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Algebra to Algorithms: An Introduction to Mathematics for Science and Computing
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Judy Cushing
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: High school algebra proficiency assumed. This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Western science relies on mathematics as a powerful language for expressing the character of the observed world. Mathematical models allow predictions (more or less) of complex natural systems and modern computing has magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence 21st-century decisions. Computer science relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving and also enables the construction of mathematical models. In fact, computer science is the constructive branch of mathematics. This program explores connections between mathematics, computer science and the natural sciences and will develop mathematical abstractions and skills needed to express, analyze and solve problems arising in the sciences and particularly computer science. The program is intended for serious students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or pursuing further work in the sciences. The emphasis is fluency in mathematical thinking and expression, along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics include concepts of algebra, functions, algorithms and programming; and calculus, logic or geometry; all with relevant historical and philosophical readings. We will also address in seminar psychological, pedagogical and development aspects of mathematics teaching and learning in particular, as we discuss the place where each of us got "stuck" or "stopped" in our earlier involvement with mathematics.
Credit awarded in: Intermediate algebra; geometry, calculus, mathematical modeling or logic, problem solving; programming; and history and philosophy of mathematics.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in the sciences or mathematics.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry; Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (11/20/02) New, not in printed catalog

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Alternatives to Capitalism
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Peter Dorman
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and above.
Faculty Signature: Yes. The faculty will conduct an interview to determine students’ interest and relevant background.
Special Expenses: One overnight field trip, cost to be determined.
Internship Possibilities: no

Is there a viable alternative to capitalism as a system of economic organization? Does the collapse of communism mean that there can only be debates within capitalism, rather than between different systems? This program will provide a one-quarter survey of potential alternatives, as they have been written about and experimented with on a small scale. We will read detailed proposals and fictional visions, visit local noncapitalist institutions, and weigh the arguments on all sides. This is, above all, a program for people who need to clarify for themselves the economic dimension of their political commitments. Because this program takes economic feasibility seriously, we will consider the nuts and bolts of capitalism and anticapitalism: the role of markets and money, the organization of production, and the problem of incentives and coordination. No prior work in economics is required; however, those new to economic analysis will take a short course on basic concepts during the first half of the quarter so that they can follow the theoretical debates. This work will take place simultaneous to the study of alternatives. Students with enough background in economics will do supplementary reading and discussion in radical political theory during the same period. The result will be an advanced program for all who take part. We will read books by Ursula K. LeGuin, David Schweickart, Michael Albert, and Hilary Wainwright. We will also cover the socialist calculation debate of the 1930s, as well as more recent anti-socialist arguments by writers like Kornai and Stiglitz. The program will include field trips, visiting speakers and films. There will be one major piece of writing, either analyzing an existing vision or experiment, or constructing a new one.
Credit awarded in: economics, political science and history.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for careers and future studies in economics, social change activism and politics.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (2/24/03) New, not in printed catalog
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America Documented
Fall, Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Sam Schrager, David Marr
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 12 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $100 for a three- or four-day field trip.
Internship Possibilities: No

For democratic principles and ideals to remain vital, they must be communicated not only across the built-in divisions of class, race and religion, but across the divisions of aesthetic styles and tastes as well. And when this is achieved, not only do we find communication and communion, but we learn a bit more about how to live within the mystery which haunts American experience and that is the mystery of how we are many and yet one.
Writer Ralph Ellison is making a bold claim about artistic expression in the United States: that it needs to reveal the interplay of unity and diversity in American life if it is to make good on the nation's democratic ideals. Is Ellison right? Are works that depict variants of American experience actually metaphors for the whole? Was this true in the past? If so, how did these imaginative re-creations reach across the barriers that separate us? Is art vital to hopes for democracy in this postmodern age, when the very possibility of a common culture is in doubt?
These perplexing questions underlie America Documented, a study of America since 1850. We will examine novels and poems, plays and essays, histories and ethnographies, films and visual artdocuments attempting to communicate truths of American experience over these harrowing 150 years. We will explore how authors and artists conceive their stories, how they draw audiences into the lives of others, how they address social and political realities of their place and time. We will focus on, among other matters, African American and Jewish experience; relations of women, men and children; mythologies of nature, progress and freedom; changing moral outlooks on class and equality; the often elusive search for community, love and faith.
Based on this inquiry, students will undertake their own two-quarter study of a local institution of their choicee.g., a law court, a school, a service organization, a church, a family, a gathering spot. The project will include oral history interviewing, ethnographic fieldwork and background historical and literary research. It will culminate in a multilayered documentary account: an experiment at representing the lived experience of people in a place.
Faculty will provide a stimulating intellectual context: guidance on writing, research methods and approaches to challenging texts and ideas. In turn, we have high expectations. We welcome first-year students ready to be seriously engaged in their studies and offer strong support to upper-division students.
Credit awarded in: Literature, history, ethnography, social thought, cultural studies, community studies and writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-year Students, Culture, Text and Language
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences, law, journalism, media, teaching, community service and government.
Program Updates:   (11/19/02) Faculty Signature added

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The American City since 1945
Fall/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Greg Mullins, Michael Pfeifer, Babacar M'Baye
Enrollment: 72
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 18 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Up to $200 for possible field trips to Seattle and Vancouver, B.C., to be paid by October 4, 2002.
Internship Possibilities: No

The economic boom following World War II marks a decisive shift in U.S. urban history and U.S. social relations. Prior to that time, cities expanded on the model of a metropolis, with a well-defined core of economic, social and cultural institutions from which radiated a periphery of residential and business areas closely bound to the center. After the war, the potential of the horizontal city was explored with a vengeance, as freeway construction and low-interest mortgages enticed millions of Americans out of city centers and into suburbs. Today, we face the emergence of the "edge city": a self-sustaining conglomeration of business, retail and residence at the far edge of the traditional periphery, competing with and possibly replacing the city's fading center.
How have the last 60 years of urban reorganization changed the way we live? Does civic identification (as a New Yorker, Seattleite, Los Angeleno, Milwaukeean) remain a salient feature of American life? How are civic identities formed? If these identities become attenuated, is our ability to participate in the social, political and cultural lives of our communities compromised?
We will pursue these and related questions while paying special attention to the ways that postwar urban planning and suburban sprawl fostered segregation by race, social class and sexual orientation. We will read literature and history texts to explore the experience of both urban and suburban life from the 1950s to the present. At what price did the white middle class seek pastoral tranquillity in homogenous enclaves? How has suburban sprawl shaped African American communities and class structures within those communities? How was sexual identity defined by urban "gay ghettos," and did this identity change when openly gay people moved to the suburbs? And, ultimately, how do minority and majority social groups inhabit shared spaces and share civic identity?
This program will be reading and writing intensive.
Credit awarded in: American history, American literature, American studies, writing and urban studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language and Programs for First-year Students.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in literature, history, urban studies, education, law, politics, social services, for-profit and non-profit management and any other field that demands precise writing, critical thinking and verbal analysis.
Program Updates:   Babacar M'Baye has been added to the faculty. The enrollment limit has been raised.

