The Mechanics of

International Feminism

 

 

International Feminism Winter Quarter Syllabus

 

Faculty Office Hours

Therese Saliba, x6854, SE3123, Wed. 9:00-10:00 am; salibat@evergreen.edu

Ju-Pong Lin, x6338, COM 362, 9:00-10:00 am; jupong@home.com

Angela Gilliam, x6018, SE4113, Wed. 1:00-2:00 pm; angelagilliam@hotmail.com

 

Program Meeting Times & Places

Tuesday: 10-12 Lecture in LH 5

1:30-3:30 Seminars in L2218 (Ju-Pong), L2221 (Angela), CRC109 (Therese)

Wednesday: 10-1 Film Screening in LH 3

 

Thursday: 9:00- 12:30 Longhouse 1007 an 1007A and L2126 (9-11)

1:30-3:30 Seminars in L2218 (Ju-Pong), L2221 (Angela), L2127 (Therese)

 

Program Objectives

 

Below are the central questions of our program. During fall quarter, we focused more on questions of representation. In winter quarter, we will shift our focus to forces of globalization and women's lives. More specifically, we will pick up again with the construction of and experiences of motherhood and "motherwork", then take up some new themes, including; the militarization of women's lives, the global sex industry and domestic service, Third Wave Feminism, reproductive rights and the social and governmental control of African American women's bodies, women and prison, and the intersection of queer and class issues.

What is the role of capitalism and globalization in limiting women's life choices of family roles and work? How is gender inequality maintained through violence, structural discrimination, and differential access to power?

How is the structural inequality between men and women eroticized in Western societies?

How do societal structures of control, including militarization, occuapation, reproduction, and the nation-state function to constrain womens' lives? How do representations of women serve to justify these structures of control to maintain unequal power relations? How can we reconstruct empowering images of women?

How can we study about, learn from , and engage with other cultures, especially other women, in non-dominating ways? In other words, how do we avoid the tendency of some forms of Western feminism to participate in the oppression of other women?

How are women's lives shaped by the intersections of nation, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, religion, and class? Of these categories, which is your primary site of struggle?

 

Week 1 - Jan 8-10 Mothers and Daughters/Palestinian women's experience, Therese

Tuesday seminar: Three Mothers, Three Daughters (read all)

Films: The Veiled Hope and Checkpoint

Thursday seminar: from Mothering: Ideology, Experience, Agency, Ch 7, 14, 15 and 16. Oral history due.

 

Week 2 - Jan 15-17 Militarization and Women 's Lives, Angela

Tuesday seminar: Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives, Cynthia Enloe, to p. 198.

Reading response paper due.

Film: The Women Outside (52 min), Half Life (60 min)

Thursday seminar: Enloe 198-300, in Talking Visions, Lubiano (411-449)

 

Week 3 - Jan 22-24 The Sex Industry and Servicing the Elite, Angela

Tuesday seminar: Bulbeck Ch 5 and Global Sex Workers, Kamala Kempadoo ( pp TBA)

Reading response paper due.

Film: Good Woman of Bangkok and A Kiss on the Mouth: Beijo na Boca

Thursday seminar: in Talking Visions,Alexander (281-305) and Global Sex Workers, Kamala Kempadoo

 

Week 4 - Jan 29-31 Cultural Critique and Production: Activist Art, Ju-Pong/ Gail Tremblay

Tuesday seminar: bell hooks, All About Love (all)

Film: Documentary of bell hooks, excerpts from Sphinxes Without Secrets

Thursday seminar: in Talking Visions, Henry (261-271) and Tropicana (137-141)

Installation proposal and research summary due.

 

Week 5 - Feb 5-7 Reproductive Rights, Faculty Panel

Tuesday seminar: Killing the Black Body, Dorothy Roberts, to p 201 and Kaplan in Mothering (121-138)

Film: Skin Deep A videotape by Alexandra Halkin and Deb Ellis 1997 (15 min.)

Women of Substance, A documentary by Rory Kennedy and Robin Smith, 1994 (55 min.)

Ventre Livre/Freeing the Womb, Ana Luiza Azeved. 1995 (45 min.)

Thursday seminar: Roberts, pp 202-312

Synthesis essay draft due.

 

Week 6 - Feb 12-14 Prison Writing in an International Context, Therese; Continuing to Punish Women, Angela

Tuesday seminar: Salwa Bakr - Memoirs from the Women's Prison, Nawal Sadawi and "The Punishment industry" (from The House that Race Built) by Angela Davis (handout)

Film: "Stranger Inside" (Cheryl Dunye, 90 min?) Four Women of Egypt 90 min., Doing Time (Suzanne Lacy)

Synthesis essay final draft due.

