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Academic Catalog

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A Dyer's Garden: Growing, Creating, and Understanding Color

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Marja Eloheimo square
ethnobotany, environmental and cultural anthropology, plant studies

“She turned back to inspect a bank of greens: olive, jade, leaf, kiwi, lime, a silver-green

like the back of birch leaves, a bright pistachio.” Anne BartlettKnitting

Dyes are substances that impart color to other materials such as fibers (including fabric, paper, yarn, and baskets). Currently, an Indigenous Fiber Arts Studio is under construction as the first step of establishing an Indigenous Arts Campus adjacent to Evergreen’s “House of Welcome” Longhouse. Participants in this program will have the opportunity to design and install a garden of dye plants to support the Fiber Arts Studio. Toward this end, students will learn about the history of natural dyes in different places and times, including among the Coast Salish; explore color science, perception, and theory; study plants used as dyes; experience the art of dyeing with plants; and develop skills required to design and create a dye garden.  Activities will include lectures, readings, research, writing, workshops, labs, and hands-on fieldwork. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

botany, arts, history, cultural ecology, Indigenous studies, horticultural design

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$55 Fall for museum entrance and project supplies; $65 Winter for workshop supplies

Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays, 9:30-5:30

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-12-04Winter quarter fee added ($65)

Abnormal Psychology (A)

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

psychology

This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Abnormal Psychology (B)

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

psychology

This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-13New Spring quarter offering added

Academic Writing at Evergreen

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Suzanne Simons square
poetry and literary arts, community studies/Middle East studies, journalism

This writing intensive course has two purposes. The first is to help students develop as academic writers, to engage in writing as intellectual work. We will work on developing "rhetorical reading" skills--noticing not only what something is about, but also how it is put together. Building on common readings, students will write and revise several academic essays. Students with more academic experience will have the option of writing essays in areas related to their academic concentrations. A key element for all students will be engaging in productive revision processes. We will also explore academic writing at Evergreen--in particular, the purpose and practice of Evergreen's Academic Statement. This course can serve as an introduction to academic writing; for more advanced students, it offers the opportunity to develop a stronger practice of revision.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays, 6-10 pm. 

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-08-09Suzanne Simons added as faculty

Accounting: The Language of Business

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Jon Baumunk
business

Accounting is often referred to as “the language of business.” In this program, we will study managerial and intermediate financial accounting concepts in the broad context of making business management decisions. We will explore how accounting information facilitates decision making in a wide variety of contexts and how managers and other decision makers rely on this information to make decisions that benefit their organizations.

Topics include operational and capital budgeting, investment, and performance evaluation, measurement of assets, liabilities, and income as well as financial statement disclosure issues. We will look carefully at conceptual frameworks of financial accounting in the United States and internationally. Guided in-class assignments will provide students with hands-on practice applying accounting concepts in the context of making business management decisions, such as managerial planning, cost-volume-profit relationships, operational control, and performance evaluation. Seminar discussions will build upon students' earlier study of accounting for financial performance and explore topics such as valuation theories and how organizations of all kinds – including manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, service organizations, government agencies, and not-for-profit entities – and sizes need financial statements and other reports to make decisions. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet software is recommended.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

various career paths within accounting and other business careers

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Introductory course in financial accounting. Students who have taken programs such as Global Exchange or The Business of Art will be well prepared for this program. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet software is recommended.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 9am (Sem II C2105)

Located in: Olympia

Activist, Student, Citizen.

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

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Taught by

Bradley Proctor
U.S. history, African American history, American studies
classics, archaeology

2017 was the year of political protest. Widespread dissatisfaction with the status quo has led many to look outside of traditional political structures for solutions to the problems they see as most pressing. A desire to transform the world combined with a post-industrial economy drives many people to pursue careers in activist, non-profit, and social justice work. This program seeks both to provide students with skills to succeed in these arena as well as historical and philosophical foundations for activism and community engagement. The fifth "Focus" of an Evergreen education is "linking theory with practical application." Students in this program will be asked to bridge the gap between theoretical and practical citizenship and community engagement. The program will provide two interconnected opportunities: to build connections and gain work experience in the political and community work, and to expand academic understandings of histories and theories of activism and applied citizenship.

Students will be asked to reflect on and implement their ideas about citizenship and a good society through projects of their choosing, spanning academic and/or advocacy work. This program will connect students with local organizations for internship and activism opportunities. Students may collaborate with The Evergreen State College’s Center for Community Based Learning and Action (CCBLA) to organize individual or group outreach to the Olympia community on self-selected issues. To aid with this learning outcome, the CCBLA will be actively involved in training students on best practices in community engagement in the first two weeks of class. Students not wishing to pursue community work may complete an original academic research project with a focus on political action and its history.  

Contemporaneous with work external to the college, students will read foundational historical texts about citizenship and reflect on their utility and relevance to their work as activists. Weekly framing lectures will contextualize these readings, and seminars will allow student to discuss both their individual experiences and program. Seminar papers and work journals will give students the opportunities to connect their experiences to the program readings.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

history, political science, social work, activism, politics, and law.

16Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

8-12 credit options available. Contact the faculty for more information.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Adaptation: Evolutionary Patterns in Biological Space-Time

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

CANCELLED

Taught by

The vast majority of complexity in the observable universe is due to one process—selection, or the tendency for some patterns to out-compete alternatives for either resources, mates, or both. And though the basics of evolutionary selection can be summarized in a single phrase ("survival of the fittest"), details and diversity of patterns are surprising in the extreme, raising profound questions at every juncture. For example, why has a simple, shared drive to increase reproductive success taken aardvarks and spruce trees in such different directions? And why would a peahen choose to burden her sons with a giant handicap to their movement by mating with a peacock carrying genes for a massive tail?

We will take a broad approach to selection, studying what is known but focusing on that which remains mysterious. The adaptive interplay between genetic, epigenetic (regulatory), and cultural traits will be of particular interest. We will also place special emphasis on understanding the tension between selection exerted by mates and that exerted by environmental factors.

We will develop a basic toolkit for evolutionary analysis: What is an adaptation and how can it be recognized? How can we infer function? What is the relationship between a trait's short- and long-term adaptive value? We will scrutinize structures, behaviors, and patterns found in the wild, and refine our ability to understand them through the language of game theory. We will then focus on pushing our model of selection to its limits and beyond by applying it to the most complex and surprising adaptive patterns in nature, with a special emphasis on adaptive patterns manifest in Homo sapiens .

We will read books and articles, have lecture, and engage in detailed discussions. Discussions will be central to our work. Students will be expected to generate and defend hypotheses and predictions in a supportive and rigorous environment. We will go out and look at nature directly when conditions are right. There will be assignments, but the program will be primarily about generating deep predictive insight, not about producing a large volume of work. It is best suited to self-motivated students with a deep commitment to comprehending that which is knowable, but unknown. This program will focus on how to think, not what to think.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, medicine, psychology, and public policy. This program will focus on how to think, not what to think. As such, it will be useful to in any career in which critical thinking is important.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$400 for a required, 5-day field trip.

Upper division science credit:

Upper-division credit will be awarded on the basis of novel analytical insight and innovation.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-09-18This program has been cancelled.

Adolescent Literature

Summer
Summer 2018 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

literacy education

Learn how adolescent literature meets the developmental needs of middle and high school ages (grades 6-12). We’ll look at the literature in historical perspective, study young adult development in reading, and consider genres with representative authors and selection criteria. Participants will read and critique several genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses. Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

teaching, education, library science

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

Advertised schedule:

Mondays  9a - 1p

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Metal Project - Architectural Iron

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 15
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Alair Wells square
sculpture

This advanced metalworking and blacksmithing class investigates design, forging and fabrication of architectural ironwork.  Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of mechanical drawing and hand drafting, field measuring, layout, and fabrication of quality hand forged elements.  A single project (architectural detail) will be worked on from concept to completion with a focus on a decorative and ornamental aesthetic.

Full attendance is mandatory and an additional 6-10 hours per week outside of class will be required in the metal shop and/or 3-D studio.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$100 for project materials

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 15
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 5:30-9:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

geology, earth science, biogeochemistry
Lalita Calabria
botany, phytochemistry, systematics
Gerardo Chin-Leo
oceanography, marine biology
Dylan Fisher square
forest and plant ecology
Carri LeRoy
freshwater ecology, quantitative biology, environmental education
Paul Przybylowicz
ecology, biology, mycology
Styring square
ornithology
marine science, zoology, ecophysiology
Pauline Yu square portrait
marine science

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in environmental studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Abir Biswas studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires, and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies, taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology, or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements.

Lalita Calabria focuses on biodiversity and conservation of bryophytes and lichens in temperate North America. As a broadly trained plant biologist, Lalita uses a multidisciplinary approach to investigating these topics including floristic surveys, ecological studies, herbarium-based research and phytochemical studies of plants. Current activities in her lab focus on assessing the impacts of fire on lichen and bryophyte communities of oak woodlands and prairies, estimating biomass and functional group diversity of bryophyte and lichen ground layers in Puget Sound prairies and quantifying biological nitrogen fixation rates of moss-cyanobacteria symbiosis. Students with backgrounds in botany, ecology, or chemistry could gain skills in bryophyte and lichen identification, as well as, field monitoring methods and studying symbiosis of bryophytes and lichens. Students participating in this program would engage with ongoing research in Lalita’s lab and may have opportunities to develop their own research projects.

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

Dylan Fischer studies plant ecosystem ecology, carbon dynamics, and nutrient cycling in forests of western Washington and the Southwest. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, molecular genetics, plant physiology, carbon balance, nitrogen cycling, species interactions, community analysis, and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project ( blogs.evergreen.edu/eeon/ ). See more about his lab's work at  blogs.evergreen.edu/ecology. Students in this program work closely with ongoing research in the lab, participate in weekly lab meetings, and develop their own research projects.

Carri LeRoy conducts research on linkages between terrestrial and aquatic environments. She is trained as a freshwater ecologist and primarily studies in-stream ecosystem processes and aquatic communities. She and her students study leaf litter decomposition in streams as a major input of organic material to aquatic systems. In addition, she conducts research on aquatic macroinvertebrate community structure, aquatic fungal biomass, and standard water quality and hydrology measurements in stream and river environments.

Paul Przybylowicz conducts research on soil fungi, mushroom cultivation and potential uses for fungi. He is particularly interested in bioremediation and biocontrol applications of fungi, along with practical mushroom cultivation methods for small-scale vegetable farmers. Current efforts are focused on isolating and screening fungi for bioremediation properties.

Alison Styring studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics as well as avian monitoring and research in Evergreen’s campus forest and other nearby locations. Bioacoustic research includes field monitoring of local birds using audio recordings and microphone arrays, and editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from the campus forest as well as tropical forest sites in Borneo. Local research projects in the campus forest and nearby locations include Pacific wren mating and life-history strategy, cavity formation and use by cavity-nesting birds (and other cavity-dependent species), and monitoring long-term trends in bird populations and communities using a variety of standard approaches.

Erik Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the ecophysiological and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton that live in the deep sea. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry.

Pauline Yu studies the developmental physiology and ecology of marine invertebrates. She is interested in the biochemistry of the seawater-organism interface, developmental nutritional biochemistry and metabolic depression, invasive species, carbonate chemistry (ocean acidification), and cultural relationships with foods from the sea. Students have the opportunity to collaboratively develop lines of inquiry for lab and/or field studies in ecology, developmental biology, physiology, marine carbonate chemistry, and mariculture.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, freshwater science, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy, and zoology.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: variable credit options available.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with A. Biswas

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

geology, earth science, biogeochemistry

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Abir Biswas studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires, and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies, taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology, or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

geology and earth sciences.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with A. Styring

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Styring square
ornithology

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Alison Styring studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics as well as avian monitoring and research in Evergreen’s campus forest and other nearby locations. Bioacoustic research includes field monitoring of local birds using audio recordings and microphone arrays, and editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from the campus forest as well as tropical forest sites in Borneo. Local research projects in the campus forest and nearby locations include Pacific wren mating and life-history strategy, cavity formation and use by cavity-nesting birds (and other cavity-dependent species), and monitoring long-term trends in bird populations and communities using a variety of standard approaches.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ornithology.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with C. LeRoy

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Carri LeRoy
freshwater ecology, quantitative biology, environmental education

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Carri LeRoy conducts research on linkages between terrestrial and aquatic environments. She is trained as a freshwater ecologist and primarily studies in-stream ecosystem processes and aquatic communities. She and her students study leaf litter decomposition in streams as a major input of organic material to aquatic systems. In addition, she conducts research on aquatic macroinvertebrate community structure, aquatic fungal biomass, and standard water quality and hydrology measurements in stream and river environments.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ecology and freshwater science.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with D. Fischer

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dylan Fisher square
forest and plant ecology

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Dylan Fischer studies plant ecosystem ecology, carbon dynamics, and nutrient cycling in forests of western Washington and the Southwest. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, molecular genetics, plant physiology, carbon balance, nitrogen cycling, species interactions, community analysis, and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project ( blogs.evergreen.edu/eeon/ ). See more about his lab's work at  blogs.evergreen.edu/ecology . Students in this program work closely with ongoing research in the lab, participate in weekly lab meetings, and develop their own research projects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

plant ecology and physiology, field ecology, restoration ecology

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with E. Thuesen

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

marine science, zoology, ecophysiology
Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Erik Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the ecophysiological and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton that live in the deep sea. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

marine science.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with G. Chin-Leo

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Gerardo Chin-Leo
oceanography, marine biology

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

marine studies and oceanography.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with L. Calabria

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Lalita Calabria
botany, phytochemistry, systematics

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Lalita Calabria's research focuses on biodiversity and conservation of bryophytes and lichens in temperate North America. As a broadly trained plant biologist, Lalita uses a multidisciplinary approach to investigating these topics including floristic surveys, ecological studies, herbarium-based research and phytochemical studies of plants. Current activities in her lab focus on assessing the impacts of fire on lichen and bryophyte communities of oak woodlands and prairies, estimating biomass and functional group diversity of bryophyte and lichen ground layers in Puget Sound prairies and quantifying biological nitrogen fixation rates of moss-cyanobacteria symbiosis. Students with backgrounds in botany, ecology, or chemistry could gain skills in bryophyte and lichen identification, as well as, field monitoring methods and studying symbiosis of bryophytes and lichens. Students participating in this program would engage with ongoing research in Lalita’s lab and may have opportunities to develop their own research projects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

 lichen, bryophyte, and plant ecology and herbarium-based research.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with P. Przybylowicz

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Paul Przybylowicz
ecology, biology, mycology

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Paul Przybylowicz  conducts research on soil fungi, mushroom cultivation and potential uses for fungi. He is particularly interested in bioremediation and biocontrol applications of fungi, along with practical mushroom cultivation methods for small-scale vegetable farmers. Current efforts are focused on isolating and screening fungi for bioremediation properties. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

mycology and ecology

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with P. Yu

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Pauline Yu square portrait
marine science

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Pauline Yu studies the developmental physiology and ecology of marine invertebrates. She is interested in the biochemistry of the seawater-organism interface, developmental nutritional biochemistry and metabolic depression, invasive species, carbonate chemistry (ocean acidification), and cultural relationships with foods from the sea. Students have the opportunity to collaboratively develop lines of inquiry for lab and/or field studies in ecology, developmental biology, physiology, marine carbonate chemistry, and mariculture.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental studies,  marine science, and zoology.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: variable credit options available.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Topics in the Performing Arts: The Audition and the Actor

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Have you ever auditioned for a show and weren't quite sure how?  Or, do you become very nervous because you feel you aren't well-prepared?  This program is a chance for students to learn new skills and practice the art of auditioning.  This is a practical hands-on program. Curriculum includes: preparing for the audition, how to choose a monologue, cold readings and improvisation technique, and audition etiquette. Students should be prepared to spend considerable out-of-class time to memorize and rehearse their monologues.  Students will learn learn how to choose and create a portfolio of classic, comic, and dramatic monologues and will present their memorized and rehearsed selections each week in technique and critique workshops. Participants should have a strong interest in performance, acting, and be able to work independently and collaboratively. The newly-trained actors will present their best audition monologues, for friends and family, in a showcase at the end of the quarter. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

performance, theatre, acting, public speaking, and teaching.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students must have significant experience in acting in which they have developed good performance skills and a strong work ethic. Students with traditional or non-traditional performance backgrounds are strongly urged to apply.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$75 for performance and entrance fees.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-07-31Fee added ($75).
2017-04-19This program requires faculty approval to register.

Advocating for a Sustainable Future: Weaving Stories and Statistics

WinterSpring
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
48
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics, history of science
creative writing, sustainability, public policy

8 credit students:

Connect passion and practice. Join an action-oriented program on advocacy and change-agency, designed to welcome students to new spring work. We will emphasize skill building for effective advocacy work, including strategies for advancing environmental and social justice.  Our focus will be issues that deeply impact our individual and collective lives.

Students will choose to concentrate on issues they are passionate about while planning, practicing, and executing advocacy strategies.

Particularly important in this complex time of polarization, we will practice ways to “break through gridlock” on community, and interpersonal levels.  (Support text: Breaking Through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World )

The work of developing resilience and self-care for advocates is critical during times of complexity and polarization. We will learn and practice methods to do both. (Support text: Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities).

Connecting passion to practice, we will invite local advocates to discuss their educational backgrounds, tools, strategies, and work. We’ll visit advocates in community so they can connect their background to current issues of ecological and social justice.

Throughout, we will develop an array of writing, speaking, quantitative, qualitative, and public presentation skills targeted to key audiences.  We will also invite public officials to discuss with us what strategies are most persuasive.

This program will offer the chance to “weave stories and statistics,” combining these and other skillsets to be the strongest possible change agents.

We’ll develop quantitative and statistical literacy by reviewing public documents related to sustainability and the public good. Students will make use of state and local policy reports to understand statistical research methods. By the end of the quarter, we will be using statistical software and design principles to create accessible tables and graphics for a general audience. No previous experience with statistics or software is expected.

Join us as we “spring” into understanding and practice to be skilled advocates and change agents!

Credit may be awarded in statistics, sustainability studies, public policy, and community studies.

 

4 credit students:

We will use statistical tools to better understand issues and phenomena in various communities: our classroom, the campus, Thurston County, the United States, and (possibly) beyond. The emphasis will be on the practice of statistics. Theory will be referenced as needed to facilitate the work. Class time will be centered around student questions and collaborative workshops. Students will present a final project/case study that relates to social or environmental justice.

The text will be open-source online and there will be an online homework/tutorial component to the class – both are free. Excel will be used throughout.

No previous software or statistics experience is required or expected.

Topics will include:

  • Graphical representations of quantitative data
  • Measures of center, variation, and position
  • Probability
  • The normal distribution
  • Confidence intervals
  • Contingency tables
  • Correlation and regression

Four credits will be awarded in descriptive and inferential statistics.

48

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$50 winter quarter for field trips and special projects materials.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

8 credit students: Wednesdays from 6 to 9:30p, plus 5 Saturdays from 9:30a to 5p per quarter. Winter Saturdays: Jan. 20, Feb. 10, Feb. 24, March 10, and March 24. Spring Saturdays: April 7, April 21, May 5, May 19, and June 2.

4 credit students:  Wednesdays from 6 pm to 8 pm and Saturdays: April 7, April 21, May 5, May 19, and June 2, from 9 am to 1 pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-234-credit Statistics only component added
2018-03-01Program description updated
2017-12-06Program now open to all levels.

African/American: Afrofuturism

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Andrew Buchman
music composition
Kris Coffey
creative writing, historical fiction, ethnic american literature

Note: Kris Coffey will be joining the program in the latter part of the quarter.

"Space is the place." — Sun Ra

Afrofuturism is a literary and cultural aesthetic embraced by artists who have imagined alternative futures while often grappling with aspects of race, ethnicity, gender, (dis)ability, and class. Rone Shavers and Charles Joseph offered a critical working definition of the genre, first named by Mark Dery in 1993: "Afro-Futurism … combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, and magic realism with non-Occidental (non-Western) cosmologies in order to critique not only the present-day dilemmas of people of color, but also to revise, interrogate, and re-examine the historical events of the past." Artists often listed in an Afrofuturist pantheon include authors Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler; visual artists Jean-Michel Basquiat and Renée Cox; and musicians George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Sun Ra, DJ Spooky, and Janelle Monáe.

After laying the groundwork for explorations of these and other artists, we will ask students to help us address additional avenues for explorations of Afrofuturism, including race and digital culture; utopia, dystopia, and the "post-historical;" prostheses and the body; urban musics (drum and bass, garage, hip-hop, house, jungle, neo-soul, funk, dub, techno, trip-hop, etc.); interrogations of identity and identity politics; previous race-based art movements (e.g., the Harlem Renaissance, Black Arts Movement); Black liberation songs; superheroes, rebels, and comic books as contemporary folklore; film/video studies; and social and cultural implications.

Because the artworks we will encounter will be both exciting and provocative, we think that students will find this hard intellectual work deeply rewarding, sometimes in unexpected ways. We expect to learn from students and to share an intellectual adventure in an ever-evolving, engrossing artistic terrain. While research writing and criticism will be emphasized, students will also be encouraged to pursue optional creative writing and music projects for possible presentation to the entire program.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

the humanities or the arts, especially creative writing and music

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$50 for admission to museums, concerts, and other similar venues. 

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-09-11Kristin Coffey joins the teaching team, replacing Joye Hardiman.

Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

9:30-11:30a Sat

Located in: Olympia

Afro-Brazilian Dance (A)

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Sat 9:30-11:30a

Located in: Olympia

Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Sat  12-2p

Located in: Olympia

Afro-Brazilian Dance (B)

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Accompanied by live drumming, we will learn dances originating in Africa and migrating to Brazil during slavery. We will dance to the driving, rapturous beat from Brazil known as samba. For the people of the villages surrounding Rio de Janeiro, samba is considered their most intense, unambivalent joy. In addition, we will dance and sing to contemporary cross-cultural beat from Bahia: Samba-Reggae and the Candomble religious dances of the Orixas. We will also learn dances from other regions of Brazil, such as Baiao, Frevo and Maracatu.
2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 24
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

12-2p Sat

Located in: Olympia

Against all Odds: The Black Experience - Global Seasoning, Resistance, and Re-incarnation

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This History, Africana Studies, Worldview Studies Literary Analysis course that explores  the  Global Seasoning Processes, its Impacts and the Resistance Movements that “pushed back  “ in both Diaspora Africa in general and the USA in specific is a continuation of the question

How did Black men and women, of many different cultures and ages, succeed against all odds? How did they consistently move from victims to victors? Where did they find the insurmountable courage and humanity to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives over and over again?

