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A People's Geography of American Empire

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Zoltan Grossman square
geography, Native American studies

This program will look at U.S. expansion, from Manifest Destiny and overseas imperial conquests, to present-day resource wars. It will focus on the place-making processes inherent in each stage of expansion, and on the imprints they have left on the human and physical landscape. It will examine imperial places that have been shaped by each era of expansion, and in turn have shaped each era.

We will examine the continuous historical arc of expansion, from the Indian frontier wars to colonialism in the Pacific and Caribbean, to occupations in Middle East tribal regions. This expansion comes full circle as immigrants arrive from formerly colonized lands, and wars at home are waged against occupied communities. In addition to the origins and rationales underlying each stage of expansion, we will explore how and to what extent the world's landscape reflects and helps to (re)produce imperial power.

The program will aim to interconnect global and local scales, foreign and domestic policies, and past histories and present-day legacies. It will examine the lasting imprints of imperial control on real local places, in particular the expanding network of U.S. military bases and counterinsurgency campaigns around the world.

As their fall-quarter project, students will focus on a single local-scale case study, writing separate essays on its past history, present-day landscape, and a resident interview (of activists, refugees, or veterans). Students will also turn in a weekly synthesis paper on their readings and other learning. A fall-quarter overnight field trip will introduce students to military installations and locations Indigenous-settler interactions. In the winter-quarter project, Joint Base Lewis-McChord and other Northwest military installations will be researched and documented as case studies of land acquisition, place-making, deployment, and dissent.

The program will make a geographical contribution to the study of American Empire by examining the making and remaking of imperial places, and using place-based approaches to examine hierarchies of race, nationality, class, and gender. Book and article authors include Cynthia Enloe, Catherine Lutz, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, David Vine, Howard Zinn, Patricia Limerick, Leslie Marmon-Silko, Dahr Jamail, Richard Drinnon, Jean Bricmont, Rinku Sen, Jeremy Scahill, Robert Kaplan, and Michael Ignatieff. While some of the histories of conflict and suffering may be difficult to learn, imperial places also offer stories of cooperation and resilience, healing, and hope.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

community studies, geography, and international studies.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$135 in fall for entrance to the Squaxin Island Museum and an overnight field trip to military installations.  $10 in winter for entrance to the Joint Base Lewis McCord Museum.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 9:30 am
SEM 2 D3109 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Abnormal Psychology (A)

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

psychology

This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Abnormal Psychology (B)

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

psychology

This course is designed to help students examine abnormal and normal behavior and experience along several dimensions. These dimensions include the historical and cultural influences in Western psychology, current views on abnormality and psychological health, cultural differences in the approach and treatment of psychopathology, and the role of healthy habitat in healthy mind. Traditional classification of psychopathology will be studied, including theories around etiology and treatment strategies. Non-traditional approaches will be examined including the role of eco-psychology in abnormal psychology. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A2107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-03-13Second section of abnormal psych added for Spring

Abroad at Mondragon and Evergreen: A Collaborative Experiment?

Spring
Spring 2019
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Feminist Theory, Cultural Studies

How are two historically innovative and collaborative-based institutions of higher education dealing with current economic challenges, particularly the changes characterized as neoliberalism?   This program will use a field study approach informed by the digital humanities to explore and document first-hand one innovative model of collaboration—teampreneurship. We'll focus on teampreneurship as developed in Finland and used by Mondragon University’s MTA program, both at home in the Basque area of Spain and abroad--including with us at The Evergreen State College--as an antidote to the oft-reported “individualistic, empathy-lacking, and market-driven” character of entrepreneurship.  What will this real-life enterprise approach teach us about both the contemporary business and the original mission of education at Evergreen and Mondragon?

 

In addition to engaging in teampreneurship on campus with Mondragon’s visiting Team Academy of international students and staff, students will have an opportunity to study abroad to experience the cultural, political, and economic context of teampreneurship’s adaptation at Mondragon University. This three-week (15 May – 5 June) study abroad in the Basque area of Spain will include an introduction to Basque history and visits to the world’s largest corporation of cooperatives.  From the heartland of Guernica -- known around the world due to Picasso’s painting of the 1937 fascist market bombing -- to industrial coops and sheepherding, from the Guggenheim and Arizmendi Museums to a renewable energy coop and cooperative banking, we’ll immerse ourselves in Basque communities.  We’ll eat at a Txokos (traditional gastronomic society) and visit farming coops and farmers’ markets. Given that the sharing of good food is quintessential to Basque culture our experiment regarding Mondragon abroad and at home will include learning to prepare and share pintxos (small bites) at Evergreen.

