific literature is introduced and often used to retrieve needed physical data. Winter quarter will start with a thorough investigation of how atoms unite to form molecules with a focus on covalent bonding. Next we will focus on the role of intermolecular forces in liquids and solids. This will be followed by chemical kinetics and an in-depth investigation of equilibrium. We will end the quarter with an introduction to acid base chemistry. Labs will include titrations, crystal growth, pH titrations, and absorption spectroscopy. An introduction to chemical instrumentation will be incorporated into lab exercises, and students will be required to utilize chemical drawing programs. Spring quarter will continue with acid base chemistry, pH, and polyprotic acids. Next we will look at buffers and complex ion equilibria. We then will cover entropy and free energy followed by an introduction to electrochemistry and electrochemical cells. Our final few weeks will be spent investigating a wide range of topics including transition metals and the crystal field model, nuclear chemistry, and other selected topics. The lab portion of the class will include buffer making, electrochemical measurements, and the use of ion exchange columns. In addition, students will be expected to partake in the on-campus Science Carnival as well as attend a locally held science conference. science and medicine. Peter Pessiki Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Geographic Information Systems Intern

Dylan Fischer and Rip Heminway

computer science ecology environmental studies geography 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring The GIS internship, based in the Computer Applications Lab, is focused on developing advanced knowledge and skills in spatial data management and analysis through development of campus GIS data, database administration, and the support of research projects such as the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON) project. Through this internship students will gain advanced understanding of working with GIS software, and specifically in using GIS for natural resource applications. Specific opportunities include working in detail with LiDAR data, high quality aerial images, assessing forest canopy structure, and identifying forest canopy type using GIS software and data. This intern will also build instructional and support skills by assisting in the instruction of GIS workshops and curricular programs. GIS, environmental studies, and computer science. Dylan Fischer Rip Heminway Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Geometry

Neal Nelson

education mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This class is an introduction to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry suitable for teachers or others interested in gaining a deeper understanding of mathematics, mathematical proof, and the historical and conceptual evolution of geometrical ideas. The course will concentrate on problem solving and the development of mathematical skills, particularly proofs, with the goal of understanding the major conceptual developments in the history of geometry. Class activities will be primarily reading, problem solving, and discussion with lectures as needed. geometry, mathematics education Neal Nelson Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Geometry in Sacred Art and Architecture

Allen Mauney

mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall For millennia, rigorous logic, exact procedures, and modeling the physical world have been essential elements of geometry. But geometry has also been used to provide symbols and tools to study the metaphysics of unity, beauty, polarity, harmony, and infinity. Students in this class will explore mathematics in the classic liberal arts tradition by collecting and analyzing data, verifying propositions, and connecting quantitative and qualitative aspects of the world. (Credit awarded in geometry.) Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
German, Advanced Beginning/Intermediate

Marianne Hoepli

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer This course is designed for students whose goal is to expand their conversational, reading, and writing skills. Students will review grammar rules, expand their vocabulary, and improve their conversational skills by practicing in the classroom and at home. They will read modern and classic German stories, news, and poetry. In addition they will watch German movies, listen to music, and discuss cultural topics. Enjoy great progress in just 5 weeks with a native speaker! Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
German, Beginning I

Marianne Hoepli

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall Komm und lern Deutsch! This is the first quarter of a year-long course for beginning German students. This course will cover the basic grammatical concepts, vocabulary and conversation. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, reading, translating and writing of standard high German. Students will also learn about culture, traditions and customs of the German people, new and old. Through involvement in children’s stories, music and activities in the language laboratory, students will also become familiar with idiomatic expressions. Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
German, Beginning II

Marianne Hoepli

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter Komm und lern Deutsch! This is the second quarter of a year-long course for beginning German students. This course will cover the basic grammatical concepts, vocabulary and conversation. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, reading, translating and writing of standard high German. Students will also learn about culture, traditions and customs of the German people, new and old. Through involvement in children’s stories, music and activities in the language laboratory, students will also become familiar with idiomatic expressions. Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
German, Beginning III

Marianne Hoepli

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This is the third quarter of a year long beginning German course. New students who want to review their basic skills are also encouraged to take this class. We will continue to use "Wie geht's" text and workbooks and expand all four basic language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students will improve their oral skills by discussing short films and modern short stories . They will also improve their writing skills by learning how to write a formal letter, a resumé or a job application. This course will use a communicative method and will be conducted primarily in German. Marianne Hoepli Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Gifts Garden: An Ethnobotanical Learning Laboratory in Fall

Marja Eloheimo

botany cultural studies environmental studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend FFall In this weekend course, students will use The Gifts Garden at the Evergreen Longhouse as a laboratory for learning related to ethnobotany, educational habitat gardening with native plants, and growing and using medicinal plants. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, writing, research, maintaining a nature journal, and carrying out an individual project as well as sharing it with the class. The course is focused on the fall season and is suitable for students interested in botany, Indigenous studies, environmental studies, education, botanical medicine, and horticulture. Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Gifts Garden: An Ethnobotanical Learning Laboratory in Spring

Marja Eloheimo

botany cultural studies environmental studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend SSpring In this weekend course, students will use The Gifts Garden at the Evergreen Longhouse as a laboratory for learning related to ethnobotany, educational habitat gardening with native plants, and growing and using medicinal plants. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, writing, research, maintaining a nature journal, and carrying out an individual project as well as sharing it with the class. The course is focused on the spring season and is suitable for students interested in botany, Indigenous studies, environmental studies, education, botanical medicine, and horticulture. Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Gifts Garden: An Ethnobotanical Learning Laboratory in Winter

Marja Eloheimo

botany cultural studies environmental studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend WWinter In this weekend course, students will use The Gifts Garden at the Evergreen Longhouse as a laboratory for learning related to ethnobotany, educational habitat gardening with native plants, and growing and using medicinal plants. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, writing, research, maintaining a nature journal, and carrying out an individual project as well as sharing it with the class. The course is focused on the winter season and is suitable for students interested in botany, Indigenous studies, environmental studies, education, botanical medicine, and horticulture. Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Grammar in Context

Emily Lardner

education writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer Do you know what sounds right in writing but lack the right terms? Does grammar make you nervous? This class will help you master conventions of Standard Edited American English. We start with brief autobiographical writings, unearthing existing beliefs about grammar, then develop a shared understanding of what “Standard Edited American English” is. Most important, you’ll develop strategies for using SEAE to your advantage. Class time consists of lively study and practice. All writers welcome. teaching, grammar studies, expository writing Emily Lardner Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities

Don Chalmers

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend SSpring This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities

Don Chalmers

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend FFall This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities (A)

Don Chalmers

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Weekend WWinter This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Don Chalmers Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Grant Writing and Fundraising: Ideas to Realities (B)

Don Chalmers

writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening and Weekend WWinter This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of grant writing and fund raising. After an orientation to contemporary philanthropy and trends, students will learn how to increase the capacity of an organization to be competitive for grants and other donations. We will share ways to plan realistic projects, identify promising funding sources and write clear and compelling components of a grant, based either on guidelines for an actual funder or a generic one. Working individually or in small groups, students will develop their project idea, outline the main components of a grant and prepare a brief common application. Don Chalmers Fri Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Grant Writing Essentials

Sylvie McGee

  Course JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend SuSummer Use hands-on practice to learn to write successful grants! We will start with an introduction to grants and their place in the development of nonprofit organizations and learn the sound planning skills needed for strong proposals. Students will write a grant for a nonprofit organization, getting feedback on each section as it is developed. A list of organizations seeking grant writing assistance will be provided**. Using interactive learning and assigned tasks, we will focus on planning, research, evaluation techniques, budgeting and how to effectively communicate issues and needs in a clear and concise manner. **NOTE: If you have a non-profit or government agency you wish to write for, you MUST contact me in advance of the first day of class, so that I can send a form to be filled out by the agency and review their readiness. Sylvie McGee Tue Fri Sat Sun Summer
Green for Green: Entrepreneurship and The Environment cancelled

Nelson Pizarro and Nalini Nadkarni

business and management ecology environmental studies sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring In a world where Earth’s environment and its inhabitants are increasingly compromised by human activities, humans must learn to step outside of their own spheres of influence to understand and forge collaborations with other people, institutions and ways of knowing. Traditionally, the fields of ecology and business have regarded each other as “other”, yet they hold many concepts, concerns, and values in common. In this upper-division program, we will first explore the structure and function of ecosystems in nature, and investigate similarities and differences with systems of business, commerce and entrepreneurship. Second, we will explore how business and entrepreneurship might be harnessed to increase conservation and stewardship of Earth’s ecosystems. During winter quarter, we will explore compelling business ideas by looking at examples of social entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship, corporations, non-profits and social business in the USA and other parts of the world. We will examine the best opportunities for social sector activity, and examine non-profit and for-profit approaches. We will also examine cases where companies have sought to exploit business opportunities that result from global, social and environmental trends. During spring quarter, students will be guided to develop feasibility plans for projects of their own choice. Projects could include such topics as developing awareness of natural ecosystems, analyzing a company that might be “green-painting” its products, or forging links between different partners that could collaborate to protect the environment. The work will involve market research, library work, data analysis, innovation and collaborative team work. business, environmental studies, entrepreneurship, management, and sciences. Nelson Pizarro Nalini Nadkarni Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Group Dynamics

Marcella Benson-Quaziena

business and management psychology sociology 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend SSpring Groups have become a part of everyday life and practitioners who are capable of understanding self and environment in relationship to groups will succeed. This program is designed for students who want to increase their knowledge and skills in working with groups. We will focus on the unique characteristics and common qualities of small groups. The course will cover group issues such as leadership, decision-making, power and creativity. Students will gain awareness of their own behavior in groups as participants and/or leaders. The students' skill focus will be to develop effectiveness in groups; to improve skills in problem-solving and decision making in groups; and to improve skills in process observation, use of self, feedback, and communication. As a group participant/observer students will learn to discriminate between observation, interpretation, judgment, description and evaluation. Students will observe and attend to group levels of systems, the individual, interpersonal, sub-group, group and organization. A gestalt perspective will be used as a foundation for group analysis of the internal and external dynamics affecting the group. human and organizational systems. Marcella Benson-Quaziena Fri Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Healing the Mind-Body: Biology and Beyond

Carolyn Prouty

biology consciousness studies health physiology psychology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter Western science has traditionally considered the mind and body as separate entities. Recent research indicates that the relationship and interactions between the mind and the body are much more complex and intimate than previously imagined. Considered as a single holistic entity, the human mind-body has an innate capacity for healing that involves complex interactions between the nervous system, immune system, endocrine system, and other physiologic systems. We all know of seemingly miraculous cures that appear inexplicable. How do mental activities and practices transform our experiences of the body? How do they manifest on a physiological level? Research from the last 30 years has revealed abundant details about the remarkable nature of the mind-body, the biological underpinnings of its connections to our past, our social circumstances and our environment, and its capacity for miraculous, seemingly unfathomable change. In this program, we will explore mind-body medicine from several disciplines and viewpoints. We will begin with a biological approach, investigating the components of the network comprised of the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. We will then explore healing as an underlying intelligence of the body, and as a pathway to wholeness. Students will examine how alternative medicine modalities practiced in the US, including acupuncture, naturopathy, vibrational medicine, and others, as well as other determinants of mind-body health affect our well being. Throughout fall quarter, we’ll study the strengths and shortcomings of approaches such as the scientific method and evidence-based medicine that allow us to assess the foundation for what we believe. During winter quarter, students will work independently and in small groups to investigate a particular aspect of mind-body healing, which may involve interviews, observations, and practice, as well as research. We’ll also continue our journey by investigating mind-body medicine of non-Western cultures, such as African/Caribbean medicine, Chinese medicine, and Amerindian medicine. The program will be conducted so as to allow students to study, assimilate, and synthesize their learning though their minds and their bodies. The format will include lectures, seminars, workshops, films, guest lectures, writing exercises, as well as opportunities for practicing mind-body connections through physical experiences including meditation and singing. Students will be expected to incorporate personal observations of their mind-body health as a vehicle for integrating their learning. alternative and complementary medicine, health sciences, holistic health practices, psychology, physiology, nurobiology, and consciousness studies. Carolyn Prouty Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Health and Human Development

Nancy Anderson and George Freeman

biology community studies cultural studies gender and women's studies health physiology psychology queer studies somatic studies 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day, Evening and Weekend FFall WWinter SSpring This thematically-based program explores the intersection of human development, health and society. Each quarter examines this relationship through content-related themes and experiences to better understand the fundamentals of health and human development. This program is designed between Evening and Weekend Studies and full-time offerings. The core of the program meets as a whole community using an evening/weekend format. Twelve credit students may register (with faculty signature) to complete an in-program internship.  Full time students will meet additional hours during the week. Our learning community will grapple with the age-old questions regarding the nature/nurture controversy. We will use the themes of our program to engage questions like: “How do we navigate our way through the world to build a healthy sense of self? What myths and beliefs guide our decision-making regarding health? What barriers prevent us from achieving a more wholesome lifestyle? How can we acquire the skills necessary to successfully be and create a health-based community? Along with these questions we will study the particulars of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, the ability/disability spectrum and religious affiliation/identity as predictors of achieving health and well-being. We'll also examine these characteristics in terms of their social construction and the creation of a multicultural, democratic society. Each quarter focuses on human development and the psychological, biological and social constructs that guide the stages of development. Fall quarter begins with adolescent and young adult development, the social and genetic construction of identity, the question of what makes for a healthy stage of development and the barriers to achieving optimal states of health and well being. Winter quarter deepens our study of developmental theory through the study of birth, early and late childhood developmental themes, and community-based health and social services. During spring quarter we’ll turn our attention to later adulthood and aging and the health-based concerns that arise. The program will progress from a faculty-directed course of study toward a more student-originated design. Students completing this program will come to a stronger understanding of their personal lives as situated in a variety of contexts. They will develop strategies for engaging in a range of settings to promote social change, in-depth personal development, increased self-awareness, critical commentary and analyses, and practices that promote health and well-being. They will learn basic tools and strategies for analysis of community health needs. They will come to understand themselves as a member of multiple communities and as having a responsibility to these communities. education, abnormal psychology and personality theory, community psychology, human development, diversity and multicultural studies, community health, anti-oppression studies, quantitative research theory and design, systems theory and group process/change, writing, and health-related fields. Nancy Anderson George Freeman Tue Thu Sat Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Health vs. Wealth

Mary Dean

health sustainability studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring We will explore the intersection where valued health care meets paid health care. In the health care arena, good intent is plagued by paradox and can yield under-funding and a mismatch with initial intent. Paradoxes and costs haunting prevention, access and treatment will be reviewed. Reports from the Institute of Medicine will aid our journey as will the video series, "Remaking American Medicine" and "Sick Around the World". We will consider the path of unintended consequences where piles of dollars are not the full answer to identified need. Mary Dean Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Hispanic Ascension in the U.S.