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Animal Behavior
New, not in printed catalog
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Heather Heying
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. At least one year of college level biology required, one year of college-level writing, and background in evolutionary and ecological theory.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 for one, four-day field trip; plus additional costs as necessary to conduct research for independent projects.
Internship Possibilities: No.
Travel Component: One four-day field trip, plus travel as necessary for students to conduct projects of their choice.

What do animals do? Hibernate, forage, mate, form social groups, compete, communicate, care for their young and so much more. How do animals achieve these things? With the tools of their physiology, anatomy and, in some cases, culture. Why do animals do what they do? For reasons having to do with their particular ecology and evolutionary history. In this program, we will be studying animal behavior from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Students will be expected to engage some of the complex and often contradictory scientific predictions and results that have been generated in this field, as well as undertake their own independent research projects to be presented to the class at the end of the quarter. Some of the topics that we will focus on include mating systems, territoriality, female mate choice, competition, communication, parental care, plant/animal interactions and convergent evolution.
Credit awarded in: Evolution, ecology, zoology, philosophy of science and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in field biology, evolution, ecology and other life sciences.
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) New, not in printed catalog
(1/28/03) Faculty signature removed; Prerequisites changed.

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Art Now: An Introduction to Contemporary Art
New, not in printed catalog
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Joe Feddersen, Mario Caro
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Lab fees $50 per quarter; art supplies approximately $250 per quarter.
Internship Possibilities: No

Since World War II, we have witnessed a number of artistic and aesthetic movements: the decline of Abstract Expressionism; the rise of Pop Art and Minimalism; Earth, Body and Conceptual Art; Performance Art; Installation; Postmodern/Critical Photography; and digital media. This program will introduce students to the history of the production of visual arts over the past five decades as it is understood within its broader social, theoretical and political contexts. We will explore relationships among the practices of art, theory and politics—foregrounding the question of consumerism and the postmodern, the politics of identity and the critique of artistic subjectivity—in light of such socio-historical "moments" as the Cold War, McCarthyism, the Feminist Movement, the Civil Rights Movement and the advent of globalization. In addition, we will also explore the practice of art by learning how to produce printed images. Processes explored will be non-toxic etching and serigraphy. Workshops will be given on a weekly basis for the first half of the quarter followed by time to refine skills and develop imagery. There will also be a self-directed portion of the program that will allow you to pursue your own interests. Classes will consist of lectures, film/video screenings, seminar discussions, gallery/museum visits and guest lectures by noted artists. Our texts will include Mixed Blessings by Lucy Lippard, Art on the Edge and Over by Linda Weintraub and Visual Culture: The Reader, edited by Jessica Evans and Stuart Hall.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) New, not in printed catalog
(2/25/03) Faculty Signature added. Not accepting new students in Spring.

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Astronomy and Cosmologies
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: E. J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; facility with algebra.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $45 for materials, $200–$300 for binoculars and tripod and $300 for possible field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Learn beginning-to-intermediate astronomy and celestial navigation through lectures, discussions, interactive workshops and observation using the naked eye, binoculars and telescopes. Students will build (and take home) learning tools such as spectrometers and position finders, research a topic of interest (in the library and through observations), create a Web page and share research with classmates. We will also seminar on cosmologies: how people across cultures and throughout history have understood, modeled and ordered their universe. We will study creation stories and worldviews from ancient peoples to modern astrophysicists. Students are invited to help organize a field trip to warm, clear skies.
Credit awarded in: Astronomy, physical science and philosophy of science.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in astronomy, physical sciences, history and philosophy of science.
Program Updates:   (11/13/02) New, not in printed catalog

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Bilingual Education and Teaching
Fall, Winter/Group Contract
Faculty: Evelia Romano
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; previous course work in linguistics strongly recommended. Students must have previous course work in or concurrent study of a foreign or second language.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $100 for three-day field trip to Toppenish and Pasco, Washington.
Internship Possibilities: Yes

Language is the main tool for the transmission of knowledge and social values. This program explores linguistic and social issues related to minority language communities in the United States. The study of these issues is crucial to understand the role of education and the educational system in the integration and promotion of minority groups.
During fall quarter, we will explore several theoretical issues related to and preparatory for the study of bilingual education and teaching: first and second language acquisition, the relationships of language, culture and society and a historical introduction to bilingual education and the politics of bilingualism. A weekly workshop will be devoted to the study of second-language teaching, with particular consideration of different theories and methodologies.
During winter quarter, we will study the historical, political and social connotations of bilingualism in the United States and language policy as it relates to the concept of the nation/state. Students will be introduced to bilingual education in elementary and high schools, program design and assessment. We will visit bilingual classrooms throughout the state and conduct ethnographic observations during field trips. We will continue with the weekly workshops on teaching methodologies, emphasizing connections between theory and practice. Students will have the opportunity to work in the community (elementary schools, high schools, etc.) to acquire practical experience and apply theories discussed in class.
A four-credit intermediate/advanced Spanish course will be an optional part of the program throughout fall and winter quarters.
During spring quarter, the faculty will sponsor internships for those students who are interested in furthering their practical knowledge and experience. Students will be able to work as teachers' aides in K-12, ESL and bilingual classrooms, teach Spanish as a foreign language in elementary schools, work with the local Hispanic community on issues of health and education, teach ESL and Spanish literacy to adults, etc.
Credit awarded in: Bilingual education theory, history and policy, linguistics, language acquisition and sociolinguistics, multicultural education, ESL and second- or foreign-language teaching methodology and practice and intermediate/advanced Spanish. Upper-division credit can be earned for advanced work in all the areas.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter. Students may register for 12 credits without Spanish or 16 credits with Spanish.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in education, Master in Teaching, linguistics, ESL and second- or foreign-language teaching.
Program Updates:    

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Blood, Iron and Oil
Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Thomas Rainey
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students are welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will explore war and revolution in the 20th century. It will focus primarily on the Russian, Nazi and Iranian Revolutions and the First and Second World Wars. To understand these world historical events, participants will read, study and discuss history texts and fictional literature. Documentary and feature films will be utilized to give participants some visual sense of how war and revolution impacted and changed human lives and societies. With respect to the world wars, primary emphasis will be given to their historical causes and long-term political, economic and social consequences, rather than to specific battles and military leaders. The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union, the Cold War, will also be considered.
Credit awarded in: History* and literature*.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in history, literature, conflict studies, teaching, foreign service, international trade and commerce and international studies.
Program Updates:    

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Body, Mind, Soul
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Heesoon Jun, Kabby Mitchell, Lance Laird (FW)
Enrollment: 75 (FW), S (50)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome. At least two quarters in a coordinated studies program at Evergreen.
Faculty Signature: Yes. No new students will be admitted into this program for spring quarter.
Special Expenses: Approximately $75 for field trips plus student project expenses (amount varies with project scope).
Internship Possibilities: Yes. Possibly spring quarter only.