 

Note: This program is part of a collaboration, providing opportunities for students to learn with Mondragon’s Team Academy at the Evergreen campus and to travel abroad to Mondragon. Other collaborating programs include: SOS: Food and Agriculture; Alternatives in and to Capitalism (AltCap); SOS: Team Entrepreneurship, Leadership, and Innovation; and Mondragon Team Academy. 

Study abroad:

Study abroad (with Alternatives in and to Capitalism program) from 15 May - 5 June to the Basque Area of Spain

Special Expenses: $800 airfare and $50 ground transport   (Estimated expenses students will cover themselves)

Required Student Fee:  $3350   (Fee covers group expenses for services organized by college)

Administrative Fee:     $400  (Nonrefundable deposit to cover administrative costs of running study abroad)

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Community Studies and Organizing, Education, Leadership and Innovation, Government and Non-Profits

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:30 am
SEM 2 E3109 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Adolescent Literature

Summer
Summer 2019 (Full Session)
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

literacy education

Learn how adolescent literature meets the developmental needs of middle and high school ages (grades 6-12). We’ll look at the literature in historical perspective, study young adult development in reading, and consider genres with representative authors and selection criteria. Participants will read and critique several genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses. Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

teaching, education, library science

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, June 24, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 A3107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Adornment: Tradition, Innovation, and Power

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Kristina Ackley
Native American studies

Using the lens of history, visual studies, fine metalsmithing, and Native American studies, our program will explore the imaginative and physical ways that we attach meaning to adornment, framing our discussion around themes of materiality, memory, and Indigeneity. We will broadly consider theories of space, place, mobility, and identity to deconstruct the binary of tradition/innovation.

Students will work to better understand and critically evaluate the multiple relationships to materials and objects, while developing a variety of skills in visual literacy, historical analysis, research ethics, and fine metalsmithing. Program work throughout the quarter will require extensive reading and writing. Studio art techniques will include drawing from observation and memory, copper forming, silver soldering, riveting, building links for chain making, and simple jewelry mechanisms. Connections between studio work and reading and writing will reinforce student understanding of the fluidity of material knowledge.

History and memory, the politics of collecting and exhibition, and the changing role of museums are among the issues which will be covered. We will question and frame competing public narratives, particularly how Native people are portrayed in museum exhibits. We will consider how museums reveal the social and cultural ideologies of those who build, pay for, work in, and visit them. The unique political status of Native nations can be better understood by highlighting the strong indigenous connections to place, particularly in art and material culture. We will examine case studies such as Iroquois raised beadwork, wampum belts, and cedar hats. We will support our analysis with guest presenters, documentary films, museum exhibits, and field trips. By the conclusion of the quarter students will present research, writing, and two substantial adornment projects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

public history, education, museum studies, and art.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$125 for entrance fees and supplies.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 C2105 - Workshop

Additional details:

On Saturday, October 6, 2018 there will be an all-day field trip to the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma, to attend the 23 rd Annual Northwest Jewelry and Metals Symposium.

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Biswas-Abir
geology, earth science, biogeochemistry
Calabria, Lalita square
botany, phytochemistry, systematics
Gerardo Chin-Leo
oceanography, marine biology
forest and plant ecology
Carri LeRoy
freshwater ecology, quantitative biology, environmental education
Paul Przybylowicz
ecology, biology, mycology
Styring square
ornithology
2019-Thuesen,-Erik-4-square
marine science, zoology, ecophysiology
Pauline Yu square portrait
marine science

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in environmental studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree—as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Abir Biswas studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires, and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies, taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology, or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation, and water collection, and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements.

Lalita Calabria focuses on biodiversity and conservation of bryophytes and lichens in temperate North America. As a broadly trained plant biologist, Lalita uses a multidisciplinary approach to investigating these topics, including floristic surveys, ecological studies, herbarium-based research, and phytochemical studies of plants. Current activities in her lab focus on assessing the impacts of fire on lichen and bryophyte communities of oak woodlands and prairies, estimating biomass and functional group diversity of bryophyte and lichen ground layers in Puget Sound prairies, and quantifying biological nitrogen fixation rates of moss-cyanobacteria symbiosis. Students with backgrounds in botany, ecology, or chemistry could gain skills in bryophyte and lichen identification, as well as field monitoring methods and studying symbiosis of bryophytes and lichens. Students participating in this program would engage with ongoing research in Lalita’s lab and may have opportunities to develop their own research projects.

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

Dylan Fischer studies plant ecosystem ecology, carbon dynamics, and nutrient cycling in forests of Western Washington and the Southwest. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, molecular genetics, plant physiology, carbon balance, nitrogen cycling, species interactions, community analysis, and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project ( blogs.evergreen.edu/eeon/ ). See more about his lab's work at  blogs.evergreen.edu/ecology. Students in this program work closely with ongoing research in the lab, participate in weekly lab meetings, and develop their own research projects.