Against All Odds will begin with a review of last quarters work on foundational African Epistemology, Axiology and Logic.  Areas of studies Winter quarter  will include the Willie Lynch Seasoning Process  (in Brazil and Haiti and the African and Indigenous push back ); Pre- Aryan India (the institutionalization of Varna/Colorism/Hierarchical structure and the Dalit push back); and the USA  (contemporary dominant discourse  media  and Black artistic push back ). Students will have the opportunity to apply their understanding about lessons learned, wisdoms earned from the class to their positionality as students on the Evergreen State College Olympia Campus and their existence in the universe,

Primary texts included the Willie Lynch Syndrome - The Making of a Slave and selections from the works of Ivan Van Sertima , Runoko Rashidi, Jacob Caruthers and Kabby Mitchell lll.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Comparative World Views,  Community Service or Human Development

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-9:30p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-11-16Course title and description updated
2017-09-07New Winter Quarter Offering Added

Against All Odds: The Black Experience - Rebirth, Renaissance, and Kabby Mitchell lll

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Course Goals

  • To study the Ancient Egyptian Intermediate Periods and identify those actions that evoked the Revolutionary Renaissances of the Middle and Late Periods
  • To apply that analysis to understanding the contextual and cultural continuity role of Afro- Futurism
  • To conduct biographical research on selected individuals and /or movements of people of African descent and worldview who against all odds maintained their identity, community, traditions, culture and destiny through Creative Production
  • To celebrate the life of one such hero- Kabby Mitchell lll through a series of Appreciative Events and Community Celebrations

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Education, Cultural Activism and Creative Production

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays 6–9:30pm  

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-14New offering added for Spring quarter

Against all Odds: The Black Experience - Studies in Resiliency, Ancient Egypt to Enslavement

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

How have people of African descent, of many different cultures and ages, succeeded against all odds? How have they consistently moved from victims to victors? Where have they found the insurmountable courage and humanity to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives over and over again? In this course, students will participate in a literary exploration of the factors that promoted resistance, resiliency and cultural sustainability in the lives and legacies of selected Black men and women from Ancient Egypt to Kabby Mitchell III.

During Fall, our collaborative explorations will use the lenses of Ancient Egyptian studies, African, African-American and Afro-Diaspora history, and the work of H. Richard Milner and Tara J. Yosso as theoretical frame works to create a memoir from an Ancient Egyptian perspective.  All students will be given the opportunity to leave the class inspired, equipped and informed. Following this course students will be able to identify historical perspectives shaping the life of people of African descent, an understanding of the dynamic forces shaping our views of Ancient Egypt and slavery and a better understanding of the concept of resilience.

The work of this course continues in Winter.  Enrollment in Fall Quarter is not dependent on being enrolled Winter Quarter. Enrollment in Winter Quarter is not dependent on being enrolled Fall Quarter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Comparative World Views, Community Service , or Human Development 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tues 6-9:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-09-07New Fall Quarter Offering Added

Algebraic Thinking

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

physics, education

Algebraic Thinking is Evergreen's entry-point college-level math class. The course develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems. Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Topics include function notation and linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Collaborative learning is emphasized.

Algebraic Thinking is designed for students who are considering areas of study such as education, science, mathematics, or economics and who have not completed previous college-level course work in mathematics or who have been away from math for some time. This course meets Evergreen's Master in Teaching college algebra requirement and serves as preparation for precalculus.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, health sciences, and other natural sciences.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$14 for printed copies of the text for the course

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Sat 9a-12:30p

Located in: Olympia

Algebraic Thinking

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

physics, education

Algebraic Thinking is Evergreen's entry-point college-level math class. The course develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems. Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Topics include function notation and linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Collaborative learning is emphasized.

Algebraic Thinking is designed for students who are considering areas of study such as education, science, mathematics, or economics and who have not completed previous college-level course work in mathematics or who have been away from math for some time. This course meets Evergreen's Master in Teaching college algebra requirement and serves as preparation for precalculus.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, health sciences, and other natural sciences.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$14 for printed copies of the text for the course

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

9a-12:30p Sat.

Located in: Olympia

Algebraic Thinking for Science

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
20% Reserved for Freshmen
6
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics, education, anthropological mathematics

Algebraic Thinking for Science develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra and mathematics common to introductory science to solve context-based problems.  Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally.  Topics include scientific notation, dimensional analysis, proportional reasoning,  linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions, right-triangle trigonometry, and linear regression.  Collaborative learning is emphasized.   
This course meets the MiT college algebra requirement and meets requirements for entering Integrated Natural Sciences.  A graphing calculator is required for the course.  

6

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$15 for textbook.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
20% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Alternatives and Resistance to Global Capitalism: Mexico, U.S., and Beyond

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 75
16Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Peter Bohmer
economics, political economy
feminist economics
Maria Morales
latinx studies, cultural studies, education
Rogol square
Spanish Language

Revolutions of the 20th century made grand promises of liberation, independence from colonialism and imperial domination, and people struggled against racism, misogyny, capitalist exploitation and freedom from want. The initial decades of the 21st century witnessed an unprecedented groundswell of global popular movements demanding political, economic and social justice. From Cairo’s Tahrir to Oaxaca’s Zocalo, from Greece’s Syntagma Square to New York’s Zucotti Park, popular mass movements demanded, greater democracy, decried the growing inequality of income and wealth, and fought to reclaim public spaces where people gathered to learn about, and experiment with alternative forms of participatory democracy. Many of these democratizing aspirations were brutally suppressed by the military and police apparatus.

Today we see the rise of new populist movements that have tapped into the anxieties and fears of increasingly insecure middle and working classes, as well as the despair and anger of the impoverished. And yet ruling elites offer little or no hopeful visions of how to deal with the challenges of climate change, or how to create an economy with decent jobs, livable income, and old age security. While center-left ruling parties offer more of the same pro-market, pro-finance austerity policies that entail cutting social programs, right-populist movements have gained momentum by exploiting xenophobia, racism, fear and demonization of immigrants, as well as nationalism to suppress fears of economic insecurity.

This program will examine the historical and-material conditions that gave rise to the political and social revolutions of the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as to the resurgence of left and right wing populism as a contemporary phenomena. Through the disciplinary lenses of political economy, feminist theory, and cultural studies, we will explore how various ideas of liberation have emerged and changed over time, with the hope of changing both society and social consciousness. In fall quarter, we will begin by reviewing the historical development of global capitalism, and study theoretical frameworks such as Critical Pedagogy, Marxism, Anarchism, Keynesianism and neoclassical economics. Concurrently, we will explore and learn from case studies, such as the Paris Commune, the Mexican revolution, the Russian revolution, the Cuban revolution, Algerian independence, as well as political struggles in the U.S., Chile and Venezuela. In winter quarter, we will study contemporary global capitalism, focusing more closely on the interconnectedness of political economic conditions in Mexico and the U.S., as well as resistance movements in Chiapas and Oaxaca that have been the catalyst for the anti-neoliberal community-based organizing seen throughout Mexico- organizing, drawing on the Zapatista philosophy of “abajo y a la izquierda.” We will study questions of economic development, im/migration as a legacy of colonial relations, now reconstituted through neoliberal structural adjustment, combined with heightened militarization and corporate control. In our studies, we will examine the day-to-day realities of dislocation and dispossession through the literature of various diasporas, and the quest for community, sovereignty and economic security. For example, we will critically examine the Zapatista Movement in Chiapas and their projects for indigenous autonomy and dignidad.

During spring quarter students our class will travel and study for two months in Oaxaca and hopefully, Chiapas, Mexico. Through classes and guest speakers, students will continue their study of Spanish. Furthermore we will study the history, politics, economics, and cultures of rural and urban Mexico, Oaxaca and Chiapas. We will visit and meet with local artists, as well as community and activist organizations working towards creating a more just Mexico. Our home-stays will be based in the city of Oaxaca, but we will also travel and meet with groups in rural and indigenous communities in Oaxaca and Chiapas. Students will select a research project they will pursue and there will be opportunities for volunteer work with nongovernmental and other organizations. There may be opportunities for those who cannot travel to pursue similar study in Olympia.

Study abroad:

Students traveling to Mexico for the eight-week study abroad component in spring quarter will have an additional fee of approximately $2,190. This amount includes $1,200 for room and board during homestays in Oaxaca City and for food and lodgings outside Oaxaca City; $300 for transportation inside Mexico; $540 for classes in Spanish language and Mexican and Oaxacan history, culture, and political economy; and $150 to cover costs of guides, helping with logistics of travel in Mexico, lodgings, volunteer labor, etc. Students will need to arrange airfare (approximately $900) and incidental expenses (approximately $400–$500), such as gifts to the homestay host family. Students will be asked to pay a nonrefundable deposit of $200 by Week 3 of winter quarter. For details on study abroad, visit www.evergreen.edu/studyabroad or contact Michael Clifthorne at clifthom@evergreen.edu .

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

political economy, community-based organizations, advocacy, public policy, law and legal rights, education, alternative justice systems, graduate school in social science, history, law, geography, and political economy

16Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

variable credit options available for students with Spanish language fluency.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$150 in fall and winter for overnight field trips.

 

 

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 75
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 10am (Sem II D1105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-11-29Students joining the program will need to do some work over winter break to prepare for winter quarter.
2017-05-17This description has been updated.
2017-05-15Required deposit updated ($200).
2017-05-04This program has changed title (Political Economy of Revolutions and Social Movements of the 20th and 21st Century).

American Sign Language I (A)

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

American Sign language, sculpture

The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language I uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

3-5p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language I (B)

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

American Sign language, sculpture

The fall quarter introduction to American Sign Language uses conversational methods to introduce basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis is upon acquisition of both language comprehension and production skills as well as Deaf culture and history with the goal that students be able to communicate with cultural competence. The course begins with visual readiness activities, then uses meaningful conversational contexts to introduce vocabulary, grammar, and culturally appropriate behaviors. Basic fingerspelling skills will also be practiced. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-7:30p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language II (A)

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

American Sign language, sculpture

 In American Sign Language II we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

3-5p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language II (B)

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

American Sign language, sculpture

In American Sign Language II we will focus on building mastery of American Sign Language grammar skills, increasing vocabulary, and gaining a deeper knowledge and appreciation of Deaf culture. Spontaneous, interactive use of American Sign Language is stressed through discussion of events and activities, and the student will continue study of information related to everyday life experiences of deaf Americans and deaf people elsewhere in the world. Students will be invited to participate in local Deaf community events. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-7:30p Tue/Thu

 

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language III

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

American Sign language

In American Sign Language III we will focus on grammatical features such as spatialization, directionality, and non-manual components. Intensive work in vocabulary development, receptive skills, production of narratives (storytelling), and continued study of Deaf culture are stressed. Students will be expected to participate in local Deaf community events.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 28
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-7:30p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language IV - at SPSCC

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 2
0% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This second-year ASL course will emphasize expressive and receptive skills development and American Sign Language fluency. Focus will be given to correct formation of signs, movement, rhythm and clarity. Idioms and slang will be taught. Prerequisite: ASL I, II, III. Credits awarded will be 4 Evergreen credits.

NOTE: Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6:00 – 8:20 pm in BLDG 21, Room 286 - The first class will meet on Tuesday, September 19 (before Evergreen's start date) . Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday September 14th.

The textbook for this course can be purchased at SPSCC Bookstore. The text will be listed under the course ID ASL& 221, and can be found at this address: http://spscc.bncollege.com

Faculty: Kimberly Crites, kcrites@spscc.edu

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 2
0% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-8:20pm in BLDG 21, Room 286

Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512 - Course begins on September 19.

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-8:20pm in BLDG 21, Room 286

Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512 - Course begins on September 19.

DateRevision
2017-06-15New offering added for Fall (at SPSCC)

American Sign Language V - at SPSCC

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 2
0% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This second-year ASL course will continue the development of ASL fluency, emphasizing expressive and receptive skills development. Focus will be given to correct formation of signs, movement, rhythm and clarity. Idioms and slang will be taught, as well as introduction to ASL linguistics.  Prerequisite: ASL IV. Credits awarded will be 4 Evergreen credits.

 

NOTE: This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College and starts 1 week before Evergreen classes. The first meeting is January 2nd at 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, Building 21, room 130, Tuesdays & Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm

BOOKS: If a text is required students will need to purchase texts for this course from the SPSCC bookstore. The book list can be found on the bookstore website (http://spscc.bncollege.com) under the course ASL 222.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 2
0% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm in BLDG 21, Room 130:  S tarts 1 week before Evergreen classes. The first meeting is January 2nd. 

Course meets at South Puget Sound Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

Course meets at South Puget Sound Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512,

Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm in BLDG 21, Room 130 

DateRevision
2017-12-12New Winter offering added (at SPSCC)

American Sign Language VI - at SPSCC

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 2
0% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Faculty: Claudia Foy,  cfoy@spscc.edu

This second year course  continues development of ASL fluency - including expanded vocabulary, including ASL idioms, increased proficiency in ASL's grammar, linguistics, and non-manual features through intensive conversational and public speaking exercises.  Prerequisite: ASL V. Credits awarded will be 4 Evergreen credits.

NOTE:  This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College. The first meeting is April 3rd  at 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, Building 21, room 285, Tuesdays & Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm

BOOKS: If a text is required students will need to purchase texts for this course from the SPSCC bookstore. The book list can be found on the bookstore website (http://spscc.bncollege.com) under the course ASL 223.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 2
0% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm in BLDG 21, Room 285. 

Course meets at South Puget Sound Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

Course meets at South Puget Sound Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512,

Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm in BLDG 21, Room 285 

Anatomy & Physiology I

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

anatomy, physiology

The first quarter of a three quarter sequence in human anatomy and physiology. The course covers anatomical terminology related to direction and body regions, levels of organization that review basic molecular and cell biology leading to new material that covers primary tissue types, and systems of support and movement including the integumentary system, skeletal system and muscular system. Laboratory sessions include the study of microscopy, histology, anatomical models and preserved bones.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Health-related fields

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 5:30 - 9 pm plus online instruction 1 hour per week

Located in: Olympia

Anatomy & Physiology II

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

anatomy, physiology

The second quarter of a three quarter sequence in human anatomy and physiology. The course will examine control and regulation of the body through exploration of the nervous system components, the special senses and the endocrine system. The course will also cover continuity of life related to the basic components of the human reproductive system and associated physiological functions. Laboratory sessions include histology, anatomical models and dissections (brain, eyeball).

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Health-related fields

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$10 for project supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 5:30 - 9 pm plus online instruction 1 hour per week

Located in: Olympia

Anatomy & Physiology III

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

anatomy, physiology

The third quarter of a three quarter sequence in human anatomy and physiology. The course will examine body fluids and transport including blood, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity. Discussion of environmental exchange will include the respiratory system, digestive system and urinary system. Laboratory sessions include histology, anatomical models, dissections (heart, kidney, fetal pig), blood typing simulation and respiratory physiology module. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Health-related fields

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 5:30 - 9 pm plus online instruction 1 hour per week

Located in: Olympia

Andean Roots: Linguistics and Ecological Agriculture

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 64
1216Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

linguistics, mathematics
Rogol square
Spanish Language
Steve Scheuerell
ecology, botany, plant pathology

This program focuses on language, agriculture, and food systems with connections to broader themes of biocultural diversity and global change. Our studies are based on the belief that many cultures have developed rich linguistic and ecological traditions that have provided the means for communication, food, clothing, and shelter based on a sustainable relationship with the land. The program will focus on the Andean region of South America. The region's diverse geography, cultures, and languages—as well as the species domesticated there—offer an ideal case study for putting the program themes in context.

This is an interdisciplinary program that bridges social and natural sciences while incorporating qualitative, quantitative, and experiential modes of inquiry to acquire discipline-specific knowledge and skills in agroecology and linguistics using texts, lectures, workshops, film, writing, seminars, and field trips. In linguistics, we will study language structure, sociolinguistics, language and culture, and field methods, with particular attention given to English, Spanish, and Quechua in the U.S. and in Peru. In agroecology, we will study the structure and function of agricultural systems, farmer-to-farmer knowledge and seed networks, food storage and distribution systems, journal article analysis, field research methods, and agricultural biodiversity emphasizing species domesticated in the Andes. Together, we will compare the structure and functions of languages and agriculture, investigate the essential role of language in the retention of agricultural knowledge, and study how seeds are like words in the way they evolve over generations and are exchanged across cultures.

The program offers students seeking Beginning I or Beginning II Spanish language instruction the opportunity to take a 4-credit Spanish language course within the program. Students who do not need this option can enroll for 12 credits. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

cultural studies, Spanish, sustainable development, linguistics, agriculture and food systems, and education

1216Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

Students may enroll for 16 credits (and take Beginning Spanish I or II within the program) or 12 credits (if they already have completed Beginning Spanish I and II).

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$140 for entrance fees to the Squaxin Island Tribe Museum Library and Research Center and an overnight field trip to Eastern WA.

Upper division science credit:

Students prepared for advanced science work will earn a total of 8 upper-division credits in agroecology and economic botany for successfully completing all program work.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 64
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 9am (Sem II D1107)

Located in: Olympia

Andean Roots: Linguistics and Ecological Agriculture in Peru

Winter
Winter 2018
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

linguistics, mathematics
Steve Scheuerell
ecology, botany, plant pathology

The program will use linguistics and ecological agriculture as primary lenses for understanding cultural ecology, history, geography, and sustainability studies in the Andean region of Peru. Most enrolled students will be in Peru for at least 5 weeks of the quarter, with the possibility of up to 10 weeks of study abroad for advanced students. Students who completed the Fall 2017 program Andean Roots may also opt to do other independent project work during Weeks 6-10, without traveling to Peru. Studies in Olympia prior to travel will focus on gaining background in Peruvian linguistics, agriculture, history, and culture, as well as community-based tourism, travel writing, and ethnography. Study in Peru will be centered in the highlands of Cusco. As the former Incan capital, and home to vibrant cultures and immense agricultural diversity, the Cusco region of Peru offers immersion in the study of biocultural diversity and how the preservation of linguistic diversity is related to the preservation of traditional ecological knowledge, biodiversity, and local food systems. We will ask how knowledge is transferred across generations and between communities, and how traditional lifeways can be supported in the face of development pressure. Students who elect to do independent projects without traveling to Peru will develop topics related to these same program themes, subject to faculty approval.

Faculty and most students will spend Weeks 1-5 of the quarter in Olympia, and Weeks 6-10 in Peru. However, advanced students whose academic preparation and learning goals allow for a more extensive international experience may opt to spend the entire quarter in Peru, with up to 5 weeks of individual studies (e.g., intensive language learning or individual research) prior to joining up with faculty and other students in Week 6. From Weeks 6-10 all study abroad students will be in Peru, and learning activities will be a combination of Spanish or Quechua language study, community immersion, rural and urban homestays, and faculty-led field research projects to gain depth in linguistics and/or agroecology and agricultural biodiversity conservation. Experiencing life in agrarian communities and participating in community-based projects to preserve cultural landscapes and indigenous knowledge systems will give context to our analysis of development pressure and societal shifts in language and agricultural practices.

Study abroad:

Study abroad students will spend at least 5 weeks, from Week 6 to Week 10, traveling to the region of Cusco, Peru; spending significant time in the Urubamba Valley, the city of Cusco, and surrounding rural areas; and participating in language school, homestays, and project work. Students with adequate preparation for independent international work may opt to travel earlier in the quarter, for up to 10 weeks of study abroad.  The study abroad application will ask students to outline their learning goals, preparation, and interest in this extended travel option.  Total estimated cost of the study abroad is approximately $3,400-$4,800 depending on length of travel, travel preparation needs and international travel expenses. Part of this cost ($800) will be assessed as a student fee (for group expenses such as language school, group lodging and land transport, some site visits, etc.) and the remainder will be managed by individual students for international airfare, individual living expenses including most meals and some lodging, vaccines, etc. A $200 deposit will be due by Friday of Week 10, fall quarter. This $200 deposit will be applied towards the $800 student fee. For details on study abroad, visit  www.evergreen.edu/studyabroad  or contact Michael Clifthorne at  clifthom@evergreen.edu .

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

cultural studies, Spanish, sustainable development, linguistics, agriculture and food systems, and education

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

This program requires faculty signature to enroll and study-abroad students will need to pay a study abroad deposit to be paid by Friday of Week 10 of fall quarter. During Week 10 of fall quarter there will be mandatory meetings to prepare students for study abroad and complete pre-departure paperwork.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.

Upper division science credit:

Students prepared for advanced science work will earn a total of 8 upper-division credits in agroecology field research and ecological agriculture for successfully completing all program work.

Research Opportunities:

During our winter quarter study abroad, students will participate in faculty-led research projects to gain depth in linguistics and/or agroecology and agricultural biodiversity conservation.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-12-05Description updated to support students who are not planning to travel abroad.
2017-11-21Deadline for application extended to week 9 and deadline for deposit extended to week 10.
2017-05-16Description has been updated.

Aotearoa New Zealand: Native Decolonization in the Pacific Rim

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Kristina Ackley
Native American studies
Zoltan Grossman square
geography, Native American studies

Maori scholar Linda Tuhiwai Smith asserts, “Our communities, cultures, languages, and social practices—all may be spaces of marginalization, but they have also become spaces of resistance and hope.” In this program we will identify and contextualize these spaces and the politics of indigeneity and settler colonialism. We will use the Pacific Rim broadly as a geographic frame, with a focus on the Pacific Northwest Native nations and the Maori in Aotearoa (New Zealand). By concentrating on a larger region, students will have an opportunity to broaden indigenous studies beyond the Lower 48 states and explore common processes of Native decolonization in different settler societies.