This program is designed for students who want to study health, sickness, wellness and healing from perspectives that integrate body, mind and soul. The main objectives of the program are: (1) to articulate historical, sociopolitical and cultural trends that have influenced the understanding of body-mind-soul and (2) to sort through and critique the images, information and ideas we receive in contemporary media, popular psychology and popular religion.
The program will explore historical, cross-cultural and autobiographical questions about the body-mind-soul connection. Examples of the historical questions are: How have religious, philosophical and cultural ideas of beauty, the body, mind and spirit developed throughout history? How do movements within and outside traditional religious, psychological and artistic communities challenge accepted notions of the body-mind-soul separation or connection? Cross-cultural questions include: Are there continuities, overlaps, disjunctures and critical perspectives within and between "eastern," "western" and "indigenous" traditions that might give us a more complex understanding of how human beings perceive themselves? What do various traditions and mainstream media prescribe as ways to nurture the development of healthy bodies, minds and souls? Autobiographical questions may include: What are the spiritual and psychological consequences of "sacred" bodies becoming "profane" or commodified? How does one's understanding of/attitude toward self in terms of body, mind and soul affect relationship to "nature," "other beings" or "the divine"? Through weekly body-awareness exercises and workshops students will deconstruct some habits and strive to construct new habits that honor body-mind-soul.
The readings will include a selection of articles as well as possible books, such as Sarah Coakley, ed., Religion and the Body, sacred texts and an abnormal psychology textbook.
Credit awarded in: Abnormal psychology, holistic healing, movement and health, cross-cultural studies on body symbology, capitalism and health, comparative religion*, history of religion* and health psychology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s):Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts and Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in health and social service professions and religious studies.
Program Updates:   (2/19/03) Faculty signature added. No new students will be admitted into this program for spring quarter.

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Business in Action
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Bill Bruner, Cynthia Kennedy
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will serve as both an introduction to business for students with little or no knowledge of the topic and as an opportunity to connect theory and practice for those who have studied business in the past. Students new to business and management will gain an overview of business principles and practices with an emphasis on finance, strategy and ethics. At the same time, intermediate students will deepen their understanding of these same topics through independent business plans, internships or research projects. All students will have an opportunity to put their business knowledge to the test in The Business Strategy Game, a remarkably realistic business simulation involving the manufacture of athletic shoes for world markets. This program will also include an introduction to techniques and technologies for doing professional business presentations and Web-page design.
Whether you are an aspiring capitalist, a critic of corporate capitalism or just curious about what makes the economy run, this program might be for you. You can expect to gain a knowledge of business terminology, a grasp of the fundamentals of business practices, an appreciation for business, sharpened points of criticism and/or more witty pro- or anti-business slogans.
Credit awarded in: Introduction to business, business finance, strategic planning, business ethics and topics in business applications.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in business, social science, law and political activism.
Program Updates:    

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Camera to Computer
Winter, Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Naomi Spellman
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome. One year of a Coordinated study program or equivalent.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $300 per quarter for photography supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

This is a two-quarter program which will engage processes and ideas in imaging and interactivity. This is will be a demanding and active class, requiring significant student input in the way of project execution, feedback, developing ideas for specific project scenarios, bringing areas of interest into group discussion, etc. Winter quarter will be devoted to learning photographic and digital imaging skills through weekly individual and group projects, discussion and field trips. Spring quarter will focus on two in-depth projects. One project will incorporate alternative imaging processes, digital manipulation and graphic printing. The second will be an interactive, site-specific project run with Global Positioning Satellite data, for which students will work together to choose a site and develop content. There will be a series of presentations on relevant topics, possibly including: the history of early computing and imaging, practical applications of imaging technologies, the role of images in various cultures and in various timeframes and augmented space artworks and ubiquitous computer applications. Visiting Artists will include artists working with imaging and other media in new formats, possibly including Negativland and The Center for Land Use Interpretation. Photography techniques will be covered insofar as optics, lighting, exposure and contrast latitude is concerned. However, we will not use the darkroom at all and chemical processes will be limited to slide film developing. We will use digital as well as traditional cameras. We will rely mainly on digital means to develop ideas and for output and presentation of projects.
Total: 16 credit each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in photography, interactive applications, computing arts and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (2/27/03) Faculty Signature added. Not accepting new students for Spring.

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Camera Work
New, not in printed catalog
Fall/Group Contract
Faculty: Paul Sparks
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, a sense of humor and a strong work ethic.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Students should budget a minimum of $250 to cover the cost of photographic supplies and lab fees.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will offer basic instruction, but will be open to students with all levels of photographic experience. The emphasis will be on camera work and seeing through an exploration of narrative photography and the traditions of photographic vision. Students should anticipate both formidable expectations and a demanding workload. Although camera work will be taught from the perspective of an artist, this program should be of special interest to anyone interested in documentary photography, journalism or film making.
Credit awarded in: Design, art history and photography.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in photography, documentary photography, journalism or film making.
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) New, not in printed catalog

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Celluloid Women and Men: Representations of Gender in Japanese and American Cinema
Winter/Group Contract
Faculty: Harumi Moruzzi
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 6 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Up to $30 for a field trip.
Internship Possibilities: No

This group contract is designed for students who are interested in cross-cultural exploration of gender issues while learning visual literacy.
It is often said that American and Japanese cultures represent diametrically opposite values in many aspects of human behavior and customs. For instance, while American culture emphasizes the importance of individuals over groups, Japanese culture dictates group cohesion; while Japanese women are valued most as wives and mothers, American housewives may feel severely undervalued if they are not wage earners. Needless to say, the reality is not as simple as these stereotypical perceptions indicate, but this dichotomized cross-cultural frame presents an interesting context in which to explore many human issues, particularly those of gender. Thus, in this program we will examine gender images presented in American and Japanese cinema and popular media, while further exploring their historical and cultural significance through books and seminars.
At the beginning of the quarter the students will be introduced to the fundamentals of film analytical concepts through texts, a lecture and a workshop. With these analytical tools students will examine gender images produced in American and Japanese films through seminars and critical essays, which will incorporate the concepts introduced in the weekly readings.
Students will also acquire basic skills in video production. They will learn how to use a camcorder and to edit VHS videotapes. By the end of the quarter the students will produce video works that deal with gender issues in specific historical and cultural contexts.
Credit awarded in: Japanese culture, film criticism, film theory, psychology and sociology.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in cultural studies, film studies, psychology and sociology.
Program Updates:    

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Centering
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Robert Leverich, David McAvity
Enrollment: 40
Prerequisites: Third quarter freshman standing.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $100 for art supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