Theresa Aragon

cultural studies government history law and public policy 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Weekend SuSummer Hispanics are currently the largest ethnic minority population in the United States, projected to number 47.8 million in 2010 and to more than double by 2050. The U.S. now has the second largest Hispanic population of all countries and Hispanics will play a major role in the future of the United States. This program will draw on the history of Hispanics in the US and will focus on social, economic, and educational policy as a framework for best serving the needs of this population.  public administration, social services, education Theresa Aragon Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
History and Systems in Psychology

Susan Cummings

psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall The purpose of this course is to provide an overall view of the emergence of psychology as a field, its historical roots, its evolution within a broader sociocultural context, and philosophical currents running throughout this evolution. Attention will be paid to the interaction of theory development and the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology. Susan Cummings Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
History of Ancient Greece and Rome

Andrew Reece

history 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer We study the history of classical Greece and Rome from the founding of the first Olympic games and the city of Rome in the 8th century BCE through the Christianization of the Roman empire in the 4th century CE.  Major themes include the development of the city state, Athenian democracy, class struggle, slavery, warfare, religion and the state, and the rise of empires.  We read secondary and primary texts, including Herodotus, Thucydides, and Tacitus. education, history, classics, political philosophy Andrew Reece Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
How All Students Learn: Supporting Diverse Learners cancelled

Terry Ford

education psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This class will help participants deepen their understanding of the learning process and the relationships of schooling and social justice. Essential questions guiding the class are: 1) What is learning? 2) What is culture?  3) How do culture and language relate to community, schooling, learning and academic achievement? Through engaging in a coordinated studies curriculum encompassing the needs of diverse learners in multicultural settings, we will consider the latest research on how the function and role of the brain, culture, and language development influence learners. Included will be topics such as culturally responsive teaching, teaching for diversity and social justice, and anti-bias education. Learning Goals: Participants will deepen their understanding of the interdependence of the brain, culture, and language development on the academic achievement of all learners. teaching, community-based work, curriculum development, further studies in education Terry Ford Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
How Poetry Saves the World

Donald Foran

literature writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring How can poetry save the world? Poetry is "a thump to the TV set to restore the picture" and "a jolt to the fibrillating heart" according to Seamus Heaney. The metaphorical power of poetry can change our perspectives and move us to action. We learn from poets like Emily Dickinson and Claribel Alegria that "Much madness is divinest sense" and that those suffering violence have "earned the right to order us to break up our sleep . . . and shake off . . . this lassitude."  Poetry can serve as a lens through which we can understand cultural legacies and the invasion of cultures more clearly.  Economic, sexual and political minorities write poetry and "hold up a mirror to nature" through their poems.  For some, like Leonard Cohen, poetry helps us discern that "the blizzard of the world has overturned the order of the soul," yet "love's the only engine of survival." Many poets, like Hopkins, affirm that "nature is never spent," that "there lives the dearest freshness deep down things."  Thus poetry also has a role in fostering sustainability. In this program students will study poems ancient and new, poems from many differing cultures and ethnicities. All will analyze and co-edit poems, write haiku and imagist poems, quatrains, heroic couplets, sonnets, terza rimas, villanelles, and poetry-based songs; they will also create their own free-style works. Finally, students will view poets reading their own works, benefit from guest poets' and songwriters' approaches writing, work on memorization and recitation, and explore how a "story arc" enhances many fine lyrical and narrative poems. Each student will produce and read from an illustrated anthology of his or her own poems in an end-of-quarter presentation. literature, law, and the creative arts. Donald Foran Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
HR: Employee Relations and Conflict Management

Ann Farrell-Becker

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening and Weekend FFall Ann Farrell-Becker Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
HR: Employment Law and Labor Relations

Natividad Valdez

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend SSpring This course will review the law under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). It will focus on unfair labor practices and union representation elections, with an emphasis on the right to engage in union activities free from interference, restraint, coercion, or discrimination, and the duty to bargain in good faith. Students will be expected to study the text of the statute, relevant selections from actual cases, and various other materials and apply them to current events and hypothetical situations. The course will also review the major employment discrimination laws including sexual harassment, disability, family leave, wage/hour, and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act. Students will learn how to apply these major laws to 'real-work' situations and will have a very good understanding of the major provisions. This course is one in a series of required courses for the , but it is also open to enrollment by students who are not part of the certification program. Natividad Valdez Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
HR: Employment Law and Labor Relations

Natividad Valdez

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend WWinter This course will review the law under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). It will focus on unfair labor practices and union representation elections, with an emphasis on the right to engage in union activities free from interference, restraint, coercion, or discrimination, and the duty to bargain in good faith. Students will be expected to study the text of the statute, relevant selections from actual cases, and various other materials and apply them to current events and hypothetical situations. The course will also review the major employment discrimination laws including sexual harassment, disability, family leave, wage/hour, and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act. Students will learn how to apply these major laws to 'real-work' situations and will have a very good understanding of the major provisions. This course is one in a series of required courses for the , but it is also open to enrollment by students who are not part of the certification program. Natividad Valdez Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
HR: Fundamentals of Human Resource Managment

Dariush Khaleghi

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall Effective management of human resources (HR) can provide the ultimate competitive edge in a changing global business landscape where an organization's survival and sustainability is constantly tested by shifting market requirements. This course is a comprehensive study of critical topics in HR which will introduce students to HR challenges and opportunities while covering how HR is used at work to help organizations achieve their mission, vision, and objectives. This course emphasizes strategic HR management, the changing role of HR consultants and management, trends in HR management, recruitment and selection, performance management and retention, and creating and maintaining high performance organizations. This course is one in a series of required courses for the , but it is also open to enrollment by students who are not part of the certification program. Dariush Khaleghi Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
HR: Human Resource Development and Training

Dariush Khaleghi

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening and Weekend SSpring Being poised to respond to market conditions is vital to organizational success. In order for this to happen, organizations need to work effectively across all departments in addition to proactively addressing the training and development needs of all employees. This course will provide you with an overview of training and staff development from a human resources perspective. Topics will include the difference between organizational development and training, leadership development vs. skill development, needs analysis, instructional systems design, strategies for managing training, selection of programs, courses, instructors and evaluation of training. (some chapters to be completed before the first class, details to be included in syllabus): Noe, R. (2006). . McGraw-Hills, Irwin. ISBN: 978-0073404905.  This course is one in a series of elective courses for the , but it is also open to enrollment by students who are not part of the certification program. Dariush Khaleghi Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
HR: Performance Management: From Discipline to Motivation

Dariush Khaleghi

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening and Weekend WWinter HR practitioners and front-line managers share accountability for developing and implementing the systems that support the identification, measurement and rewarding of employees for their performance. This module will explore how to use motivation vs. discipline to drive exceptional performance and achieve organizational results. The course reviews current motivational theories and best performance management practices that help organizations achieve their goals and objectives.  This course also explores the field of organizational coaching to help managers and HR professionals grow, develop, and manage human capital more effectively, ensuring  long-term and sustainable organizational success. This course is one in a series of elective courses for the , but it is also open to enrollment by students who are not part of the certification program. (to be completed before the first class):   Dariush Khaleghi Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
HR: Total Compensation

Cary Randow

business and management 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring Using a "building blocks" approach, this course identifies and examines the components of a total compensation program; salary, benefits and workplace environment. Current and emerging trends and applications will be discussed with emphasis on practical in-class exercises and study. The instructor will relate course content to business strategy in order to demonstrate Human Resources' role in developing a relevant and successful total compensation program. This course is one in a series of required courses for the , but it is also open to enrollment by students who are not part of the certification program. Cary Randow Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Human Anatomy and Physiology

Cindy Beck

biology health 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 6, 12 06 12 Evening SuSummer Students will study the anatomy and physiology of the human body using a systems approach while exploring the interrelationship of health and disease in the human body. Each body system will be covered utilizing a traditional lecture and laboratory format.  This course meets prerequisites for nursing and graduate programs in health sciences. health and medicine Cindy Beck Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
The Human Element

Charles Pailthorp, Trevor Speller and Nancy Koppelman

American studies history literature philosophy physiology writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day FFall WWinter In the early seventeenth century, the philosopher René Descartes chronicled his reflections on how little he actually knew, when he looked closely. He found he even had to ask, “How do I know I myself exist?” His answer, “I think, therefore I am,” became a keystone of Western philosophy. When he asked further, “What then am I?”, he answered, “A thing that thinks,” not just a body, but an . To be human, he concluded, is to be a compound of two elements: mind and body. His contemporary, Thomas Hobbes, argued this was wrong, that we humans, however mind-ful, are entirely material. The debate continues to this day. In concluding that the human element is our immaterial mind, Descartes reasoned that non-human animals differ from us by being only material, that they are completely mindless. Are animals then, only machines, without thought, even without feeling? (This was Descartes’ conclusion!). What about machines that mimic rational conversation (surely a very strong indicator of thought)? Couldn’t they be as mind-ful, and therefore as human, as we? Or from Hobbes’s materialist point of view, if we humans are only machines, how can we justify, for example, punishing a human who has caused some harm? Would we punish a car that has broken down and gone out of control? These questions remain with us today: consider the force of arguments concerning animal rights by organizations such as PETA, or the tangle of human-machine interactions evident in programs such as Second Life. What makes us different from other animals? What makes people different from the machines we create, or envision? To ask the question more broadly: what are the qualities that make humans different and unique – if there are any at all? Is there a “human element,” or are we just made up of those found on the periodic table? Questions about the ‘unique’ nature of humanity will be this program’s driving force. We will consider what makes us different from our animal, vegetable, mineral, mechanical and spiritual peers on planet earth, and how we might or might not live in symbiosis with them. We will consider shifts in our understanding of human nature, shifts that have been shaped by developments in science, from mechanics to evolution, and by developments in how we lead our daily lives, from hunting and gathering to browsing the internet. Fields of study may include the history of technology, epistemology, and the traveler’s tales of the Romantic period. Texts may include Descartes: Hobbes: Shakespeare: John Milton: Mary Shelley: Jonathan Swift: ; and works by Kant and by historians of science and technology. The program will include significant attention to writing and reading well. American studies, humanities, literature, philosophy, social sciences, and the sciences. Charles Pailthorp Trevor Speller Nancy Koppelman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall
Hybrid Music I

Peter Randlette

music 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This year-long sequence is intended for the student interested in exploring musical experimentation with computer applications. The course will combine specific technical information regarding hardware architecture, software and interface design, and creation of musical pieces with focus on the new options presented by this compositional environment. This is a lab course with limited (18) positions available. Please make sure you complete an application and speak with the faculty regarding your skills. Peter Randlette Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Hybrid Music II

Peter Randlette

music 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This continuing class will focus on building pieces from techniques of synthesis introduced in fall quarter, and learning new production oriented controller, processor, and production skills. Members will complete two projects which apply voices built in the lab with composites from acoustic lines and realtime analog manipulation.  New techniques will include use of the Kat percussion controller, voice editing, sample editing applications, and signal processing editing. Members will attend the weekly lecture/lab/demo, maintain journals, use a minimum of two weekly independent studio times and present work to the group for critique. Peter Randlette Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Hybrid Music III

Peter Randlette

music 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This continuing course will focus on building projects in the studio and continuing to learn advanced digital production techniques. Members will develop pieces based on design problems using combinations of computer-based and analog resources covered in prior quarters. New material will include acoustic/synthesic integration, mastering techniques using Waves plugins and multiband compression, object-oriented voice construction and advanced production methods. Students will complete two projects, one incorporating live elements, attend weekly seminar/lecture/critique sessions, use weekly studio times and maintain production journals. Peter Randlette Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
I Want to Be a Producer

John Robbins

  Course SR - GRSenior - Graduate 4 04 Evening SuSummer An outdoor music festival? An art exhibition? A grand opening or a CD release party? Successful event production requires strategic planning, organization and project management skills. Come plan your own event and learn the theories of arts management, leadership, organizational structure, and fiscal management. Basic principles of fundraising, grant writing, contract management and presenting will be covered as well as the many public policies involved in conducting public events. John Robbins Tue Thu Summer
Imperialism

Zahid Shariff, Savvina Chowdhury and Jon Davies

cultural studies economics education gender and women's studies literature political science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter By the time the First World War broke out in 1914, the vast majority of the societies of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas had been radically transformed through their encounters with the imperial powers of modern Europe. Colonial rule imposed through military conquests, political subjugation and the exploitation of human and natural resources was facilitated by religious, scientific, as well as cultural discursive practices that legitimized colonialist aspirations. How did the experiences of colonization affect colonized societies? What effects did colonialism have on the colonizers themselves? What lasting effects of imperial subjugation continue to impact relations between the former colonial powers and postcolonial states in the 21st century? This two quarter program explores these kinds of issues from the perspective of the peoples of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas as a way to understand the complexities of the world in which we live. We are interested in unpacking the discursive practices of both the colonial past and the neo-colonial present. Through our study of history, literature and political economy, we will examine the ways in which European ideologies, traditions, and scientific knowledge were used to legitimize the formation of empire in the past and continue to re-inscribe asymmetrical relations of power today under the guise of modernity, progress and global economic development. The program will explore the forms of resistance that arose in the historical colonial contexts, as well as those that mark the postcolonial experience as nations continue to contest manifestations of imperial power today. Frequently, the lenses of orientalism, modernity, and capitalism will guide our study of these encounters as we also consider prospects of meaningful decolonization. education, history, international relations and organizations, law, literature, non-profit organizations, political economy, politics, and postcolonial studies. Zahid Shariff Savvina Chowdhury Jon Davies Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Implementing the International Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples cancelled

Alan Parker and John Gates

  Course JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend SuSummer The United Nations General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in September 2007. At that time, 144 member nations of the UN voted for adopting the Declaration and 4 nations voted against it while 11 abstained. The 4 voting against the Declaration included the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. Australia changed to a "yes vote" in 2008 while the other three countries waited until 2010 to amend their votes. The last to announce that they had changed their vote was the United States when President Obama made an announcement to the assembled US Tribal Leaders in Washington DC on December 16, 2010.  We will examine the history of International Law pertaining to the rights of Indigenous Peoples as documented in Professor James Anaya's 2004 edition of "Indigenous Peoples in International Law. We will then consider the views of Indigenous Activists and experts who recently collaborated on the text, "Making the Declaration Work" published in 2010. Finally, we will examine current efforts to address questions regarding implementation of the UN Declaration through the advocacy work of the National Congress of American Indians and other Indigenous national organizations. Steps leading to implementation could include changes to the "plenary power" doctrine and clarifying the authority of tribal courts. Alan Parker John Gates Fri Sat Sun Summer
Improvisational Acting cancelled

Paul Wickline

communications theater 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer Students will learn the history, evolution, and craft of improvisational acting to foster team building, develop spontaneity, sharpen concentration, increase listening skills, solve problems, recognize and develop basic elements of storytelling, and stretch creative imagination. The focus is on taking risks and exploring moment to moment, allowing the student to overcome inhibitions in a supportive, creatively-stimulating environment that emphasizes process rather than performance. education, acting, directing, dance, performance Paul Wickline Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
In The City

Stephanie Kozick

architecture community studies cultural studies field studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring - Richard Sennett This is a field-based program designed for students who have completed previous academic work in urban studies or social science, and who are prepared to spend a number of weeks living in one of the world’s cities. Possible urban study topics are numerous and include: transportation, housing, art venues, urban community organizations, environmental concerns, architectural styles, historical studies, city schools, city writing, or music or arts projects. Students design a formal field study plan that details: site, specific urban research topic of their interest, field study questions, research methods and modes of documentation. The first two weeks of the quarter will focus on the preparation of the field study document along with book seminars on (de Botton 2002) and (Rick Steves, 2009).  Students are responsible for all travel, accommodation and other expenses associated with their urban field study.  Budgets must be calculated according to destination. Students will keep a field journal during the six weeks of field study that documents research activities and responds to their readings. Weekly, program e-mail communiques are required.  Students are required to be on campus during week nine to prepare for a formal program presentation of their fieldwork to be presented during week ten. Program Itinerary: First two weeks on campus (March 28-April 7) Six-week field study period (April 7-May 23) Last two weeks on campus (May 23-June 3) Evaluation week is June 6-10. social studies, urban planning, urban studies and city arts. Stephanie Kozick Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
In Times of Crisis: History and Film

Mark Harrison and Thomas Rainey

history media arts 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening WWinter Historical films exert a powerful influence on the way we visualize the past.  To determine how feature and documentary films contribute to the discourse of history, we will read relevant historical texts and screen and critically analyze several films for their aesthetic characteristics and historical authenticity.  Our study will focus on the two major crises in American history—the Civil War and its Aftermath, and the Great Depression.  While these crises provoked severe hardship and lasting consequences for American society, they also have inspired a high level of creativity in American filmmakers.  Examples range from films dealing with important historic figures (Col. Robert Shaw in ) to events (the California migration in ) to a wide range of genres (the screwball comedy, for example, flowered during the Great Depression when the new censorship code in 1934 necessitated sex comedies without sex!). We will also explore the impact of diverse topics on historical representation—such as genre, screenwriting and filmmaking techniques, Hollywood codes of representation, and the business of film production.  Students will need access to a comprehensive source for DVD rentals (such as Netflix) for out-of-class screening. Mark Harrison Thomas Rainey Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Individual Study: Book Arts, Letterpress, Graphic Design