A comparative study of the role of treaties in Washington state and New Zealand—in natural resources, governance, the arts, education, etc.—will provide a key framework for the program. We will study decolonization through cultural revitalization and sovereign jurisdiction of First Nations. In order to examine the central role of indigenous peoples in the region's cultural and environmental survival, we will use the lenses of geography, history, and literature.

In fall, our focus will be on familiarizing students with the concept of sovereignty, working with local Native nations, and preparing to travel to Aotearoa or elsewhere. The concept of sovereignty must be placed within a local, historical, cultural, and global context. Through theoretical readings and discussion, we will move from state-building in the U.S. and Canada to Native forms of nationalism. We will stress the complexities and intricacies of colonization and decolonization by concentrating on the First Nations of western Washington and British Columbia.

We will later expand the focus to appreciate the similarities and differences of indigenous experiences in other areas of the Pacific Rim, such as Native Alaskans, Aboriginal peoples in Australia, and South Pacific island peoples. We will emphasize common Pacific Rim concerns such as climate change, tourism, and cultural domination.

For up to seven weeks spanning the last half of winter quarter and the beginning of spring quarter, many of us will travel to Aotearoa, where we will learn in a respectful and participatory way how the Maori have been engaged in revitalizing their language, art, land, and politics, and their still unfolding, changing relationships with the Pakeha (non-Maori) people and society. Alternatively, some students will continue their studies locally. Students will learn about the ongoing effects of colonization as well as gain a foundation in theories and practices of decolonization. We will take as our basic premise in this program that those wishing to know about the history of a particular Native group should study it with a purpose to be in solidarity with these people today.

Students will develop skills as writers and researchers by studying scholarly and imaginative works, by conducting policy research and fieldwork with Native and non-Native communities, and by comparing community and government relationships in the U.S., Canada, and New Zealand. Students will be expected to integrate extensive readings, lecture notes, films, interviews, and other sources in writing assignments.

Study abroad:

Students will have the option to travel to New Zealand for up to seven weeks in the late winter to early spring quarters at a cost of approximately $6,360, including airfare. For details on study abroad, visit www.evergreen.edu/studyabroad or contact Michael Clifthorne at clifthom@evergreen.edu .

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, U.S. and tribal governments, law and nongovernmental organizations

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Fall and Winter: Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
  • Spring: Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$145 in fall for a field trip to the Squaxin Island, Quileute, and Makah nations.

Internship Opportunities:

Internships are possible in winter and spring quarter; contact the faculty to discuss options.

Research Opportunities:

Students will be required to undertake a substantive research project that will span the late winter and early spring quarters.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 9:30am (Longhouse 1007A)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-10-16Study abroad fee increased (from $5,950 to $6,360).

Art of Helping

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

psychology
Doing well while doing good is a challenge. Whereas some kind of help is the kind of help that helps, some kind of help we can do without. Gaining wisdom to know the paths of skillful helping of self and others is the focus of this four-credit course. We will explore knowing who we are, identifying caring as a moral attitude, relating wisely to others, maintaining trust, and working together to make change possible.
4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Tue

Located in: Olympia

Arts and the Child: Early Childhood

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Hir'
visual arts, Chinese studies, human development

All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing. Yet, as we grow up, this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This course will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will also examine practices of education and self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. Our study will focus on children of preschool age, 0-6 years old and early grades, 1-3rd grade.

Credit will be awarded in arts and human development.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

teaching, education, social work

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$10 fee for art materials

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thu 5:30-9:00p

Located in: Olympia

Arts, Culture, and Spirit on the Silk Roads

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
812Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Hir'
visual arts, Chinese studies, human development

All human societies and cultures express their relationship to spirit through art. Art is the earliest and most enduring expression of humanity. For community and the individual, art can be a practice of connecting with higher consciousness and with the spirit. In today's global community it is important to understand art of other cultures and by so doing to awaken art within oneself while learning to understand the "other."

Education and Arts are at the core of creating a healthy, diverse, and civic society. Children naturally understand the importance of art and are creating art constantly in their play. Children also have an instinctive sense of right and wrong. In the modern, industrial world these natural abilities often become suppressed and lost. Modern educators need to be confident in their own artistic abilities and grounded in their own moral core; they need to be trained in communication across cultures to be able to support development and cooperation in the modern world.

Silk Roads could be a metaphor for such cooperation. In the past, Silk Roads connected cultures of east and west and facilitated trade, communication and advancement of consciousness in a peaceful way. What are the Silk Roads of today? How can we envision Silk Roads of the future?

The students in this half-time, interdisciplinary program will immerse themselves in study and practice of art and in cultural experiences that are vastly different from the Western dominant culture by studying Native American, Muslim, Hebrew, and Chinese cultures. Students will make art, study myths and world religions as they have been shaped by cultures and landscapes of the past, and examine cultural and ethical norms. Students will also examine cultural influences and pressures of today's global society and will investigate the importance of preserving and developing cultural, artistic, and ethical traditions. Students will engage in traditional academic study such as reading, writing, and seminars and will also engage in art making, meditation, community events, and the practice of Tai Ji. Students will participate in their community's spiritual practices and will cultivate their own spiritual, meditative, ethical, and artistic life. In addition to classroom study, students will participate in meditation retreats and will go on field trips to explore art and spiritual resources in the community.

In winter quarter students will be able to work on community service projects, in schools, and on Native American reservations. Students will also have the option to travel to China in March of 2017 to study in important Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian centers.

Possible MiT endorsement credits are available. Please contact the faculty for more information.

Study abroad:

China 3 weeks, winter, approximately $3,500.00, with possible extended stay abroad for service learning and for mentoring Chinese students in American culture and English language. For details on study abroad, visit www.evergreen.edu/studyabroad or contact Michael Clifthorne at clifthom@evergreen.edu.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

business, education, & cultural studies

812Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

Winter: A 4-credit option is available for students to participate only in the study abroad component. Please contact Hirsh Diamant for additional information and the required signature to register. 

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$50 in fall for an overnight field trip; $20 in winter for Lunar New Year seminar registration and concert tickets. For study abroad in China and Vietnam, 3 weeks, winter, approximately $3,500.00

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Fall Quarter: Every Saturday, 9:30 am - 5 pm; Winter Quarter: Specifics to be announced. Overnight retreat is planned for Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 18-19, 2017. Study abroad: Week 6-10 of Winter quarter.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-12-13Winter quarter fee updated to $20 (was $10)
2017-07-06New Fall/Winter Program: Replacing Business and Culture along the Silk Road

Arts, Culture, and Spirit on the Silk Roads: Study Abroad

Winter
Winter 2018
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 10
0% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Hir'
visual arts, Chinese studies, human development

The half-time, interdisciplinary program Arts, Culture, and Spirit on the Silk Roads immerses students in the study and practice of art and in cultural experiences that are vastly different from the dominant paradigm of Western culture. Students in the program will have the option to travel to China in March of 2017 to study in important Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian centers. This study abroad option is also available as an individual component by taking the variable credit option within Arts, Culture, and Spirit on the Silk Roads.

Silk Roads connected cultures and people. For us, it is a metaphor of cultural exchange and competence, of communication, of development, and transference of knowledge. From a poetic metaphor to China’s new initiatives, Silk Roads are changing geopolitical realities of Central Asia and the world.  Whether you’re passionate about tea or about China’s history and contemporary culture, this study abroad intensive will provide opportunities to experience China in three renowned cultural centers:  Shanghai, WuYi Shan, and Hangzhou.  While each student will be supported to develop an individual study project, our shared study of traditional and contemporary Chinese culture will include visits to Buddhist, Daoist, and Neo-Confucian centers; tea arts and appreciation; and the practice of meditation and calligraphy. 

In order to accommodate students who wish to participated but are registered in other programs, our anticipated dates of travel will be at the end of Winter quarter: week 10, evaluation week and spring break (March 12 through April 2). Contact faculty member Hirsh Diamant (diamanth@evergreen.edu) with any questions or to discuss your specific itinerary. Additionally, students, in consultation with faculty, may plan to extend their study abroad in China in spring quarter.  

Study abroad:

3 weeks in China at the end of winter quarter, with possible extended stay abroad for Internships, Independent Study, and/or Service Learning. The approximate cost for the 3-week study abroad is $3500 with a mandatory $200.00 deposit due January 14. The group is limited to 15 students, so if interested, please make your deposits early. The estimated budget of $3500 will include airline fair and all transportation in China, lodging in International dormitories at University campuses (2 students per room) and most meals. All students must be willing and able to participate in 5 required pre-departure meetings during the winter quarter.  These meetings will be on Saturdays, January 13, 20, Feb. 3, Feb. 17, and March 3, from 4pm to 5:30pm. The meetings will include such topics as: tickets, passports and visa applications; Chinese language survival skills; student conduct and cultural etiquette; and study abroad orientation sessions with Michael Clifthorne (International Programs Assistant Director) and David McAvity (Academic Dean). 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

international studies and cultural studies.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

 $10 for Lunar New Year seminar registration. For study abroad in China, 3 weeks, winter, approximately $3,500.00

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 10
0% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Asian/American: Pop Culture Crosscurrents

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Kris Coffey
creative writing, historical fiction, ethnic american literature

“Japanese jazz now hip-hop in home/At Seventh and Jackson, the microphone’s open.” — Blue Scholars, Seattle hip-hop duo (from “Evening Chai”)

From Bruce Lee to Harold & Kumar , henna to hip-hop, bulgogi to ph , manga to The Matrix , Asians and Asian Americans have left an indelible imprint on U.S. popular culture. As eloquently noted by Mimi Thi Nguyen and Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, “[f]ew of us are immune to popular culture’s intimate address or to its pleasures and affirmations, frustrations and denials” ( Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America ). It is, indeed, that lack of immunity and a restless hunger to understand those “pleasures, affirmations, frustrations, and denials” that will sustain us on our 10-week journey. We will begin the quarter with two fundamental questions—“What is an Asian American?” and “What is popular culture?"—that will lead us to (1) an exploration of the major historical, cultural, social, and political contours of the Asian American experience, and (2) an immersion in critical theoretical perspectives on culture in general, and popular culture in particular. We will devote the remainder of the quarter to an examination of the complex, and frequently vexed, ways in which Asians and Asian Americans have been represented in U.S. popular culture and, more importantly, how members of those communities have become active producers of popular culture. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, multilayered, and transgressive in its insistence on an intertextuality that moves beyond the commonly interrogated categories of race, gender, and class.

Students will read selected fiction, poetry, comics, graphic novels, scholarly articles, and other written texts. There will be weekly screenings and analysis of documentaries as well as fictional films, including martial arts and anime. We will also explore Asian American popular culture in music, photography, and other visual art; bodies (e.g., tattoos); and cuisine. Students will participate in weekly seminars and workshops, submit short weekly writing assignments, and produce a final project that will help them refine both their expository and creative nonfiction writing skills. Field trips may include visits to Pacific Northwest locations with Asian/Pacific Islander historical and cultural connections, and to off-campus film, music, and other venues.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

American studies, Asian American studies, cultural studies, humanities, and education

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$50 for museum entrance fees, concert admission, and/or movies

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 10am (Sem II D2105)

Located in: Olympia

Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
481216Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dharshi Bopegedera
physical chemistry

This upper-division chemistry program offers advanced studies in chemistry to prepare students for graduate studies or careers in chemistry. Based on the theme "what do chemists do?", our classroom studies will be connected with the applications chemists encounter in their everyday work.

In the fall, we will study topics in quantum mechanics and descriptive inorganic chemistry. We will study simple quantum mechanical systems, apply them to solve simple chemical problems, and investigate how they can be adapted for more complex systems. In inorganic chemistry, we will explore atomic structure, simple bonding models, molecular symmetry, group theory and its applications, molecular orbital theory, and acid-base chemistry.

In the winter quarter, we will continue our studies in quantum mechanics to include more complex systems and investigate the use of spectroscopy to validate the quantum mechanical theories. Inorganic chemistry topics will include the study of coordination compounds and the solid state. In addition, we will begin our study of thermodynamics by exploring the laws that lay the foundation in this field of study.

The spring quarter will find us doing in-depth investigations of the spectrometric methods including a detailed analysis of the high-resolution infrared spectrum of a diatomic molecule. We will continue our studies in thermodynamics with topics in chemical equilibria and kinetics.

In the laboratory, students will work with a selection of analytical instrumentation available at the college. This will include an exploration of the physical principles as well as analysis of samples. Students are strongly encouraged to work with individual chemistry faculty on research projects during the course of the year. The results of these projects will be presented at the annual Undergraduate Research Symposium of the Puget Sound Section of the American Chemical Society and at the annual Evergreen Science Carnival & Research Exposition.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

chemistry, physics, instrumentation, environmental science, and science education

481216Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

Students can take quantum mechanics (4 credits, fall-winter-spring), inorganic chemistry (8 credits in fall and 4 credits in winter), or thermodynamics (8 credits, winter-spring) as individual components.

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

One year of college-level general chemistry with laboratory and one year of college-level differential and integral calculus required. Some physics experience is helpful.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

Students who achieve the expected level of competency will earn all upper-division science credits.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 9:30am (Lab I 054)

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

2019-20

DateRevision
2018-02-13This program does not accept new enrollment in spring.
2017-05-23In fall, students can register for 4 credits (quantum mechanics), 8 credits (inorganic chemistry), 12 credits (inorganic chemistry AND quantum mechanics), or for the full program without signature.

Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions: Inorganic Chemistry

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 6
48
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dharshi Bopegedera
physical chemistry

The full-time program Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions covers quantum mechanics, inorganic chemistry (in fall and winter), and thermodynamics (in winter and spring), all at the upper-division science level. Each of these subjects is available to students as an individual component by taking the variable credit option within Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions .

In the inorganic chemistry component, we will cover advanced inorganic chemistry topics in atomic structure and periodicity, bonding models, symmetry elements and operations, point groups, character tables, molecular orbital theory, photoelectron spectroscopy, acid-base concepts, solid-state chemistry, and coordination compounds and their chemistry, including bonding models.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

chemistry

48

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students must have successfully completed one year of college-level general chemistry with laboratory.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

Students who achieve the expected level of competency will earn upper-division credits in inorganic chemistry.

Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 6
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-22This is available for 8 credits in fall and 4 credits in winter (not 4 credits both quarters).

Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions: Quantum Mechanics

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 8
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dharshi Bopegedera
physical chemistry

The full-time program Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions covers quantum mechanics, inorganic chemistry (in fall and winter), and thermodynamics (in winter and spring), all at the upper-division science level. Each of these subjects is available to students as an individual component by taking the variable credit option within Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions .

In the fall quarter of the quantum mechanics component, topics will include history and origins of quantum theory, wave-particle duality of light, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, operators, the Schrödinger equation, particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, hydrogen-like atoms, angular momenta, Zeeman effect, variation method, multi-electron atoms, and application of the Pauli exclusion principle.

In winter, we will extend our studies to learn Slater determinants, Hartree-Fock self-consistent field method, atomic term symbols, spin-orbit coupling, atomic spectra, Born-Oppenheimer approximation, application of quantum mechanics to diatomics, potential energy diagrams, confocal elliptic coordinates, molecular term symbols, hybridization model, Hückel molecular orbital  theory, rotational spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, vibration-rotation spectra of diatomics, and an introduction to Raman spectroscopy.

In spring, we will conclude our exploration in quantum mechanics with electronic spectroscopy, the Franck-Condon principle, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and lasers. Students will analyze the vibration-rotation spectrum of the HBr molecule and the visible spectrum of iodine to obtain molecular parameters and present them in two formal lab reports to demonstrate their ability to extract atomic and molecular parameters from the spectra.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

chemistry, physics, science education, and environmental science.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students must have successfully completed one year of college-level general chemistry with laboratory and one year of college calculus (differential and integral).

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

Students who achieve the expected level of competency will earn upper-division science credits in quantum mechanics.

Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 8
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

WinterSpring
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 8
48
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dharshi Bopegedera
physical chemistry

The full-time program Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions covers quantum mechanics, inorganic chemistry (in fall and winter), and thermodynamics (in winter and spring), all at the upper-division science level. Each of these subjects is available to students as an individual component by taking the variable credit option within Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions .

In winter, we will study the fundamentals of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, including combinatorics and probability, the properties of large numbers of interacting particles, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, work, heat, energy, the equipartition theorem, entropy, enthalpy, rates of processes, equations of state, ideal gases, the Einstein solid, two-state paramagnets, calorimetry, refrigerators, engines, and the Carnot cyle.

In spring, half the time will be spent continuing the study of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics and other half adds the study of chemical kinetics. Spring quarter topics include: free energy and chemical thermodynamics with Gibbs and Helmholtz energy, phase transformations of pure and mixed substances, colligative properties, chemical equilibrium, Boltzman statistics, and quantum statistics. Kinetics lectures will cover reaction rates, rate law, orders, Arrhenius effects, molecularity, chain reactions, reaction mechanisms, the Eyring relationship, the Boltzmann distribution, and the Maxwell distribution of speeds. Laboratory exercises may be included if time permits.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

chemistry, physics, and science education

48

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students must have successfully completed one year of college calculus (differential and integral) and EITHER one year of college-level general chemistry with laboratory OR one year of college-level physics.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

Students who achieve the expected level of competency will earn upper-division science credits in thermodynamics and kinetics.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 8
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Mon 1 - 3p; Thurs 9:30 - 11:30a

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-11-21Description updated.

Audio Recording I

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

John Wilson
audio recording, contemporary composition, multimedia production
This course will introduce students to the process and tools of modern recording and sound/music production. This three quarter sequence begins with the study of microphones, portable recorders, and mono/stereo editing. Analog and digital recording using audio consoles, multitrack software, and mixing/production techniques will be introduced as you gain proficiency in the Audio Lab and the audio mixing benches. Final projects will consist of collaborative production pieces completed in the labs. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops. Students will maintain studio journals and complete weekly project assignments. Collaborative skills in studio work will be a focus.  This course is designed to provide anyone interested in audio production the fundamental skills needed to use modern technology to create music and other sound pieces. The only prerequisite is an interest in creating audio content and learning about sound production.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:30p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Audio Recording II

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

John Wilson
audio recording, contemporary composition, multimedia production

This course will introduce students to the process and tools of modern recording and sound/music production. This three quarter sequence begins with the study of microphones, portable recorders, and mono/stereo editing. Analog and digital recording using audio consoles, multitrack software, and mixing/production techniques will be introduced as you gain proficiency in the Audio Lab and the audio mixing benches. Final projects will consist of collaborative production pieces completed in the labs. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops. Students will maintain studio journals and complete weekly project assignments. Collaborative skills in studio work will be a focus.  This course is designed to provide anyone interested in audio production the fundamental skills needed to use modern technology to create music and other sound pieces. The only prerequisite is an interest in creating audio content and learning about sound production.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:30p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Audio Recording III

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

John Wilson
audio recording, contemporary composition, multimedia production

This course will introduce students to the process and tools of modern recording and sound/music production. This three quarter sequence begins with the study of microphones, portable recorders, and mono/stereo editing. Analog and digital recording using audio consoles, multitrack software, and mixing/production techniques will be introduced as you gain proficiency in the Audio Lab and the audio mixing benches. Final projects will consist of collaborative production pieces completed in the labs. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops. Students will maintain studio journals and complete weekly project assignments. Collaborative skills in studio work will be a focus.  This course is designed to provide anyone interested in audio production the fundamental skills needed to use modern technology to create music and other sound pieces. The only prerequisite is an interest in creating audio content and learning about sound production.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:30p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Awakening the Dreamer, Pursuing the Dream

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 36
75% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Cynthia Kennedy
leadership
music composition, theory, and technology

"The only myth that is going to be worth thinking about in the immediate future is one that is talking about the planet, not the city, not these people, but the planet, and everybody on it." —  Joseph Campbell

Joseph Campbell points out that our greatest challenge is how to live a humane existence in inhuman times. This program will focus on the individual's relationship to personal and cultural values, society, leadership, and the creative process. It is intended for students who seek to explore and refine their core values in a context in which they can act upon them with increasing awareness and integrity.

In every era, people have lived their lives in the face of significant social, ecological, and psychological challenges. It is now widely recognized that crisis often precedes positive transformation. This program will begin by focusing on how people in the past have worked to create a meaningful relationship between themselves and the world around them. We will explore movement, stories, and images of various creative practices and spiritual traditions from ancient to modern times to discover their relevance in our own lives. As students gain knowledge and skills in identifying their personal values, passions, and purpose, they will envision connections between that purpose and the larger world of life. They will cultivate leadership and emotional intelligence skills, build confidence and self-awareness, and—with faculty support—begin to prioritize and pursue their dreams.

Throughout the year, the program will work with multiple forms of intelligence, somatic practices, and integrative expressive arts approaches to learning. Students will explore the practices of music, movement (such as dance or yoga), writing, drawing, and theater in order to cultivate the senses as well as the imagination and powers of expression. These practices will help us understand the deeper aspects of the human experience, which are the source of self-leadership, intentional living, and positive change. Students will also investigate the relationship between inner transformation and social change through engagement in community service. Students will read mythology, literature, and poetry while exploring ideas that continue to shape contemporary culture. We will also look to indigenous cultures to deepen our appreciation of often-overlooked wisdom and values. We will seek to develop a broader understanding of contemporary culture as a stepping stone to thinking critically about how today's dreams can become tomorrow's reality.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

expressive arts, liberal studies, psychology, leadership, somatic studies, and cultural studies.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$85 in fall, $15 in winter, and $100 in spring for overnight retreats and art supplies.

Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 36
75% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Weekly Schedule: Tuesday 10-4:30, Wednesday 10-1, and Thursday 10-4:30

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-19This program is now open to enrollment of all class levels.
2018-03-06This program will accept new enrollment without signature.
2018-02-12Fee increased (from $85 to $100).