What is your craft? Are you an artist or a scientist? Are they that different? What values and processes are common to them both? How do they give shape and meaning to each other? These are central questions in this program, designed to introduce students to wheel-thrown ceramics, applied principles of chemistry and physics and the nature of craft. Both art and science involve crafta thoughtful, skillful and informed centering on the task at hand.
Program work will center around the clay studio, with supporting science lectures and lab work and seminar. In the studio students will prepare clay, master basic wheel-throwing techniques, use drawing to explore ideas, produce a range of thrown ware, glaze the work and fire it in electric and gas kilns. Science lectures and lab assignments may address topics such as the physical and chemical make-up of clays, the physics of rotational systems, glaze chemistry and phase change properties of clay and glaze materials during the firing process. Through readings, seminars, work discussions and writing, students will reflect on their own work, the relationships between ceramics and scientific inquiry and the thinking and craft of each.
Credit awarded in: Ceramics, science, drawing and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-year Students
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in art, science and the humanities.
Program Updates:    

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The Citizen Artist: Activism Through Art
New, not in printed catalog
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Steven Hendricks, Margaret Tysver
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. New students are welcome to join the program at the beginning of each quarter as openings allow.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 for art materials, museum tickets and field trip expenses.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, winter and spring quarters with faculty approval.

The artist is first and foremost a teller of stories. Whether the story is in the actual work an artist does or in how that work fits into history, the story of art and the stories of artists help us to understand who we are as individuals, as communities, as human beings. In The Citizen Artist: Activism Through Art, we will explore the roles of an artist as an individual with creative vision, as a collector and interpreter of communal memories and as an agent of action and change in communities. We will become artists, historians, activists, critical readers and thinkers, writers and involved members of our community. Fall quarter, we will begin our two streams of focus: developing artistic vision through many different media and building our understanding of how history is transmitted and interpreted. If history is, in the words of one historian, "the gossip of winners," our history—local, national and global—can be both limiting and liberating, depending on whose stories you are told. Historical principles will be explored through alternative histories in art and literature that blur the line between fiction and nonfiction. Writing will focus on personal narrative, research and creative writing workshops. Studio sessions will consist of developing proficiencies in two- and three-dimensional media, creating work that responds to formal and conceptual challenges and exploring the process and purpose of making artwork for display in a gallery. Winter quarter turns from visionary art and historical principles toward the museum and the artifact. Museums organize history in order to reflect and frame the present, though not necessarily the truth. We will investigate how museums can support or question the dominant culture in service to society. Should museums shape culture or be shaped by it? Our creative work and study of museums will focus on reframing history in ways that transform our connection to the past by investigating contemporary alternative museums in order to reconceive the concept of "museum." Through creative and curatorial experiments, we will explore the role of the artist in telling communal stories. Fiction, non-fiction and proposal writing will be emphasized. Spring quarter, students will be responsible for creating "community art projects," projects which either incorporate community members in the creative process or respond to community needs. Public art takes art from the world of privilege—museums and galleries—and onto the streets. How does the artist transform social issues into art, creating with and for the public? Does the act of making art public redefine art itself? Through our understanding of local "histories" of all kinds, we will work in groups to develop our own artistic visions and carry out projects that explore the role of artists as agents for communal creativity and change. Proposals and reports will be the major writing forms through this quarter.
Credit awarded in: Art, art history, history, writing and editing and student individualized projects.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-year Students
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in art, art history, education, history, community development, editing and writing and project management.
Program Updates:   (11/20/02) New, not in printed catalog.

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The Classical Legacy: Provence and Tuscany
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Bob Haft, Marianne Bailey, Hiro Kawasaki
Enrollment: 75
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome. Core program or equivalent and some study of a foreign language.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Fall and winter quarters, students should expect to spend approximately $40-$120 on art supplies. In the spring, this amount could double, especially if students participate in one of the studio arts offerings at the Studio Art Center International in Florence, Italy. During spring quarter, the program will travel to France and Italy for 10 weeks, approximate cost $4,000.
Internship Possibilities: No

Nietzsche believed that great human advances occur when disparate groups encounter and meld with one another. The ancient Greek and Roman cultures offer examples of such a melding; both were fertile, syncretic blends of aesthetic notions and belief systems from North Africa, the entire Mediterranean basin and the ancient Indo-European world. The classical legacy of these cultures, which is neither static nor monolithic, exerts itself in various times and places throughout history. We will be especially interested in looking at the regions of Tuscany and Provence, two areas where the classical world view mixed especially well with indigenous elements. Both locales, which still fascinate the modern imagination, offer us rich and unique opportunities to do cultural studies while being immersed in an intoxicating sensory bath. (Think of Dante, the scent of orange blossoms, bouillabaisse and fields of lavender.) How and why does the classical legacy still hold such sway? This program addresses that question by first defining the ingredients of the classical legacy, evaluating its merits and faults and then showing how European cultures are indebted to it.
Fall quarter, we will examine the ancient Greek and Roman cultures as well as their influences and antecedents, by studying mythology, religious practices, art, architecture, literature and philosophy. Throughout our studies, we will deal with three themes space, time and selfhoodthat are continually evolving conceptual legacies of the classical world.
Winter quarter, we will shift our focus to study how these thematic classical legacies have had an impact on later European civilizations. We will study cultural turning points (both the Renaissance and later) when the classical legacy has been resurrected and re-conceived, philosophically and aesthetically. Ihe main question will be the ways the classical legacy has constituted either a boon or a burden to subsequent artistic and intellectual developments in Europe.
In order to examine our topics firsthand, spring quarter we will go to France and Italy where we will live, travel and study. The first five weeks we will spend in Provence, exploring sites from Marseilles to Nice. The second five weeks of the program will be spent in Tuscany; students will live in Florence and participate in art history and/or studio art programs offered jointly by Evergreen and SACI (Studio Art Centers International).
Students will be encouraged to study French during fall and winter quarters. Spring quarter they will have the option of studying Italian for five weeks at SACI.
Credit awarded in: History, art history, literature, philosophy, cultural studies, mythology and studio arts.
Total: 16 credits each quarter. Students may enroll for 12 credits with a faculty signature.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in the humanities, history, literature, cultural studies, art, arts management and teaching.
Program Updates:   (2/19/03) New students need to read the book "The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony" if they are accepted, as well as some other readings which the faculty will announce at the Academic Fair. New students will be staying on campus and will be working with Marianne Bailey.