Steven Hendricks

visual arts 

  Contract ONLY Only 8 08 Day SSpring Steven is available to support a limited number of intermediate to advanced students interested in studying and developing projects in these areas: book arts, letterpress printing, and graphic design.  Some previous experience or relevant foundation for the proposed work is expected (e.g. printmaking, photoshop, creative writing, fiber arts, etc.). Senior thesis work welcome.Use the online proposal process to make contact.  Steven Hendricks Spring
Individual Study: East-West Psychology

Ryo Imamura

cultural studies philosophy psychology religious studies study abroad 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Individual Study: East-West Psychology offers opportunities for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death & dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. counseling, cultural studies, peace studies, psychology, social work, religious studies, and human services. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Environmental Studies, Sustainability and Justice, Geography

Ted Whitesell

community studies environmental studies field studies geography sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn on how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combination of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure.  Students interested in a self-directed project, research, or internship related to environmental studies, geography, sustainability and justice, community studies, and activism are invited to present a proposal to Ted Whitsell. environmental studies, sustainability and justice, and geography. Ted Whitesell Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Individual Study: Environmental Studies, Sustainability and Justice, Geography

Ted Whitesell

community studies environmental studies field studies geography sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn on how to manage a personal project, to focus on unique combination of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure.  Students interested in a self-directed project, research, or internship related to environmental studies, geography, sustainability and justice, community studies, and activism are invited to present a proposal to Ted Whitsell. environmental studies, sustainability and justice, and geography. Ted Whitesell Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Individual Study: Fiber Arts, Non-Western Art History, Native American Art, Creative Writing

Gail Tremblay

Native American studies art history cultural studies visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring In the fields listed, Gail Tremblay offers opportunities for intermediate and advanced students to create their own course of study, creative practice and research, including internships, community service and study abroad options. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must describe the work to be completed in an Individual Learning or Internship Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students wishing to do work that has 1) skills that the student wishes to learn, 2) a question to be answered, 3) a connection with others who have mastered a particular skill or asked a similar or related question, and 4) an outcome that matters. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. the arts, art history, literature and creative writing, especially poetry, and the humanities. Gail Tremblay Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Fiber Arts, Non-Western Art History, Native American Art, Creative Writing cancelled

Gail Tremblay

Native American studies art history cultural studies visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall In the fields listed, Gail Tremblay offers opportunities for intermediate and advanced students to create their own course of study, creative practice and research, including internships, community service and study abroad options. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must describe the work to be completed in an Individual Learning or Internship Contract. The faculty sponsor will support students wishing to do work that has 1) skills that the student wishes to learn, 2) a question to be answered, 3) a connection with others who have mastered a particular skill or asked a similar or related question, and 4) an outcome that matters. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. the arts, art history, literature and creative writing, especially poetry, and the humanities. Gail Tremblay Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Individual Study: History, European Cultural Studies

Stacey Davis

cultural studies history 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Students can complete individual study contracts in history, especially European, North African and/or American history; European cultural or art historical studies; gender studies as long as there is some historical component to the work; or issues in politics, society, religion, culture and/or immigration in contemporary Europe. History contracts can include work in historiography (theories of history) and historical methodology.  Senior thesis work welcome. history and cultural studies. Stacey Davis Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Humanities and Social Science

Bill Arney

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring All students, including first-year students and transfers, are welcome to make a proposal to Bill Arney. Individual Study offers opportunities for students to pursue their own courses of study and research through individual learning contracts or internships. Freshmen to seniors ready to do good work may apply. Bill Arney sponsors individual learning contracts in the humanities and social sciences. the humanities and social sciences. Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Imperialism, Political Science, Third World, Foreign Policy

Zahid Shariff

cultural studies international studies political science 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Students are expected to work closely with faculty to first, plan precisely what the learning contract expects to achieve, and second, determine how it will be accomplished. The first will become part of the written learning contract. The second will be an agreement concerning how often the student and faculty will meet or exchange messages that review the progress being made and make specific suggestions that might help meet the needs of each student. Individual study yields the most fruitful results when the objectives as well as the ways to achieve them are clear. Zahid Shariff will sponsor contract on topics in political science, including topics such as politics, Third World issues, imperialism, ideologies and development. government, imperialism, non-governmental organizations, politics, Third World issues,  ideologies and development. Zahid Shariff Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Interdisciplinary Projects, Arts, Consciousness Studies and Humanities

Ariel Goldberger

aesthetics anthropology architecture art history classics communications community studies consciousness studies cultural studies field studies gender and women's studies geography international studies language studies leadership studies literature music outdoor leadership and education philosophy psychology queer studies religious studies sociology somatic studies theater visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unqiue combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the humanities, or projects that include arts, travel, or interdisciplinary pursuits are invited to present a proposal to Ariel Goldberger. Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Ariel Goldberger supports interdisciplinary studies and projects in the Arts, Humanities, Consciousness Studies, and travel. humanities, arts, social sciences, and consciousness studies. Ariel Goldberger Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Individual Study: Interdisciplinary Projects, Arts, Consciousness Studies and Humanities

Ariel Goldberger

aesthetics anthropology architecture art history classics communications community studies consciousness studies cultural studies field studies gender and women's studies geography international studies language studies leadership studies literature music outdoor leadership and education philosophy psychology queer studies religious studies sociology somatic studies theater visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unqiue combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the humanities, or projects that include arts, travel, or interdisciplinary pursuits are invited to present a proposal to Ariel Goldberger. Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. Ariel Goldberger supports interdisciplinary studies and projects in the arts, humanities, consciousness studies, and travel. humanities, arts, social sciences, and consciousness studies. Ariel Goldberger Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Interdisciplinary Projects, Arts, Consciousness Studies and Humanities

Ariel Goldberger

aesthetics anthropology architecture art history classics communications community studies consciousness studies cultural studies field studies gender and women's studies geography international studies language studies leadership studies literature music outdoor leadership and education philosophy psychology queer studies religious studies sociology somatic studies theater visual arts writing 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, to focus on unqiue combinations of subjects, and to pursue original interdisciplinary projects without the constraints of an external structure. Students interested in a self-directed project, research or internship in the humanities, or projects that include arts, travel, or interdisciplinary pursuits are invited to present a proposal to Ariel Goldberger.Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply.Ariel Goldberger supports projects in the Arts, Humanities, Consciousness Studies, Arts, and interdisciplinary studies. humanities, arts, social sciences, and consciousness studies. Ariel Goldberger Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Individual Study: Legislative Internship

Lin Nelson

community studies environmental studies government law and public policy political science sociology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring This program will explore the broad conditions that shape legislation. We will examine models, evidence and debates about the sources, causal connections and impacts of evolving systems of law, regulation, governance and a broad array of community response. Each student will be learning through work as an intern with a legislator and her or his staff. This will involve intensive staff-apprenticeship activities, especially legislative research and draft development, bill-tracking and constituent correspondence.Students apply to become interns for the 2011 Washington State Legislative session in the fall of 2010. Information sessions on the Internship Program will be held spring quarter and in early October. The Academic Advising Office will inform students about the process, with applications due mid-to-late October. Applications are available online through www.leg.wa.gov/internships. Students who submit a complete application will be interviewed and informed of acceptance by late November. Each student accepted into the Internship Program will develop an internship learning contract, profiling legislative responsibilities and linkages to academic development.Each student intern will translate her or his activities in the Legislature into analytic and reflective writing about the challenges, learning and implications of the work; students will be making presentations about their learning and participate in various workshops. Each intern will keep a journal, submitted to the faculty sponsor on a regular basis, and a portfolio of all materials related to the legislative work.Students will learn through a range of approaches - internship responsibilities in a regular work-week, guest presentations, seminars, visits and collaborations with regional officials and activists. Drawing broadly from the social sciences, we will discuss relevant concepts and issues. We will explore relationships between elected officials, legislative staff, registered lobbyists, non-governmental organizations, citizen activists and district constituents. Interns will participate in mock hearings, a floor debate on current legislative issues and a session on budget development.The 2010-11 session will involve student-interns for both winter and spring quarters. Each quarter will comprise a different 16-credit contract. In the spring quarter, students can develop an 8-credit Legislative Internship Contract, augmented by another 8-credit project or program. Or, they may sustain a full 16-credit internship for spring quarter, involving specific post-session research and writing. Student performance for the two-quarter internship is evaluated by the faculty sponsor, field supervisors and legislative office staff. Student participation involves discussion in workshops, public speaking, analysis and writing, and the array of legislative responsibilities. community studies, government, law, political science,  public interest advocacy, public policy, social issues, and sociology. Lin Nelson Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Individual Study: Legislative Processes, Regulatory Agencies and Environment

Cheri Lucas-Jennings

American studies communications community studies computer science cultural studies economics environmental studies gender and women's studies government health law and government policy law and public policy leadership studies media studies political science sustainability studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend SSpring Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract. This faculty wecomes internships and contracts in the areas of environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations. This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community (as a result of work begun in fall 2010 and winter 2011 "Problems to Issues to Policies;" to those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  American studies, art, communications, community studies, cultural studies, environmental field studies, gender and women's health, history, law and government and public policy leadership Cheri Lucas-Jennings Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Mathematics, Computer Science

Brian Walter

computer science mathematics 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Day SSpring Individual study offers students the opportunity to develop self-direction, to learn how to manage a personal project, and/or to learn how to learn technical material outside of the classroom.  Students interested in a self-directed project, research, or course of study in Mathematics or Computer Science are invited to present a proposal to Brian Walter for Spring Quarter 2011. Students with a lively sense of self-direction, discipline, and intellectual curiosity are strongly encouraged to apply. mathematics and computer science. Brian Walter Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Media Arts, Visual Anthropology, Communications

Sally Cloninger

communications cultural studies media studies moving image visual arts 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Sally Cloninger offers opportunities for intermediate and advanced students to create their own course of study, creative practice and research, including internships, community service and study abroad options. Prior to the beginning of fall quarter, interested individual students or small groups of students must describe the work to be completed in an Individual Learning or Internship Contract. Sally is particularly interested in sponsoring individual contracts or internships in media arts, media studies, media production, visual anthropology, cultural studies, photography, performance studies, screenwriting and communications but will also consider other disciplines on a case-by-case basis. Where applicable, students will meet in small groups with faculty for critique and discussion as part of their contract. communications, humanities, media arts, performance studies, visual anthropology, and visual arts. Sally Cloninger Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Individual Study: Political Economy, Globalization, Contemporary India

Jeanne Hahn

geography government history international studies law and government policy political science study abroad 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Individual Studies offers opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of spring quarter, interested individual students must consult with Jeanne about their proposed projects. The project is then described in an Independent Learning Contract. She will sponsor student research and reading in political economy, U.S. history (especially the "Founding Period"), various topics in globalization, historical capitalism and contemporary India. political economy, U.S. history (esp. the "Founding Period"), topics on globalization, historical capitalism and contemporary India. Jeanne Hahn Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study: Psychology

Mukti Khanna

community studies cultural studies health psychology 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring This opportunities allows students to create their own course of study in the form of an Individual Learning Contract or Internship. Working with the faculty sponsor, individual students or small groups of students design projects or internships and meet regularly with faculty to reflect on their work. Students pursuing individual study or internships in psychology, counseling and health are invited to join this program. Mukti Khanna will sponsor contracts and internships in psychology, counseling, service-learning, expressive arts therapy, cultural studies, ecopsychology and health. While this opportunity is oriented towards sophomores through seniors, freshmen may be admitted if they are applying for an internship or are part of a group project. counseling, education, the health professions, human services, and psychology. Mukti Khanna Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study/Internships: Business, Management, Non-Profits, Seaport & Maritime Studies, International Trade

John Filmer

business and management economics maritime studies 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring Individual Learning Contracts require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor.  Individual Learning Contracts traditionally offer students an opportunity to do advanced study in areas that are not usually possible through regular programs or courses at Evergreen and in which they already have established skills and/or background. Internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applicational skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research. John welcomes the opportunity to work with students interested in maritime studies including history, geography, sociology, literature and navigation and the technology of sailing vessels. He also can prove of great value to students interested in business and non-profit development, organizational management, project management, international business, financial analysis, international trade, maritime commerce, economics, intermodal transportation and seaport management. John also sponsors business and non-profit internships, legislative internships and internships with state and federal government agencies, port authorities, maritime and merchant marine firms, freight forwarders and other private sector organizations, including banks and financial houses. agency administration, business, economics, leadership,  management, maritime and seaport studies, and U.S. history. John Filmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Individual Study/Internships: Business, Management, Non-Profits, Seaport & Maritime Studies, International Trade

John Filmer

business and management economics maritime studies 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Contract SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Individual Learning Contracts require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor.Individual Learning Contracts traditionally offer students an opportunity to do advanced study in areas that are not usually possible through regular programs or courses at Evergreen and in which they already have established skills and/or background. Internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applicational skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research. John welcomes the opportunity to work with students interested in maritime studies including history, geography, sociology, literature and navigation and the technology of sailing vessels. He also can prove of great value to students interested in business and non-profit development, organizational management, project management, international business, financial analysis, international trade, maritime commerce, economics, intermodal transportation and seaport management. John also sponsors business and non-profit internships, legislative internships and internships with state and federal government agencies, port authorities, maritime and merchant marine firms, freight forwarders and other private sector organizations, including banks and financial houses. agency administration, business, economics, leadership,  management, maritime and seaport studies, and U.S. history. John Filmer Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Integrated East-West Psychology

Jamyang Tsultrim

psychology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Weekend SuSummer This class explores similarities and differences between Eastern and Western psychology and examines possibilities for creating an integrated approach to help to alleviate the psychological suffering of others while maintaining emotional balance and professional ethics. Through the integrated practice of clinical East-West counseling skills such as intentional listening/reflection, personal practice/role-play, and cultivation of insight and positive emotions, students will develop knowledge and aptitude to differentiate and apply effective counseling methods in the helping professions. counseling psychology, East-West psychology Jamyang Tsultrim Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Interactive Sound and Video

Ben Kamen

media arts music visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer In this course, students will learn to use the Max/MSP/Jitter visual programming environment to examine video and sound as expressed through numbers, simple mathematics, and logic. Students will learn to operate audio and video recording equipment and develop techniques for playing back and modifying materials through algorithmic processes. Students will develop strategies for interacting with their materials in real time using MIDI controllers and other input devices.  Students will create original works of sound and video art exploring the manipulation of time and form.    Ben Kamen Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Interdisciplinary Psychology: From Science to Society

Mark Hurst

psychology 

Signature Required: Fall Winter Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend FFall WWinter SSpring Psychological science is in greater demand by many disciplines as the world becomes more complex. In this year-long program, students will explore the difference between the science and pseudoscience of human behavior and mental processes, as they: 1) examine the fundamental research behind individual, social and cultural human experience; 2) learn how this material is applied in public and private settings; and 3) develop personal strategies for application of this material across life domains (love, work, parenting, leisure, etc.), and in diverse disciplines (education, social services, business, government, criminal justice, medicine, etc.). This program is designed to foster comprehension of the material, enhance critical thinking, and build a skill base that can be applied in any setting. Each quarter builds on previous material, so the intention is for students to continue through the year. During fall quarter, students will focus on the essential processes of the individual (i.e., neuropsychology, motivation, cognition, emotion and behavior), as well as the concepts and theories that underlie social functioning (social identity, social cognition and influence, and interpersonal relations). During winter quarter, students will explore the call for evidence-based practices in psychology as well as other disciplines and develop a knowledge and skill base in valid and reliable assessment, counseling theory, and consultation. During spring quarter, students will invest in an experiential examination of what is right about the human experience. Much of the history of psychology has largely focused on "psychopathology" and all of its manifestations. However, over the last 12 years a movement has flourished within psychology to investigate the social science of life satisfaction (positive experience, positive character, and positive institutions and communities). While this was often relegated to the edges of the field, it appears to be in greater demand as people are striving to achieve pleasure, gratification and meaning from their lives. We will use a variety of instructional strategies such as small and large group seminars, lectures, workshops, films, role-playing, field trips, guest lectures and videoconferences with prominent contemporary psychologists. The material covered in this program is relevant to daily living, as well as preparatory for careers and future studies across all disciplines. psychology, education, human services, and management. Mark Hurst Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
International Administration