Awakening the Leader Within

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Dariush Khaleghi
Leadership, Management, Organizational Psychology and Behavior, and Huamn Resources Management

We need a new generation of leaders and game-changers.  The notion of leadership that once resonated with greatness no longer inspires new dreams, compelling visions, and revolutionary actions.  The unethical behavior, self-indulging decisions, and ego-driven conduct of many contemporary leaders has eroded the society’s trust in corporate, public and political leaders.  There is an urgent need for conscious and principled leaders who are driven by a set of universal virtues, a strong moral compass, and a deep desire to serve a global society and a sustainable world.  This course teaches students critical concepts and skills to examine their passion and purpose, develop vision, mission, values, and a plan of action to serve their communities.  This course provides students with the opportunity to reflect, collaborate, and learn through individual and group activities including self-evaluation, cases, discussions and seminars, and team projects.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Alternating Saturdays, 9a-4p: Jan 13, Jan 27, Feb 10, Feb 24, and Mar 10

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-04-03Updated Schedule: Class now meets alternating Saturdays (was Monday evenings)

Barely Modern: Aesthetics and Philosophies of Disillusionment

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
1216Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

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Taught by

Kathleen Eamon
aesthetics and philosophy, critical theory, psychoanalysis
Stein square
cultural anthropology

Our program will explore a set of surprising ideas and identities that emerged in reaction to the perceived clutter, alienation, and violence of early 20th century modernity. Europe and the U.S. will serve as the focus of much of our inquiry; we will also consider modernity’s detractors in Asia, especially those invested in new anti-colonial nationalisms. We will take particular interest in aesthetic, social, and epistemological movements aimed at stripping down and baring all: so-called “primitivism” and minimalism; naturism and socialism; and the emerging disciplines of psychoanalysis, sociology, and cultural anthropology. How did these movements articulate their disillusionment? What kinds of imaginaries—of the past, of nature, of community, of decadence, of the unconscious, of the “savage”—shaped everyday practices, critical philosophies, and utopian visions? We will look at both what seem to be “naive” responses (e.g., nudism as health and hobby) and their “knowing” re-inscription as artistic and theoretical strategies (e.g., minimalism and decadence). Although our gaze will be directed to the past, we will find there uncanny echoes of our own contemporary social and political worlds. 

We will approach our studies through a range of materials, looking at modernist and anti-modernist texts, art, and design, as well as more contemporary critical theory, cultural studies, anthropology, and history. Possible areas of focus include the sociology of Georg Simmel, Freud’s psychoanalytic theories, Picasso’s primitivism, Gandhi’s philosophies, Le Corbusier’s architecture, Franz Boas’ anthropology, the photography of Edward Curtis, and the performances of Josephine Baker. Students will conduct close readings and regular written work. Each student will also choose, develop, and pursue a substantial primary source–based research project.

A 12-credit option is available for students completing language study.  Students taking the program for 12 credits will not be required to attend the Wednesday morning activities: art lecture talks, visual literacy studies, and archives workshops.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

aesthetics, anthropology, history, and philosophy

1216Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

Variable credit options may be available upon consultation with faculty.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$130 for entrance fees and an overnight field trip.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-14This program is now available for 12 or 16 credits.
2018-03-01Fee increased ($130 from $30).

Best of Both Worlds: A Fiction/Nonfiction Workshop

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Steve Blakeslee
English, writing, literature
creative writing, sustainability, public policy

Fiction and creative nonfiction: at first glance, these two widespread and highly popular modes of written expression may seem neatly bounded, sectioned off from each other in both form and intention. In practice, however, these modes have a complicated relationship. Much creative nonfiction, for example, makes use of the traditional tools of fiction, such as plotting, character development, scene-setting, and dialogue. Some fictional works require large amounts of factual research in order to function properly. And the genre of memoir, with its memory gaps, unsubstantiated claims, and necessary embellishments, sometimes seems to occupy both creative spheres at once.

In this program we will consider the complex relationships between fiction and nonfiction writing by studying and practicing the two modes in tandem. How do they differ, intersect, and inform each other? And how might each mode help us in our pursuit of the other, thereby giving us the best of both worlds? We will read and analyze both traditional and contemporary examples of high-quality fiction and creative nonfiction, including “flash” (short-short) pieces, personal essays, short stories, reportage, and longer works such as memoirs and novels. These readings will inform our own efforts as we begin to brainstorm, plan, draft, and edit our own fiction and nonfiction creations.

Much of our work will take place in supportive group settings where students will have plenty of opportunities to generate new writing and experiment with new forms and approaches. We will take a close look at the particular challenges of writing from personal experience. Students will also learn how to establish productive writing habits, build effective narrative structures, give and receive productive critiques, and bring a poet’s ear to the refinement of their prose.

Be prepared to read widely, write daily, work hard, and have fun.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

writing, literature, humanities, education

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-9:30p

Located in: Olympia

Books and Silences: Samuel Beckett and Book Arts

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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CANCELLED

Taught by

Steven Hendricks
book arts, literature, creative writing

In this program we’ll study the work of Samuel Beckett, one of the most influential and acclaimed writers of the 20th century. Our study will blend careful textual study with literary criticism and philosophy to allow us access to a variety of readings from Beckett's difficult oeuvre. Because Beckett's writing invites us to consider the limits of literature and language, it provides a unique lens with which to explore the art of the book as the "organism that literature demands" (to quote Mallarmé). Through a practical and philosophical encounter with book arts, we'll develop ways of thinking about the book form and about the arts of reading and writing. Studio work will emphasize basic letterpress printing, basic bookbinding, and experimental book arts practices. Student work will include short essays, creative writing, and individual experiments with the book as an expressive and practical form. This program entails a lot of reading and a lot of studio time, including the purchase of numerous texts and art materials in order to complete required projects. This program is suitable for students with prior experience in literary studies who want to delve into difficult readings and who are interested in an introduction to new artistic practices.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

literature, design, writing, and the arts

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend approximately $175 for texts, art materials, and tools.

Fees:

$50 for studio materials and tools.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-04-20This program has been cancelled. Steven Hendricks will offer Narrative Silences with Vuslat Demirkoparan.

Born into Language: Creative Writing, Philosophy, Sound Art, and Psychoanalysis

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Kathleen Eamon
aesthetics and philosophy, critical theory, psychoanalysis
Lynarra Featherly square
creative writing, philosophy, critical theory

How does language precede us? How does it shape our being in the world, the emergence of a self, the connections and disconnections between us? In this introductory program, we will move between a variety of theoretical traditions and art practices (particularly in experimental writing, sound art, philosophy and psychoanalysis) to think about language as it stands in relation to sound and image, thinking and memory, power and the individual. Our reading, writing, and thinking will be experimental, as we look to playfully access our own language and the discourses and disciplines that surround it. How do these “inputs” shape our creative and intellectual “outputs”?

Over the quarter, we will closely read psychoanalytic texts and short stories as well as texts in critical, literary and sound theory, with regular seminars, small groups, lectures, and reading sessions. (Our authors will likely include Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, Žižek, Fanon, Michel Chion, Gertrude Stein, Roland Barthes, Sianne Ngai, Fred Moten, Herman Melville and Edgar Allan Poe.) Writing will be a central focus, as we alternate between poetic experimentation and playful academic essays. We will “write” with found language and sound collage, working within constraints in an attempt to disrupt language’s smooth functioning.

In addition to regular short essays and writing experiments, students will develop a final collection of written work and an experimental electronic soundscape. The program will provide introductory technical instruction in graphic design, Adobe InDesign, and small press publishing, as well as parallel sound technology training (recording, editing software like Adobe Audition, and formal approaches to sound and soundscapes). There will be likely be day trips to Seattle or Portland to investigate contemporary art. At the end of the quarter, we will collectively organize a sound art audition party and reading series.

Note: this program repeats winter quarter. Students who take the program in fall should not take the winter quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

language studies, philosophy and writing.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$60 for entrance fees.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 1pm (Lecture Hall 03)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-22Fees reduced (from $200 to $60).

Born into Language: Creative Writing, Philosophy, Sound Art, and Psychoanalysis

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Kathleen Eamon
aesthetics and philosophy, critical theory, psychoanalysis
Lynarra Featherly square
creative writing, philosophy, critical theory

Note: this is a repeat of a program in fall quarter. Students who took the program in fall should not take the winter quarter repeat.

How does language precede us? How does it shape our being in the world, the emergence of a self, the connections and disconnections between us? In this introductory program, we will move between a variety of theoretical traditions and art practices (particularly in experimental writing, sound art, philosophy and psychoanalysis) to think about language as it stands in relation to sound and image, thinking and memory, power and the individual. Our reading, writing, and thinking will be experimental, as we look to playfully access our own language and the discourses and disciplines that surround it. How do these “inputs” shape our creative and intellectual “outputs”?

Over the quarter, we will closely read psychoanalytic texts and short stories as well as texts in critical, literary and sound theory, with regular seminars, small groups, lectures, and reading sessions. (Our authors will likely include Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, Žižek, Fanon, Michel Chion, Gertrude Stein, Roland Barthes, Sianne Ngai, Fred Moten, Herman Melville and Edgar Allan Poe.) Writing will be a central focus, as we alternate between poetic experimentation and playful academic essays. We will “write” with found language and sound collage, working within constraints in an attempt to disrupt language’s smooth functioning.

In addition to regular short essays and writing experiments, students will develop a final collection of written work and an experimental electronic soundscape. The program will provide introductory technical instruction in graphic design, Adobe InDesign, and small press publishing, as well as parallel sound technology training (recording, editing software like Adobe Audition, and formal approaches to sound and soundscapes). At the end of the quarter, we will collectively organize a sound art audition party and reading series.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

language studies, philosophy and writing.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-11-15Fee cancelled.
2017-05-22Fees reduced (from $200 to $60).

Botany: Plants and People

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 23
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Frederica Bowcutt
botany, ecology, environmental history

This is a one-quarter program designed to support students learning introductory plant biology in an interdisciplinary format. Students will learn about plant anatomy, morphology, evolution, and systematics. Lectures based on textbook readings supplement the laboratory work. The learning community will explore how present form and function informs us about the evolution of major groups of plants such as mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants. Students will get hands-on experience studying plants under microscopes and in the field. Students will also learn how to maintain a detailed and illustrated nature journal to develop basic identification skills of local native species of plants. They will be taught basic botanical illustration skills to support this work. This program also focuses on people's relationships with plants for food, fiber, medicine, and aesthetics. Students will study economic botany through seminar texts, films, and lectures that examine agriculture, forestry, herbology, and horticulture. They will examine political-economic factors that shape our relations with plants. The learning community will use economic and historical lenses to inquire about why people have favored some plants and not others—or why those preferences have radically changed. (For example, why might a former cash crop be considered a weed?) In our readings, we will examine the significant roles botany has played in colonialism, imperialism, and globalization. Initiatives to foster more socially just and environmentally sustainable relations with plants will be investigated. Weekly workshops will help students improve their ability to write thesis-driven essays defended with evidence from assigned texts. Quizzes, exams, and weekly assignments will help students and faculty assess learning.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

field plant taxonomy, field ecology, plant science, plant ecology, economic botany, agriculture, forestry, and environmental education

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$25 for entrance fees and supplies.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 23
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, April 2 at 11 am (SEM II E3107).

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

2018-19

DateRevision
2018-03-12Fee added ($25).

Bryophytes and Lichens of the Pacific Northwest

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Lalita Calabria
botany, phytochemistry, systematics

This upper-divison science program focuses on the the diversity and ecological significance of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) and lichens (i.e., lichenized fungi). With approximately 40,000 described species these lineages occur in virtually every ecosystem on earth and are among the most sensitive indicators of environmental change. In these ecosystems, bryophytes and lichens perform important biological functions including carbon sequestration, nitrogen-fixation, soil stabilization, reduction of water and nutrient run-off, as well as providing habitat and nesting material for invertebrates and vertebrates.

This program will foster skills in field taxonomy and ecology of lichens and bryophytes. A multi-day field trip as well as several day-long field trips will emphasize life history, ecology, collecting and identification of bryophytes and lichens from urban areas, temperate rainforests of the Olympic and Cascade mountains as well as lowland prairie ecosystems of Washington and Oregon. Lab activities will involve identifying collected specimens to species using dichotomous keys and developing proficiency in techniques for the identification of mosses and lichens, such as chemical testing for lichens and use of compound and dissecting microscopes. Many of these lab and field skills can be applied broadly to other taxonomic groups of plants and fungi. Lectures and seminars will focus on readings from texts and scientific papers relating to the ecology and conservation of these taxa. Students will also gain skills and experience in scientific writing through independent and group writing activities which may include creating a blog, keeping a detailed field journal and in some cases, crafting a grant proposal for future independent research.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

natural resource management, botany, ecology, conservation and environmental studies

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

one year of college level biology and one quarter of basic botany/plant biology

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$286 for multi-day field trip to Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center.

Upper division science credit:

All credit will be designated upper-division science for those students who demonstrate a solid working understanding of the prerequisites and successfully complete all of the program work.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 10am (Sem II C1107)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-04-25Fee added ($286).

Business, Biology, and Sustainable Solutions

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

biology, virology, molecular biology

This program will allow students to develop an understanding of the relationship between business and biology, particularly how natural resources are used for business. We will explore how business practices and biological technology shape, impact, and are influenced by natural resource limitations and policies. Our emphasis will be on the Western United States, with a particular focus on how watershed resources are utilized directly or indirectly for business. The program includes fundamental work in entrepreneurship, ecotourism, sustainability, energy, water use, and biology. Students leaving this program will be better equipped to understand how a successful business operates, and how to work within the constraints imposed by competition, government, and limited natural resources. In addition, students will gain an understanding about sustainable alternatives to existing infrastructure.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology and business.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Special expenses:

Students will need to purchase a plane ticket for a field trip (approximately $200).

Fees:

$250 for overnight field trips.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 10am (Sem II B3105)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-09-19Special expense added (approximately $200).
2017-09-19Fee reduced (from $450 to $250).
2017-04-25Fee added ($450)
2017-04-20This program is now fall only.

Business, Personal Finance and Statistics

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Gleen Landram
management science, statistics

Would you like to better understand the business world’s set of numbers? This program will provide the quantitative reasoning for the conduct and understanding of business and finance in today’s world. We will focus on contemporary business issues, as well as offer an introduction to personal finance and investing in the fall. The fall program also includes four credits of basic undergraduate statistics, which can serve as a foundation for further work in advanced social sciences including graduate programs (e.g., an MBA or MPA) requiring statistics.  During winter quarter we will continue the examination of business issues while emphasizing the study of basic economics and management science--which is the study of the quantitative tools used to optimize business processes.

Over both quarters we will examine the financial and economic challenges faced by smaller businesses, entrepreneurs and individuals, and what it takes to be effective in our current economic environment. There will be workshops, lectures, films, guest speakers and student-led sessions. Readings from daily newspapers such as the  Wall Street Journal , magazines such as the  Money  and  Kiplinger's, and texts such as That Used to Be Us by Thomas Friedman will increase student familiarity with current business topics and help students develop the skills to organize and analyze business, economic and financial information. Strategies for effectively presenting quantitative information will also be covered. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

business, social work, non-profit organizations and government. 

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

High School Algebra required. 

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First winter class meeting: Monday, January 8 at 9:30am (Sem II E3109)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-10-23This program has been extended into winter quarter; the description has been updated.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics, education, anthropological mathematics

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I, II, and III is a year-long sequence of courses that will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long (Fall, Winter, Spring) sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.

Calculus I will be offered during fall quarter.  Calculus and Analytical Geometry I will include a rigorous study of limits, derivatives and their applications through multiple modes of inquiry and multiple (algebraic, graphical, numerical, and verbal) representations. Collaborative learning is emphasized.  If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.   A graphing calculator is required for the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Education, Engineering, Mathematics, Science, Economics

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 7:30 am - 9:00 am

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 7:30am (Sem II A1107)

Located in: Olympia

Calculus and Analytical Geometry II

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics, education, anthropological mathematics

This course is the second of a year-long sequence that will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.  

Winter quarter will focus on procedures and applications of integration.  There will be an emphasis on context-based problem solving and collaborative learning. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.    A graphing calculator is required for the course.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Calculus and Analytical Geometry III

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics, education, anthropological mathematics

Calculus and Analytical Geometry III completes the year-long sequence of courses that provides a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This three-quarter-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics. Spring quarter topics include introduction to multi-dimensional space, introduction to differential equations, and sequences and series.  There will be an emphasis on context-based problem solving and collaborative learning. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.   A graphing calculator is required for the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Teaching, science, economics, mathematics

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Calculus I

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics, history of science

Calculus is the mathematical study of change. In the first quarter of this yearlong sequence, we will focus on the derivative. The derivative will first be developed intuitively as the slope of a tangent line or equivalently as an instantaneous velocity. Using limits, the derivative at a point will be defined formally and the limit definition of the derivative will be applied to power functions. All of the standard rules for differentiating combinations of power, polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions will be used to study various rates of change. Major applications of the derivative will include related rates, extrema on closed intervals, concavity, and optimizing functions.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, Education, Physical and Computer Science, Economics

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Pre-calculus including college-algebra and trigonometry are required for success in the class.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thursdays, 6-10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Calculus II

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics, history of science

The focus this quarter will be on the integral. Using simple, rectangular approximations, the integral will first be developed intuitively as the area between curves and then formally defined as the limit of Riemann Sums. A substantial portion of the class will be devoted to learning methods for finding anti-derivatives. Students will have substantial opportunity to review differentiation while finding integrals. Via the FTC, integrals will be used to calculate areas, volumes, work, energy, and displacement. Emphasis will be given to developing excellent symbolic reasoning skills, modeling geometric and physical phenomena, and using numerical approximations effectively.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, Education, Physical and Computer Science, Economics

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Calculus 1

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thursdays, 6-10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Calculus III

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

mathematics, history of science

This is the last class in the first-year calculus sequence. The main emphasis will be on translating the ideas and applications of the derivative and integral from two dimensions to higher dimensional settings. The quarter will begin with an introduction to differential equations. Students will do some qualitative work and leave with a good foundation in solving linear first-order differential equations. Partial differentiation will be used to determine and apply the gradient. Students will revisit some area and volume problems using double integrals.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Mathematics, Education, Physical and Computer Science, Economics

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Calculus 1 and 2

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thursdays, 6-10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Ceramic Art Practices: Exploring the Role of the Object

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Evan Blackwell
ceramic art, sculpture, visual studies

This studio arts program examines the role of the object in art history and contemporary artistic practice. Students will learn both sculptural and functional approaches to making ceramic artworks while combining 2- and 3-D ceramics techniques. This program is designed for beginner to intermediate students with little or no experience with ceramics and art history. Our introductory thematic focus will be on the “still life” object: how objects reflect and represent us, embodying our tastes, values, hopes, and identities. Through lectures, readings, seminars, and critiques, we will explore how humans have historically used inanimate objects to represent religious, allegorical, personal and political ideas, and how these objects and symbols impact our culture today. Through our own creative projects, we will explore the relationship between image and object and the role of the object in contemporary art.

Students will have opportunities to develop technical skills in ceramic forming, glazing, and firing techniques while learning about the history of ceramics. Each student in the program will create a series of creative works related to the object over the course of the quarter. This program is designed for students who have a strong work ethic, self-discipline, and who are willing to work long hours on campus in the ceramics studio.  It is ideal for students who have some visual art experience in any medium and would like to apply their previous experience to making 2- and 3-D ceramics functional and sculptural clay pieces. Students who fully engage in the theory and practice of this program can expect to leave the program prepared for more intermediate to advanced studies in the visual arts.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual arts, arts education, art history, and arts management.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$80 for admission to museums and for ceramics supplies.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 10am (Arts Annex 2104)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-01-18New fall opportunity added.

Ceramics: Figuratively Speaking

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Ceramics: Figuratively Speaking is an interdisciplinary program that will combine sculpting the human form out of clay, professional art practices, and discussion about identity theory, self-representation, ethics of appropriating other people’s bodies/stories, and “the gaze.” By combining making figures with discussion of the implications of making figures, students will have an opportunity to reflect in real time about their own work, work of their peers, and work they see in the art world. The studio will offer a place for students to build skills in figure sculpture. Students will gain experience in deciding on a pose, working with a steel pipe armature, and hollowing and reconstructing clay figures. Students will be exposed to both fired and cold temperature surfaces. In the professional practices portion of the program, each student will research and finalize an application to a graduate program, residency, fellowship, or grant. There will be critiques of student projects as well as iterative drafts of an artist statement. Some previous figure drawing or clay experience is recommended. This program is designed for students who are considering art making, museum studies, or art criticism as a future career.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual art, museum studies, art criticism

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Some previous figure drawing or clay experience is recommended

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend $50-$75 for clay and other supplies.

 

Fees:

$15 fee for supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 6-10pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-07-26Required fee raised to $15 (was $10)

Ceramics: Form and Function

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this class students will explore the sculptural and design potential of functional ceramic forms. Topics discussed will include elements of design, historical and cultural significances of functional forms, and integration of surface and form. Techniques will include wheel throwing, alteration of thrown forms, piecing parts to make complex or larger forms, and creating hand-built accoutrements.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

$50-$75 for supplies and materials

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tues/Thu 6-8:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Foundational Skills

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This is an introductory studio course in forming processes and surface options in ceramics. Students will learn the hand-building techniques of pinching, coil-building, slab-building, and get an introduction to wheel-throwing.  Surfaces will include terra sigillata, stains, slips and low-fire glazes. We will also cover common ceramic terminology, materials, and firing techniques. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend $30-$50 on materials and tools

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Thu 6-8:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Function and Design

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course is intended as an overview of ceramic studio practices.  Students will learn a variety of hand-built ceramic techniques beginning with traditional methods and moving toward current ceramic technologies.  Functional pottery will be emphasized with technical demonstrations based on utility.  Thematic projects are designed to aide students toward the development of an informed and personal style while gaining solid foundation skills in both functional and sculptural work. Critical analysis of resulting work will be scheduled through written observations and through group discussions.  Course will introduce students to clay types, kiln firing methods, glazing and related surfacing techniques.   Presentations on the history and contemporary application of ceramic arts will contextualize studio work. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Visual arts, education, liberal arts

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$15 for supplies

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 5:30-9:30p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-04Class level restrictions changed: This course is now So-Sr only. Please use the class level specific CRN.