Thursday: essay from Frontline Feminisms by Angela Davis (handout)

 

Week 7 - Feb 19 - 21 Poetry/Queer issues/Class, Guest

Tuesday: film instead of lecture, Down and Out in America (57 min) and Khush

Tuesday seminar: Thinking Class by Joanna Kadi, selected poetry, June Jordan, Suheir Hammad

Wednesday: Guest lecturer Joanna Kadi, writing workshop

Thursday seminar: in Talking Visions Allende (273-280), Carillo (391-411), Joseph (357-367)

Week 8 - Feb 26-28 Class and Gender in an International Context, Angela (Ju-Pong gone)

Tuesday seminar: Nickle and Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich

Reading response paper due.

Film: If You Only Understood (Cuban)

Thursday seminar (in morning): in Mothering, Nelson (181-209), Segura (211-233), and Chang (259-285)

Movement workshop, then seminar. Attend Women of Color and Labor Conference in Tacoma on March 1 or 2.

 

Week 9 - March 5 -7 (March 8 International Women's Day)

Tuesday lecture: Meet to organize installation.

Tuesday seminar: in Talking Visions, Guerrero (413-439), Mohanty (485-500), Grewal (501-530)

Mount and exhibit Installations and Poetry Slam in conjunction with International Women's Day

Installation process piece and evaluation of contributors due.

Friday night 6:00-10:00

 

Week 10 - March 12 - 14 Third WaveFeminism. Guest speakers

Tuesday seminar: To Be Real, Rebecca Walker

Films TBA

Thursday: Potluck. Feedback on installations due.

 


International Feminism

Syllabus, Fall 2001

Faculty Office Hours

Therese Saliba, x6854, SE3123, Wed. 9:00-10:00 am; salibat@evergreen.edu

Ju-Pong Lin, x6338, COM 362, Wed. 9:00-10:00 am; jupong@home.com

Angela Gilliam, x6018, SE4113, Wed. 1:00-2:00 pm; angelagilliam@hotmail.com

 

Program Meeting Times & Places

Tuesday: 10-12 Lecture in LH 3, 1:30-3:30 Seminars in L2126 (Ju-Pong), CRC109 (Therese), Longhouse1007B (Angela)

3:45 - 6:00 Supplementary workshops in MacLab, Computer Center

Wednesday: 10-1 Film Screening in LH 5

Thursday: 9:00- 1:00 Workshops in Longhouse 1007 B/C, L1316,

2:00-4:00 Seminars in L2127 (Ju-Pong) L2130 (Therese), L2458 (Angela)

Video workshops will be in L1316 on Thursdays or 3:56-6:00 in various spaces (TBA)

 

Program Objectives

 

Throughout the program, our central questions will be

How do images or representations of women constrain their life choices? How do these representations serve to justify unequal power relations? How can we reconstruct empowering images of women?

How can we study about, learn from , and engage with other cultures, especially other women, in non-dominating ways? In other words, how do we avoid the tendency of some forms of Western feminism to participate in the oppression of other women?

How are women's lives shaped by the intersections of nation, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, religion, and class? Of these categories, which is your primary site of struggle?

How is the structural inequality between men and women eroticized in Western societies?

What is the role of capitalism and globalization in limiting women's life choices of family roles and work? How is gender inequality maintained through violence, structural discrimination, and differential access to power?

 

Required Texts

The Wind Done Gone, Alice Randall. Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

Veils and Daggers, Linda Steet. Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Press, 2000.

Re-Orienting Western Feminisms, Chilla Bulbeck. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1998.

Black Feminist Anthropology, Ed. Irma McClaurin. New Jersey: Rutgers U. Press, 2001.

Look at My Ugly Face, Sara Halprin. NY: Viking, 1995.

A Daughter of Han, Ida Pruitt. Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 1967.

Primitive Passions, Rey Chow. NY: Columbia Univ. Press, 1995.

Talking Visions, Ed. Ella Shohat. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998.

Mothering: Ideology, Experience and Agency, Eds. Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Grace Change, and Linda Rennie Forcey. NY: Routledge, 1994.

 

Writing, Art, and Video Assignments and Presentations

 

Students will be expected to complete the following writing assignments during fall quarter:

 

1) Reading response papers (2-3 double-spaced pages). These concise essays on the readings will respond either to faculty reading questions or to your own clearly stated question. Using supporting examples and quotes from the readings, you should give a brief summary and analysis of how the author attempts to deal with a particular issue. Include at least two direct quotations or page citations to support your inquiry, and include any connected questions the readings sparked for you (see handout). Due Thurs. Week 1 and Tues. weeks 7 and 9.