Laurance Geri

  Course JR - GRJunior - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend SuSummer This course will explore the theory and reality of international organizations.  Problems such as climate change and unequal development require global solutions.  Yet institutions such as the United Nations designed to confront them are weak and widely distrusted.  The course will explore this dilemma, the challenge of sustainable development, the role of social movements in guiding global change, and the intercultural skills needed to work effectively at the global level. Laurance Geri Fri Sat Sun Summer
Internet: Knowledge and Community

Stephen Beck and Douglas Schuler

communications community studies philosophy 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend FFall WWinter The Internet as we know it didn't exist ten years ago, and it's a fair guess that in another ten years it will be radically transformed yet again. How is it changing the ways people see their world and interact with each other — and how does it merely reflect how people have interacted before it existed? In this two-quarter program, we will study the origin and the structure of the Internet, its relation to other technologies, the roles that it plays in our lives, and both the opportunities and the dangers that it opens for us. In fall quarter, we will focus on the way that we construct knowledge and how the Internet affects this. In winter quarter, we will consider the nature of community including the ways that people can build communities through the Internet, and the ways that communities can make use of the Internet for their own goals. computer science, media, teaching, and public policy. Stephen Beck Douglas Schuler Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Introduction to Electronic Music I

Ben Kamen

music 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This is the first course in a year-long sequence that introduces students to the operation and creative use of the music technology labs. Students will learn how to effectively operate analog electronic music equipment including mixers, reel to reel tape machines and analog synthesizers. Reading and listening assignments will provide a historical and theoretical context for the hands-on work. Original music compositions will be the primary goal of the course work. Ben Kamen Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Introduction to Electronic Music II

Ben Kamen

music 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This is the second course in a year-long sequence that introduces students to the operation and creative use of the music technology labs. During this quarter students will be introduced to digital tools for the creation of electronic music. Topics include digital audio, MIDI controllers, synthesizers and sound collage. Reading materials will provide an historical and technical background to the studio work. Ben Kamen Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Introduction to Electronic Music III

Ben Kamen

music 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This course is a continuation of Introduction to Electronic Music I and II. No new students will be enrolled for spring quarter. Students will continue exploration of the electronic music labs. Topics covered will include software sampling, synthesis, effects processors and MIDI sequencing. Students will complete two composition assignments that explore creative uses of specific tools and draw on techniques from previous quarters. Ben Kamen Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Introduction to Natural History

John Longino and David McAvity

biology botany ecology environmental studies field studies mathematics natural history zoology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall The scientific study of nature is carried out with a combination of descriptive natural history and quantitative analysis. We will develop skills in both areas by exploring the major terrestrial habitats of western Washington and carrying out short field problems that introduce statistical approaches to natural history description. Readings and lectures will cover introductory concepts in biodiversity studies, ecology, and evolutionary biology. Workshops will emphasize the scientific process, statistical methods and probability models as they apply to natural history. We will take one-day field trips to visit shrub steppe, alpine and coastal forest habitats. Evaluation will be based on exams, written assignments and a field journal. biology, environmental science, mathematics, and natural history. John Longino David McAvity Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Introduction to Natural Science: Life on Earth

Dharshi Bopegedera, Clarissa Dirks and Christopher Coughenour

biology chemistry geology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring The origin and evolution of life on Earth, along with changes in Earth itself, have been sources of fascination and controversy. This yearlong interdisciplinary program will examine significant events in the history of life, and the large-scale geologic changes that have occurred in Earth's history, to provide a conceptual and experimental introduction to natural science. This approach will include the cycles and transformations of matter and energy in living and nonliving systems, affording an opportunity to gain an understanding of biological and physical Earth processes on a variety of scales. Students will engage these themes using an experimental approach to develop critical and quantitative reasoning skills. Fall quarter will introduce students to fundamental principles in geology, chemistry and biology by studying early Earth history. In winter quarter, we will continue to move forward in geologic time, providing students an opportunity to apply their knowledge while adding layers of complexity to their investigations. In spring quarter, students will use this background to engage in projects. Field trips will provide opportunities for students to experience the natural world using skills they learned in the program. Each quarter, program activities will include: lectures, small group problem-solving workshops, laboratories, field trips and seminars. Seminar readings and discussions will be spread across the history, philosophy and contemporary applications of science. During spring quarter there will be an opportunity for small groups of students to conduct scientific investigations. Students will learn to describe their work through report writing and public presentations. This program is designed for students who want to take their first year of college science using an interdisciplinary framework. It will be a rigorous program, requiring a serious commitment of time and effort. Overall, we expect students to end the program in the spring with a solid working knowledge of scientific and mathematical concepts, and with the ability to reason critically and solve problems. Students will also gain a strong appreciation of the interconnectedness of biological and physical systems, and an ability to apply this knowledge to complex problems. biology, chemistry, environmental studies, geology, and health professions. Dharshi Bopegedera Clarissa Dirks Christopher Coughenour Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Introduction to Public Health

Nancy Anderson

health sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend SuSummer The program will provide an introduction to the scope and tools of public health.  Students will work individually and in groups to understand milestones in the history of public health, the basic tools of public health research, and the challenges to successful health promotion projects. The learning community will work in small groups to identify a significant public health problem, develop a health promotion/ intervention, and consider methodology for evaluation of impact.  The program will focus on public health issues in the United States but will also draw on international examples of successful interventions. health professions including public health, social services, and education. Nancy Anderson Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Introduction to Statistics and Research Design

Ralph Murphy

environmental studies mathematics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer This class introduces students to key elements of research design and basic statistical analysis.  The course emphasizes the importance of developing clear research questions and the selection of statistical methods to evaluate data collected.  Descriptive and inferential statistical tests, such as sampling, normal distributions, probability, chi square, correlation and regression, and tests of hypothesis are covered.  Students will develop a clear conceptual understanding of quantitative reasoning and the ability to correctly interpret findings. Meets statistics prerequisite for MES and MPA programs at Evergreen. Ralph Murphy Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Invasive Species: Plants and Patterns

Lalita Calabria and Peter Impara

botany ecology field studies geography natural history 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Invasive species are a critical threat to biodiversity and ecosystems and are one of the greatest challenges in restoration projects. Throughout this one-quarter program, we will explore major ecological concepts within the framework of the threats invasive species pose to restoration and conservation efforts. We will survey some of the leading theories and approaches regarding invasive plants, including their effects on ecosystems, plant community interactions, the ecophysiology of individual species, and how invasive plants become successful invaders at the patch and landscape scale. What are the characteristics of invasives species that allow them to quickly outcompete native plants, alter habitat of native species and often reduce the habitat and food availability for wildlife? At the molecular to organism scale, we will investigate the genetic and biochemical signatures of invasive plants to assist our understanding of their competitive advantages as well as their evolutionary history. At the ecosystem to landscape scales we will study meta-population and island biogeography theories in relation to restoration and conservation efforts and planning, and in the analyses of patterns of invasive plants. Students will learn the taxonomy, ecology and biology of invasive plants through lectures, plant collecting, workshops, labs, fieldwork, seminars, small group projects, becoming proficient in ecological tools such as GIS, field sampling, journaling and herbaria. To deepen their understanding of the impacts of invasive species on native plant communities of these ecosystems, students will conduct restoration ecology research focusing mainly on the Puget Lowland prairies. Lab activities will involve identifying collected plant specimens, preparing herbarium specimens and phytochemical analysis. We will take a 5-day field trip to Dry Falls to learn about sagebrush steppe habitat restoration. Seminar will focus on the current scientific literature regarding the restoration ecology, conservation and invasive plants. Upper division science credits will be awarded for upper division work. ecology, botany, geography, restoration, and conservation. Lalita Calabria Peter Impara Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Irish Language and Song

Sean Williams

language studies music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This course is an introduction to Irish-Gaelic through conversation, poetry, and songs (using the natural singing voice). At the end of the class, students will be able to engage in culturally appropriate small talk and sing about a dozen songs in Irish. We will spend the first half of each meeting working on conversation and grammar and the second half learning traditional songs in Irish that reflect aspects of what we have just learned. No previous language or singing skills necessary! Each class will include a break for tea, treats, and a chance to practice what you have learned. cultural studies, anthropology, folklore, ethnomusicology Sean Williams Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Issues in Clinical and Counseling Psychology

George Freeman

psychology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer The cornerstone of modern counseling and clinical psychology lies in our understanding of human behavior through personality theory and psychopathology. This program explores the central personality theories from traditional and non-traditional perspectives. We will examine the relationship of personality theories to abnormal behavior, develop an understanding of the DSM IV classification system and other diagnostic methods, and use films to explore the diversity of human behavior. We will use on-line Moodle instruction for discussions. There is support and desire to achieve students' personal goals. George Freeman Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Japanese, Advanced Beginning I

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This is the first quarter of a yearlong course designed for students who have taken college-level Japanese before. Students must be familiar with basic verb forms and elementary kanji letters. Students will build on previous skills and learn new grammar and vocabulary so they can function in a variety of situations. Classroom activities include presentations, learning kanji and small group conversation. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Japanese, Advanced Beginning II

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This is a continuing course from fall quarter. Students will build on their skills and learn new sentence structures as well as vocabulary so they can function in Japanese in a variety of situations. Classroom activities include presentations, watching film and TV clips, and discussion. Students will continue their kanji studies at their own levels in small groups. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Japanese, Advanced Beginning III

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This is a continuing course from winter quarter. Students will build on their skills and learn new sentence structures as well as vocabulary so they can function in Japanese in a variety of situations. Classroom activities include presentations, watching film and TV clips, and discussion. Student will spend part of their class time in small groups to study according to their needs and levels. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. The class is conducted primarily in Japanese. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Japanese, Beginning I (A)

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This is the first quarter of a yearlong course designed for students who have never studied Japanese before. Students will learn how to function in Japanese in everyday situations by learning useful expressions and basic sentence structures. They will also learn hiragana letters. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Japanese, Beginning I (B)

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening FFall This is the first quarter of a yearlong course designed for students who have never studied Japanese before. Students will learn how to function in Japanese in everyday situations by learning useful expressions and basic sentence structures. They will also learn hiragana letters. Japanese culture and life will be discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Japanese, Beginning II

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This is a continuing course from fall quarter. Students will learn how to function in Japanese in everyday situations as they build on their skills and improve their communicative skills. Students will start elementary kanji studies. Japanese culture and life are discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Japanese, Beginning III

Tomoko Hirai Ulmer

language studies 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This is a continuing course from fall and winter quarters. Students will learn how to function in Japanese in everyday situations as they build on their skills and improve their communicative skills. Students will continue learning elementary kanji letters. Japanese culture and life are discussed throughout the course. Tomoko Hirai Ulmer Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Knowing Place: Living in the Flux and Flow of Our Surroundings

Kathy Kelly

communications environmental studies sustainability studies 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend SuSummer This program is designed for students in Evergreen's program at Grays Harbor College as a continuation of the year of study in the program "Leading in Turbulent Times."  The summer program is open to any student interested in studying the locale or practicing the learning strategies the class will use. The purpose of this program is to expand and deepen students' understanding of systems, especially living systems. Students will use critical and technical skills, research and field experience, and reflective practices to understand, integrate, and interpret their environment. Following a brief (re-)introduction to systems theory, we will examine the dynamics of the Chehalis River watershed that includes Grays Harbor. We will use an framework that identifies nature's services and places an economic value on those services, useful for conservation and development planning. Students will become familiar with measures proposed by various stakeholders for flood control management of the watershed, and consider the implications of greater systems thinking in the current policy debate. The program engages experiential as well as cognitive learning as students participate in exercises to raise awareness of ways of being present in and perceiving the place we live.  Students will develop map reading skills and practice journaling in both narrative and field journal styles as a means of recording, reflecting upon, integrating, and presenting knowledge.  Readings, coupled with these exercises, will fuel discoveries about how our surroundings shape our thoughts, emotions, and actions. Field trips include a series of visits to sites within the watershed, along with visits to a local salmon hatchery and a sensitive natural area whose conservation is being advocated by local residents. Guest speakers will engage students in field activities. ecology, economics, public policy making, social change work Kathy Kelly Fri Sat Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Labor Economics

Tomas Mosquera

economics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter This introductory course in economics will apply basic economic concepts to the understanding of how labor markets work.  By the end of the quarter, students should have gained a basic understanding of economic concepts and their relevance in answering such questions as why some people choose to work while others withdraw from the market, why some firms expand their employment at the same time that other firms are laying off workers, or why earnings are distributed unequally in most societies.  The main philosophy behind this course is to put in plain words the story of the way labor markets work so that students will be much better prepared to form opinions about proposed policies and their impact on labor market opportunities.  This program is designed to prepare students for career paths in economics, labor economics, business, and managerial economics. Tomas Mosquera Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Landscape Ecology and Ecosystem Management

Peter Impara

ecology environmental studies field studies geography law and public policy 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring At what scale should we manage or study an ecosystem or landscape? What is a natural landscape, and how do (or can) we manage for it? Geographers and ecologists have pondered the question of scale in ecosystems, and how to apply scale issues to conservation and research. Many ecosystem and related studies have been conducted at fine spatial scales, yet many of the problems and issues of resource management and conservation are best approached at broader, landscape-level spatial scales.  This program will investigate broader scale approaches to on-going conservation and management activities in important ecosystems and how scientists address the issues of scale and the ecological patterns and processes used to define "natural systems." Scale, landscape analysis and pattern-process interactions will be addressed using computer labs in GIS and spatial analysis. Students will learn about landscape ecology concepts through lectures, field trips to nearby natural areas to observe pattern-process interactions, and through the design and implementation of a landscape ecology research project. Through class and field work students will learn about important ecological principles such as disturbance regimes, biotic diversity and species flow, nutrient and energy flows, and landscape change over time. Seminar readings will tie landscape ecology principles to on-going ecosystem management activities. Students will develop skills in ecological pattern and spatial analysis, natural history and field interpretation, and in the generation of multiple research hypotheses and methods to address those hypotheses. resource management and conservation; environmental and ecological research; and landscape ecology and analysis. Peter Impara Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Language and Power

Susan Fiksdal

education gender and women's studies international studies language studies law and public policy linguistics writing 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day FFall WWinter What are the connections between language and power?  To what extent does language have the power to shape the way we think?  How do our attitudes about language affect us and those around us? Should the US have a national law declaring English an official language?  Does it matter if languages die? This program will explore these questions and others from the perspective of sociolinguistics.  Fall quarter we will focus on major concepts in sociolinguistics and the structure of language to provide context for a study of creoles, gender, dialects, and disappearing languages.  Winter quarter we will continue our study of sociolinguistic principles, focusing on metaphor and language choice in the courts and in the classroom and the question of bilingualism in both institutional contexts.  You can expect to learn sociolinguistic principles through texts, workshops, and seminars, and you will learn qualitative research approaches of discourse analysis and ethnography. There will be weekly writing as well as short research projects and an exam each quarter.  This program is designed primarily for students taking a language in addition to the program, and it is excellent preparation for Language Matters, a spring quarter program. communications, education, gender studies, law, and linguistics. Susan Fiksdal Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Language and Species