Ceramics: Intermediate/Advanced Projects

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In this intermediate-advanced level course students will develop a body of work based around themes generated by the class. Students will learn constructive critique methods and will participate in weekly critiques in both large and small groups. Participants will learn about various types of artist statements and work on drafts throughout the quarter. Selected work will be presented in a final class exhibition at the end of the quarter. Students will be expected to come to the course with previous experience working in clay at the college level and be prepared to complete intermediate-advanced projects.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Previous experience working in clay at the college level

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

$50-75 in clay and other materials

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-8:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Wheel-thrown Pottery

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The goal of this course is to provide students with opportunities to concentrate on advanced wheel throwing techniques.  It is highly encouraged that students have previously taken a ceramics course and have the ability to center clay on a pottery wheel.  Students will learn to develop better control over their cylinders, create forms with walls of uniform thickness, improve handles, spouts, lids and trimming techniques.  Weekly demonstrations will include surface techniques, lidded forms, plates, large vases, double wall cylinders and teapots.  Students will work toward the development of a personal style while drawing from a library of historically celebrated ceramic design.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 5:30-9:30p

Located in: Olympia

Chekhov's Russia

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Anton Chekhov, Russia's foremost short story writer and playwright, reflects in his fictional works the massive social and economic forces that undermined the Russian autocratic system. Chekhov's life (1860 to 1904) and literary production, spans the final years of autocratic rule before the 1905 revolution, which some of his stories and plays anticipate. The format of the course will be lecture/discussion. Students can also expect to view films about the writer's life and works as well as some of his dramatic productions. Space permitting, students in this course may also attend voluntarily the seminars on Chekhov's fictional works on Wednesday evenings.  For full credit, students must attend Monday lectures and film viewings, write weekly response papers to the required readings, and submit an integrative essay (3-5 pages) on some aspect of his stories and plays as social history.

 

This 4 credit course is part of the 8 credit program Chekhov, Stanislavski, and Modern Drama. The registration CRN for this course is: 10456

The CRN can be also be found on the catalog page for the program:

http://www.evergreen.edu/catalog/offering/chekhov-stanislavski-and-modern-drama-15638

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays 6pm to 10pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-08-28New course added for Fall: Part of the 8 credit program Chekhov, Stanislavski, and Modern Drama.

Chekhov, Stanislavski, and Modern Drama

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 44
12
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Marla Elliot portrait
performance, voice, community studies

This program will explore the works of the Russian short fiction writer and playwright Anton Chekhov and other European dramatists, such as Henrik Ibsen, who together are credited with the development of modern drama. We will analyze not only their fictional and dramatic works but also their lives and times—from which they drew their characters and dramatic situations.

Chekhov’s drama, subtle and mundane yet profound, led Constantin Stanislavski to invent an entirely new system of acting in order to interpret them, and has linked the two inextricably.  Modern actors’ concern with emotional authenticity originated with Chekhov and Stanislavski. In fall quarter, all students will be trained in the fundamentals of acting, voice, directing, and design.  Students will apply those skills to stage scenes from Chekhov’s Three Sisters. A 4-credit component, titled Chekhov's Russian, is also available in Fall. For more information, see the Chekhov's Russian catalog listing. 

In winter quarter, the entire class will become a production company to stage Three Sisters for the public.  In addition to acting, students can expect to be involved in all aspects of technical theatre.  They will help create costumes, scenery, lighting, and sound; work backstage during performances; create and carry out publicity plans for the production; and serve as stage managers and house managers. Most major acting roles will be reserved for those who enroll in the program for both fall and winter quarters.

Also in winter quarter, we will study plays by Ibsen, Shaw, Brecht, and other dramatists associated with the birth of modern drama. Throughout the program we will read, critique, and discuss commentaries—current and past—on the plays of Chekhov and the other late-19th and 20th century dramatists, and explore the many explanations given for their enduring legacy and influence.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

history, literature, and theater

12

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$20 per fall quarter for theatre tickets

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 44
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed/Thu 6-10p. Winter quarter, during the final rehearsals and performances, additional evenings and late evenings will be required.

Located in: Olympia

Chemistry for Everyone

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

John Kirkpatrick
environmental chemistry, molecular biology and ecology, oceanography

Chemistry lies at the center of many disciplines that  touch upon our everyday lives, from the food we eat, the energy we use, the places we live, to the cells that make up our selves. As foundational knowledge applicable and useful to all humans, this course aims to provide college-level experience in chemistry and how it connects to and ties together diverse fields such as environmental science, geology, physics, engineering, math, and others. Topics include the composition and structure of matter; forms of energy and energy transfer; elements and molecules; reactions and equilibrium; and the basic tenets of science and how we know what we know. This introduction  is not intended to provide prerequisites for upper-division science courses, but instead provide exposure to different aspects of the physical sciences that will be useful for many students wishing some knowledge of these topics to help guide future course and career paths.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 6-8p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-09-06New Spring Quarter Offering Added

China at the Crossroad of Tradition and Modernity

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Rose Jang square
China studies, theater
Wenhong Wang
sociology and social statistics

This program aims to study China—both as a powerful nation in the global community and as a unique and complex cultural entity constantly wrestling with traditional and modern ideologies and practices at its very core. The long Chinese history and the fast-paced modernization process have put today’s China at a crossroad of confusion and potential, and the constant debates and negotiations between the old and the new permeate every aspect of the current Chinese society. Such tension between tradition and modernity gives us a glimpse of the Chinese national characteristics on the international stage, and sheds light on many domestic social and political issues that have attracted world attention.

Since the quarter is short, we will choose only a few topics—including interrelated elements from the fields of medicine, arts, literature, environment, public media, and religious beliefs—as distinct examples that bring the tension between tradition and modernity into sharp focus. Faculty will select topics and examples with care, and develop lectures, readings, and workshops that illuminate these selective and complex topics. Students will be encouraged to develop their own research projects and look into specific areas of interest under faculty guidance. The purpose of the program is to develop a general understanding of China’s unique role in today’s globalized world as well as an appreciation for China’s complex national identity marked by history, tradition, and unstoppable progress.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Chinese studies, cultural studies, social sciences, health, literature, and arts

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Chinese - First Year I

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Lin Crowley
media and Chinese studies

This introductory Chinese course will emphasize the standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with no or little prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through interactive practice and continuous small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Chinese - First Year II

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Lin Crowley
media and Chinese studies

This Chinese course will continue to emphasize the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with some prior experience will learn to build on their knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. The class is fast-paced with use of internet to accelerate the learning. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Both traditional and simplified Chinese characters will be introduced and practiced throughout the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Chinese - First Year III

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Lin Crowley
media and Chinese studies

This third course in the introductory Chinese series will continue to emphasize the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with some prior experience will learn to build on their knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. The class is fast-paced with use of internet to accelerate the learning. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Both traditional and simplified Chinese characters will be introduced and practiced throughout the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

City Parks and Politics: An Introduction

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

academic and creative nonfiction writing, community studies, analog game design

Residents of U.S. cities say that urban green spaces provide them with multiple benefits. These range from the elevated economic worth of near-by houses to the development of stronger neighbor-to-neighbor relationships. History suggests that public spaces also serve as physical locations for political dissent, including the consideration of community values. Participants in City Parks and Politics will focus on the multiple contributions made by city parks and city recreation programs to urban communal life.

Our inquiries will begin with the reality that parks are public spaces constructed for specific purposes. The topics of social equity, policy-making, human health, park-related employment, and varied interpretations of the common good will center our explorations. Part of our work will be to examine conflicts over who does, and who should, use parks – and for what ends.

Parks and recreation programs in Olympia and Lacey will serve as informal case studies for our explorations. Invited speakers and visits to area parks will inform our inquiries. Planned classroom activities include workshops, seminars, and short interactive lectures. During one Saturday class session, we will contribute to a hands-on park project as volunteers.

Program members will enjoy multiple occasions to develop the habits of mind of critical thinkers. Clear and thoughtful writing, coupled to opportunities to explore ideas related to the public good, will be essential components of our work together. Texts will include The Right to the City: Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space (Mitchell), and reports and articles available online. Participants should plan to develop their knowledge of urban parks and recreation programs and of the contributions these programs make to the political and social lives of U.S. cities. Credit will be awarded as City Parks and Recreation: An Introduction.  

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

community work, local or state government, city planning, politics, parks and recreation, sociology

8

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

None

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Wednesdays, 5:45-9:45pm and every other Saturday, 9 am- 5 pm: April 7, 21, May 5, 19, and June 2.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-26Program description updated
2018-01-23Schedule Change: Class is now Wed/Sat, was Thu/Sat

Cityscapes

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

European history
Shaw Osha (Flores)
visual arts, painting, drawing

Important Note:  This program is taught by Stacey Davis and Shaw Osha. An intermittent error in the catalog incorrectly displays Steve Davis. 

This program investigates the relationship between modern cities and the art that shapes and responds to their historic, geographic, and contemporary socio-cultural identities. Urban living brings with it an immediacy of culture clash, social mixing, and the loss of local identities for new denizens, yet also the potential for the reconstruction and/or reconfiguration of both individual and collective identities. Cities are sites of social, economic, ethnic, and gender hierarchies, yet have also been at the forefront of radicalization and revolution in terms of gender, class, and race.

New York and Paris will be our focus. Through the intertwined disciplines of art and history, we will take a visual and critical studies approach to how these cities are formed by social, cultural, and political history, including the legacies of aristocracy, revolution, slavery, and waves of immigration. We will consider how the vestiges of the past are present in the architecture, geography, community structures, and social and cultural landscapes of each city. By accounting for their particular American and European histories, we will study contemporary issues and visual landscapes that reveal tensions over resources and the myriad social and political realities in these cities. How did past artistic movements, like impressionism in Paris and the Harlem Renaissance in New York, reflect and challenge the cultural norms and tensions in those cities? What sort of art became codified in museums, salons, and academies, and what art broke boundaries and created its own rules?

Our inquiries will be shaped by studies of major current sociopolitical and artistic events occurring as the 30 weeks unfold. These may include conflicts over immigration, social movements, political change, violence and fears of terrorist attacks, as well as issues of free speech, discrimination, and social justice. Students will be instructed in theory and practice in arts and humanities methodologies of investigation, including work in history, art history, urban and gender studies, and a visual arts practice. In fall quarter, instruction in drawing and painting will acquaint students with formal issues in visual language so they can represent and visualize ideas. Students will practice modalities of research in the humanities that will prepare them to conduct research and write a research paper later in the year. In winter, students will practice following lines of investigation in art-making and writing through assignments and working in small collaborations. In fall and winter, there will be short field trips to study local cities and their art scenes.

During the 10-week period spanning the second half of winter and the first half of spring quarters, students will hone their own artistic practice or academic research in response to their growing understanding of the identities and tensions present in New York, Paris, or another city of their choice. Students will have the opportunity for individual travel to study a city in depth for this independent research or artistic project. Students will return to the classroom in the middle of spring quarter to reflect on, critically examine, and integrate their fall quarter theoretical and methodological learning with their winter and spring quarter research or artistic practice.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual arts, urban studies, history, European and American studies, gender studies, and art history

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Fall: Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
  • Winter and Spring: Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Additional expenses, for supplies or travel, will vary by individual project. Approximately $2,000 in winter for an optional ten-day study of contemporary art in New York City, including travel, lodging, meal, and individual project expenses. Students will be responsible to make arrangements for their own travel, lodging, meals, and individual project expenses. An additional $225 is required for museum passes, studio visit artist fees and travel to Dia Beacon. Students will take projects and unused supplies with them at the end of the program. The program will be structured as it is on campus with 16 hours of class time, which includes seminar, lectures, field trips and project work. Students will have the opportunity to experience NYC in context, in terms of its history and culture including a study of art from throughout history and from all over the world in museums, galleries and in artists’ studios. This is an opportunity for students to situate launch their research projects will also be able to situate their own line of inquiry within the context of what is being made and shown in a major contemporary art center.

Fees:

$200 in fall, $75 in winter and $100 in spring for museum and theater tickets, art supplies, and overnight field trips.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, January 8 at 10am (tbd)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-01-31Winter fee reduced (from $200 to $75).
2017-05-02Fees updated ($200 in fall, $200 in winter, and $100 in spring). An optional trip to New York will cost an additional estimated $2225.
2017-05-02Variable credit section added.

Climate and Ecosystem Change in the Anthropocene

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Paul Goldberg square
landscape ecology, physical geography (climate, landforms, biogeography), spatial analysis/GIS
Angelos Katsanis
ecology, entomology, agronomy

What are the impacts of human-induced climate change on ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest? Students in this program will investigate this question from the perspectives of climate change science, basic meteorology, ecosystem science, and invasive species ecology and biology. 

The impact of climate change and rising average world temperatures can have a profound influence on species’ geographical ranges and the ecosystems they inhabit. Ecosystem structure, function and composition are often determined primarily by the climate and its interactions with these elements. Understanding the scientific basis of climate change and its environmental impacts will be important in understanding future effects on ecosystems and the human cultures that rely on them. We will review and discuss the mechanisms behind past, present, and likely future climate change, together with its influences on the landscape and the effects of biological invasions of species.

Biological invasions are responsible for almost half of the known species extinctions on Earth, through ecological processes such as predation and competition. In addition their environmental damages cost the global economy billions of dollars each year. Climate change has had a significant impact on invasive species success in colonizing and affecting ecosystems. Students will explore the interaction between climate change and the biological, ecological and socio-economic impacts of invasive species as well as understand the mechanisms behind biological invasions. They will assess the impact of those invasions to biodiversity and ecosystems as well as their potential impacts as climate change alters ecosystems to their benefit. Through field trips and lab exercises, the program will provide the approaches for understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems and options for managing invasive species.

This program will be repeated in spring quarter. Students who take this program in winter should not register for the spring quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ecology, geography, climate science, invasive species biology and ecology.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$215 for a 4 night 5 day overnight field trip.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Additional details:

Overnight field trip: January 16th - January 20th

Located in: Olympia

Climate and Ecosystem Change in the Anthropocene

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Paul Goldberg square
landscape ecology, physical geography (climate, landforms, biogeography), spatial analysis/GIS
Angelos Katsanis
ecology, entomology, agronomy

This program is a repeat of the program in winter quarter.  Students who take the program in winter should not register for the spring quarter program.

What are the impacts of human-induced climate change on ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest? Students in this program will investigate this question from the perspectives of climate change science, basic meteorology, ecosystem science, and invasive species ecology and biology. 

The impact of climate change and rising average world temperatures can have a profound influence on species’ geographical ranges and the ecosystems they inhabit. Ecosystem structure, function and composition are often determined primarily by the climate and its interactions with these elements. Understanding the scientific basis of climate change and its environmental impacts will be important in understanding future effects on ecosystems and the human cultures that rely on them. We will review and discuss the mechanisms behind past, present, and likely future climate change, together with its influences on the landscape and the effects of biological invasions of species.

Biological invasions are responsible for almost half of the known species extinctions on Earth, through ecological processes such as predation and competition. In addition their environmental damages cost the global economy billions of dollars each year. Climate change has had a significant impact on invasive species success in colonizing and affecting ecosystems. Students will explore the interaction between climate change and the biological, ecological and socio-economic impacts of invasive species as well as understand the mechanisms behind biological invasions. They will assess the impact of those invasions to biodiversity and ecosystems as well as their potential impacts as climate change alters ecosystems to their benefit. Through field trips and lab exercises, the program will provide the approaches for understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems and options for managing invasive species.

Up to 16 upper-division science credits in geography and advanced ecology may be offered to juniors and seniors. In order to earn upper-division science credit, students will conduct advanced research  on invasive species ecology and effects on existing ecosystems; investigate the role of climate change in invasive species success; collect and analyze data on invasive species biology and ecology; and present their work in the form of a scientific paper.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ecology, geography, climate science, invasive species biology and ecology.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$215 for a 4 night 5 day overnight field trip.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-16This program will now accept enrollment for all class levels.

Code/Switch

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
41216
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

queer studies, philosophy, poetics
Catalina Ocampo
Spanish language, Latin American literature

"Not only do I code-switch in language," writes the late Chicana writer Gloria Anzaldúa, "but I jerk the reader around by also code-switching in genre: mixing genres, crossing genres from poetry to essay to narrative to a little bit of analysis and theory. The reader has to put it all together at the end." In an interview Anzaldúa adds: "My code switching is my way to resist being made into something else. [...] This resistance is part of the anticolonial struggle against both the Spanish colonizers and the white colonizers. [...] To me it is a political choice, as well as an aesthetic choice."

This intensive critical/creative reading/writing program is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of code-switching. Although the term was first used by linguists to describe the practice of alternating between two (or more) languages in a single conversation, we will enlarge the concept in order to consider code-switching between cultures, disciplines, discourses, genres, and identities. Our goal is to increase our ability to code-switch in all these senses, and to reflect on those abilities, to think about what we are doing, to theorize the practice. What does it mean to code-switch? Who does it and where? How and why do we do it? What roles do power and desire play in the practice? What are the relations between text and context? What are the relations between language and power, language and desire?

After studying some basic concepts around language and code, we will explore these questions by reading on texts from Latin America and the United States, including work by Latina/o/x and Native American communities that regularly code-switch between various cultural codes and queer writers who peer deeply into social codes from a subaltern perspective. We'll also explore how the idea of code-switching appears in media theory, in particular with respect to communication with ghosts, aliens, or occult forces as a kind of code-switching in mediated spaces. Our readings will come from a range of disciplines, including philosophy, linguistics, literature, and cultural studies. We will learn how to identify and work within the “code” behind each of those disciplines while considering when it is more appropriate to “break the code” of a discipline and how authors move between various codes within a single text. As we do this, we will also practice switching between different writing “codes.” We will read and write in various genres, including poetry, fiction, and the essay.

The short of it is this: we’ll be reading and writing (and re-writing) a lot, both in class and out of it, on the page and on the screen. At the same time, we will sharpen our cross-cultural skills and develop capacities to move within and between disciplines and cultural codes in the broader sense, inhabiting newly conceived aspects of the political and aesthetic spaces within which we, like Anzaldúa, seek to make choices.

Note: Students may choose to take a 4-credit language-only module for Spanish at the intermediate to advanced level or a 12-credit module for students registered for a separate language course.  Students interested in the language-only module should have at least two years of college-level Spanish or one year of intensive Spanish immersion offered in programs such as in The Spanish-Speaking World.

41216

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 10am (Lecture Hall 04)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-08-294 and 12 credit options added.

Code/Switch: Intermediate-Advanced Spanish

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 10
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The full-time program Code/Switch  includes a four-credit module that will offer intermediate to advanced students of Spanish an opportunity to expand their skills reading, writing, and speaking in Spanish. Readings and activities in this module will complement the themes explored in the program, though the module can be taken independently by students not enrolled in the rest of the program.This subject is available to students as stand-alone 4 credit course by taking a partial credit option within  Code/Switch

In this module, we will read and study texts written by Latinx authors who routinely code-switch between English and Spanish, and whose texts require that readers know a significant amount of Spanish. Some of our texts will be written in Spanglish and will require a significant capacity to code-switch between languages and registers. Possible texts include Yo-Yo Boing! by Giannina Braschi, as well as short stories by Roberto Fernández, Pedro Juan Soto, Francisca Tenorio, Alicia Gaspar de Alba, and others.

We will offer grammar study and instruction every week, but the bulk of our time will consist of reading and writing workshops that refine our capacity to code-switch as readers while expanding reading comprehension in Spanish. Instruction and discussion in this module will take place in Spanish. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students must have taken at least two years of college-level Spanish or a year-long intensive such as The Spanish-Speaking World.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 10
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Thurs 10a–1p, with the option of an additional hour depending on student schedules.

Located in: Olympia

Community Connections - Sustainable Development (Grays Harbor)

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Grays Harbor
Grays Harbor
Weekend
Weekend
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Stephen Buxbaum
political economy, community development and planning

This program will equip students to better understand and assess how communities function – politically, socially and economically. Our contextual focus will be the communities in the “Harbor” region – the geographic region that is connected socially and economically to the communities of Aberdeen, Cosmopolis and Hoquiam. These communities will be our learning laboratory for our investigation into what makes communities work. We will use a multidisciplinary approach in the examination of how these communities evolved, drawing directly from the disciplines of community psychology and political economy. We will learn about the role that the private, public and non-profit sectors played in the development of the natural resource based industries that historically drove the growth and development of the region. We will actively seek solutions to the current economic and social challenges the region faces.

Students will learn how to work with primary source material and conduct research as a means of learning skills that are transferable to a broad range of social science disciplines. We will be researching and seeking specific answers to what needs to happen for the Harbor region to successfully meet the challenges of climate change and a severely depressed local economy.

Students will work in teams as they learn research skills, participate in field activities, and keep a record of their progress through a variety of assignments, such as mapping, journaling, oral histories, and data analysis. One of the primary objectives of this program will be to give back to the communities we are studying by adding to historical internet archives, creating photo journals, stories and published articles. We will directly engage with local projects and activities related to sustainable agriculture, economic development and sea level rise. Emphasis will be placed on learning practical skills that will help students succeed professionally in the fields of community and economic development, social service, non-profit management and education.

This program meets in person 4 hours a week, with 4 additional hours of online program work.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Community and economic development, education, social services, non-profit management

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Regular class time is Saturdays 9 AM to 2:30 PM (including lunch and breaks). Access to computer lab time, including one-on-one instruction, is available until 5 PM on Saturdays. Some Saturdays include field trips, that may go later than 2:30 PM.  First Fall meeting will be held on the Olympia Campus.

Grays Harbor

Located in: Grays Harbor

DateRevision
2017-09-27Advertised Schedule Updated

Computation and Mindfulness(4-credit)

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Jamyang Tsultrim
Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies, East-West psychology, philosophy of consciousness
Richard Weiss
mathematics, computer science

This is a 4-credit option of the full-time program Computation and Mindfulness designed to address the needs of students who would like to apply mindfulness to the study of a scientific discipline such as computer science. Those who have taken computer science in previous quarters can explore computer science at a deeper level, and those who have not taken computer science in the past can study the basic concepts and applications. Please refer to the 4-credit option within Computation and Mindfulness .

For the last 30 plus years, research studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of mindfulness approaches for treating many clinical conditions. They have also found them to be effective as a method for broadening positive human qualities. This course will emphasize the mindfulness approach to knowing and learning about the mind/emotions. All students will learn theory, practice and application of mindfulness. Specifically, the learning objectives are to able to apply it to learning programming and solving complex computational problems.This course is affiliated with a 16-credit program, whose learning goals are to explore different ways of learning and knowing from the computational perspective and from the human perspective. If we look at learning from the human perspective, we can identify three major modes: analytical reasoning, non-conceptual awareness (experiential learning and perception), and reliable resources, e.g. peer-reviewed journals. From the computational perspective, learning is formulated as a function approximation problem. Students will be able to apply machine learning frameworks to basic learning problems.