 

2) Synthesis essay (6-7 pages). This essay should draw together some of the program materials&emdash;films, readings, lectures, etc.&emdash;from weeks 2-4 of the program in a creative way to address the question of feminist methodology. That is how do we avoid the tendency to dominate and oppress other women in the study of their lives? Consider how the various feminist authors seek to "re-orient" feminism, and set forth an argument that shows how such work is possible. Use comparative examples across cultures from the readings, films, and possibly outside media sources. First draft due Wed. Oct. 17; Final draft due Wed. Oct 24.

 

3) Video Portrait. Using in-camera editing, make a 2-minute video of a woman whom you respect. Consider how women are traditionally represented and how you might resist methods that objectify rather than humanize women. This will be due Oct 16 for Group 1, November 1 for Groups 2 and 3.

 

4) Politics of Identity essay (5 pages). Using descriptive details and vignettes from your own life experience, you will examine the intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, nation, and religion in defining your own identity. You will also identify your primary site of struggle, and form a group with others who share the same concerns/struggles to write a Collective Statement (3 pages). First draft personal essay due Thurs. Nov. 1; Final due Wed. Nov. 7; Collective Statement due Thurs. Nov. 8.

 

5) Self-Representation Collage. Using images culled from the mass media and your own photographs, you will create a collage that represents your relationship to your own body image. In the workshop on Oct. 24, we will look at the work of some artists who use collage as a technique (for example, Hannah Hoch, Muirne Kate Dineen, Holly Warburton) and learn how to use color copiers to create layered effects. You are encouraged to work with a partner, although each individual should complete a work of her own. Due Wed., Oct. 31.

 

6) Collective Video project. Working collaboratively in your collectives, create a 3-5 minute video in which the group examines representations of their primary site of struggle. Using research and appropriated images of, for example, working class women, queers, etc, draw on images of women appropriated from U.S. mass media sources. Then look at how these images compare to women with a similar identity in different cultural and national contexts. How is your primary identity complicated by cultural and national difference and by your place in global power relations? Due Tues., Dec. 4, Week 10.

 

7) Zine Project. On Thurs. Nov. 8, we will begin layout for an "International Feminism" zine that includes our personal collages, identity politics essays, and collective statements. The zine must be completed by Tues. Dec. 4, for presentation week.

 

 

 

Credit Policy

Sixteen Quarter hours of credit will be awarded for each quarter to every student who fulfills the requirements:

submission of all assignments by the deadlines announced in the syllabus unless otherwise agreed upon by the student and faculty member;

regular attendance at all class activities, including lectures, seminars, workshops and field trips. If absent due to illness or family emergency, please call or email your seminar leader in advance and leave a message. Unexcused absences may result in loss of credit.

draft of written self-evaluation and faculty evaluation at the time of the evaluation conference.

Partial or incomplete credit will be allowed only under exceptional circumstances, and by negotiation with the faculty team.

 

Academic Honesty

The work we submit--in discussion, writing, etc.--must reflect our own ideas. When we incorporate the ideas of others, be those published authors, filmmakers, or classmates, we should acknowledge our sources. While much of the work in this program will be collaborative and the ensuing ideas will reflect the contributions of more than one person, we will get in the habit of acknowledging the people and ideas that have influenced us. Failure to cite copyrighted sources, or presentation of the work of others as one's own, is plagiarism and will be treated in accordance with the provisions of the Social Contract.

 

Fall Quarter Schedule

 

Week 1: September 25 - 27 Race and representation of women in literature and film.

 

Tues. Lecture: Angela: "The Globalization of the Pro-Slavery Narrative"

Therese: "Neo- slave narratives"

Seminar: Randall, Wind Done Gone

Wed. Film: Gone With the Wind, Film analysis

Thurs. Workshop: at Organic Farm , Collage workshop, Anti-racism Work

Seminar: hooks in Talking Visions, p 65-74

Response paper on WDG due

 

 

Week 2: October 2 - 4 Orientalist Fantasies and Representations of the Middle East

 

Tuesday, Lecture: Therese, "Colonialist fantasies and counter-terrorism" -

Seminar: Veils and Daggers, Hatem in Talking Visions (369-390), & essay in Signs

Wed. Film: Edward Said on Orientalism and Benaat Chicago

Angela comments on the U.N. and women's issues

Thursday, Workshop: 9:00-10:00 Intro. Camcorders

10:00 Intro to synthesis essay

11:00 Guest performer, Vinie Burroughs

Seminar: Dutt, Talking Visions (225-235)