Richard McKinnon

linguistics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter Humans often claim distinction as unique among the animals of the world. This course examines this hypothesis from the perspective of communication. What are the parameters that describe communication systems of all species? What does it mean when bees dance, frogs croak, and humans speak? What kinds of messages do members of various species communicate to each other? Is human language qualitatively different from other forms of animal communication? If so, how did it evolve to be so different and what does that mean about humans as a species? Is the function of human language to communicate information, or are there perhaps other functions? We will employ the tools of linguistics, psychology, ethology and anthropology to find answers to these questions. Richard McKinnon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Language Lifecycle: Genesis, Expansion, and Loss

Richard McKinnon

linguistics 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring Languages are not static systems, but exhibit a lifecycle just as living organisms do. They are brought into being through pidginization and creolization, grow and change as their function changes and they attain status, and they disappear (presently at an alarming rate). In this course, we'll examine these stages in some detail, acquiring a toolset along the way that will allow participants to understand the linguistic factors involved, and to appreciate the policy issues in play. Richard McKinnon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Language, Literature, and the Schools

Lester Krupp

education literature writing 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend WWinter SSpring As external pressures on schools increase—through such forces as standardized testing and public accountability—many people concerned about education would argue that we have lost sight both of the active learning of the individual student and of the social conditions in which our school systems exist. This program will explore the question: In what ways can an understanding of language, learning, and creativity clarify our vision of the education of children? Focusing primarily on language and the literary arts, this program will examine the psychological, social, and philosophical foundations of language development; the teaching of writing within constructivist pedagogy; literature and literary theory as they relate to all levels of elementary and secondary education; and the historical tensions between philosophy of education and educational practice in the past century. Students will also participate in weekly writing groups as one way to observe closely the interaction between language, writing, and learning. In spring quarter, we will draw together these strands in studying the current political struggles between traditional and constructivist education, with particular attention to the teaching of writing and literature in the schools and to arts education in general. In addition, students will conduct classroom observations (in elementary or secondary classrooms) and/or significant reading-research projects on topics in language, literature, the arts, and public education. The 12-credit option will enable students to meet specific requirements for Washington State teacher certification. Students may earn the additional four credits in any of the following areas: children’s literature, adolescent literature, multicultural literature, or language skills/structure. (Please note that only 2-3 choices will be available each quarter.) Students will earn these credits through participating in a weekly small-group seminar and completing significant independent work in coordination with the curriculum of the 8-credit core of the program. teaching, child development, and writing. Lester Krupp Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Language Matters: Persuasive Language in Popular Culture

Susan Fiksdal and Rachel Hastings

communications language studies linguistics media studies writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day SSpring This program will focus on the linguistic resources we all use to persuade others of a particular point of view. We will study the art of persuasion in a wide range of settings within popular culture, ranging from comedy to politics, from news journalism to blogs. Our work will engage us in several areas of linguistic theory, including discourse analysis, semantics, pragmatics, metaphor, morphology and syntax. As we develop these theoretical tools, we will concurrently be using them to analyze discourse from the media, the internet, conversations and speeches in order to uncover ways in which speakers use their linguistic knowledge to persuade. We will study how different individuals and different categories of communication vary with respect to the structure and content of their persuasive language.  For a broader view of linguistic resources, we will sometimes examine cross-linguistic variation in persuasion in languages other than English, including Quechua and French. Students will apply their understanding of concepts by writing papers using three formats—persuasive essays, short summary essays and linguistic analyses. To demonstrate their understanding of persuasion in a particular setting, they will create final oral presentations. communications, education, languages, law, linguistics, media studies, and writing. Susan Fiksdal Rachel Hastings Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Latin: An Intensive Introduction

Andrew Reece

language studies 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer This course provides an introduction to the classical Latin language, the language of the later Roman Republic and the early Roman Empire as represented by Cicero, Horace, Virgil, and Tacitus. It also prepares one to read Medieval, Renaissance, or Ecclesiastical Latin texts.  At its completion students should enjoy a solid grounding in basic vocabulary, forms, and syntax and will need little additional study before reading primary Latin works in the original. classics, law, education Andrew Reece Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Law and Literature: Equality, Citizenship and Democracy in the United States

Jose Gomez and Greg Mullins

American studies law and government policy literature 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day FFall WWinter Democracy in the United States, as a social practice and political ideal, has been a work in progress since the Revolution. Given the linguistic, religious, ethnic and regional diversity of the U.S. population, and given differential hierarchies assigned to race, gender, sexuality and social class in this country, institutions that aspire to promote democratic ideals have become sites of debate and struggle around such questions as how to define citizenship, how to define equality, how to protect minority populations against majority prejudices, and how to promote individual liberties while safeguarding the common good. In this program we will study U.S. Constitutional history and U.S. literature, from the Constitutional Convention to the Civil Rights Movement. Our studies will focus on how the law defines, and how literature represents, national belonging and exclusion. During fall quarter we will focus on the origins and framing of the Constitution, American Indian sovereignty, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. During winter quarter we will focus on women’s suffrage, school segregation and desegregation, internment of Japanese Americans, Critical Race Theory, and migrant workers’ struggle for justice. Central themes will include the political factors the Supreme Court considers in making its decisions, competition between sectors of society in wielding effective political citizenship, the gradual expansion of formal citizenship and voting rights over the course of the nation’s history, and forms of social discrimination. We will complement our analysis of Constitutional history by reading literature that represents and illuminates the struggle for equality and national belonging. American studies, education, government, law and literature. Jose Gomez Greg Mullins Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall
Law and Literature: Revolution to Reconstruction

Jose Gomez and Greg Mullins

American studies law and government policy literature 

  Program FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day SSpring Democracy in the United States, as a social practice and political ideal, has been a work in progress since the Revolution. Given the linguistic, religious, ethnic and regional diversity of the U.S. population, and given differential hierarchies assigned to race, gender, sexuality and social class in this country, institutions that aspire to promote democratic ideals have become sites of debate and struggle around such questions as how to define citizenship, how to define equality, how to protect minority populations against majority prejudices, and how to promote individual liberties while safeguarding the common good. In this program we will study U.S. Constitutional history and U.S. literature, from the Constitutional Convention to Reconstruction. Our studies will focus on how the law defines, and how literature represents, national belonging and exclusion. We will focus on the origins and framing of the Constitution, American Indian sovereignty, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Central themes will include the political factors the Supreme Court considers in making its decisions, competition between sectors of society in wielding effective political citizenship, the gradual expansion of formal citizenship and voting rights over the course of the nation’s history, and forms of social discrimination. We will complement our analysis of Constitutional history by reading literature that represents and illuminates the struggle for equality and national belonging. American studies, education, government, law, and literature. Jose Gomez Greg Mullins Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring
Leadership for the Common Good

Dariush Khaleghi and Steven Johnson

business and management 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend WWinter Today’s leadership challenges are vastly different from the past.  The most notable difference is that society seeks leaders who not only strive to meet their business obligation but also take action to benefit the society and promote the common good.  In response to such a paradigm shift, there is a need for a new generation of leaders whose personal and professional values, in addition to their compelling vision for a just and sustainable world, fuels their passion to become change agents and transformational leaders.   This course is designed for students who are interested in developing themselves as effective leaders whose mission is to serve the common good. Dariush Khaleghi Steven Johnson Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Leading in Turbulent Times

Emily Lardner and Kathy Kelly

business and management leadership studies writing 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Weekend FFall WWinter SSpring “Another world is possible”—but how? What does it take to actually make change? The purpose of this three-quarter program is to help people develop the capacities in themselves, in groups, and in organizations which lead towards healthier, more equitable, and sustainable communities. We will explore important ideas about leadership, group dynamics, change theory and systems theory, applying ideas to specific cases and building new insights together. In addition to a series of projects that help develop analytical abilities and clear communication skills, students will be creating electronic portfolios based on Evergreen’s Expectations. Fall quarter will introduce students to systems theory as they explore systems across an array of disciplines. Looking more deeply into human systems, students will focus on group dynamics, the role of group process, and the nature of leadership. We will examine socio-historical precedents for leading in turbulent times and explore questions about the practice of responsible leadership across settings and contexts. Students will apply systems theory to practice as they experience their own group dynamics and paradoxes of group life and develop skills in collaboration, communication, and leadership. Winter quarter will expand on students’ understanding of systems dynamics, and introduce change theory as they focus on the organizational level of human systems. Students will examine leverage points for making change in systems through the introduction of the field of organizational development. Leadership studies continue as students explore different models of leadership within organizations, and by observing systems dynamics of an organization that they know from direct experience. In spring, students will further integrate systems thinking and change theory as the level of system in focus this quarter is the community or wider world. By examining case studies, students will identify challenges presented during turbulent times, historic and current, and research responses by leaders to learn what is effective in advancing constructive change. Through practical experience, they will explore and develop their own leadership and cooperative abilities. Demonstrating their understanding of systems, change, and leadership, students will develop extensive capstone projects for the year. Each quarter will include focused work on writing. Modules for additional 4 credits (must be done sequentially but students can start the series in any quarter): Module 1: The student will develop a general framework for doing program reviews and then adapt that to an organization, first garnering observational data and data put forward by the organization including the organization’s history, product or service, customers, context, role in their industry, finances, structure, and core competencies. The student will research the organization’s leaders to ascertain the leaders’ stated values and aims for the organization, and the challenges the organization and leaders face. Learning will be demonstrated through a series of analytical memos outlining the framework and the initial findings. The student will also develop human subjects review forms for subsequent research. Module 2: To deepen his or her research on the subject organization, the student will acquire information through interview or survey methods, observing unobtrusive data, or other methods of discovery of the organization’s less visible or hidden aspects. The student will analyze values-stated in contrast with values-in-use to understand the system dynamics at play. Learning will be demonstrated through a series of analytical memos and annotated instruments for gathering data. Module 3: Applying systems thinking and change theory in constructing organizational development strategies, the student will identify system leverage points and imagine possible interventions, anticipating the system’s response and identifying possible unintended consequences. Learning will be demonstrated through a series of analytical memos and the preparation of final report that could be offered to the organization. public service, business, and management. Emily Lardner Kathy Kelly Sat Sun Junior JR Senior SR Fall
The Legislature and the Public: Environmental and Social Justice

Lin Nelson

community studies environmental studies government law and public policy sociology sustainability studies 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day FFall This program explores the relationship between the Legislature (the Washington State Legislature in particular) and the public. We'll examine how citizens, community groups, non-governmental organizations and social movements engage with the legislative process. We'll read legislative, political and community literature, and we'll meet with a range of individuals (legislators, agency staff, lobbyists and activists) and organizations readying themselves for the upcoming session through research, collaboration and strategic planning. Our central goal will be to understand how the public learns about and interacts with the legislative process. We'll examine links between the Legislature and the public agencies, as we study selected pieces of proposed and enacted legislation to learn how these grow from and respond to community-based concerns. Our focal points will be environment, public health, labor, poverty and community development, as we explore how features of public life are transformed into legislative initiatives. Case studies will include issues such as environmental monitoring and remediation, environmental justice, right-to-know, welfare rights and health care for low-income populations. Students will deepen their knowledge and application of public documents, case analysis, field research, interviewing and public presentation. Each student (or student team) will design and complete a case study of a legislative initiative being developed for the 2011 session or an initiative being activated through a public agency. Students may take this program in coordination with the application process for the Legislative Internship 2011 program, or students may take the program based on a general interest in legislation, community involvement and social change. Our work will be shaped in tandem with emerging regional issues and in connection with organizations focusing on environment, health, working conditions, community and poverty. social science, public policy, public interest research, environmental studies and community studies. Lin Nelson Junior JR Senior SR Fall
The Lens-Based Image: Theory, Criticism, Practice cancelled

Matt Hamon

aesthetics art history visual arts 

  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day SSpring The focus of this program will be on photographic theory, criticism and practice. Photographic images pervade every facet of our society and affect almost all of our thoughts and emotions. Though their intentions can be elusive, and dependant on context, they are always present and should be approached with a critical mind and eye.This program is designed for beginning photographers and will emphasize seeing, thinking and creating with thoughtful inquiry in hopes of providing a better understanding of the construction and manipulation of an image's meaning and form. All of the exercises, lectures, presentations, film screenings, gallery visits, critiques, etc. are designed to develop each student's technical, theoretical and conceptual approach to the subject matter and his/her understanding of the connections between these three elements. Students will carry out art historical research as well as visual research to support personal artistic inquiry. Students will be expected to rigorously pursue their personal studio work while participating in interdisciplinary critiques of their work and the work of others.Students should be prepared to do work in critical thinking, reading, writing, and most of all, art production. Seeing, thinking, visualizing and creating "exercises" will be assigned. Students should be prepared to actively engage in these exercises which might, at times, seem fundamental-for instance, making a photogram. Students should be prepared to complete a significant, but reasonable, number of assigned readings. Seminar readings will inform our understanding of aesthetics generated from lens-based images. Students should be prepared to complete a significant, but reasonable, amount of writing on the arts. Each week, students will be required to demonstrate active studio practice in relationship to their personal work. art, photography, art theory, art criticism, studio practice, and writing for the arts. Matt Hamon Freshmen FR Spring
"Liberty and Justice For All"

Stephen Beck

history philosophy 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening SSpring The United States was founded on a set of political ideals, yet the words we use to express them hide deep and lasting political disagreements. Our history is infused with recurring conflicts over the nature of and of , and most prominently over whom the phrase includes. In this 12-credit, writing-intensive program, we will study several theories of political philosophy through historical and contemporary writings and in the context of different periods of U.S. history. The goal of the program is to come to a better understanding of different political philosophies and their lasting appeal in U.S. society. Credit will be awarded in political philosophy and U.S. history. Stephen Beck Tue Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Lifespan Developmental Psychology

Carrie Margolin

psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer This course will focus on milestones of human development from conception through death. We will consider the nature of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development throughout the lifespan, addressing major theories and current research that explain how and why developmental change occurs. Some practical topics to be explored will include child rearing, learning disorders, adolescent rebellion, adult midlife crisis, and care giving for elderly parents. This course serves as a prerequisite for upper-division work and graduate school admission in psychology, education, and health care.    psychology, social services, health care, education Carrie Margolin Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Linguistics for Teachers and Writers

Richard McKinnon

communications education psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SuSummer Do you work intimately with language every day but would like to have a better understanding of the nuts and bolts?  This course will take you under the hood and give you the foundation you'll need to learn, teach, or create language.  We'll also look at the process of reading and its relationship to spoken language.  Richard McKinnon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Living Buildings - Science and Analysis

Steven Abercrombie

architecture ecology environmental studies sustainability studies 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring In this upper division science course, students will undertake technical analyses related to building design, energy performance, water usage, stormwater handling, and occupant health to explore concepts in cutting-edge sustainable building performance. Participants will examine the theory behind the most progressive green building rating system in North America and gain experience utilizing building science analysis software employed by design professionals. Students taking this course should have a background in MS Excel, science, and statistics. The course will have one Saturday field trip where students will be able to experience many of the concepts discussed in the classroom in the field. Steven Abercrombie Tue Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Looking at Animals

Susan Aurand and Joseph Tougas

art history literature visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring This program is a one quarter interdisciplinary study of how we see, understand and represent animals. Animal images are the oldest known artworks. From the painted bulls in Lascaux cave to Mickey Mouse, Godzilla and the Republican Elephant, images of animals pervade our history and culture. Our relationship to animals as the Other/Ourselves has been a major preoccupation throughout human history. Through lectures, seminars and common readings, we will examine our relationship to animals as it is portrayed in art and literature. We will consider how the study of animals can give us ideas about human nature and the human mind. We will look at the portrayal of animals throughout art history, and we will read novels, short stories and critical texts that deal with our relationship to animals. We will also use studio work to explore our individual relationships to animals. Workshops in the program will provide skill development in 2D art (drawing, painting, mixed media) and 3D art (making animal masks and woodcarving). As a major part of the program, each student will do an individual project that combines studio work with library research, exploring a particular animal or topic within our larger theme. art history, arts, creative writing, literature, humanities, and the visual arts. Susan Aurand Joseph Tougas Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Looking Backward: America in the Twentieth Century