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Coastal Dune Ecology
Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Al Wiedemann
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Basic course work in plant biology helpful but not required.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must fill out an application available from Al Wiedemann, (360) 867-6023, or wiedemaa@evergreen.edu beginning February 10, 2003. Faculty will conduct interviews to assess student's background knowledge, interests and writing skills. Students will be advised of their acceptance prior to the Academic Fair, March 5, 2003.
Special Expenses: Students can expect to spend approximately $290 for travel and lodging (food not included) for four, multiple-day field trips to coastal sites in Northern California, Oregon and Washington for a total of about 20 days in the field.
Internship Possibilities: No

Coastal dune systems constitute some of the most valuable landscapes in the world. At the meeting place of land and sea, they have been important for settlement, agriculture, industry, recreation and "coastal defense"protection from the eroding fury of ocean storms. In many places these uses conflict with one another and the decisions reflecting these uses become highly politicized. What is the nature of these systems and why are they so important?
Through a wide variety of reading and field study of the dunes from northern California to northern Washington, we will learn about dune morphologythe various kinds of dunes and how they are formed. We will also look at dune dynamicsthe interaction of ocean currents, sand, wind and vegetation in the creation of the dune systems. And, finally, we will examine the nature and complexity of the demands placed on these systems.
Credit awarded in: Geomorphology of coastal dune systems*, vegetation of coastal dune systems*, dune management and restoration,* and human interactions and aesthetics*.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in ecological research and management, natural history, forestry and wildlife management.
Program Updates:   (3/5/03) Enrollment increased from 14 to 20.

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Coastal Ecology and Geology
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Paul Butler, Gerardo Chin-Leo
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $75 for a three- to four-day camping trip to the Pacific coast of Washington.
Internship Possibilities: No

Coastal areas are dynamic environments characterized by unique biota and elevated biological productivity. This introductory program examines the physical forces acting on coasts (e.g., tides, waves and earthquakes) and how these forces determine a beach's composition and morphology. Both high-energy and low-energy systems will be examined. We will also study coastal organisms and how they have adapted to the stresses associated with wave action, periodic exposure to air and changing salinity. With this understanding of the physical factors that shape coastlines and the organisms that live there, we will then examine the ecology of both rocky and sandy areas along the Pacific coast of Washington and Puget Sound. The impact of human activities will also be incorporated into our study. The material will be covered through lectures, lab and fieldwork, seminars and student presentations. Field trips to various locations around Western Washington will be an integral part of the program.
Credit awarded in: Coastal geomorphology, coastal ecology, quantitative methods and technical and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-year Students
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in geology, oceanography, marine biology and environmental science.
Program Updates:    

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Computability and Cognition
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Sheryl Shulman, Al Leisenring
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome; one year of college and intermediate algebra.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must successfully complete a take-home entrance exam obtained from Sheryl Shulman, The Evergreen State College, SE 3127, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

By reasoning I mean computation - Thomas Hobbes

A variety of beliefs are about the nature of human cognition. For some, like Hobbes, thinking consists of nothing but the manipulation of symbols according to certain rules. For others, thinking is characterized not by a system of rules, but by a network of associations. This program will explore the strengths and limits of a variety of computational models and their relationships to human cognition. We will study the mathematics of formal systems, topics in philosophy and linguistic and recent work in artificial intelligence, as well as various topics in formal computer science.
The mathematics of formal systems constitutes the foundation of the program. Topics in mathematics, such as mathematical logic, theory of computation and formal language theory, will be selected because they have clear implications for computer science and cognitive science. Assignments will give students the opportunities to learn programming languages and computer-based projects.
In addition to these activities in which the student is working within a formal system, we will focus on the limitations of formal systems and in particular examine one of the great intellectual achievements of the 20th centuryGodel's incompleteness theorem, which states that every axiom system for arithmetic is necessarily incomplete or inconsistent. This result and others like it, establish inescapable limits to the power of formal systems in general and to computer programs in particular.
The seminar will examine a variety of issues in artificial intelligence and human cognition. Readings during the year will focus on the intellectual foundations of debates about the nature of cognition and the nature of mind and their implications for artificial intelligence. A primary focus of the seminar will be the current debate between those who favor computational models of the mind that are based on symbol manipulation and those who favor systems that model neural networks.
Beyond intermediate algebra there are no math prerequisites. Most important is an interest in and previous exposure to, the mathematical way of thinking.
Credit awarded in: Mathematical or symbolic logic, computer programming, formal language theory, theory of computability, artificial intelligence techniques and philosophy. Students will be awarded upper-division credit for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits, or variable between 4 and 15 credits, with faculty permission.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004­05.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in mathematics, computer science, philosophy, cognitive science and teaching.
Program Updates:   (2/28/03) Might accept very well prepared students. Must have C++ experience. Various credit options exist within this program. Speak with the faculty for details.

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Concepts of Computing
Cancelled
Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Judith Cushing, TBA
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: High school-level algebra. This all-level program accepts up to 50 percent or 24 first-year students
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Whether one aims to be an "end user" or a system developer, today's computer applications e.g., Microsoft Word, Excel or Web authoring tools can seem like a collection of arcane commands, rather than a coherent "system." Understanding the fundamental ideas in computing and mathematics that underlie today's computing can help one be a more effective user and a more discerning consumer of such technology just as understanding the customer needs behind such applications will enable one to be a better developer.
This program introduces some fundamental principles of computer science as well as the primary objectives of several major application packages. It is intended for students with a limited background in computing, who want some exposure to computing as a basis for future work, especially the sciences and the arts. This program is also helpful to students who want to follow with Data to Information, but who have had no programming experience.
There will be hands-on lab work together with an examination of the models, methods and abstract concepts behind software systems. Topics will include learning to use one or more software applications such as Dreamweaver or Excel; some programming in a very high-level language; some mathematics or logic; computational organization; the World Wide Web; and the historical, philosophical, social and ethical implications of computing.
Credit awarded in: Introductory computing.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-year Students; Scientific Inquiry.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2003­04.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in science, mathematics and computing.
Program Updates:   (12/18/02) Cancelled

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Creative Nonfiction: Reading and Writing the Literature of Reality
Cancelled See Fiction and Nonfiction as an alternative.
Winter/Group Contract
Faculty: Tom Foote
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Based on review of recent prose work; students must submit prose work to faculty by the Academic Fair, December 4, 2002. Send prose materials to Tom Foote, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA 98505, or e-mail footet@evergreen.edu
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Writers have come to realize that the genre of nonfiction writing can be as colorful and gripping as any piece of fiction. The difference is that nonfiction writers are not burdened with inventing characters, dialogue, plot and description as everything they write about actually happened. Creative Nonfiction writers assemble the facts and events and array them artistically and stylistically using the descriptive techniques of the fiction writer. They immerse themselves in a venue, set about gathering their facts while demonstrating scrupulous accuracy and then write an account of what happened in their own voice. Students will become practiced with the form through intensive fieldwork, research and writing.
John McPhee says, "the piece of writing has a structure inside it. It begins, goes along and ends in a manner that is thought out beforehand." That being the case, all the writer has to do is find that architecture and the piece practically writes itself. This helps to define and describe the form of creative nonfiction. The story and structure are already there and all the writer has to do is take the mallet and chisel and chip away the unnecessary marble encasing it to see the artistic form emerge.
This program combines journalism, field research and literary techniques. We will study folklore and field research to learn to pay attention to detail and journalism to learn how to construct a fact hierarchy and write a lead. Students will be introduced to the focus structure format, where the writer proceeds from the particular to the general. Following a period of redrafting and corrections, students will present their piece to the group in the last week of winter quarter. They will submit this polished piece to magazine or journal for publication.
We will read and discuss representative pieces written by noted authors such as
Joseph Mitchell, Jane Kramer, Susan Orlean, John McPhee and Truman Capote.
Credit awarded in: Reading creative nonfiction, fieldwork and writing creative nonfiction.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in the humanities: creative writing and creative nonfiction writing.
Program Updates:   (12/18/02) Cancelled. See Fiction and Nonfiction as an alternative.