Prior programming experience is not required.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays, 9:00am-4:30pm (April 7, 21, May 12, 26, June 9)

Located in: Olympia

Computation and Mindfulness: An Exploration of Consciousness

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime Weekend
Day and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 60
25% Reserved for Freshmen
41216
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Jamyang Tsultrim
Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies, East-West psychology, philosophy of consciousness
Richard Weiss
mathematics, computer science

This program explores the concepts of mind and learning from the computational and human perspectives.  If we look at learning from the human perspective, we can identify three major modes: analytical reasoning, non-conceptual awareness (experiential learning and perception), and reliable resources, e.g. peer-reviewed journals.  From the computational perspective, learning is formulated as a function approximation problem, and we will study computational techniques in supervised and unsupervised learning.  Students will be able to apply machine learning frameworks to basic learning problems. The program integrates several threads: an overview of machine learning, Buddhist philosophy of mind, and the application of mindfulness to the study of computer science. 

For the last 30 plus years, research studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of mindfulness approaches for treating many clinical conditions.  They have also found them to be effective as a method for broadening positive human qualities. This program will emphasize the mindfulness approach to knowing and learning about the mind/emotions.  All students will learn theory, practice and application of mindfulness.  Specifically, the learning objectives are to able to apply it to learning programming and solving complex computational problems.

The program will be organized around these content areas: machine learning; general problem-solving; and mindfulness. We will explore these topics through lectures, programming labs, workshops, writing (a research paper) and seminars, and mindfulness practice logs. Students will be expected to read primary sources in computer science and cognitive as well as contemplative science.

The students can register for 16 credits (the whole program), 12 credits of cognitive and computer science (which does not include the application of mindfulness), or 4 credits of the application of mindfulness. No prior experience is required for the 4-credit course on mindfulness, which meets on Saturdays.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science and consciousness studies

41216

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.

Upper division science credit:

Students seeking to earn upper-division credit must contact the faculty to discuss options prior to the start of the quarter.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 60
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime Weekend

Scheduled for: Day and Weekend

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-124-credit section added (in addition to 16-credit and 12-credit).
2018-02-05Description has been updated.
2018-02-05Title updated (formerly Computation and Consciousness)
2017-10-02Adam King has left the teaching team.

Computer Science Foundations

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 65
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

mathematics
computer science, mathematics
computer science
Richard Weiss
mathematics, computer science

The goal of this program is for students to learn the intellectual concepts and skills that are essential for advanced work in computer science and beneficial for computing work in support of other disciplines. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving, and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics, and programming in the context of the liberal arts. The program is compatible with the model curriculum developed by the Association for Computing Machinery's Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium.

Program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The computational organization theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to the computer architecture and assembly language supporting high-level languages and operating systems. The programming theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The mathematical theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions, and problem-solving skills needed for computer scientists. A technology and society theme explores social, historical, or philosophical topics related to science and technology.

We will explore these themes throughout the program by way of lectures, programming labs, workshops, and seminars.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science, education, and mathematics

16Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

Contact faculty for more information.

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

High school algebra II

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 65
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Computers and Cognition

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Ab Van Etten
computer science

What types of problems can be solved by computers? How do humans and computers differ in the types of problems they can solve? What is the future of computing, and will computers evolve an intelligence that includes what we would define as human thought? Can computers learn or create on their own? This program will explore the basics of computer science, how computers work, and their possibilities and limits. The program will include basic programming in Javascript, Web development, introductory computer electronics, and other computer science topics. We will contrast this with human cognition. We will then look at how computers will likely affect the way we live, work, and relate in the future.  In seminar we will explore the issues surrounding machine vs. human consciousness and strong artificial intelligence.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course explores the theory and practice of conflict resolution with a special emphasis on power, culture, and personal skills development. Course activities include educational games and simulations, interactive lectures, small group discussions of film and literature, role plays, and online training tools. Students learn to better understand, analyze, and respond to conflict; recognize the challenges and opportunities of cross-cultural conflict; identify values and factors which tend to divide or unite people; and critically examine their own values and ideas while respecting those of others. Students who successfully complete this course will: better understand, analyze, and respond to conflict; recognize the challenges and opportunities of cross-cultural conflict; identify values and factors which tend to divide or unite people; and critically examine their own values and ideas while respecting those of others.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

leadership, conflict resolution studies, and the Native Pathways Program.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays: Jan 13, Feb 3, Feb 24, Mar 17

Located in: Olympia

Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This course explores the theory and practice of conflict resolution with a special emphasis on power, culture, and personal skills development. Course activities include educational games and simulations, interactive lectures, small group discussions of film and literature, role plays, and online training tools. Students learn to better understand, analyze, and respond to conflict; recognize the challenges and opportunities of cross-cultural conflict; identify values and factors which tend to divide or unite people; and critically examine their own values and ideas while respecting those of others. Students who successfully complete this course will: better understand, analyze, and respond to conflict; recognize the challenges and opportunities of cross-cultural conflict; identify values and factors which tend to divide or unite people; and critically examine their own values and ideas while respecting those of others.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

leadership, conflict resolution studies, and the Native Pathways Program.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays April 7, April 28, May 17, and June 9 at the Longhouse 9:30am-12:30pm

Located in: Olympia

Conserving Wildlife

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Paul Goldberg square
landscape ecology, physical geography (climate, landforms, biogeography), spatial analysis/GIS
Angelos Katsanis
ecology, entomology, agronomy

How do we conserve endangered plants and animals? How do we set conservation priorities? How does continued climate change loom over these decisions? These are complex questions that demand interdisciplinary perspectives to address. This upper-division program will focus on examining and analyzing the threats facing some of the Pacific Northwest’s threatened or endangered species and applying that knowledge to the development of species conservation plans. Throughout this process, students will develop an intricate interdisciplinary suite of knowledge and techniques that include spatial analysis, ecological modeling, integration of scientific, legal and political information, forest management practices, and computer tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS). As a final project, students will develop and present a formal Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) for a threatened or endangered Pacific Northwest species in accordance with the Endangered Species Act of 1973.

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) has been the defining piece of legislation used for the protection of threatened and endangered species in the US for over 50 years, but it has also been the focus of significant political tension. We will examine the tensions that exist between political and economic interests and species preservation. Students will be tasked with identifying and evaluating the competing interests of potential stakeholders and their positions with regards to species and habitat conservation. This will be accomplished by collecting and analyzing biological, ecological, and habitat data, and using GIS to develop habitat suitability models and cost surface maps. Habitat analysis will be conducted at the landscape scale, integrating the disciplines of landscape ecology with wildlife habitat analysis, forest management, wildlife biology, and habitat conservation planning.

Lectures will cover the areas of landscape ecology, island biogeography and meta-population theory, spatial analysis, GIS, wildlife habitat analysis, and habitat conservation planning. Field trips to examine current wildlife will expose students to methods of habitat assessment, conservation and restoration.

Note: Students who have previously taken Conserving Wildlife (Fall 2015 – Winter 2016) or Wildlife: Conservation and Writing (Fall 2014) should not enroll in this program.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental studies, ecology, public policy, biology, and natural resources.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$425 for a mandatory 10-day-long field trip to Yellowstone National Park from 9/29/17  – 10/7/17.

Upper division science credit:

Upper division science credit will be offered in Habitat Studies, GIS, Forest Management, Landscape Ecology

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Coral Reefs: Ecology and Entrepreneurial Endeavors

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dion Gouws square
strategic planning, business management and entrepreneurship, accounting
marine science, zoology, ecophysiology

Coral reef ecosystems are the among the most biodiverse locations on our planet and also support many different business opportunities. These are highly valued ecosystems in many tropical parts of the world, but they face a suite of different threats to their continued healthy existence. We will examine the biology and ecology of coral reef ecosystems and explore the possibilities for entrepreneurs to develop sustainable business endeavors. We will learn about business strategies and career opportunities associated with coral reefs, sustainable development of ecotourism and objectives of environmental management. Lectures will cover topics such as the biodiversity of coral reefs, ocean acidification, strategic business planning, licensing, etc. Weekly seminars will focus on the interactions of humans and coral reefs, including ecotourism, coral reef restoration, threats due to climate change, etc. In labs and workshops, students will have opportunities to learn practical skills such as water quality monitoring. Students will undertake organized group projects to develop business plans linked with some aspect of ecotourism, coral reef restoration or scientific research on coral reefs. We will discuss how the skills and knowledge gained in this program can transfer to other ecosystems and other sustainable entrepreneurial endeavors.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

marine biology, restoration ecology, business, and ecotourism.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.

Upper division science credit:

Students with a year of college biology and a year of college chemistry, up to eight upper division science credits are possible.  Contact faculty for more information.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-01New fall opportunity added.

Core Ballet (A)

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Wed 6:30-8:30p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-03New Schedule: Course is now offered Wednesday evenings (was Monday)

Core Ballet (A)

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays 12:30-2:30pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-11-17Schedule change: Class will meet Mondays 12:30-2:30pm (was Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm)
2017-05-03New Schedule: Course is now offered Wednesday evenings (was Monday)

Core Ballet (A)

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Wed 6:00-8:00p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-03New Schedule: Course is now offered Wednesday evenings (was Monday)

Core Ballet (B)

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Dance, Movement Therapy, Physical Education

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6:30-8:30p

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet (B)

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Dance, Movement Therapy, Physical Education

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6:00-8:00p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-11-27Schedule change: Course now meets 6-8pm (was 6:30-8:30pm)

Core Ballet (B)

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Dance, Movement Therapy, Physical Education

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6:30-8:30p

Located in: Olympia

Cornerstone: Foundations for Success

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Junior
Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Stephen Beck
philosophy

For beginning and returning students, this 4-credit class is designed to strengthen students' reading, writing, and critical thinking skills in relation to Evergreen's Five Foci (Interdisciplinary Study, Collaborative Learning, Learning Across Significant Differences, Personal Engagement, and Linking Theory with Practical Applications). Students will read, write about, discuss in seminar, and do workshops focused on a common theme. This quarter, the theme will be the role of a liberal arts education in our contemporary society. Students will also do research and writing on a topic of particular importance to them in their own college education. Through doing this work, students will sharpen the abilities needed to shape a strong Liberal Arts education at Evergreen. 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Junior
Class Standing: Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Cornerstone: Foundations for Success

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Junior
Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Suzanne Simons square
poetry and literary arts, community studies/Middle East studies, journalism

For new and returning students, this class is designed to help develop the knowledge, skills and confidence to be successful in your college experience. There are many kinds of academic learning and many ways of knowing. Students will have to make sense of lectures, discussions, literature, and research, all of which involve different approaches to learning. This course is designed to help you discover a pathway toward reading, writing and discussing critical issues relevant to your complex worlds. Students will examine how to increase their understanding and knowledge in relation to Evergreen's Five Foci (Interdisciplinary Study, Collaborative Learning, Learning Across Significant Differences, Personal Engagement, and Linking Theory with Practical Applications) as well as charting a course for a liberal arts degree that links career goals with lifelong learning.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Junior
Class Standing: Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thursdays 5:30-9:30p

Located in: Olympia

Cornerstone: Foundations for Success

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Junior
Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Rafael Lozano
military history, communications, veterans affairs and policy

What do you hope to gain from being in college? What will it take for you to succeed here? This 4-credit class is an opportunity for beginning and returning students to think deeply about their education, to develop skills that contribute to college success, and to chart a path toward career goals and life-long learning. We will begin by investigating the history and function of the Liberal Arts in society, with special attention given to the Five Foci of an Evergreen Education (Interdisciplinary Study, Collaborative Learning, Learning Across Significant Differences, Personal Engagement, and Linking Theory with Practice). In the process of our investigation, students will work to strengthen their academic reading, writing, note-taking, speaking, and critical reasoning skills. Students will identify areas of particular academic interest and need, and they’ll develop strategies to meet those learning goals in the future.   

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Junior
Class Standing: Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thursday 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-01-25Rafael Lozano added as faculty

Countertextual Ecologies: Eco-Music

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

The relationship between nature and history is complex, so much so that the space between nature and the human, being and language, may not even be measurable. Yet the environmental imperatives of our moment—including the need to cultivate a tolerance if not an appreciation for complexity itself—are the decisive ones. In this program, we will think through questions of environmental consciousness and its discontents from the points of view of political ecology, gastropoetics, eco-poetics, and eco-music. How does immersion in complex music prepare us to recognize the complexities of an ecosystem? Does the deliciousness of a fine organic, single origin chocolate correspond to the tropical ecosystem of the country of origin, the evolutionary development of mammalian taste receptors, or the cultivated aesthetic of the chocolatier? Is the poem mimetic of nature, or a function of it? How could such a seemingly noble enterprise as 'environmentalism' or 'protecting nature' be problematic? How have powerful environmental imaginaries and narratives served to dangerously simplify how environmental problems and their solutions are conceptualized? Ours will be a multifaculty, multidisciplinary approach to interdisciplinary community-based learning. While activities will include shared lectures and readings, half of program work will take place in faculty-specific tracks.

Eco-music with Andrea Gullickson will examine the intricate patterns that make up music, with consideration of how deepening our understanding of the interconnectedness of these patterns might impact the ways we think about and interact with the environment in which we live.  Works studied may include those by John Luther Adams, Daved Rothenberg, Olivier, Messiaen, Henryk  Górecki, and Toro Takemitsu.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

aesthetics, ecology, environmental studies, geography, literature, music, philosophy, political economy, sustainability studies, and writing

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$100 in fall for entrance fees and overnight field trips.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 9:30am (Com 110)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-16Winter fee cancelled.
2017-11-21Winter fee reduced to $20.
2017-11-03Winter signature requirement added.

Countertextual Ecologies: Eco-Poetics

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

The relationship between nature and history is complex, so much so that the space between nature and the human, being and language, may not even be measurable. Yet the environmental imperatives of our moment—including the need to cultivate a tolerance if not an appreciation for complexity itself—are the decisive ones. In this program, we will think through questions of environmental consciousness and its discontents from the points of view of political ecology, gastropoetics, eco-poetics, and eco-music. How does immersion in complex music prepare us to recognize the complexities of an ecosystem? Does the deliciousness of a fine organic, single origin chocolate correspond to the tropical ecosystem of the country of origin, the evolutionary development of mammalian taste receptors, or the cultivated aesthetic of the chocolatier? Is the poem mimetic of nature, or a function of it? How could such a seemingly noble enterprise as 'environmentalism' or 'protecting nature' be problematic? How have powerful environmental imaginaries and narratives served to dangerously simplify how environmental problems and their solutions are conceptualized? Ours will be a multifaculty, multidisciplinary approach to interdisciplinary community-based learning. While activities will include shared lectures and readings, half of program work will take place in faculty-specific tracks.

Eco-poetics with Leonard Schwartz will explore creative and critical approaches to language, with a view to reframing our understanding of the relationship between nature and history. This program within the Counter-Textual cluster is recommended for students seeking to explore experimental possibilities in writing - poetic, theoretical, and the spaces in between. Readings will include the Chilean poet Raul Zurita, Camille Dungy's anthology Black Nature, Timothy Morton's Dark Ecology , Jed Rasula's This Compost: Ecological Imperatives in American Poetry and the (Eco)(Language)(Reader), edited by Brenda Iijima.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

aesthetics, ecology, environmental studies, geography, literature, music, philosophy, political economy, sustainability studies, and writing

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$100 in fall for entrance fees and overnight field trips.

Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 9:30am (Com 110)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-16Winter fee cancelled.

Countertextual Ecologies: Gastropoetics

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

feminist theory, consciousness studies

The relationship between nature and history is complex, so much so that the space between nature and the human, being and language, may not even be measurable. Yet the environmental imperatives of our moment—including the need to cultivate a tolerance if not an appreciation for complexity itself—are the decisive ones. In this program, we will think through questions of environmental consciousness and its discontents from the points of view of political ecology, gastropoetics, eco-poetics, and eco-music. How does immersion in complex music prepare us to recognize the complexities of an ecosystem? Does the deliciousness of a fine organic, single origin chocolate correspond to the tropical ecosystem of the country of origin, the evolutionary development of mammalian taste receptors, or the cultivated aesthetic of the chocolatier? Is the poem mimetic of nature, or a function of it? How could such a seemingly noble enterprise as 'environmentalism' or 'protecting nature' be problematic? How have powerful environmental imaginaries and narratives served to dangerously simplify how environmental problems and their solutions are conceptualized? Ours will be a multifaculty, multidisciplinary approach to interdisciplinary community-based learning. While activities will include shared lectures and readings, half of program work will take place in faculty-specific tracks.

Gastropoetics with Sarah Williams will explore taste, its pretension and its denigration, as the sense most touched by categorical distinctions like mind/body, high/low, self/other, culture/nature, soul/soil, free/enslaved, speech/food.  Although sensual pleasure's capacity to overwhelm communicative value has been considered a crime in various times and places, we'll deliberately explore “eating words” and the powers of taste’s orality--say of a mere swelling fruit--when well savored through mouth and/as mind. Texts may include Tender Buttons (Gertrude Stein), Trimmings (Harryette Mullen), The Book of Salt (Monique Truong), Food, Poetry, and Aesthetics of Consumption (Michael Delville), Recipes for Racial Tension Headaches (A. Breeze Harper), and selections from Heide Hatry: Not a Rose as well as Gastronomica. Students should plan for track field trips to the Culinary Breeding Network’s Variety Showcase (10.2.17) and the Northwest Chocolate Festival (11.11.17).

 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

aesthetics, ecology, environmental studies, geography, literature, music, philosophy, political economy, sustainability studies, and writing

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$270 for entrance fees, supplies, and an overnight field trip.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 9:30am (Com 110)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-04-18Fee increased (from $70 to $270).

Countertextual Ecologies: Political Ecology

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

climate justice, climate policy and politics, political ecology, environment and development

The relationship between nature and history is complex, so much so that the space between nature and the human, being and language, may not even be measurable. Yet the environmental imperatives of our moment—including the need to cultivate a tolerance if not an appreciation for complexity itself—are the decisive ones. In this program, we will think through questions of environmental consciousness and its discontents from the points of view of political ecology, gastropoetics, eco-poetics, and eco-music. How does immersion in complex music prepare us to recognize the complexities of an ecosystem? Does the deliciousness of a fine organic, single origin chocolate correspond to the tropical ecosystem of the country of origin, the evolutionary development of mammalian taste receptors, or the cultivated aesthetic of the chocolatier? Is the poem mimetic of nature, or a function of it? How could such a seemingly noble enterprise as 'environmentalism' or 'protecting nature' be problematic? How have powerful environmental imaginaries and narratives served to dangerously simplify how environmental problems and their solutions are conceptualized? Ours will be a multifaculty, multidisciplinary approach to interdisciplinary community-based learning. While activities will include shared lectures and readings, half of program work will take place in faculty-specific tracks.

The political ecology track with Shangrila Joshi Wynn will focus on critical analyses of dominant environmental narratives through a lens of social difference. Our goal will be to understand how prevailing environmental discourses are shaped by colonialism and other contemporary configurations of power and privilege. The Fall curriculum will be focused on unpacking the environmental imaginary of protecting 'nature' from humans to arrive at more nuanced ways to understand the complexities of the nature-society relationship. In the Winter, we will extend this work to explore the complexities and nuances of the multi-faceted discourse of climate justice.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

aesthetics, ecology, environmental studies, geography, literature, music, philosophy, political economy, sustainability studies, and writing

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$200 for a 3-day overnight field trip to the Olympic Peninsula (including entrance feels to national park and museums).

Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 9:30am (Com 110)

Located in: Olympia

Counting on Renewable Energy

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

CANCELLED

Taught by

physics education research, cognitive abilities development and assessment, adult and continuing science education

How do we harness energy from the wind? How do solar panels produce electricity? How do we make sense of numbers to describe these physical relationships? In this introductory-level program, renewable energy will be our entry point for exploring how algebra and physics explain the world around us. We will emphasize representations, reasoning, and problem solving. We will use the language of mathematics to describe and communicate important relationships between observations and measurements in physics and other fields of science. Integrated reasoning in math and physics will be supplemented with topics from educational psychology, including the nature of scientific knowledge, metacognition, novice/expert differences, and the mind-brain connection.

Students will develop and demonstrate their learning through active in-class participation, homework assignments, papers, labs, and exams. Laboratory activities will solidify students' understanding of the program concepts, as well as develop data collection skills and mathematical modeling abilities. Students successfully completing this program will have covered the equivalent of one quarter of math (college algebra or pre-calculus), physics with laboratory (algebra-based), introductory level educational psychology, and introduction to renewable energy. Students will be prepared for further introductory science programs such as Computer Science Foundations, Integrated Natural Science, and/or Matter and Motion.

Note: Students who take the fall quarter program may not enroll in the winter repeat program.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, mathematics, physics, health sciences, education, and other natural sciences.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 9am

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-16This program has been cancelled. Sara Rose is teaching Playing with Patterns.

Counting on Renewable Energy

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

CANCELLED

Taught by

physics education research, cognitive abilities development and assessment, adult and continuing science education

Note: This program is a repeat of the fall program of the same title. Students who took the fall quarter program should not enroll in the winter repeat program.

How do we harness energy from the wind? How do solar panels produce electricity? How do we make sense of numbers to describe these physical relationships? In this introductory-level program, renewable energy will be our entry point for exploring how algebra and physics explain the world around us. We will emphasize representations, reasoning, and problem solving. We will use the language of mathematics to describe and communicate important relationships between observations and measurements in physics and other fields of science. Integrated reasoning in math and physics will be supplemented with topics from educational psychology, including the nature of scientific knowledge, metacognition, novice/expert differences, and the mind-brain connection.

Students will develop and demonstrate their learning through active in-class participation, homework assignments, papers, labs, and exams. Laboratory activities will solidify students' understanding of the program concepts, as well as develop data collection skills and mathematical modeling abilities. Students successfully completing this program will have covered the equivalent of one quarter of math (college algebra or pre-calculus), physics with laboratory (algebra-based), introductory level educational psychology, and introduction to renewable energy. Students will be prepared for further introductory science programs such as Computer Science Foundations, Integrated Natural Science, and/or Matter and Motion.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, mathematics, physics, health sciences, education, and other natural sciences.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-17This program has been offered. Please see Playing with Patterns in the catalog.