David Hitchens, Julianne Unsel, Thomas Rainey and Tom Maddox

American studies economics government history international studies law and government policy literature sociology 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring The United States began the 20th century as a minor world power and a debtor country. The nation ended the century as the last superpower with an economy and military that sparked responses across the globe. In between, Americans invented flying, created atomic weapons, sent men to the moon and began exploration of the physical underpinnings of our place in the universe. Many have characterized the the 20th century as "America's Century" because in addition to developing the mightiest military machine on earth, the United States also spawned the cultural phenomenon of "the mass:" mass culture, mass media, mass action, massive destruction, massive fortunes—all significant elements of life in the United States. This program will be a retrospective, close study of the origins, development, expansion and elaboration of "the mass" phenomena and will place those aspects of national life against our heritage to determine if the political, social, and economic growth of the nation in the last century was a new thing or a logical continuation of long-standing, familiar impulses and forces in American life. While exploring these issues we will use history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture and other tools to help us understand the nation and its place in the century. Simultaneously, students will be challenged to understand their place in the scope of national affairs, read closely, write with effective insight, and develop appropriate research projects to refine their skills and contribute to the collective enrichment of the program. There will be workshops on economic thought, weekly student panel discussions of assigned topics and program-wide discussion periods. Each weekly panel will provide a means of rounding out the term's work and provide students with valuable experience in public speaking and presentation. American history, American literature, the humanities and social sciences, law, journalism, history, economics, sociology, literature, popular culture, cultural anthropology and education. David Hitchens Julianne Unsel Thomas Rainey Tom Maddox Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Making American History

Nancy Koppelman

American studies history writing 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day SuSummer Students will learn about key people in US history and central themes in the development of American society and culture.  They will also learn how history is written—“made”—by historians.  Well-known figures will be studied alongside accounts of obscure people who made American history.  Themes will include reform, radicalism, rights, privileges, freedom, individualism, identity, entrepreneurship, and dissent.  Students will learn to appreciate the craft and challenge of historical understanding.  All students will write responses to the texts; those who enroll for 8 credits will also produce a substantive research prospectus. Credit will be awarded in American history. Education, social work, government, law. Nancy Koppelman Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Making Dances: Creative Process in Motion

Robert Esposito

aesthetics art history consciousness studies dance linguistics physiology somatic studies theater 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall This focused one-quarter program centers on progressive study in Laban-based modern dance composition/choreography. Activities include technique, theory/improvisation/seminar, and composition classes. Technique is based in basic anatomy and principles of dance kinesiology, not style, period or ethnicity. Students learn how to make dances from their own sensory, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral experience by developing skills in modern dance technique, theory/improvisation, composition, performance, and critical analysis. This multidimensional approach to creative dance develops a kinesthetic vocabulary drawing on linguistics, poetics, architecture, visual arts, art history, anatomy, and choreography. The course includes units on diet, injury prevention, and somatic therapy. Strength, range, poise, and depth are developed though Pilates-based floor barre and Hanna/Feldenkrais-based Somatics. Seminar will focus on building verbal and non-verbal skills aimed at critical analysis of the history of art, choreography, and their socio-cultural contexts. Writing will focus on the development of a journal using action language, visual art, and poetics. The program culminates with a Week Ten concert of student and faculty and/or guest choreography. criticism, dance, expressive arts, movement therapy, and somatic studies. Robert Esposito Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Managing for High Performance

Dariush Khaleghi and Steven Johnson

business and management 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend SSpring In today's world, managers are being asked to develop and implement various plans and projects supporting goals and objectives of their organization. Furthermore, they are being asked and even mandated to report their progress using hard data. In this course students will be introduced to performance management as a discipline, using strategic planning and performance measurement as a foundation. The primary focus of this course is for students to learn how to build and manage high performing individuals, teams, and organizations in private and public sectors. Dariush Khaleghi Steven Johnson Fri Sat Sun Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Mapping for Change

John Baldridge

geography 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening WWinter John Baldridge Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Mapping for Change

John Baldridge

geography 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring John Baldridge Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Marine Biology of the Pacific Northwest

Gerardo Chin-Leo

biology marine science 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer This program introduces principles of marine biology focusing on the marine life and marine habitats of the Pacific Northwest coast. We will study the environment, taxonomy, adaptations, and ecology of marine organisms as well as the major oceanographic features of the northwest coast. There will be various field trips including a camping trip to the Olympic Peninsula and possibly a sailboat trip. Gerardo Chin-Leo Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Marine Life: Marine Organisms and Their Environments

Jennifer Nielsen and Seabird McKeon

marine science 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter SSpring This program focuses on marine organisms, the sea as a habitat, relationships between the organisms and the physical/chemical properties of their environments. Marine biodiversity, evolution, fisheries biology and conservation ecology will be emphasized. Students will also learn field-sampling methods, laboratory techniques and quantitative methods for data analysis. Concepts and techniques will be applied via faculty-designed experiments and student-designed research projects. Seminars will discuss literature, including scientific primary literature, relevant to the lecture topics and to student research projects. An important component of the program is to learn how to conduct scientific research. The faculty will facilitate identification of student research projects that are consistent with the available resources and time. Teams of students will design their research projects during winter quarter and write a research proposal that will undergo peer and faculty review. The research projects will then be carried out during spring quarter. Because the research project continues across two quarters, students are strongly recommended to commit to both quarters of the program. marine ecology and biology, field and laboratory methods in marine science, and research in marine science. Jennifer Nielsen Seabird McKeon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Marketing and (Anti-)Consumerism

David Shaw and Shoji Kamise

business and management communications economics psychology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Day FFall 10301 8-credits; 10472 12-credits This program will meet from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m on Tuesdays and Thursdays. This quarter-long program is designed to provide an introduction to and overview of the intersection of three related fields—consumerism, anti-consumerism and marketing, including classical, critical and multidisciplinary perspectives on the field of marketing as it reflects consumer and business participation and behavior in economic exchanges in the marketplace. In the economic perspective, firms engage in various behaviors and efforts (which could include artifice, persuasion or other means) to influence consumer choice. Firms and consumers are said to be engaging in economic exchanges in pursuit of their own benefit, however calculated or construed. This quarter-long program begins a two-quarter program sequence examining (1) interdisciplinary approaches to the study of consumer behavior, firm marketing behavior and their consequences, as well as (2) an introduction to the art and science of marketing, as reflected in the theories, models and techniques employed in the marketing discipline today. In fall quarter, we will review the literature from marketing and related disciplines (e.g., economics, psychology and sociology) including classic, critical, practical and recent books, essays and studies, with an eye toward identifying the theories, models and perspectives that help illuminate real-world behavior by firms and consumers. While the primary focus will be on the behavior of marketing firms and consumers in their interdependent courtship of each other in the marketplace, positive and negative spillover effects (i.e., consequences, intentional or not) of these exchanges in the marketplace will also be examined. Students enrolled in the 12-credit section will participate in an additional research workshop. Topics may include social networking, consumerism and marketing; consumering and/or marketing to women; consumerism and/or marketing to children; and marketing and (anti-)consumerism in other countries or cultures. The underlying goal of the Research Workshop is to help students develop skills in social sicence research. business, marketing, management, psychology, sociology, economics, consumer and leisure studies. David Shaw Shoji Kamise Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Marketing and (Anti-)Consumerism (full-time) cancelled

David Shaw

business and management communications economics psychology 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall Marketing and (Anti-)Consumerism was initially advertised as a full-time program, but it has been changed to a half-time program. You may see its description at . business, marketing, management, psychology, sociology, economics, consumer and leisure studies. David Shaw Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Marxist Theory cancelled

Lawrence Mosqueda

history philosophy political science 

Signature Required: Spring 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring "I am not a Marxist" -Karl Marx "Sit down and read. Educate yourself for the coming conflicts" -Mary Harris (Mother) Jones If one believes the current mass media, one would believe that Marxism is dead, and that the "end of history" is upon us. As Mark Twain is reported to have said upon news accounts of his demise, "The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated." The same, of course, is true for Marxist Theory. Few Americans have read more than , if that. Very few "educated" people have a clear understanding of Marx's concept of alienation, dialectics, historical materialism, or his analysis of labor or revolutionary change. In this program, we will examine the development of Marx's thought and Marxist Theory. We will read and discuss some of Marx's early and later writings as well as writings of later Marxists. We will also explore concrete examples of how "dialectics" and "materialism" can be applied to race and gender issues. At the end of the program, students should have a solid foundation for further study of Marxist analysis. philosophy, political theory and economy, history, race and gender studies, and the social sciences. Lawrence Mosqueda Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Math for Elementary Teachers

Sheryl Shulman

education mathematics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day SuSummer This 8-week program is for individuals interested in learning the mathematics required for an elementary education teaching certificate. We will cover topics in problem solving, sets, fractions, algebra, statistics, mathematical reasoning and proof, geometry, number and operation, mathematical representation, and mathematical communication.  Students registering for 4 credits will study geometry and statistics. mathematics, teaching Sheryl Shulman Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
MatheMagics

Paul McCreary

mathematics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day SuSummer Each student will begin working where their current skill level is. Appropriate skill levels for the course include algebra, calculus, and any in between. We will directly confront the fears and phobias that many of us feel and help to move beyond those fears. All students will support each other and also receive tutoring help from other students in the class. Because different texts will be used for different students, please contact the instructor before purchasing a text. This course will count towards requirements for becoming elementary, middle, or high school teachers. Students registering for 4 credits will attend only 10a-1p Tue/Wed and 10a-noon Thu. science, technology, mathematics, teaching Paul McCreary Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Meaning, Math and Motion

Krishna Chowdary and Rachel Hastings

linguistics mathematics physics 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter This challenging program is an integrated introduction to linguistics, mathematics and physics. We invite serious students of various backgrounds who are interested in reading, writing, communicating and calculating in order to become quantitatively literate citizens. Students will be supported in developing a firm background in physics, mathematics and linguistics at the college level, and becoming prepared for further work in these areas. We believe any area of inquiry involves entering into a previously ongoing conversation. Quoting a charming articulation by Kinsman (a mathematician-turned-oceanographer, in the preface to ): "To the beginner, science is a conversation that has been in progress for a very long time. Science resembles the babble at a party; some of the participants are euphoric, some saturnine, some quarrelsome, and some inspired beyond their usual capacity. Whatever else happens, the conversation cannot proceed systematically or at the level of humdrum sobriety. Some scientists wander from group to group, while others remain fixed. Some groups talk about similar things, and occasionally conversations pass from one group to another. You have arrived in the middle of the party." Our collective work is to catch up on the conversation, which means being deliberate about how we calculate and convince, speak and write, listen and read, and also means acquiring the science content and process skills required to judge what is being argued. In addition to learning science content and process skills, mathematics and physics studies will be supported by applying techniques of linguistic analysis which help to illuminate the conventions and assumptions upon which the conversation relies. The study of linguistics will be deepened by using scientific texts as case studies for identifying and analyzing linguistic conventions. For example, we may study the source and nature of unstated assumptions, conventions of scientific logic, the nature and role of definitions in scientific inquiry, and the linguistic conventions found in different kinds of scientific texts. This program is designed for students with high school math who are ready for pre-calculus, but requires no prior preparation in linguistics or physics. It is intended for students serious about understanding language, improving their writing, and learning physics and mathematics, including calculus. The work will be intensive in both science and language, and students should expect to spend over 50 hours per week engaged with material. Students will participate in seminar, labs, workshops and lectures. Students will perform linguistic analyses of texts, do weekly problem sets in all areas that combine concepts, calculations and communication, and write about linguistics, math and physics. Quizzes and exams will be among the methods used to assess student learning. In fall quarter, we will study pre-calculus and begin calculus. In winter, we will continue the study of differential calculus and move on to integral calculus. In physics, topics will include mechanics and electromagnetism (algebra- and then calculus-based) over the two quarters. In linguistics, we will study principles of pragmatics, semantics and discourse analysis in both quarters. education, linguistics, mathematics, physics, quantitative literacy, and writing. Krishna Chowdary Rachel Hastings Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Mediated States of Modernity: Distraction, Diversion, and Ambivalence

Kathleen Eamon and Julia Zay

aesthetics art history cultural studies media studies moving image philosophy writing 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall One of the ways that historians and theorists distinguish modernity, and mass and popular culture more specifically, is by describing the ways in which it ushered in a new age of sensation. Using Marx's notion of the "social hieroglyph" as a model for looking at everyday life, we will splice together visual culture studies, cinema studies and 19th and 20th century aesthetic philosophy in an investigation of some of the defining mental and emotional states of attention produced by and for emerging cultural forms, such as cinema, radio, amusement parks, the arcade, and the language of modernist art. We will construct our own partial and fragmented or, to borrow Benjamin's phrase, "little" history of modern senses and sensibilities. In particular, we'll focus in on in-between states of attention that are easily dismissed as unremarkable but that, precisely by going unremarked, play a central role in our mediated public lives. Public intellectuals of the 20th Century like Freud, Benjamin, Kracauer, Gorky and others examine these states closely in their descriptions of everyday life in terms that make evident both the dangers and potentials of these modes of attention. We'll model our approach on the studied "ambivalence" that characterizes the attitude of Frankfurt School figures like Benjamin and Kracauer towards popular or mass culture, thinkers who are not indifferent but who sustain a truly divided, thus complicated, understanding of how one inhabits a mass-mediated, capitalist, industrialized, post-traditional culture - neither submitting to its demands nor removing oneself entirely, one ought to engage it playfully. We'll explore how we ourselves are always both submitting and resisting the ideological forces of mass culture. Some examples of the states we have in mind are: amusement, distraction, diversion, boredom, play, and so on. These states are often "located" in terms of specifically modern places, such as the cinema, amusement parks, and urban centers, and we will ask what kinds of audiences or what kind of "public" gets constituted by these states and contexts. Although our focus will be largely turn-of-the-century to mid-century (the last one, that is), we will follow our line of thought into more recent times with thinkers like Susan Sontag and David Foster Wallace. We will also develop our own practice of paying close attention to everyday life and meta-attention to our modes of engagement with it in our weekly observation exercises and field study. This work will inform both our traditional and our experimental essay-writing as we attempt to yoke the observational with the lyrical and theoretical modes. In summation, we will read and write a lot, watch films, look at art, listen to both music and sound, mix lecture with seminar and workshops with fieldwork. film studies, humanities, media, philosophy, visual culture studies, and writing. Kathleen Eamon Julia Zay Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Medical Assisting, A Practical Approach

Barbara Krulich and Elizabeth McHugh

Signature Required: Fall 

  Course SO - SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Day and Evening FFall WWinter SSpring This nine-month pre-medical practicum designed for students who are interested in careers in health and medical care allows students to work closely with health care professionals in a clinical setting. During the academic year, students will receive the credits and training necessary to become licensed in the state of Washington as health care assistants. See for more information. Barbara Krulich Elizabeth McHugh Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Medicinal Botany in Fall: Leaves

Marja Eloheimo

botany environmental studies health 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day FFall In this course, students gain an introduction to botanical, artistic, seasonal, and medicinal dimensions of leaves through exploring their functions and forms; drawing, pressing, and incorporating them into art; maintaining a nature journal of fall plant observations; cultivating plant identification skills in the field; considering harvest and processing of medicinal plants in fall; and discovering medicinal plants for the respiratory system. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, seminar, and an individual project. This course is appropriate for students with interests in botany, environmental studies, health, and botanical medicine. Marja Eloheimo Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Medicinal Botany in Spring: Flowers and Fruit