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Crime in America
Fall, Winter/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Bill Bruner, Justino Balderrama, Ernestine Kimbro
Enrollment: 63
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Crime seems to permeate much of our everyday experience. Films, television programs, novels, theatrical plays, popular music, computer games and the news media have blurred the boundary between crime and entertainment. As law-abiding American citizens do we harbor a romantic liking for criminal acts and criminals?
This two quarter, upper-division program explores the phenomenon of crime and its impact on contemporary American culture. Our focus is interdisciplinary, informed by cultural theory, economic models and literature. Our purpose is to identify and examine the fundamental issues that form the nature of criminality.
During fall quarter, we will gain a comprehensive overview of crime, looking first at definitions of crime, measurement of crime and the "causes" of crime. We will also study the criminal justice system. Finally, we will consider the social and economic impacts of criminal activity.
In winter, we will turn our attention to the specifics of criminal activity, especially toward understanding the nature of specific types of crimes, both violent and nonviolent.
Credit awarded in: Criminology, sociology, social psychology, cultural studies, social work, economics, American literature, applied social statistics and creative writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in the humanities and the social sciences.
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) This program now accepts sophomores and above. The signature requirement has been removed.
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Culture and Participatory Research
New, not in printed catalog
Fall quarter
Faculty: Carol J. Minugh
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome
Faculty Signature: Yes. Contact faculty at (360) 867-6025, or minughc@evergreen.edu.
Special Expenses: $100 for field trip expense.
Internship Possibilities: No.

This program explores how cultures have been historically examined and provides opportunity for students to find new ways of learning about diverse people. Topics to be covered include: The development of a model for examining cultures; colonialism and identity; humans used as objects of scientific research and personal gain; how defining a people from the outside takes away the power inherent in self-identity; and power structures of privilege. The program will also examine the power of identity as it relates to juvenile justice and how research can be changed from objectifying people into empowering people. This class will meet once a week at Maple Lane School and confront the cultural and political struggles of incarceration. Students will be given an opportunity to utilize participatory research methods while providing cultural workshops. All students must pass the security check.
Credits awarded in: cultural studies and community studies.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in education, justice administration, community action and social work.
Program Updates:   (11/26/02) New, not in printed catalog
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Data to Information
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Neal Nelson, Brian Walter
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome; students must be proficient in high school algebra.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Entry may require an entrance exam or other assessment of proficiency in high school-level algebra and problem solving. Contact the program secretary at (360) 867-6550, The Evergreen State College, SE 3127, Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Are you interested in how your PC or the Internet really works? How Java programs run? Do you like building things, solving puzzles or doing mathematics?
This entry-level computing and mathematics program is a study of how bits, bytes and raw numbers gain meaning by having an appropriate structure imposed upon them, thus transforming data into information. Organizing data into different structures can produce different resultsthrough interpretation, correct or incorrect, raw data becomes information. Thus, with appropriate algorithms and data structures, computers can correctly manipulate data to draw pictures, transmit information around the globe or compute answers to mathematical problems.
A primary focus is problem solving, nevertheless, real-world problems often do not have clear-cut textbook solutions, so throughout the program all students are expected to develop the ability to search out the necessary information and develop the necessary skills to effectively solve mathematical and technical problems. We guide you through this process of "learning how to learn" in the fall and winter quarters.
The program also emphasizes weekly discussions of readings about topics in science, technology and society. Data to Information covers material in a core computer science curriculum at a liberal arts college, concentrating on mathematical abstractions and fundamental algorithmic and data modeling concepts. There is an intense hands-on laboratory component where students develop their own logic, programming and design skills.
The program is organized around four, yearlong and interwoven themes. A computational organization theme begins with digital logic and machine organization and continues with concepts of computer architecture and operating systems. A programming language theme concentrates on learning how to program in two major programming paradigms: functional programming and imperative programming. Various mathematical abstractions are studied through the year to build mathematical skills and to develop important theoretical foundations of the program. Finally, there is an ongoing seminar theme in which we explore social, historical or philosophical topics of science, technology and society.
Credit awarded in: Introductory programming, data structures and algorithms, digital logic, computer architecture, operating systems*, discrete mathematics and various topics on science, technology and society.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2003­04.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in computing, science and mathematics.
Program Updates:   (2/19/03) Will accept new students. Students must have programming experience in some language other than Visual Basic. Students entering only seminar do not need programming experience. Students must have high school algebra or eqivalent.
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Democracy and Equality
Fall/Group Contract
Faculty
: José Gómez
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Equality is an ancient ideal, yet at best the United States has embraced it ambiguously and ambivalently throughout its history. At worst, it has rejected the ideal altogether by selectively applying it, an oxymoronic result that effectively nullifies the ideal in favor of the opposite rule of inequality. Thomas Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal," yet he owned slaves. The framers claimed to cherish equality, yet they chose not to enshrine it in the Constitution. It wasn't until the 14th Amendment adoption in 1868 that this ideal was represented as an enforceable constitutional guarantee. Nevertheless, this did not prevent the states from passing Jim Crow laws to maintain white dominion or the Supreme Court from ruling that the Amendment did not mean what it said. Women were denied the right to vote until the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920 and the struggle to secure and maintain equal rights for many classes of persons continues to this very day.
In this program, we will study this long and continuing struggle to secure equality for all Americans. We will do this primarily by studying the long chain of Supreme Court cases that arose before and after the 13th, 14th, 15th and 19th Amendments, as well as the Civil Rights Acts of 1866, 1870, 1875 and 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. We will begin by taking a critical look at the early cases in which the Supreme Court effectively circumvented these amendments and statutes and, instead, eviscerated the ideal of equality in such opinions as Slaughterhouse Cases (1873), Cruikshank v. United States (1876), Civil Rights Cases (1883) and Plessy v. Ferguson (1896). We will then study the many cases in the 20th century and the new millennium that have chipped away at Jim Crow and inequality. These involve struggles for equal rights in education, employment, public accommodations, housing, voting and university admissions. We will also look at the modern equal protection cases that have gone beyond race to fight discrimination based on sex, age, disability, indigence, alienage, wealth and sexual orientation.
In addition to court opinions, reading for the program will include Internet resources and various books and journal articles that explore equality, inequality and 14th Amendment theory. Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real equal protection cases decided recently by the U.S. Court of Appeals and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions.
For students who want to study constitutional law winter and spring quarters see Democracy and Free Speech in winter quarter and Democracy and Religious Freedom in spring quarter.
Credit awarded in: 14th Amendment Law: Equal Protection, critical legal reasoning, legal research and writing and oral advocacy.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in social science, constitutional law, education, public policy, political theory, history and political science.
Program Updates:    
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Democracy and Free Speech
Winter/Group Contract
Faculty: José Gómez
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