Vinie Burroughs performance: Fri, Oct 5, 8:00 pm, Longhouse

 

Week 3: October 9 - 11 U.S. and International Feminisms; Colonialism and Exhibition

 

Tuesday, Lecture: Therese, "US feminist movements"; Angela, "International feminisms"

Wednesday, Film: Couple in the Cage, On Cannibalism, & On Boys, Girls & the Veil

Seminar: Bulbeck, Re-orienting Western Feminism, Intro. Chapters 1, 2, and 4

In Talking Visions, Fusco (113-136), Gunning (203-224), Cheang (307-314), Kaplan p (451-484)

Read Intro of Talking Visions for Thursday

Thursday, Workshop: 9:00-11:00 L 1316 Group 1 Camcorders

11:15 - 1:00 Theory Debate

Seminar: Intro of Talking Visions (1-64)

 

Week 4: October 16 - 18 Black Feminist Anthropology and Autobiography

 

Tuesday, Lecture: Angela, "The Pathway to Becoming a Black Feminist Anthropologist"

Seminar: Black Feminist Anthro. Foreward,Chaps. 1, 2,6 (Gilliam) and 9.

 

Wednesday, Film: Life and Times of Sara Bartmaan

Writing Workshop-Synthesis draft due

Read Combahee Collective Stmt for Thurs

Thursday, Workshop: 9:00-1:00 Identity Politics and Autobiography [Show don't tell]

Seminar: BFA Chaps. 4 & 8

Video Group 1 Follow-up L 1301

 

Week 5: October 23 - 25 How are we colonized by concepts of women's bodies?

 

Tuesday, Lecture: Ju-Pong, "Women's bodies in art" history and the body as site of struggle

Seminar: Look at My Ugly Face, prelude - p 185

Workshop: iMovie proficiency, Group 1, MAC Lab

Wednesday, Film: The Ad and the Ego & Introduce self-representation collages. Bring in self images

Final synthesis essay due

Thursday, Workshop: Individual conferences with faculty.

9-11 L2126 Group 1 Video Project #1

9:00-11:00 L1316, Group 2 Camcorders

11:00 - 1:00 L1316, Group 3 Camcorders

Seminar: Look at My Ugly Face (complete book)

 

Week 6: October 30 - November 1 The Opium Wars. (Faculty Retreat Nov. 1 and 2)

 

9:00 Tuesday, Lecture: Angela, "The Opium Wars"

Seminar: Daughter of Han

Wednesday, Film: Slaying the Dragon (60 min) & Lotus (27 min)

Self collage due

Thursday, Workshop: Writing Groups- L1316 available

Autobiography drafts due

Seminar: Daughter of Han (cont.)

 

Week 7: November 6 - 8 Representation of Women in Chinese cinema.

 

Tuesday, Lecture: Ju-Pong, "Survey of Feminist Film Theory"

Workshop: iMovie, Group 2, MAC Lab. Group 3 View Assn #1, L 2103

Seminar: Primitive Passions, Part 1, Response paper due

Wednesday, Film: Yellow Earth

Thursday, Workshop: Graphic design, Zine assembly . Final autobiography due

Seminar: Primitive Passions,cont.

 

Week 8: November 13 - 15 The Body as Sign and the Politics of the Body

 

Tuesday, Lecture: Therese "Invisible Minorities: skin color and passing" Angela, "The politics of hair"

Seminar: In Talking Visions Piper (75-112) and Kaplan (451-484)

Workshop: iMovie, Group 3, MAC Lab. Group 2 View Assn #1, L 2103

Wednesday, Films: Picturing Oriental Girls, Hairpiece: a film for nappy headed people, Western Eyes. Collective Statement due

Thursday, 9:00 leave for Field Trip to Seattle from Red Square

Seminar at lunch: In Talking Visions, Jones (119-136), Zane (161-192), Meena Alexander (143-160) and Benamou (325-356)

 

Thanksgiving Break - November 19 - 23

 

Week 9: November 27 - 29 Mothering

 

Tuesday, Lecture: all three faculty lecture on mothering

Seminar: Mothering: Ideology, Experience, Agency - Chapter 1 & 3, Ch 4, Ch 11, In Talking Visions Lopez (193-202)

Wednesday, Films: Body Beautiful, Land and Skin, Measures of Distance

Thursday, Workshop: Oral history, Angela and Therese, prepare for interviews with mothers

Seminar: Bulbeck Ch 3, Response paper due

 

Week 10: Dec. 4-6 Zine and Collective Video Projects Due--Presentations

 

Afternoon spaces TBA