Marja Eloheimo

botany environmental studies health 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SSpring In this course, students gain an introduction to botanical, artistic, seasonal, and medicinal dimensions of flowers and fruits through exploring their functions and forms; drawing, pressing, and incorporating them into art; maintaining a nature journal of spring plant observations; cultivating plant identification skills in the field and laboratory; considering harvest and processing of medicinal plants in spring; and discovering medicinal plants for the first aid and the digestive system.  Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, seminar, and an individual project.  This course is appropriate for students with interests in botany, environmental studies, health, and botanical medicine. Marja Eloheimo Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Medicinal Botany in Summer

Marja Eloheimo

botany cultural studies environmental studies sustainability studies visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day SuSummer In this 8-credit program, students will gain an introduction to medicinal plants in summertime, with particular focus on plant identification and morphology (botany), medicinal concepts and practices (botanical medicine), and botanical arts and nature journaling (art). Students will also explore selected aspects of such topics as approaches to cross-cultural herbalism, research and experience, bringing medicinal plants into our lives, and plants for summertime health. Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, seminar, field activities, and hands-on projects. This course is appropriate for students with interests in botany, environmental studies, health, education, and botanical medicine.  botany, health-related fields, ecology, education, cultural studies, sustainability Marja Eloheimo Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Medicinal Botany in Winter: Stems and Roots

Marja Eloheimo

botany environmental studies health 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day WWinter In this course, students gain an introduction to botanical, artistic, seasonal, and medicinal dimensions of stems and roots through exploring their functions and forms; drawing, and incorporating them into art (specifically basketweaving); maintaining a nature journal of winter plant observations; cultivating winter plant identification skills; considering a place for botanical medicine in home and kitchen; and discovering medicinal plants for the urinary and nervous systems.  Activities include lectures, workshops, reading, seminar, and an individual project.  This course is appropriate for students with interests in botany, environmental studies, health, and botanical medicine. Marja Eloheimo Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Medieval Art History and Sacred Geometry

Ann Storey

art history cultural studies gender and women's studies history religious studies visual arts 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening FFall This program will examine the art and sacred geometry of the Medieval era, a singular period of creativity, spirituality, and change. We will study the motivating ideas and issues of the age: the dynamic influence of migrating tribal cultures on inherited classical traditions, the problem of iconoclasm, the arcane goals of the alchemists, and Neoplatonic philosophy expressed through the visions of the mystics. The idea that both mystic and artist were "seers"—seeing beyond the physical into the transcendent and metaphysical—impelled them into visionary realms. We will learn about the mysticism of Hildegard of Bingen, Meister Eckhart, and other charismatic figures, as we see their visions expressed in superb mosaics, illuminated manuscripts, stained glass, sculpture and architecture. Sacred music of the era will be experienced through recordings and a possible field trip. We will also learn about the outstanding art, architecture and geometry of medieval Islamic Spain. Islamic dictates forced artists of the period to use ingenious geometrical techniques (rather than figurative ones) to create sacred and secular architectural adornments. Art, design and simple geometry workshops will enable students to move from theory to practice. Students will use geometry skills to create Islamic tilings and to design, draw, and paint a Gothic rose window. art history, education, history of mathematics, geometry, fine art, humanities, and museum studies. Ann Storey Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Memory and Conflict in the Eastern Mediterranean

Ulrike Krotscheck and Steven Niva

classics cultural studies international studies political science study abroad 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring –David Lowenthal, ) In this program, students will investigate the political, cultural and economic life of the Eastern Mediterranean. Situated between Europe and the Middle East, this area includes the lands known today as Greece, Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine and Egypt. Although it is the origin of some of the world's most important civilizations and religious traditions, this region has increasingly become a site of political conflict, war and terrorism. This program will explore how the past, and particularly contested memories of this past, plays a role in many conflicts that have arisen in this region as a result of colonialism, nationalism and religious differences. In particular, the program will focus on how contested memories of the past shape conflicts between Israelis and Palestinians, over the ancient heritage and modern identity of Egypt and over the identity and boundaries of modern Turkey and Greece. We will examine how struggles over the past—who claims it, what it means, and whose memories are empowered or marginalized—are primarily struggles over the present—who has power, which identities will be favored, and who has rights to territory and place. Drawing primarily upon the fields of archaeology and political science, the program will introduce students to central debates and methodological issues in each discipline and students will learn how to examine the evidence and claims from archaeological findings, museums and heritage sites in light of contemporary political and cultural power relations. In the fall, the program will trace this region's evolution from the rise of ancient Egypt and classical Greece to the rise of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and then the transformation of the region through European colonialism and modern nation-states. We will explore the relationship between past and present through examining specific archaeological sites in each area, including Luxor (ancient Thebes) in Egypt, the Temple Mount/Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem and Catalhoyuk in Turkey. In the winter, we will continue this study through examining Napoleon's conquest of Egypt, the origins and present status of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the population exchange between Greece and Turkey at the end of the Ottoman Empire, among other topics. Our study will be based on theoretical texts and primary sources, novels and religious documents, as well as guest speakers and occasional field trips. Students will build learning communities through workshops, lectures, research, seminars and presentations. In the process, students will learn how to apply theory to case studies, undertake advanced research projects and develop critical thinking skills based upon an awareness of a diversity of views. In the spring quarter, a group of students from the program—subject to qualifications and available space—will have the opportunity to travel abroad to Turkey and Egypt. This six-week travel abroad program will explore both ancient and modern sites and political developments in each location in order to deepen their learning about the role of memory and conflict within the contemporary region. archaeology, education, cultural studies, history, Middle East studies, political science and international affairs. Ulrike Krotscheck Steven Niva Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Metal Casting

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day and Evening SuSummer In this program, participants will learn about the production of sculpture as well as everyday objects through the process of casting. Students will design and construct models in plaster, clay, and wax. We will experience the process of sand casting in aluminum. We will do plaster molding, wax fabrication, and investing for (the ultimate) lost wax casting in bronze. After the work of de-gating and chasing, we will experiment with various patina applications for final presentation. This is a process-intensive studio class where we turn ideas into bronze. Beginners are welcome. sculpture, visual arts Bob Woods Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Metalworking (A)

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course FR - SOFreshmen - Sophomore 4 04 Evening SSpring This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication. Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring
Metalworking (B)

Bob Woods

visual arts 

  Course JR - SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening SSpring This course is an introduction to the tools and processes of metal fabrication. Students will practice sheet-metal construction, forming, forging and welding, among other techniques, while accomplishing a series of projects that encourage student-centered design. Bob Woods Thu Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Methods of Mathematical Physics

EJ Zita

astronomy mathematics philosophy of science physics 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring A close examination of the complex and varied world around us reveals a high degree of underlying order. Our goal as scientists is to understand and explain this order. Mathematics is the language created (or discovered) to describe the order observed in physics. The goal of this advanced program is to introduce the mathematical language we use to describe and create physical models of our natural world, and to better understand both. To that end, we will study a number of key physical theories and systematically develop the mathematical tools that we need to understand them. We plan to begin, in fall quarter, with a review of series, complex numbers and linear equations, including matrixes, concentrating on their applications to physics, such as rotations, circuits and the simultaneous solution of linear equations. We will continue with ordinary and partial differential equations, with applications to classical mechanics, including oscillators, waves, Laplace's equation, Poisson's equation, and other fundamental examples in physics. Students will plan research projects in teams. In winter, we plan to connect differentiation with integration via vector analysis (applications in electromagnetism), Fourier Series (applications to waves, e.g. acoustic oscillations on the Sun and at the Big Bang), and variational calculus. We will go deeper into areas begun in fall. For example, we would like to take vector analysis deeper into tensor analysis, with applications such as general relativity. Students will carry out their research projects in teams. In spring, students may continue with a full-time study of electromagnetism and vector calculus, or may continue independent contract work on their research projects in teams. Students might also have the option to begin a study of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Students will be encouraged to present their research at a regional professional physics meeting. Our program work will consist of lectures, tutorials, group workshops, student presentations, computer labs, seminars on the philosophy and history of physics and mathematics, essays and responses to essays. Teamwork within an integrated learning community will be emphasized, 1) for best learning practices, and 2) to model work within mature scientific communities. chemistry, education, engineering, history, mathematics, philosophy, and physics. EJ Zita Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Mind the Gap: Gender, Race, Religion and Public Service

Amy Gould

  Course FR - GRFreshmen - Graduate 4 04 Evening and Weekend SuSummer "Mind the gap!" Should be the alert announced while working in public service. Too often we develop policies, programs, or management styles that actually increase the social divides in service delivery because we ignore cultural attributes of gender, race, and religion. Alternatively, we may possess the knowledge but lack the action to bridge the gap. Our course will investigate the nature and paradox of how public administration as a field of study may have contributed to this schism along with how the popular practices of public servants may perpetuate the divide. Readings, seminar, lectures, workshops, videos, and assignments will focus on actual cases in public service. The key learning objective for this course is to see how and why the discipline and practice of public administration is both a site of struggle and emancipation for academics, workers, and service recipients. Amy Gould Fri Sat Sun Summer
Mind-Body Medicine

Mukti Khanna and Joanna Cashman

consciousness studies cultural studies health psychology 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter Mind-body medicine is an interdisciplinary field focusing on the applications of sociocultural, psychosocial, somatic and behavioral knowledge relevant to health and wellness. Fall quarter will explore historical foundations of mind-body medicine from diverse cultural perspectives. We will look at how mind-body medicine is being integrated into health care in disease prevention, health promotion, treatment and rehabilitation settings. Applied skills training will focus on energy psychology, qigong, expressive arts therapy, somatic practices, communication skills and mindfulness in psychotherapy. Questions to be explored include "What practices are emerging at the creative edge of health care?" and "How are healthcare providers preparing themselves to work in an integrated healthcare system?" The program will include a variety of approaches to learning including seminar, theoretical assessments, open space learning formats, guest speakers, dialogue and extended workshops. Students will be supported in developing practices based on the principles of mind-body medicine. Students will work with faculty to develop a Cocreative Learning Plan for winter quarter and write a proposal for either a project study or internship to be implemented in winter quarter. Winter quarter will allow students to implement their own Cocreative Learning Plans with program modules and individual project or internship studies. Students can take up to 4-16 credits of project or internship studies through the program in winter quarter. Modules in seminar readings and continuing skills training will be offered for 4 credits each within the program for students who choose to integrate this focus in their winter program work. Student project and internship work will be presented in a symposium at the end of the program. counseling, health, health care practice, psychology, and social and human services. Mukti Khanna Joanna Cashman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Mind-Body Medicine

Mukti Khanna

health psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend SuSummer Mind-Body Medicine focuses on the applications of sociocultural, psychosocial, and behavioral knowledge relevant to health and wellness.  The course will explore historical foundations of mind-body medicine in addition to clinical practices including energy psychology, qigong, expressive arts therapy, somatic practices and mindfulness.  Questions to be explored include "What practices are emerging at the creative edge of healthcare?" and "How are healthcare providers preparing themselves to work in an integrative healthcare system?" health, psychology, alternative and complementary medicine Mukti Khanna Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Mindfulness Psychology: Contemplative Clinical Science

Jamyang Tsultrim

philosophy psychology 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend SSpring This course will emphasize mindfulness psychology as a clinical tool as well as a method of professional self-care. Recent research has proven the effectiveness of mindfulness training to treat conditions such as stress and pain, addictions, chronic depression, anxiety, eating disorders and other health conditions. Students will explore the similarities and differences between Mindfulness Psychology and Western Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and gain practical skills to help alleviate the psychological suffering of others while maintaining emotional balance and professional ethics. Students will have opportunities for personal practice, observational learning, and the development of counseling skills through role-play, reading and discussion. Jamyang Tsultrim Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Modern Models of Motion

David McAvity and Rachel Hastings

mathematics physics 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day SSpring In the first half of the 20th century there was a remarkable revolution in physics that gave birth to new ways of thinking about the physical laws of the universe. Newtonian ideas of a deterministic, clockwork universe of absolute time and space gave way to a strange new world of quantum mechanics and relativity. These new models describing the motion and interaction of particles at all scales raised as many questions as they answered, and we are still grappling with the consequences today. This program will provide a mathematical introduction to the laws of quantum physics and relativity. We will start with some of the key issues in classical physics that lead to the changes in physics and will end with look at some of the remaining problems confronting modern physics today. The main topics in physics we will cover are special relativity, quantum theory, and some topics in cosmology and particle physics. We will learn topics in calculus relevant to this study, including an introduction to differential equations and infinite series. The program will also include individual student projects and seminar discussions on the history and philosophy of modern physics. Student entering this program should have a confident grasp of the usual material in the first two quarters of calculus-based physics and the first two quarters of calculus. mathematics, physics, chemistry and engineering. David McAvity Rachel Hastings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Molecule to Organism

Benjamin Simon, Lydia McKinstry and Maria Bastaki

biochemistry biology chemistry 

Signature Required: Winter Spring 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring This yearlong program develops and interrelates concepts in advanced laboratory-based science, thus providing a foundation for students who plan to continue studies in chemistry, biology (field or laboratory), and/or medicine. Students will carry out upper-division work in biochemistry, microbiology, cellular and molecular biology, and organic chemistry. Students who remain enrolled in the entire program for all three quarters can earn up to 48 credits of upper-division science. The program examines the subject matter through the central idea of the interrelatedness of structure and function, integrating two themes; one at the level and the other at the level. In the theme, we start with cellular biology and microbiology and proceed to the whole organism. We examine structure/function relationships at each level of increasing complexity. In the theme, we examine the nature of organic compounds and organic reactions, and carry this theme into biochemistry and the fundamental chemical reactions of living systems. As the year progresses, the two themes continually merge through studies of cellular and molecular processes in biological systems. Program activities include lecture, laboratory and collaborative problem-solving workshops. Each area of study will contain a significant laboratory component emphasizing bench skills and instrumentation. Students will be expected to write papers and maintain laboratory notebooks. All laboratory work, and approximately half of the non-lecture time will be spent working in collaborative groups. Group work will also include reading scientific literature and discussion of topics of current or historical significance in science. This is an intensive science program; the subjects are complex, and the sophisticated understanding we expect to develop will require students to work for many hours each week, both in and out of class. biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology, dentistry, medicine, microbiology, naturopathy, optometry, organic chemistry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. Benjamin Simon Lydia McKinstry Maria Bastaki Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Mount Rainier: The Place and its People

Jeff Antonelis-Lapp, Lucia Harrison and Carolyn Dobbs

Native American studies environmental studies natural history outdoor leadership and education visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring Mount Rainier, known locally as "the Mountain" or "Tahoma", dominates the landscape of the Puget Sound region and commands the attention, imagination and respect of its inhabitants. The relationship of people to the Mountain has varied widely: prized by Indigenous Peoples for a variety of activities, even today; seen by European-American settlers as a potentially vast resource for timber and minerals; and as a wilderness and recreation destination for Puget Sound inhabitants and tourists from the world over. Some of the questions we will investigate include: What do we know about the natural and human history at Mount Rainier, and how might this predict the future? What are the interrelationships of people, place, flora and fauna at Mount Rainier? What role does Mount Rainier play in the arena of conserving protected areas? Does place-based, experiential conservation service-learning lead to environmental stewardship? To capitalize on the usual pattern of late summer good weather, we will begin the program on September 13, two weeks before the regularly scheduled start of fall quarter. This will allow us to be on the Mountain at arguably the finest time of the year. Students planning to live on campus will receive our help in arranging for storage prior to our departure for the Mountain. Students must be prepared to camp in primitive conditions, and must be ready to undertake strenuous hikes and outdoor work. The tenth week of the program will be the week of November 15, and evaluations will be completed by November 23. Students may begin their winter break at the completion of their evaluation process. We will meet on campus on September 13-14 to plan for our departure to the Mountain, and on our initial field trip, September 15-24, we will study the area's natural history, including an introduction to the geology, geography, watersheds, flora and fauna of the Mountain. Students will learn to draw and create an illustrated field journal documenting their natural history learning. An important portion of this field trip will engage students in conservation service-learning opportunities at Mount Rainier. Potential activities include assisting in archeological excavations, meadow revegetation, historic rock wall restoration, trail work or a variety of other projects. These and other program activities will equip students to continue to learn, teach and advocate for the environment. During winter quarter, we will broaden our study to include the park's neighbors within the Nisqually River Watershed and examine the efforts of the various stakeholders to create a cooperative management strategy that protects and sustains the watershed. We will observe and study the natural history of birds in the watershed, learning to use them as a way to teach environmental education. We will also use drawing as a mode of inquiry in environmental education, assist on service learning projects, and help public school students with water quality field monitoring and at the Green Congress on March 18 .  During week 8, a four-day field trip will take us to Mount Rainier and other places in the upper Nisqually watershed. Other day-long field trips will introduce us to organizations and the work they pursue within the Nisqually watershed. We will work with the Park and its neighbors to identify potential student projects for spring quarter. Near the end of winter quarter, students will plan their spring quarter independent or small group projects, which will be spring’s primary focus. Students will develop skills in drawing, visual communication, public speaking and graphic arts computer applications to aid in interpretive projects. Winter and spring quarter field trips to the Mountain and the surrounding watersheds will continue to provide service-learning opportunities in a variety of conservation and environmental education projects. As we enlarge our geographic area of study, the Nisqually River watershed and Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge will provide opportunities to study salmon recovery efforts and avian natural history and opportunities to design and complete individual and group projects. A range of place-based projects—scientific, historical, environmental education, interpretive and artistic—will be available. biology, civics, environmental education, environmental studies, natural history, visual art, and visual communication. Jeff Antonelis-Lapp Lucia Harrison Carolyn Dobbs Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Movement and Mindfulness