Carri LeRoy conducts research on linkages between terrestrial and aquatic environments. She is trained as a freshwater ecologist and primarily studies in-stream ecosystem processes and aquatic communities. She and her students study leaf litter decomposition in streams as a major input of organic material to aquatic systems. In addition, she conducts research on aquatic macroinvertebrate community structure, aquatic fungal biomass, and standard water-quality and hydrology measurements in stream and river environments.

Paul Przybylowicz   conducts research on fungi, mushroom cultivation, and other applications using fungi. He is particularly interested in bioremediation and biocontrol of soil diseases, along with practical mushroom cultivation methods for small-scale vegetable farmers. Current efforts are focused on isolating and screening fungi for bioremediation properties. 

Alison Styring studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics as well as avian monitoring and research in Evergreen’s campus forest and other nearby locations. Bioacoustic research includes field monitoring of local birds using audio recordings and microphone arrays and editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from the campus forest, as well as tropical forest sites in Borneo. Local research projects in the campus forest and nearby locations include Pacific wren mating and life-history strategy, cavity formation and use by cavity-nesting birds (and other cavity-dependent species), and monitoring long-term trends in bird populations and communities using a variety of standard approaches. NOTE: winter quarter only

Erik Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the ecophysiological and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton that live in the deep sea. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry.

Pauline Yu studies the developmental physiology and ecology of marine invertebrates. She is interested in the biochemistry of the seawater-organism interface, developmental nutritional biochemistry and metabolic depression, invasive species, carbonate chemistry (ocean acidification), and cultural relationships with foods from the sea. Students have the opportunity to collaboratively develop lines of inquiry for lab and/or field studies in ecology, developmental biology, physiology, marine carbonate chemistry, and mariculture.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, freshwater science, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy, and zoology

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: variable credit options available.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with C. LeRoy

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Carri LeRoy
freshwater ecology, quantitative biology, environmental education

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Carri LeRoy conducts research on linkages between terrestrial and aquatic environments. She is trained as a freshwater ecologist and primarily studies in-stream ecosystem processes and aquatic communities. She and her students do fieldwork and labwork to understand organic matter processing, aquatic macroinvertebrate community structure, aquatic microbial community structure (algae, bacteria, fungi), hydrological variables, and water-quality measurements in stream and river environments. Students in this program will be involved in new research projects funded by the National Science Foundation at streams at Mount St. Helens and ongoing research in streams within the campus forest reserve. See Dr. LeRoy's website for more information: https://sites.evergreen.edu/carrileroy/.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ecology and freshwater science.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with D. Fischer

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

forest and plant ecology

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Dylan Fischer  studies plant ecosystem ecology, carbon dynamics, and nutrient cycling in forests of western Washington and the Southwest. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, molecular genetics, plant physiology, carbon balance, nitrogen cycling, species interactions, community analysis, and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project (  blogs.evergreen.edu/eeon/  ). See more about his lab's work at   blogs.evergreen.edu/ecology  . Students in this program work closely with ongoing research in the lab, participate in weekly lab meetings, and develop their own research projects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

plant ecology and physiology, field ecology, restoration ecology

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with G. Chin-Leo

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Gerardo Chin-Leo
oceanography, marine biology

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

marine studies and oceanography.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options: seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with L. Calabria

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Calabria, Lalita square
botany, phytochemistry, systematics

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Lalita Calabria's research focuses on biodiversity and conservation of bryophytes and lichens in temperate North America. As a broadly trained plant biologist, Lalita uses a multidisciplinary approach to investigating these topics including floristic surveys, ecological studies, herbarium-based research and phytochemical studies of plants. Current activities in her lab focus on assessing the impacts of fire on lichen and bryophyte communities of oak woodlands and prairies, estimating biomass and functional group diversity of bryophyte and lichen ground layers in Puget Sound prairies and quantifying biological nitrogen fixation rates of moss-cyanobacteria symbiosis. Students with backgrounds in botany, ecology, or chemistry could gain skills in bryophyte and lichen identification, as well as, field monitoring methods and studying symbiosis of bryophytes and lichens. Students participating in this program would engage with ongoing research in Lalita’s lab and may have opportunities to develop their own research projects.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

 lichen, bryophyte, and plant ecology and herbarium-based research.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advanced Research in Environmental Studies with P. Przybylowicz

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Paul Przybylowicz
ecology, biology, mycology

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market.

Paul Przybylowicz   conducts research on soil fungi, mushroom cultivation and potential uses for fungi. He is particularly interested in bioremediation and biocontrol applications of fungi, along with practical mushroom cultivation methods for small-scale vegetable farmers. Current efforts are focused on isolating and screening fungi for bioremediation properties. 