May racists burn crosses to express their supremacist views? May protesters burn flags to express their opposition to government policy? The First Amendment is most vulnerable to erosion when we fail to protect expression that some or many may find "unpopular," "offensive," "repugnant," "indecent," "subversive," "unpatriotic," "heretical," "blasphemous," etc. This program will be a comprehensive and critical examination of the wide range of issues implicated by the protection and censorship of expression.
We will use the case method to study every major free speech opinion issued by the courts. This intensive study necessarily focuses on the last 75 years, since it was not until well into the 20th century that the U.S. Supreme Court began to protect speech from governmental suppression. Our study of controversies will include the new challenges presented by hate speech, government-subsidized art, political campaign spending and new technologies such as the Internet.
Students will be expected to examine critically the formalist free speech paradigms that have evolved and to question the continuing viability of the "free marketplace of ideas" metaphor. Reading for the program will include court opinions, Internet resources and various books and journal articles that explore First Amendment theory and its application. Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real free speech cases decided recently by the U.S. Court of Appeals and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions.
For students who want to study constitutional law see Democracy and Religious Freedom in spring quarter.
Credit awarded in: First Amendment Law: Free Speech, critical legal reasoning, legal research and writing and oral advocacy.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in social science, constitutional law, education, journalism, public policy, political theory, history and political science.
Program Updates:    
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Democracy and Religious Freedom
Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: José Gómez
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The framers of the U.S. Constitution sought to ensure that the federal government neither promote religion nor interfere with religious liberty. The very first two clauses of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution capture the framers' concern: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." On parchment, those 16 words seem simple enough. In practice, however, the two clauses often are in tension and give rise to enduring controversy over the meaning of "establishment" and "free exercise." For example, if the government exempts church property from taxation, is it assisting the establishment of religion? If the government does not exempt church property from taxation, is it interfering in the free exercise of religion?
In the United States, controversies about what the religion clauses prohibit or protect intensified in the 1940s, when the U.S. Supreme Court first recognized that the First Amendment applied to the states, not just the federal government. The disputes have arisen over such disagreements as what "religion" means; whether the First Amendment only prohibits the government from preferring one religion over another but permits it to aid all religion if it does so nonpreferentially; whether the government may prohibit certain religious practices; whether government must accommodate religious beliefs; whether governmental measures taken to protect the health, safety and welfare of the community may override religious beliefs; whether some or all types of prayer or religious instruction are impermissible in the public schools; whether the government may use tax money to transport parochial school children, to buy their textbooks, to subsidize their teachers' salaries or to reimburse noninstructional health services provided by their religious schools.
We will use the case method to study every major court opinion that implicates the First Amendment's religion clauses. This intensive study necessarily focuses on the last 62 years, since it was not until the 1940 case of Cantwell v. Connecticut that the Supreme Court began to protect religious rights under the First Amendment.
In addition to court opinions, reading for the program will include Internet resources and various books and journal articles that explore the history and theory of religious liberty as a constitutional right. Working in legal teams, students will develop appellate briefs on real freedom of religion cases decided recently by the U.S. Court of Appeals and will present oral arguments before the "Evergreen Supreme Court." Students will also rotate as justices to read their peers' appellate briefs, hear arguments and render decisions.
Credit awarded in: First Amendment Law: Freedom of Religion, critical legal reasoning, legal research and writing and oral advocacy.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in social science, constitutional law, education, public policy, political theory, history and political science.
Program Updates:    
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Drawing a Life
Spring/Group Contract
Faculty: Marilyn Frasca
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent or 6 first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Students must provide their own art supplies, approximately $75.
Internship Possibilities: No

Drawing images from one's own life in both writing and drawing are activities that will form the center of our work together. Students will have the opportunity to develop skill at drawing posed models and they will use journal-writing sessions to identify the unique events, situations and experiences that have formed their life context. Activities will include weekly figure drawing sessions, journal writing workshops, discussions of selected topics drawn from art history, literature and psychology, work-in-progress critiques and individual conferences with the faculty.
This spring quarter program is designed to create a community of image-makers who, with the aid of the faculty and one another, agree to develop skill at making their own images. The issues become ones of attention, intention and seeing. Writing and drawing will form the center of our work together. Students will be expected to make a presentation drawn from their own life experience at mid-quarter. For a final presentation, students will create a series of images based on the life of another person.
Credit awarded in: Drawing, creative writing and humanities.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in the humanities, art and psychology.
Program Updates:    
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The Empty Space: Theater of Compassion
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Doranne Crable, Walter Grodzik
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. Completion of one full-time coordinated studies program and evaluations from previous faculty.
Faculty Signature: Yes.
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 for attendance at live theater performances.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will explore theater and performance from the point of view of "catharsis," which is at the root of western theater. Study will include focus on the Greek foundations as we turn our attention to the concept of "compassion." If catharsis means to release whatever binds us to suffering, is not compassion the result? If theater, in its essential nature, is "ritual" that engenders community, might it also bring together people whose perspectives and experiences vary widely but whose humanity is the same? We will study and participate in workshops based on the dramatic, folkloric and mythological literatures of various cultures whose theatrical and performance traditions attest to people's capacity to rise to compassion, out of suffering, through the transforming power of expressive arts. Among the cultures we will consider are Native American, Jewish, African American, Chinese and Russian. The archetype at the center of our work will be Quan Yin, the Mother of Compassion (she who hears the cries of the world).
Fall quarter, we will begin the preparations and training for performances in winter and spring quarter. The theme will be "moving into darkness," as this seasonal archetype is experienced, through performance, in festivals of various cultures (e.g., mid-autumn celebrations, All-Souls Day and Halloween, then Kwanza, Michelmas, Hanukkah, Christmas, Solstice). Students will participate in seminars on drama, poetry and prose literatures related to this theme. They also will take part in weekly workshops exploring acting training, scripting techniques and character development. We will include study of children's theater as an educational medium, working with puppets, masks and storytelling. Faculty and guests will facilitate the work; students will write papers based on their workshop experiences, reading in cultural studies and lectures.
Continuing the experiential and analytical studies begun in fall, students will develop performance pieces in winter quarter, for in-house presentation only. At this time, they will identify the areas they most want to pursue on an in-depth levelscripting, directing, acting, composing, choreographing, technical work, promotionsduring spring. To prepare for student-motivated collaboration in spring, students will have to take technical theater workshops in the winter session. Performance, scripting and character development workshops will continue, facilitated by faculty and guests. The theme will change to seasonal celebrations of the coming of light (Twelfth Night, Chinese New Year, St. Valentine's, Tibetan Losar). Students will research, write about and present a topic of their choice, related to one cultural expression of suffering and compassion, through theater.
Spring quarter will be devoted to creating a public performance in the Experimental Theatre. This performance will reflect the year's work. Faculty will serve as artistic directors; and one or more students will serve as stage directors. Students will collaboratively create all aspects of the piece or pieces within the concept of "Quan Yin and the Theater of Compassion."
Credit awarded in: Education through children's theater (puppetry, mask-making, storytelling), research and presentation, dramatic literature (analysis, adaptation, scripting, performance), cultural studies (poetry, prose fiction, history), production (acting, directing, composing, design, choreography or promotions).
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Expressive Arts
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in theater and production.
Program Updates:   (2/26/03) Faculty Signature added. Not accepting new students in Spring.
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Energy: Working Towards a Sustainable Future
New, not in printed catalog
(This program replaces Working Towards a Sustainable Future)
Winter quarter
Faculty: Michael Beug
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This advanced group contract will engage in an in-depth analysis of global energy policy. We will analyze in detail the most comprehensive and far-reaching single volume on energy policy ever published—World Energy Assessment: Energy and the Challenge of Sustainability, Josť Goldemberg, Ed., United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs and World Energy Council, New York, 2001 (ISBN 92-1-126126-0, $65). In the first part of the quarter we will place energy in the context of major global issues (poverty, population, gender, health and environment). We will then spend the bulk of the quarter examining both current and prospective world energy resources and technology. At the end of the quarter we will examine six scenarios for the future—three disastrous (including business as usual) and three successful, finally asking where do we go from here?
Credit awarded in: Energy systems. Up to eight upper-division credits will be awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, energy systems and science policy.
Program Updates:     (12/03/02) New, not in printed catalog.
This program replaces Working Towards a Sustainable Future
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Energy and Trash: Over-Consumption in North America
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Sharon Anthony, Robert Cole
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome; college-level algebra.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $125 for overnight field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