Counting on Soils: Precalculus and Soil Sciences

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

geology, earth science, biogeochemistry
Melissa Nivala
mathematics

Want to get your hands dirty learning about soils?  Want to see how math can help us better understand environmental processes?

This interdisciplinary, introductory-level program will explore topics in soil sciences and applied precalculus and introductory statistics. It is designed for students with a desire to have a broader and deeper understanding of earth, of mathematical concepts and functions, and of applications of math to soil sciences. The study of lab and field sciences and mathematical problem-solving through rigorous, quantitative, and interdisciplinary investigations will be emphasized. We expect students to finish the program with a strong understanding of the scientific and mathematical concepts that help us investigate the world around us.

In soil sciences we will study fundamental concepts including weathering, soil development, nutrient cycling, and organic matter, and learning will be supported by weekly labs/field work. Precalculus material will focus on polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Pattern identification and conceptual understanding of mathematical ideas will be emphasized along with applications to soil and field sciences. Additional math topics will include introductory concepts in statistics; qantitative reasoning and statistical analysis of data will be emphasized throughout the program. We will focus on skill-building in the laboratory and math workshops with the goal of doing meaningful field-lab work over the quarter. Students will conduct group projects, including library research and writing, based on topics related to their field work.  An overnight field trip (to Pack Forest) will give students the opportunity to investigate a range of forest soils and soil development processes and to apply mathematical concepts in a field setting.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

This program is preparatory for students interested in entering the sciences (for example the Integrated Natural Science program during 2018-19). 

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$250 for a field trip to Pack Forest.

Research Opportunities:

There will be a 4-credit literature-based research component, focusing on soils, within the program.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Tues 9-12, 1-3; Wed 9-1; Thurs 9-12, 1-4 (students attend AM or PM); Fri 9-12.

Located in: Olympia

Crafting Truth: Documentaries for Radio

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

communication

How do stories about social problems and social change help us understand the world we live in, and how can audio documentaries, features, and news stories contribute to this understanding?  In Crafting Truth students will learn to analyze and create audio pieces that reflect on social problems and the ideas, actors, and actions that contribute to social change. 

Technological advances in recording and podcasting have fostered a renaissance in the production of creative audio stories.  Our exploration of documentaries will include innovative radio shows and podcasts, as well as traditional radio news documentaries.  Class readings will introduce students to the history, ethics, and aesthetics of audio documentary and news feature stories.  We will explore the unique characteristics, constraints, and impacts of documentary work by studying other people’s productions and reflecting on our own work.

This program is designed as an introduction to media production: no previous media experience or personal equipment is required.  Students will learn basic skills involved in planning, recording, interviewing, scripting, narrating, and editing audio works.  Students entering the program with more advanced skills will be expected to expand those skills through additional independent reading and through engagement in more technically or conceptually complex projects. Projects will include documentary work featuring individual or collective contributions to regional and/or global social change efforts, and short news stories highlighting city or state public-policy issues. Students will receive some training toward on-air certification at KAOS Community Radio, and they may have the option of airing their work on the radio or in other public forums.  This program fulfills requirements for selected MIT communication endorsements.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

radio production, media production, media arts, public advocacy, and journalism.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Monday 10-12:00; 1:00-3:00;  Wednesday 10-1:00 Thursday 10-12; 1-4:30 

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-13This program is offered for 16-credits (partial credit option removed).
2018-01-30Title, Description, Credit Options, and Schedule Updated
2018-01-29Laurie Meeker has left the teaching team.

Creating Dance: Basic Technique, Theory, and Composition

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

modern dance, kinesiology

This full-time, one-quarter program is a basic course of study in fine art dance that is suitable for beginners as well as experienced dancers wanting to refine basic dance skills. Fundamentals of modern dance technique, theory, improvisation, composition, and performance will be covered. Original student dance compositions will be systematically developed and performed regularly for peer and faculty critique. We will use the Nikolais/Louis system, a technique based in the principles of anatomy and kinesiology as developed by Rudolf von Laban, Hanya Holm, Alwin Nikolais, and Murray Louis. Throughout the quarter we will learn a basic kinesiological grammar expressed in values of shape, space, time, and motion. The study of experiential anatomy ("somatics") and kinesiology form the foundation of a basic artistic technique leading to three interrelated program goals: 1) to establish and maintain a safe and healthy dance technique that includes sound protocols for injury prevention and care, 2) to develop clarity of artistic exposition, 3) to place the art of dance in its social, historical, and interdisciplinary context. Completion of the program will prepare students for intermediate study in dance and physical theater.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

dance, theater, and performance art

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Students must be willing and able to undertake strenuous physical and kinetic exercise, much like an athlete.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 11am (Com 209)

Located in: Olympia

Creative Oceans

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Freshman
Freshman Only
Class Size: 46
100% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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CANCELLED

Taught by

marine science, zoology, ecophysiology

This program will examine life in Earth's oceans and use the ocean and its inhabitants as sources of inspiration for creative writing. Our goal is to build a solid understanding of marine biology and develop our abilities to write in styles appropriate to several creative genres, including short stories, nonfiction, poetry, and other literary forms. We will also learn to write in a correct scientific style. Our marine studies will focus on the organisms that live in the ocean and their ecological interactions. The ocean has inspired a diverse group of authors to compose creative pieces, and seminars will explore these works across a wide variety of genres and diverse marine ecosystems. These include works by Joseph Conrad, Yukio Mishima, Pablo Neruda, and Sheri Tepper, among others. Laboratory work will introduce students to skills needed to carry out studies in marine biology. We will conduct various field studies in Puget Sound, and there will be a weeklong field trip to the coast of the Olympic Peninsula to observe marine organisms in their natural habitat and to take advantage of opportunities for reflective creative work. Through weekly workshops, students will hone their abilities to write creatively and analyze quantitative data. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their writing assignments, exams, quizzes, laboratory exercises, and notebooks, as well as their participation in seminars and workshops.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental studies, life sciences, and writing skills

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$190 per quarter for entrance fees and overnight field trips.

Freshman-Freshman
Class Standing: Freshman Only
Class Size: 46
100% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-04-20This program has been cancelled.

Critical Issues in Human Resources Management

WinterSpring
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Douglas Hammel
human resources

Companies today are working hard to stay relevant in a rapidly changing and hypercompetitive business environment. This is placing unprecedented pressure on both management and employees to transform workplaces to meet those business challenges. By designing human capital management systems and organization support structures that leverage knowledge of the organization's operations, employees, ever-changing compliance requirements and new technologies, human resources professionals have a huge role to play in shepherding the organization's cultural and organizational transformation to succeed.

This two-quarter program will first provide students with a foundation of the key components of effective human resources management that supports the employment lifecycle. They will then examine the new trends and challenges facing those functions, including:

  • Changing workforce demographics (with five generations of workers in our workforce today) and the demand of today's workers for more personalization of their HR services;
  • The legal and compliance environment relating to equal employment opportunity, nondiscrimination practices and workplace safety;
  • Human resources planning, recruitment, selection, hiring and employee development (training);
  • Compensation and benefits approaches within the shifting legal and regulatory environment;
  • Performance management and employee development;
  • Managing employee retention and termination;
  • Collective bargaining and labor relations; and
  • Putting the "human" in human resources by blending operational needs and strategic imperatives with tactics to empower employees and enhance the organization's employment brand.

The course will include class discussions, guest interviews with HR thought leaders, guided personal research and business case analysis. These business cases identify a real organization's challenge with a core HR function, and students will work on these problems both individually and in teams to solve the problems.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

human resources, business, public administration

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Alternating Saturday/Sunday Weekends, 9:30-5:00p

Winter: January 13/14, January 27/28, February 10/11, February 24/25, March 10/11

Spring: April 7/8, April 21/22, May 5/6, May 19/20, June 2/3

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-08-10New Program offering added for Winter/Spring

Critical Reasoning

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Stephen Beck
philosophy

In this intensive writing course, students will learn how to critically evaluate persuasive writing as well as how to write well-reasoned, persuasive writing of their own. Students will study informal reasoning and develop their own abilities to give good reasons in writing for their own views. Students will develop their reasoning and writing skills through sustained engagement with a particular theme. This quarter's theme will be the multiplicity and diversity of perspectives in a pluralistic society.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Cultivating Voice: A Writing Tutor's Craft

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Sandra Yannone
writing theory and practice, poetry, women's/LGBT studies

This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors at Evergreen's Writing Center on the Olympia campus. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor, develop effective tutoring practices, and address working with writers across significant differences. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. This year the Writing Center is expanding our services to support and cultivate the strengths of Spanish-speaking writers. Therefore, we additionally welcome applicants who are bilingual in English and Spanish. 

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

4-6p Thursdays

Located in: Olympia

Culture as History

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

geography
Jennifer Drake
English language and literature
Mark Harrison
theatre, opera, film, performance studies
Susan Preciso
English literature

Our national myths and cultural icons will provide the lens through which we will examine American history in this yearlong program. Students will study diverse works in order to learn how our culture shapes our understanding of past and present realities. We’ll look at cultural products, from high art to popular culture, with a particular focus on film and literature, to see how they reflect and shape our ideas about who and what we are. Our study will be organized around three turbulent decades in American history.

During fall quarter we will consider the post-Civil War years, to include Reconstruction and western expansion. From dime novels to Hollywood westerns, we’ll examine how deeply we are shaped by 19th and 20th century frontier ideology. Money and technology—capitalism and the railroads—also drove westward migration. We’ll explore the tensions around race and class as they figure in film, novels, and popular culture.

In winter we'll move to the 1930s. How did the Great Depression and the policy created to deal with that crisis change the way we see government? What was the impact of two great migrations—from the Dust Bowl states to the West, and from the agricultural South to the industrial North—on American society? In such a time of hardship and deprivation, how did the golden age of Hollywood reflect our cultural realities through genre films, such as the screwball comedy, the musical, and the gangster film?

In the spring, we’ll focus on the 1950s and ’60s and how upward—and outward—mobility informed who and where we are today. The Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War transformed the country. Cars, freeways, and the rise of the suburbs reshaped the cultural landscape, and television expanded the scope of mass media and popular culture.

Students will learn about schools of cultural criticism using different approaches to enrich their analyses. They will participate in seminars, lectures, workshops, and library research—and attend field trips to local museums and live theater performances.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

literature, history, film studies, and education

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

A $30 fee each quarter will cover the cost of field trips to museums and other venues.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Wednesdays from 6-9:30 pm and five alternating Saturdays.  Fall Saturdays Oct 7, 21, Nov 4, 18, and Dec 2. Winter Saturdays Jan 20, Feb 3, 10, 24, Mar 10. Spring Saturdays April 14, 28, May 5, 19, June 2. 

Located in: Olympia

Dance of Consciousness

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

physics, plant physiology
literature, dance, performance, cultural studies

This is program of exploration and discovery.  Come prepared to involve your body and mind in a dynamic understanding of consciousness.

What is consciousness?   Our inquiry will hold open this question within an intentional learning community for six months as we explore dance as metaphor and practice for how mystics as well as artists and scientists experience the movement of consciousness.

If you really want to inquire about your experience of the movement of consciousness, this program is an invitation to explore its embodiment in relationship to Indian wisdom tradition.  Specifically, we’ll practice Odissi dance as well as study our dreams and beliefs as manifestations of the dance of consciousness. Our work will include lectures, book seminars, films, workshops, and introspective journaling in order to explore the multidimensional movements of consciousness. We'll consider texts such as Fritjof Capra’s The Tao of Physics that bridge ideas from East and West, mysticism and science, psychology of dreams, and quantum physics. Capra, after inquiring into his experience while sitting by the ocean, wrote: “I ’saw’ cascades of energy coming down from outer space, in which particles were created and destroyed in rhythmic pulses; I ‘saw’ the atoms of the elements and those of my body participating in this cosmic dance of energy; I felt its rhythm and I ‘heard’ its sound, and at that moment I knew that this was the Dance of Shiva, the Lord of Dancers worshiped by the Hindus."

Students should expect to document their work of 50 hours per week during each quarter.  During the winter quarter, instead of dance we will continue our studies of dreams (including lucid dreams) and the nature of physical and mental reality and the role of beliefs in shaping our experience.  Students will have an opportunity to interact with the author of the lucid dreaming text as well as a weekend retreat on Taoist philosophy and Tai Chi.  A portion of the winter quarter credits will be in research and include a short presentation to the class on a topic of your choice. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

consciousness studies, dance, psychology, cultural studies, and philosophy

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$20 in winter for registration fees.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 11am (Com 323)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-09-12This program now accepts students of all class levels
2017-07-27Description updated.

Decolonizing in an Era of Climate Change and Denial

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Rebecca Chamberlain
literature, writing, storytelling
Marja Eloheimo square
ethnobotany, environmental and cultural anthropology, plant studies

We live in an era of climate change and its denial. We also live in a country founded on genocide and its denial. How are these denials related? Through explorations of science, history, and literature, we will examine practices, paradigms, and politics that undergird these denials and their counterpoints—patterns of renewal, resiliency, and sustainability . We will focus on learning how to transform mainstream cultural and ecological narratives, and how to support Indigenous leadership, justice, and restitution in environmental policy making. We will identify existing colonial structures and examine how they diminish ecological and cultural diversity. We will learn to engage in careful and respectful research, develop tools to craft essays for particular audiences and purposes, cultivate the practice of storytelling, and develop methods to critically examine texts and the media.  We will explore relationality as both paradigm and practice, and as a method of decolonization and reciprocity. Through nature journals and hands-on engagement with the Longhouse Ethnobotanical Garden, we will cultivate an intimate and enlivened relationship with plants, people, and place. We will explore the Coast Salish cultural context of the garden, including the Lushootseed language, as we deepen our understanding. As we work to cultivate authentic voices, informed narratives, and skills to actively transform the twin denials of colonization and climate change, we will ask: how can we cultivate communities of kindness that nurture hope and renewal in difficult times?  How might the seeds of ecological diversity and cultural diversity be the seeds of survival? Activities include lectures, workshops, careful reading, thoughtful writing, meaningful research, maintaining a nature journal, field work, and garden care.  Texts include: The Collapse of Western Civilization  by Oreskes and Conway; An Indigenous People’s History of the United States  by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz; as well texts by Naomi Klein, Winona LaDuke, Rebecca Solnit, Linda Hogan, and others.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, writing, sustainability and justice, environmental studies and management, Indigenous studies and leadership, cultural ecology, plant studies

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$75 for museum entrance and project supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Every Wednesday, 5:30-9:30p; April 4-June 6 and Alternate Saturdays 9:30a-5:30p (April 7 & 21, May 5 & 19, June 2)  

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-15Program is now accepting Freshman
2018-02-16Program fees updated: Now $75 (was $55)

Development as Freedom

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

climate justice, climate policy and politics, political ecology, environment and development
psychology

What does it mean to live a fulfilling life? What factors contribute to a greater quality of life, assuming this is a desirable goal for all human societies? What are some of the prevailing theories and practices within the social sciences about human well-being and how best to attain it, at the individual and international scales?

This program will tackle these questions, focusing on perspectives from the subdisciplines of health psychology, critical development studies, and environmental justice. We will be studying applications of sociocultural, psychosocial, somatic, and behavioral knowledge relevant to health and wellness from diverse cultural perspectives. We will critically examine perspectives in mainstream economic development theory and their implications for social and environmental justice. We will consequently explore alternative conceptualizations of development, considering those that draw on ideas of freedom, capabilities, and sustainable livelihoods.

This interdisciplinary program will include a variety of approaches to learning, including seminars, theoretical assessments, films, expressive arts workshops, somatic practices, and reflective and analytical writing. Students will read literature from psychology, integrative health, critical development studies, and environmental justice. Some of the authors we will read include Amartya Sen, Martha Nussbaum, Helena Norberg-Hodge, and Joanna Macy.

There's no better way to explore the range of activities and topics that psychology offers—and to learn of cutting-edge research in the social science field—than to attend and participate in a convention of psychology professionals and students. To that end, our program will take a one-day field trip to attend the annual convention of the Western Psychological Association, the western regional arm of the American Psychological Association . This year's convention will take place April 26–29, 2018, in Portland, Oregon.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

international development, environmental/sustainability studies, psychology, and integrative health

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$150 for expressive arts workshop supplies and registration for the Western Psychological Association convention.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-19This program now accepts enrollment in all class levels.
2018-03-09Fee increased (from $80 to $150).

Dialogue In A Diverse and Divided Society

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Stephen Beck
philosophy
Wenhong Wang
sociology and social statistics

We live in a society that is not only diverse but is divided by deep political and cultural disagreements and misunderstandings. Yet somehow we must all share the same space: political, social and spiritual. Coming to mutual understanding is challenging for all, if at all possible, yet due to differences in power and status, the stakes are higher for some than for others. Students and faculty in this program will grapple with the challenges of living in a diverse and divided society together. We will benefit from study of sociology, specifically concerning the role of institutions in embodying power and in shaping the lives and identities of individuals. We will also draw upon philosophy by studying the “ideal speech” ethical and political philosophy of Jürgen Habermas as well as theories that foreground difference, including the work of Iris Marion Young and others.

Central to our work will be dialogue, both the hopes we have for it as well as the difficulties of conducting it. To develop our powers of dialogue, students will engage in dialogues across deep differences with others. This program will be challenging academically and personally. Students who do well in this program will improve their abilities to understand, work with others in, and act wisely in our diverse society. The program will prepare students for further study or work in areas such as social work and psychology  that require these abilities. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

philosophy, sociology, social work.

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mondays and Wednesdays, 6-10 p.m.

Located in: Olympia

Diverse Issues in Social Work

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Andrea Seabert
social work

This social work course examines current public issues and societal responses that impact various demographic groups. Homelessness, suicide, sexual assault, and chronic disease are topics that may be explored through a group project that examines the issues from micro and macro angles. Coursework will study the role, function, and effects of oppression in society as it relates to economic and social justice. Through exploration of personal identities, students will have an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of how social work with diverse populations may be enhanced or hindered.

This class is designed for junior and senior level students interested in psychology, social work, and human services.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Social Work, Psychology, Counseling, Health Care, or Human Services

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thu 5:30-9:30pm + Saturday Field Trip April 14 (required)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-06Schedule change: Required field trip Saturday April 14 added
2018-02-13New course added for Spring quarter

Diversity and Dissent in Education and the Media

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Freshman
Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Grace Huerta
educational policy studies, qualitative research methods
film and video production, media theory

As communities continue to reflect the country's increasingly diverse population, what media representations challenge and support discrimination in our communities, schools, and institutions? How can we generate a framework for actions that reject inaccurate representations of human difference, value diverse forms of knowledge, and question institutional inequalities? In this program, we will pursue answers to these questions by examining identity, educational history, cultural studies, and the media in order to design strategies to support a more equitable school system and to create diverse forms of media expression.

We will begin by analyzing a working definition of racism and sexism that frames intentional, as well as unintentional, normalized acts of inequality over time. We will challenge depictions in literature and the media that promote the stereotyping of diverse groups. Through an analysis of anti-racist and anti-sexist case study research and the media, we will also explore the lived experiences of diverse populations whose identities are often impacted by assumptions and disparities found in communities and school settings based upon the social construction of race and gender and the stereotyping of immigrant students. In order to break down such assumptions, students will engage in community service, writing, and media analysis over the course of the program.

Throughout our program, community service will take the form of engagement in student groups at Evergreen or with community-based organizations. In addition, we will investigate specific everyday actions that media artists, activists, and educators generate to confront these inequalities. By incorporating media and writing workshops with qualitative research methods such as interviews and participant observation, we will collect various sources of data and present our work that documents how specific counter-narratives can be created that affirm and support diverse learners to achieve within their schools and communities. Writing workshops will help students develop skills in critical analysis and media analysis, while media workshops (which may include photography, digital video, and new media) will help students develop skills in visual literacy and expression.

Lastly, we will demonstrate our understanding of everyday anti-racist/anti-sexist practices by creating presentations that merge theory, community service, and writing. Possible themes that may emerge through our own study include examining the community and students' funds of knowledge, as well as the use of alternative media outlets and the arts as tools of empowerment that specifically recognize our collective cultural hybridity.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, teaching, multimedia production, cultural studies, and community service

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$130 in fall for conference and film entrance fees and supplies.

Freshman-Freshman
Class Standing: Freshman Only
Class Size: 36
100% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, January 8 at 10am (Com 323)

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-16Winter fee cancelled.

Doing the Business of Non-Profits: Ideas to Realities through Grantwriting and Fundraising

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Don Chalmers
grantwriting

Students in this class will learn a lot about philanthropy in the United States and the role of nonprofits in contributing to healthy, sustainable communities. We’ll look at the historical role of charitable giving before and after contact and the evolving role nonprofits have played and are playing in the U.S.  As a part of this inquiry, we’ll consider what it takes to create a nonprofit and grow and sustain existing organizations.  We’ll also focus on Development Readiness tm  for these organizations and how using this approach helps ensure a sustainable organization that benefits, for example, from an empowered and engaged board and staff as well as contemporary and ongoing strategic planning. The ethics of nonprofit organizations will also be considered as will professional development and volunteer recruitment and management. We’ll learn about grant writing and fundraising for nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations. This portion of the course will also include effectively finding funding sources for organizations and their programs. Each student will be asked to identify and develop an organization and a project over the course of the quarter. The organization and project can be based on an existing nonprofit or one that is created for the purposes of the class.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-9:30pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-02Description updated and additional detail added to title
2018-01-26New Spring Quarter Offering Added

Doing the Business of Nonprofits: Ideas to Realities through Grantwriting and Fundraising (Grays Harbor)

Spring
Spring 2018
Grays Harbor
Grays Harbor
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Don Chalmers
grantwriting

Students in this class will learn a lot about philanthropy in the United States and the role of nonprofits in contributing to healthy, sustainable communities. We’ll look at the historical role of charitable giving before and after contact and the evolving role nonprofits have played and are playing in the U.S.  As a part of this inquiry, we’ll consider what it takes to create a nonprofit and grow and sustain existing organizations.  We’ll also focus on Development Readiness tm  for these organizations and how using this approach helps ensure a sustainable organization that benefits, for example, from an empowered and engaged board and staff as well as contemporary and ongoing strategic planning. The ethics of nonprofit organizations will also be considered as will professional development and volunteer recruitment and management. We’ll learn about grant writing and fundraising for nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations. This portion of the course will also include effectively finding funding sources for organizations and their programs. Each student will be asked to identify and develop an organization and a project over the course of the quarter. The organization and project can be based on an existing nonprofit or one that is created for the purposes of the class.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thu 6-9:30pm

Grays Harbor

Located in: Grays Harbor

DateRevision
2018-03-02Description updated and additional detail added to title

Drawing: Foundations

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Emily Adams
printmaking

This course is an introduction to principles and techniques in drawing. Emphasis will be on learning to draw what you see through close observation in still life studies. Students will be introduced to a variety of drawing materials and techniques as well as proportion, sighting, perspective, value and composition. Students will develop a context for their work through readings and research projects about influential artists. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time. A final portfolio of completed assignments will be due at the end of the quarter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Visual Arts, Illustration, Graphic Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Students will be required to purchase a drawing kit from the Greener Bookstore. The estimated cost is $50.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-8p

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-04Class level restrictions changed: This course is now So-Sr only. Please use the class level specific CRN.