Rebecca Chamberlain and Cindy Beck

consciousness studies health literature outdoor leadership and education writing 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening FFall WWinter What can we do to achieve healthy bodies, minds, and spirits, sometimes referred to as being in the “flow”? In this intensive two-quarter program, students will broaden their ability to recognize healthy behaviors that integrate body, mind, and spirit as we develop our connection to the natural world. During fall quarter we will study kinesiology, exercise physiology, and Pilates while developing a regular practice of yoga and meditation. We will study a variety of topics that give us clues about how our bodies’ healing processes work, from science and medicine to meditation, consciousness-studies, and wisdom literature. Through physical activity, writing, journaling, and critical reflection, we will learn how the body moves, how to maximize various physiological processes, and how to integrate our interior lives and imaginative processes with outer experience, healthy practices, and our relationships to the natural world. During winter quarter we will develop our understanding of our body’s health, fitness, and nutrition as we begin to train ourselves as athletes, develop basic wilderness skills, and study sustainability, environmental literature, and practices of meditation, pilgrimage, and engagement with the natural world. We will add strength training to our practice of yoga, meditation, pilates, and outdoor education. As we continue to develop an understanding of sports nutrition and to appreciate the delicate balance of our body’s internal environment, we will explore food as fuel, as well as its historic and symbolic roles. We'll investigate where food comes from, ethno-botany, various practices and rituals around food gathering and preparation, and food for backpacking. We will accommodate different fitness levels as we test and track our progress. Field-work will include day trips to the Olympics or Mt. Rainier for winter hiking or snowshoeing. health and wellness, literature, writing, consciousness studies, and environmental and outdoor education. Rebecca Chamberlain Cindy Beck Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Multicultural Counseling: An Innovative Model

Heesoon Jun

communications consciousness studies cultural studies gender and women's studies health psychology 

Signature Required: Fall 

  Program SR ONLYSenior Only 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring This program will allow students to examine the efficacy of existing psychological counseling paradigms and techniques for a diverse population. One of the program goals will be to increase the students' multicultural counseling competency through transformative, non-hierarchical and non-dichotomous approaches to learning. We will use a wide range of instructional strategies, such as lectures, workshops, films, seminars, role-playing, group discussions, videotaping, field trips, guest lectures and internship case studies. During fall quarter, students will learn at least seven personality theories and counseling skills based on these theories. In winter quarter, students will learn to incorporate scientific inquiry into clinical inquiry and will learn abnormal psychology and its effectiveness with multicultural populations. In spring quarter, students will learn ethics in helping professions. Consciousness studies, psychological research interpretation, studies in internalized oppression/privilege and systematic oppression/privilege, multicultural counseling theories and practice, and social justice and equity will be emphasized throughout the year. In both winter and spring quarters, students will be required to complete internships of 10 hours per week in local counseling/mental health settings, providing opportunities to apply their classroom learning in a practical setting. allopathic and complementary medince, ethics in the helping professions,multicultural counseling theory and skill building,  personality theories, psychological counseling, psychological research interpretation, psychology (abnormal, clinical, developmental), studies of oppression and power, social work, and school counselling. Heesoon Jun Senior SR Fall
Multicultural Literature

Gail Tremblay

education literature 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day SuSummer This course will explore American literature with a multicultural perspective and examine works, novelists, and poets. Works will include Leslie Marmon Silko's , Joy Harjo's , Benjamin Alire Saenz's , Victor Hernandez Cruz's , Toni Morrison's , Colleen McELroy's , Peter Bacho's , and Alan Lau's . teaching literature, cultural studies Gail Tremblay Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Multitrack Audio Production

Terry Setter

media studies music 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day SuSummer This program provides instruction in the use of digital and analog recording studio equipment, microphone design and placement techniques, mixing console design, signal flow, monitoring techniques, room acoustics, and signal processing.  There will be written assignments based upon readings in Huber's , and students will present research on topics related to audio production.  Students will do at least 40 hours of recording  and familiarization work in teams of two in addition to the in-class activities. We will record local musicians and produce finished mixes of the sessions. music, media technology Terry Setter Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
Music and Consciousness

Terry Setter

consciousness studies music 

  Program JR - SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Day FFall WWinter This program will investigate the relationship between sound, music and human consciousness. We will compose music that explores the psychological and spiritual effects of this music on those who hear it. The program is for experienced composers and performers. It is primarily a musical endeavor, working with aspects of psychology and contemplative studies, rather than a study of psychology that involves aspects of music. The program goal is to become better composers and performers and to develop greater understanding of the qualitative aspects of listening, how music “functions” in our lives, and how it can be used to affect changes in various internal states, such as brain wave frequencies, breathing patterns and galvanic skin response. We will read texts that deal with established contemporary compositional techniques as well as recent findings related to the effects of music at the somatic level. We will also read texts on psychology, such as Jung’s , in order to build a working vocabulary of psychological terminology. Students will be expected to complete bi-weekly research projects, listening exercises, and to keep a journal of their experiences with the music that we create. In fall, we will build listening and compositional skills and begin to relate these to the psychological and spiritual dimensions of the pieces, learning to use appropriate vocabulary and critical techniques. There will be an overnight retreat during which guest artists from various cultures will work with the students and share information about how music functions in their respective cultures. In winter, students will deepen their musical skills and will select a topic for a twenty-minute formal research presentation that will be given during week nine. There will also be a public concert of original pieces at the end of winter quarter. music composition, music therapy and consciousness studies. Terry Setter Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Music and Movement in Nature and Culture

Andrew Buchman, Kabby Mitchell and Sean Williams

cultural studies dance music theater 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter SSpring This performing arts program explores societal concepts, artistic behaviors, and reactions to music and dance in cultural and physical contexts. Themes include the exploration of music and dance in relation to the natural world, and the intersections of music and dance with gender, spirituality, urbanization and social change. After establishing a firm base of concepts, skills and approaches together in the fall, we will emphasize thematic and/or regional work and individual or small group projects during the winter term. Spring quarter offers the opportunity for students to engage in individual fieldwork studies with performing artists off campus. With some serious preparatory reading and listening, students may join the group in winter on a space-available basis, but not in spring. A deep interest in music and/or dance is expected, and prior study, formal or informal, will help. Students will be expected to do significant reading, writing and study of musical texts and choreography—especially field recordings, videos and ethnographies. Knowing how to read music will help you; if you do not, we will teach you. We will engage in critical listening and viewing (analyses of what we hear and watch), and transcription—simple, quick ways to write music and dance movements down so that you can look at them in different ways. Those with previous training will do work at their level, but such training is not expected. If you're a serious student, you will do well in this program. Other activities are likely to include choreography, composition, field trips, instrument building, research projects, papers and presentations. If funds are available, we will have workshops by visiting artists. We will have periodic performances and critiques of work by students in the program. Expect to work hard on developing your performance skills in a musical instrument or dance genre, practice regularly and perform. The goal of this study is not necessarily a performing career, but rather the development of insights into the performing arts that only hands-on, experiential work can provide. We cannot subsidize private lessons, but we will provide a steady, challenging and safe forum for performance, critique, and creative and intellectual growth. anthropology, cultural studies, dance, ethnomusicology, and music. Andrew Buchman Kabby Mitchell Sean Williams Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Musical Instruments: Design, Build, Play

Bob Woods

music visual arts 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening WWinter In accompaniment to the study of the physics of musical sound, participants will construct a series of simple musical instruments that incorporate a vibrating membrane, vibrating string(s), or column of air. These unique soundings will present further exploration of scales/tunings, electrification, composition and more. We will practice playing our instruments together under the direction of a guest artist, culminating in a possible performance during week 10. No previous experience (musical or otherwise) is required – and all levels (especially musical) are welcome. Required text: by Bart Hopkin Physics of Musical Sound, Musical Instrument Design, Experimental music. Bob Woods Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Musicianship

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening FFall This class will help students develop free, healthy singing voices and learn fundamentals of music literacy and piano technique. Students will develop musical skills through the use of self-paced interactive software as well as classroom instruction. At the end of each quarter, students will perform both vocally and on piano for other class participants and invited family and friends. This class requires excellent attendance and a commitment to practice every day. Credit will be awarded in Musicianship. Marla Elliott Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Musicianship

Marla Elliott

music 

  Course FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Evening SSpring This class will help students develop free, healthy singing voices and learn fundamentals of music literacy and piano technique. Students will develop musical skills through the use of self-paced interactive software as well as classroom instruction. At the end of each quarter, students will perform both vocally and on piano for other class participants and invited family and friends. This class requires excellent attendance and a commitment to practice every day. Credit will be awarded in Musicianship. Marla Elliott Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Native Decolonization in the Pacific Rim: From the Northwest to New Zealand

Kristina Ackley and Zoltan Grossman

American studies Native American studies cultural studies geography international studies 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program SO - SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter Maori scholar Linda Tuhiwai Smith asserts, “Our communities, cultures, languages and social practices – all may be spaces of marginalization, but they have also become spaces of resistance and hope.” In this program we will identify and contextualize these spaces and the politics of indigeneity and settler colonialism. We will use the Pacific Rim broadly as a geographic frame, with a focus on the Pacific Northwest Native nations and the Maori in Aotearoa (New Zealand). A comparative study of the role of treaties in Washington state and New Zealand—in natural resources, governance, the arts, education, etc.--will provide a key framework for the program. By concentrating on a larger region, students will have an opportunity to broaden Indigenous studies beyond the Lower 48 states, and explore common processes of Native decolonization in different settler societies. We will be studying decolonization through cultural revitalization and sovereign jurisdiction of First Nations. In order to examine the central role of Indigenous peoples in the region's cultural and environmental survival, we will use the lenses of geography, history, art and literature. In fall our focus will be on familiarizing students with the concept of sovereignty, working with local Native nations, and preparing to travel to Aotearoa or elsewhere. The concept of sovereignty must be placed within a local, historical, cultural and global context. Through theoretical readings and discussion, we will move from state-building in the U.S. and Canada to Native forms of nationalism. We will stress the complexities and intricacies of colonization and decolonization by concentrating on the First Nations of western Washington and British Columbia. We will later expand the focus to appreciate the similarities and differences of Indigenous experiences in other areas of the Pacific Rim, such as Native Alaskans, Aboriginal peoples in Australia, and South Pacific island peoples. We will emphasize common Pacific Rim concerns such as climate change, tourism, and cultural domination. For up to five weeks in winter quarter, many of us will travel to Aotearoa, where we will learn in a respectful and participatory way how the Maori have been engaged in revitalizing their language, art, land, and politics, and their still unfolding, changing relationships with the Pakeha (non-Maori) people and society. Other students in the program may fulfill their Study Abroad work in other Pacific Rim Indigenous regions, such as British Columbia, Australia, the Philippines, Hokkaido, Siberia, western Mexico, Central America, Ecuador, Peru, or Chile. Students will challenge post-colonial theory that merely deconstructs and move to a consideration of decolonizing practices. We will take as our basic premise in this program that those wishing to know about the history of a particular Native group should write it with a purpose to be in solidarity with these people today. Students will develop skills as writers and researchers by studying scholarly and imaginative works and by conducting policy research and fieldwork with Native and non-Native communities, and to compare community and government relationships in the U.S., Canada and New Zealand. Students will be expected to integrate extensive readings, lecture notes, films, interviews, and other sources in writing assignments. Native American studies, geography, cultural studies and world Indigenous peoples studies Kristina Ackley Zoltan Grossman Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall
Natural Order

David McAvity

computer science mathematics physics 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day WWinter The natural world is filled with a wonderful variety of forms and is shaped and transformed by complex interactions. Careful observation reveals that behind this complexity is an underlying order. The order manifests itself as spatial arrangements, such as spirals in shells, branching in rivers and hexagonal cells in beehives, and in temporal sequences, such as in patterns of growth, the interference of waves, and the motion of planets. In this program we will investigate the physical constraints and simple mathematical rules that make sense of this order. We will also explore the conditions under which this order is lost in the transition to chaos and randomness. The program will be structured around two main approaches to investigating order. First we will use nature as a guide to learn the mathematical methods for describing the patterns we see. Then we will learn the physical laws that give rise to order, from the clockwork universe of Newtonian dynamics to the strange world of quantum mechanics. In support of this study we will also learn how to model these natural phenomena by programming computer simulations. This program is introductory in nature and is well suited to students who want to investigate the mathematical and physical underpinnings of natural phenomena. Students of all background are welcome, but everyone should be prepared to spend a full quarter working with quantitative material in a spirit of curiosity and engaged inquiry. This program would serve as a good introduction and preparation for some of our foundation programs in mathematics and the sciences and for students interested in becoming teachers. teacher education, mathematics, and science. David McAvity Mon Mon Tue Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter
Nature/Image

Susan Aurand

aesthetics art history natural history visual arts 

Signature Required: Winter 

  Program FR - SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day FFall WWinter This program is an intensive visual arts program for students having a good background in studio art, who are passionate about the natural world and eager to learn more about it. How have past artists, philosophers and scientists understood and depicted the physical world? How are contemporary artists re-interpreting and re-shaping our fundamental relationship to the environment and to other species? What is the role of the artist in a time of environmental crisis? Through readings, lectures seminars and focused studio work, we will examine these questions. Individually, we will take the approach of artist/naturalists, and delve deeply into an exploration of some aspect of nature that intrigues each of us. Through research and studio work we will express our understanding and personal vision of this piece of Nature. Fall quarter will focus on intensive skill building work in drawing, painting and mixed media, in preparation for our individual field studies. We will also study critical reading and research skills through lectures, readings, and practical assignments. In the first weeks of winter quarter, each of us will present a proposal for an in-depth, individual field study of a site, organism, natural process or system. During the three weeks (weeks 7,8,9) of winter, everyone will conduct his/her field study at a site either on-campus or off-campus in the U.S. Back on campus in week 10, we will all present our Nature/Image field projects to the program. How will each of us choose where we want to do our field study? You may have a special place that calls you, or a passion for a particular plant, animal or natural phenomenon that determines your choice. The work of another artist may inspire your project. Your field study could be done on Evergreen's Beach trail or in your home town. Your project might take you on hikes into a pristine wilderness area or to the Seattle Zoo. Both on-campus and off, this program will function as a learning community. On-campus, you will need to commit at least forty hours of work per week in class and