How much energy do you use? How is electricity generated? How does energy production affect the environment? How much trash do you produce? Where does your trash go? How does your trash affect the environment? This program will examine the technical and policy aspects of North American energy consumption and trash generation and compare it to the rest of the world. Students will use mathematical modeling tools to explore the flow of energy and material goods in society and will conduct audits of our personal contributions to these flows. We will use chemistry to investigate the effects of energy generation and waste emissions on the atmosphere and aquatic environments. We will also examine policy options and investigate directions that point to a more sustainable future.
This intensive 10-week program of study will include workshops and lectures, computer labs, seminar discussions, field trips and library literature searches. In addition to the scheduled activities, students will have the opportunity to do an independent research project of their own choosing.
Credit awarded in: energy and solid waste policy, renewable and non-renewable energy systems and environmental chemistry. Upper-division credit awarded for upper-division work.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in environmental policy, environmental science and environmental health.
Program Updates:   (1/24/03) Prerequisites: Remove one quarter of college-level chemistry.
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Environmental Analysis: Chemistry and Geology of Aqueous Ecosystems
Fall, Winter, Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: Jeff Kelly, Clyde Barlow, James Stroh (FW)
Enrollment: 46 (FW) 25 (S)
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. One year of college-level chemistry and college-level algebra required; physical geology and trigonometry strongly recommended.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: One-week field trip to Sun Lakes in Eastern Washington, approximately $250 for transportation, logistical support, food, incidentals and personal items.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, under special circumstances with a faculty signature.

Baseline assessment of natural ecosystems and determination of environmental contamination require accurate chemical and geological measurements. We will study the geology and chemistry of ecosystems and develop topics that are appropriate to the analysis of the contents of natural water systems and problems of aquatic and terrestrial pollution. This program integrates material from geology, hydrology, analytical chemistry, statistics and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Projects will include research on geological and chemical issues and problems of ecological and environmental significance.
Fall and winter, we will address topics in geochemistry, analytical chemistry, GIS, statistics and instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Students will participate in field trips and begin group projects working with state, county and city agencies to monitor water quality at selected sites in Washington and establishing baseline analyses of the chemical composition of ground, surface and rainwater on campus. Methods and procedures will be developed to analyze for trace materials. Computers and statistical methods will be used extensively for data analysis and simulation.
Spring will be devoted to project work and completing studies of statistics and analytical chemistry.
Credit awarded in: Geochemistry*, geohydrology*, analytical chemistry*, Geographic Information Systems*, statistics*, chemical instrumentation* and group projects*. Students leaving at the end of fall quarter will receive lower-division credit. Students who strengthen their knowledge by completing at least fall and winter quarters will receive upper-division credit for both quarters.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies; Scientific Inquiry.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004­05.
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in geology, hydrology, chemistry, environmental analysis and environmental fieldwork.
Program Updates:   (2/19/03) Talk to faculty regarding admission in Spring. Unlikely they would take any new students.
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Exotic Species in Marine Ecosystems
New, not in printed catalog
Spring/Coordinated Study
Faculty: David Milne
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, background in ecology or marine biology.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $180 for field trip expenses.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will examine marine plants and animals that are transported to localities in which they are not native, usually by human agencies. These include species of value in aquaculture (oysters, clams, fish), species that behave as pests (oyster drills, green crabs) and species that appear to blend innocuously with the native communities into which they are introduced (many clams, Japanese eelgrass). Lectures and readings will focus on the ecology of introduced marine species, their economic implications, modes of transport and dispersal, relationships with physical/chemical properties of their environments, their distributions, features and theory of their spread, Washington state policy regarding exotic marine species and related issues. Lab and field trips will be devoted to identification, recognition and detection of local exotic species and assessment of properties of their populations in Washington. In addition to the study of the broad spectrum of exotic marine species, the class will focus in detail on one subset of them, the Spartina cordgrasses. Student teams of two will concentrate on an exotic species of their choosing, with weekly reports on aspects of the species' ecology, effort to find it in the field and a final comprehensive report and poster on that species. Although our focus on marine species, aspects of the ecology and impacts of terrestrial and freshwater species (e.g., zebra mussels) will be considered where relevant.
Credit awarded in: Ecology of invasive species*, marine ecology* and invasive species policy*.
Total: 12 or 16 credits. Students who enroll in the 12-credit option are choosing not to participate in the evening Ecology and Politics of Invasive Marine (Spartina) Cordgrasses in Washington State component of this program.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program is preparatory for: Careers and future studies in resource management, marine ecology, aquaculture and aquatic nuisance species policy.
Program Updates:   (11/22/02) New, not in printed catalog
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2700 Evergreen Parkway NW
Olympia, WA 98505
(360) 867-6000

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