Drawing: Foundations

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Emily Adams
printmaking

This course is an introduction to principles and techniques in drawing. Emphasis will be on learning to draw what you see through close observation in still life studies. Students will be introduced to a variety of drawing materials and techniques as well as proportion, sighting, perspective, value and composition. Students will develop a context for their work through readings and research projects about influential artists. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time. A final portfolio of completed assignments will be due at the end of the quarter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Visual Arts, Illustration, Graphic Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Students will be required to purchase a drawing kit from the Greener Bookstore. The estimated cost is $50.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays 10am-2pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-20Schedule Change: Course is now offered Saturdays (was Mon/Wed)

Drawing: The Human Form

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This course will focus on accurately rendering the human form through close observation of a live model. We will start by translating what we see onto paper and progress to using the figure to communicate content. We will deepen our understanding of what we are drawing by developing an understanding of how basic anatomy affects the shape of the body. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time each week. Students will also complete a research project about an influential artist. A final portfolio of completed assignments will be due at the end of the quarter. Some college level drawing experience is recommended.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual art

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students should expect to spend between $40-$60 on drawing supplies and materials.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-8p

Located in: Olympia

Earth and Sky: Climate and Change

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

CANCELLED

Taught by

geology, earth science, biogeochemistry
EJ Zita Square portrait
physics, math, astrophysics

The Earth’s atmosphere and oceans are affected by human activities, the sun, and geologic activity. Over many millions of years, the Earth has experienced wide fluctuations in climate—from ice ages to very warm periods. Earth is currently experiencing an unusually rapid warming trend, due to anthropogenic (human-caused) changes in atmospheric composition. Historically, a major factor determining global climate has been the intensity of the sun's energy reaching the Earth. However, climate changes cannot be explained by variations in solar radiation alone. We will focus on the role of the sun and greenhouse gases in regulating Earth’s climate, examine climate records to understand how and why climate has varied in the past, and consider studies modeling how climate change will occur into the future.

Interactions between oceans and atmosphere affect the composition of both, and oceans impact global climate by redistributing the sun's energy. What is the evidence for causes of contemporary global warming? What are the expected consequences? What can be done? What about proposed schemes to engineer solutions to global warming, such as the sequestration of anthropogenic carbon into the deep sea? We will study diverse and interconnected physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes. This requires a basic understanding of chemistry and facility with algebra. No physics prerequisite.

Students will learn through lectures, workshops, laboratories, and seminars, often using primary scientific literature. Students will do significant teamwork and will research questions that particularly interest them. We will have weekly online assignments, so students should be comfortable using computers and the internet.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

climate studies, education, natural science, environmental science, and science studies

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students need a basic understanding of chemistry and facility with algebra. No physics background is needed.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$200 for an overnight field trip to the Columbia River Gorge.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-02-05This program has been cancelled. Abir Biswas will be teaching in Counting on Soils and EJ Zita will be teaching Science Seminar.

Earth Dynamics: People, Place, Technology, and History

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

CANCELLED

Taught by

Nancy Koppelman
American studies
EJ Zita Square portrait
physics, math, astrophysics

Human activity shapes the environment. Earth warmed out of the last ice age about 10,000 years ago, enabling our species to develop stable societies and transform the experience of being alive. Agricultural activity emitted greenhouse gases that changed Earth’s air, water, and land. People changed, too, improving technologies and creating written and artistic records of their ideas and histories. Today, we understand our impacts on the environment in ways incomprehensible to our ancestors, and we are challenged to mitigate those impacts with knowledge, skill, and political will.

This program will examine changes in the Earth system, human understanding of those changes, and the history of technological efforts to enhance human flourishing and shape our impacts on the environment. We'll study multiple drivers of climate change such as Sun-Earth interactions, volcanoes, industry, consumption, and greenhouse gases. We’ll consider the changing role of science in providing the understanding required for people and planet to thrive together. Students will learn about the history of technology, from the wheel to the internet, and particularly how technological advances shaped values and habits of everyday life in the United States over the last 200 years. We will ask whether and how modern consumer societies are uniquely positioned to hasten and/or slow the rate at which resource use drives the ecosystem. Is global warming simply a disaster, or does it also present an opportunity for global cooperation? How do we adapt in the face of the most dramatic change to the Earth system in recorded history? How can we develop skills and language to think in creative and effective ways about these dynamics, and share what we learn with others? Scientific methods and historical studies will inform each other and provide new tools for thinking about and taking action in our own historical moment.

Our work will include lectures, discussions, workshops, labs, quantitative homework, expository essays, writing workshops, and teamwork. Field trips will enable us to learn about sustainability efforts in our region. Students will do hands-on research related to our topics and learn how to analyze and write about everyday technologies in order to teach others how climate impacts intersect with widely held cultural values. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to a published anthology of student research. Credit will be awarded in the natural sciences and the humanities.

This program will be repeated in winter quarter. Students who take this program in fall should not register for the winter quarter repeat.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

sustainability, environmental studies, journalism, writing, and history

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$125 museum entrance fees, theater tickets, and supplies.

Research Opportunities:

Students will research climate-change science and the history of technology.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-08-29This program has been cancelled. Interested students should consider the winter version of the program.
2017-05-02This program is now offered as a one-quarter, repeating program.

Earth Dynamics: People, Place, Technology, and History

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Nancy Koppelman
American studies
EJ Zita Square portrait
physics, math, astrophysics

Human activity shapes the environment. Earth warmed out of the last ice age about 10,000 years ago, enabling our species to develop stable societies and transform the experience of being alive. Agricultural activity emitted greenhouse gases that changed Earth’s air, water, and land. People changed, too, improving technologies and creating written and artistic records of their ideas and histories. Today, we understand our impacts on the environment in ways incomprehensible to our ancestors, and we are challenged to mitigate those impacts with knowledge, skill, and political will.

This program will examine changes in the Earth system, human understanding of those changes, and the history of technological efforts to enhance human flourishing and shape our impacts on the environment. We'll study multiple drivers of climate change such as Sun-Earth interactions, volcanoes, industry, consumption, and greenhouse gases. We’ll consider the changing role of science in providing the understanding required for people and planet to thrive together. Students will learn about the history of technology, from the wheel to the internet, and particularly how technological advances shaped values and habits of everyday life in the United States over the last 200 years. We will ask whether and how modern consumer societies are uniquely positioned to hasten and/or slow the rate at which resource use drives the ecosystem. Is global warming simply a disaster, or does it also present an opportunity for global cooperation? How do we adapt in the face of the most dramatic change to the Earth system in recorded history? How can we develop skills and language to think in creative and effective ways about these dynamics, and share what we learn with others? Scientific methods and historical studies will inform each other and provide new tools for thinking about and taking action in our own historical moment.

Our work will include lectures, discussions, workshops, labs, quantitative homework, expository essays, writing workshops, and teamwork. Field trips will enable us to learn about sustainability efforts in our region. Students will do hands-on research related to our topics and learn how to analyze and write about everyday technologies in order to teach others how climate impacts intersect with widely held cultural values. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to a published anthology of student research. Credit will be awarded in the natural sciences and the humanities.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

sustainability, environmental studies, journalism, writing, and history

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Research Opportunities:

Students will research climate-change science and the history of technology.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-11-27Fee removed.

East-West Psychology: Cultivating Constructive thought/emotion

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Jamyang Tsultrim
Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies, East-West psychology, philosophy of consciousness

In what ways do our constructive emotions/perceptions enhance our ability to see reality? Are there effective methods for training the mind to cultivate positive thought/emotions? Students will analyze the nature of constructive emotion/thoughts, their influence on our mental stability and brain physiology, and methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function. Students will explore the correlation between mental training of the mind and physiological changes in the brain. We will also examine the nature of the genuine happiness from Eastern and Western psychological models of mind/emotion as well as from a traditional epistemological model of cognition based on Indo-Tibetan studies.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

9am to 4:30pm, alternate Saturdays: Sept 30, Oct 14, 28, Nov 11, Dec 2

Located in: Olympia

East-West Psychology: Transforming Destructive Thought/Emotion

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Jamyang Tsultrim
Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies, East-West psychology, philosophy of consciousness

Are destructive emotions innately embedded in human nature?  Can they be eradicated?  A growing body of Western research has examined these and other questions through the perspectives of Eastern psychology and philosophy which view destructive emotions, perceptions, and behaviors as the primary source of human suffering.  To alleviate this suffering, Eastern psychology has developed a rich and varied methodology for recognizing, reducing, transforming, and preventing these destructive forms of mind and emotion.  After examining the nature and function of the afflictive mind/emotions, students will choose one emotion to study in-depth and develop effective East/West interventions to transform this emotion/state of mind.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Advertised schedule:

From 9am to 4:30pm, alternating Saturdays: Jan 13, 27, Feb 10, 24, Mar 10

Located in: Olympia

Ecological and Environmental Economics

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

political science, economics

This advanced social science program examines the methods and applications of ecological and environmental economics for environmental problem solving. The major goal of the program is to make students familiar and comfortable with the methodologies, language, concepts, models, and applications of ecological and environmental economic analysis. The program does not assume an extensive background in economics; therefore, it begins by quickly reviewing selected micro economic principles. We will study the models used in natural resource management, pollution control approaches, and sustainability as an empirical criterion in policy development. We will explore externalities, market failure, and intergenerational equity in depth. Examples of case studies we will evaluate include natural resources in the Pacific Northwest; management and restoration of the Pacific salmon stocks and other marine resources; energy issues including traditional, alternative, and emerging impacts from hydraulic fracturing (fracking), oil trains, and climate change; selected issues of environmental law; wetland and critical areas protection and mitigation; and emerging threats such as ocean acidification and low-oxygen zones. We also will develop a detailed consideration of the theory and practice of benefit-cost analysis. The program concludes by critically evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of using ecological and environmental economics to develop solutions to environmental problems.

Program activities include lectures, seminars, research and methods workshops, field trips, quizzes, exams, and a research assignment.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Public sector: federal, state, and local government agencies involved in environmental protection; natural resource management; land use planning, critical areas management, and public policy. Private sector: work in business firms, natural resources firms, environmental consulting firms, environmental assessment firms, and other firms that must deal with environmental laws and regulations in their normal business operations

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

Field trips will be scheduled for Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

First class meeting: Tuesday, September 26 at 1pm (Sem II C1105)

Located in: Olympia

Ecology of Perennial Agricultural Systems

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Michael (Mike) Paros
veterinary medicine
Steve Scheuerell
ecology, botany, plant pathology

This field-based program will provide students with practical tools to understand perennial-based agricultural systems in the Pacific Northwest by exploring the ecological relationships between perennial crops, ruminant livestock, and the land. Pacific Northwest agriculture is predominantly based on perennial plants—with livestock forages covering the largest acreage, and berry and tree fruit crops having the highest commercial value. Students will analyze the regional distribution and management of livestock forages, hops, nuts, berries, and tree fruits in relation to climate, topography, soils, and water availability. We will learn practical identification, morphology, physiology, and production of select species. The suitability of perennial forages as ruminant livestock feed will be learned in relation to ruminant nutrition, foraging behavior, and digestive physiology. We will also explore the potential and challenges of integrating diverse perennials and livestock in terms of nutrient cycling and management compatibility.

Classroom lectures, workshops, and guest speakers will be paired with weekly field trips to observe perennials and ruminants on working farms. There will be an overnight trip to the Willamette Valley, where we will study managed intensive grazing dairy operations; forage production; and hazelnut production. There will also be an overnight trip to eastern Washington to learn about hops, grapes, and fruit trees. Student learning will be assessed through classroom and field notebooks, weekly homework assignments, and in-class quizzes.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

agriculture, ecology, and natural resource management

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$300 for overnight field trips.

Upper division science credit:

Up to eight upper-division science credits in natural science may be earn.  Students develop an individual plan with the faculty. Eligibility will be based on prior academic preparation, earning all credits and consistently demonstrating advanced work.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-08Up to eight upper-division science credits available.

Electronics in Music : Collaborating With Machines

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

music technology and theory

In this course, students will explore methods for using technology as an active collaborator in the creation of music.  Students will develop compositions in the music technology labs while diving deep into modular synthesis, MIDI programming, creative mixing techniques and other topics.  We’ll take our conceptual and technical cues from pioneering electroacoustic composers and experimenters such as Pauline Oliveros, Brian Eno, Morton Subotnick, Laurie Spiegel, and others.  Students entering this course are expected to have some foundation in music technology, either through the “Introduction to Electronics in Music” courses or through equivalent experience.  Please contact the faculty for a course application. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$70 supply fee for magnetic tape

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Electronics in Music : Compositional Processes

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

music technology and theory

From serialism to chance music, musical dice games to change-ringing, musicians have often found methods of creating music that rely on external processes.  In this course, students will work extensively with Max/MSP, a visual programming environment, to develop algorithms and generative processes for creating music.  Students will learn how musical ideas can be expressed and manipulated using numbers, simple math, and logic.  Students entering this course are expected to have some foundation in music and/or music technology, either through the “Introduction to Electronics in Music” courses or equivalent experience.  Preference is given to students continuing from the fall quarter of “Electronics in Music.”  Please contact the instructor for a course application. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed.

Located in: Olympia

Electronics in Music : Projects

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

music technology and theory

The spring quarter of Electronics in Music is a chance for students to develop musical compositions and/or interactive projects centered around the use of technology.  Students will work closely with the instructor and classmates to develop concepts, tackle technical hurdles, and get critical feedback on their work.  Students will regularly present works in progress on route to a final composition, which will be presented at a public concert at the end of the quarter.  Students entering this course are expected to have a strong foundation in music technology, either through the “Introduction to Electronics in Music” courses or equivalent experience.  Preference is given to students continuing from the fall or winter quarters of “Electronics in Music.”  Please contact the instructor for a course application.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed.

Located in: Olympia

Emotional Intelligence and Organizational Behavior

FallWinter
Fall 2017
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

development/learning, abnormal psychology, multicultural psychology

In this junior and senior program, students will learn the fundamentals of organizational psychology, especially organizational behavior. We will focus on factors influencing organizational climate, communication, and ethics from macro (cultural/societal), meso (institutional), and micro (familial) perspectives.

During the fall quarter, students will explore emotional intelligence and its impact on our mental, emotional, and physical health. We will examine the lack of cultural, institutional, and familial support for emotional intelligence throughout socialization and its consequences on our perception; intra- and interpersonal communication; and motivation. Paradigm shifts in thinking (from dichotomous and hierarchical to holistic) and learning (from conceptual to transformative) will be emphasized in order to learn to value both cognitive and emotional intelligence.

During winter quarter, students will examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational behavior (e.g., conflict resolution, group dynamics, and power struggle) from multiple sources (e.g., theories of personality, cultural diversity, and organizational policies and culture). Organizational behavior is about how humans behave at work consciously or unconsciously.  Students will explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational behavior from an employee’s as well as an employer’s perspectives in order to find factors influencing job satisfaction, productivity, health, absenteeism, and accountability. 

Students will be expected to successfully demonstrate appropriate college-level writing, thinking, and oral communication skills and attend every program activity on time with full preparation to participate. Students will be expected to work efficiently for a minimum of 40 hours each week (including class time). Activities will include lectures, seminar discussions, workshops, mindfulness practices, self-reflection activities, weekly small group process meetings, and integrative academic paper writing, and integrating theory with practice.

Students should be prepared to explore challenging and unfamiliar ideas that will expand their creative mode of inquiry.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

leadership studies, communication, and psychology.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-10Description has been updated.

Employment Law

Spring
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

human resources, legal studies

The course will review the major employment laws, including those dealing with discrimination, sexual harassment, disability, family leave, wage standards, and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act as well as and the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA).   Students will learn how to apply these major laws to 'real-work' situations and will have a very good understanding of the major provisions.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Human Resources

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Tuesday, 6-9:30p

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Problem Solving

WinterSpring
Winter 2018
Spring 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 40
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

ecology, vertebrate biology
political science, economics

It is a common misconception in environmentalism that if you can educate people about a problem, they will automatically take steps to solve it. In reality, environmental problem solving is much more complex. It requires a good grasp of the ecological system involved, the structure of government, and public policy as well as the ability to work effectively in groups.

In this program we will cover basic ecology, political science, economics, and statistics in order to provide students with the necessary background to understand environmental problems. We will look at ecosystem structure, community ecology, population biology, and some of the ways in which human activities impact ecological systems. In the political science component, students will learn about the structure of government at several different levels and the interaction of federal, state, and local government. We will take advantage of the proximity of the state legislature by attending committee meetings and observing the legislative process firsthand. Our focus will be on resource extraction and conservation in the Pacific Northwest, including timber harvest and fisheries, as we develop our toolbox of skills and concepts. Students will be able to explore other environmental issues in assignments and a project in spring quarter.

In winter quarter we will develop the core concepts in ecology, political science, and economics through lectures, seminars, workshops, and fieldwork and look at the strategies involved in environmental problem solving. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills necessary to work together in groups to solve problems. They will be introduced to some basic psychology in order to understand what they and others bring to these discussions. A series of workshops will introduce students to research design and statistical analysis. Spring quarter will continue to build on these concepts and use case studies and specific examples from the region to provide students with the opportunity to wrestle through the complexity of environmental problems. Students will also explore an environmental issue of their choice in a final project.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental studies, environmental regulation, ecology, natural resource management, and public policy

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$25 in fall for entrance fees.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 40
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-06-11Spring fee cancelled.
2018-02-21This program will accept new enrollment with faculty signature.

Environmental Sociology: Nature, Society, and Equity (at Grays Harbor)

Fall
Fall 2017
Grays Harbor
Grays Harbor
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Wenhong Wang
sociology and social statistics

What is nature? What is the relation between nature and human society? What is the role of social structure in shaping our environment? What are the underlying causes of environmental issues? Why are certain class, racial and ethnic groups more likely to bear the brunt of environmental consequences? What is environmental movement and how effective is it, and what are its limitations in addressing the environmental issues? How can we act as a community to create a more sustainable environment and more equitable future?   

This course is going to explore environment issues in the U.S. in the larger social context of increasing social inequality, consumerism, technological innovation and new economic reality.

Using environment as our subject of inquiry, we will study sociological theories and key concepts and critically examine their applicability in environment, particularly environmentally related public health issues. We will examine the social construction of environment, environmental justice and community action. Course activities will include lectures, seminar, and workshop, individual and group projects. Students will write seminar essays, self-reflection papers, and carry out a mini research project oriented toward action.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

social work, environmental studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Advertised schedule:

Thursdays 6-10p at Grays Harbor College

Grays Harbor

Located in: Grays Harbor

DateRevision
2017-05-30New offering added (at Grays Harbor)

European Philosophy: 20th and 21st Century

Winter
Winter 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Tougas square
philosophy

This program will focus on the philosophy of language and phenomenology, covering the work of Wittgenstein, Husserl, Arendt, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida, and other 20th- and 21st-century European thinkers. Students will be expected to have some familiarity with the European philosophical tradition, and some experience reading and analyzing dense philosophical texts. The activities of the program will include close reading and analysis of primary texts within the context of their composition and the writing of reflective, argumentative, and synthetic essays in response to those texts. Students will be encouraged to explore connections between the theories developed in the program readings and their own social, political, and personal concerns.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

philosophy

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2017-05-15This program is now offered winter quarter (formerly spring).

Even When Erased, We Exist: Native American Women Standing Strong for Justice

Fall
Fall 2017
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Native American studies, history, women's studies

Native American women have been erased from history. It is not that they did not exist; it is that they were made invisible, omitted from history. At the same time, stereotypes such as "squaw" and "princess" have plagued Native women since 1492. Ironically, the history of Native women reflects a different reality with a long tradition of standing strong for justice. Native women have stood to protect the lands and the natural world, their cultures and languages, the health of their families, and tribal sovereignty. But few learn about these Native women, who consistently defied the stereotypes in order to work for the betterment of their peoples and nations.

Drawing upon the experiences and writings of such women, we will explore the ways in which leadership is articulated in many Native American communities. We will critique how feminist theory has both served and ignored Native women. Through case studies, autobiography, literature, and films, we will analyze how Native women have argued for sovereignty and developed agendas that privilege community over individuality. We will explore the activism of 20th-century Native women leaders, particularly in the areas of the environment, the family system, and the law.

This program will implement decolonizing methodologies to give voice to some of these women, while deconstructing the stereotypes in order to honor and provide a different way of knowing about these courageous Native American women, past and present. Students will develop skills as writers, researchers, and potential advocates by studying scholarly and imaginative works and conducting research. Through extensive reading and writing, dialogue, art, films, and possible guest speakers, we will investigate important aspects of the life and times of some of these Native American women across the centuries.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Native American studies, women's studies, education, social sciences, U.S. history, leadership studies, and political science

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

First class meeting: Monday, September 25 at 9am (Sem II B2109)

Located in: Olympia