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

seat availability and credit options vary per quarter.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Advertising and Social Media

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Jon Baumunk
environmental studies and business
cognitive psychology

Advertising and social media are ubiquitous and powerful forces that seduce us into wanting, seeking, and buying desired—and sometimes even unneeded—products and services, donating to charitable causes, and for better or worse, changing our lifestyle. What psychological processes are responsible for the effectiveness of advertising? Which advertising messages are received and why? Consumers and firms buy and sell products and services without necessarily understanding the reasons. This program explains how attention works, how consumers acquire and process information, how they can use their attention to focus on relevant information, and how they make choices.

Each year, companies commit considerable resources to advertising and social media campaigns. The digital revolution and rise of the internet have transformed the way we live and do business, making today’s business environment more competitive. Businesses can tap the power of social media to increase sales, cut marketing costs, and reach consumers directly. The art of selling has become more scientific. This program explores how companies use behavioral insights to attempt to connect products and services with people.

Consumers form attitudes toward brands that can affect purchase decisions. Firms use persuasion and other psychological techniques to change preexisting attitudes and beliefs and influence consumer behavior. Frequently, consumers’ brand preferences develop from attitudes about advertisements. How do advertising and social media cause consumer behavior to change? Because consumers generally try to avoid exposure to advertisements, firms use humor and other techniques to attract consumers’ attention. This program explores how advertising and social media affect memory and influence buying behavior.

One can gain different perspectives on society from critically examining themes in advertisements. For example, advertising may be based on a product’s benefits or appeal more to materialism. Has our culture become one of consumption for its own sake? If so, what does that say about our society? In addition, as ads become more interactive, privacy concerns will increase. Therefore, certain advertising and aspects of social media may result in negative outcomes, some with long-term consequences.

Social media can be used to empower participants, rather than make them passive receivers of information. Companies can use social media to listen to their customers and other stakeholders via more conversational forms of corporate communication, involving a broader range of stakeholders in dialogues, and patiently building relationships with consumers. This program explores how advertising and social media may be used to more effectively and ethically influence consumers and persuade them to change their buying behavior.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

business, management, leadership studies, economics, communication, and psychology.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 A1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

Africa Is Not a Country

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Sarah Eltantawi square
comparative religion
Bradley Proctor
U.S. history, African American history, American studies

Africa has long been characterized as one “nation” or a “country” by uninformed outsiders. This interdisciplinary program will historicize and complicate totalizing narratives that position Africa as undiverse, undeveloped, and principally as an origin for natural and human resources. This program seeks to disrupt colonial narratives by analyzing Africa as a diverse place, exploring examples of different pieces of African history, culture, music, literature, and religion. Through lectures, seminars, books, articles, poetry, songs, and films, students will explore Africa--and, to a lesser extent, African descended people in the diaspora--through multivalent modes of inquiry. Potential readings include Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World; the novel Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie; the Nigerian play Death of the King’s Horseman by Wole Soyinka; The Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, a primary source account of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; and Shari'ah on Trial: Northern Nigeria's Islamic Revolution. In addition to weekly in-class writing exercises, students will be expected to develop one short (3-page) essay early in the quarter, and a longer (5-8-page) essay later. Students will end the quarter with solo presentations on subjects of their choosing in negotiation with faculty.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International relations, ethnomusicology, religious studies, African studies, history, performance studies.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 C1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

Algebraic Thinking

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

physics, education

Algebraic Thinking is Evergreen's entry-point college-level math class. The course develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems. Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Topics include function notation and linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Collaborative learning is emphasized.

Algebraic Thinking is designed for students who are considering areas of study such as education, science, mathematics, or economics and who have not completed previous college-level course work in mathematics or who have been away from math for quite some time. This course meets Evergreen's Master in Teaching college algebra requirement.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, health sciences, and other natural sciences.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

A scientific calculator is required.

Fees:

$12 for printed copies of the text that will be provided to students during the first class

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 6 - Classroom

Advertised schedule:

6-9:20p Thu

Located in: Olympia

Alternatives in and to Capitalism: Hands-on from Cascadian Grain to Basque Cooperatives

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Feminist Theory, Cultural Studies
 There are many problems with capitalism, but is an alternative economic system worth striving for? Is it feasible? After more than a century of theoretical studies and practical experiments, we know a lot about these questions, but the answers remain speculative. Is there a way to imagine economics not as a framework we’re destined to live in, but only as a constraint we can minimize in order to achieve a more humane world?
 
This advanced program will embrace economics, political economy, feminist cultural studies, community building, artisanship, and ecological sustainability. We'll use theory and history to examine capitalism’s initial basis in colonialism and the standardization of goods and livelihoods. We'll travel both locally–to the Cascadia Grain Conference–and internationally–to Mondragon cooperatives in the Basque region of Spain. Be prepared to take seriously diverse theoretical perspectives, including Marxist, anarchist, feminist, mainstream, Austrian, and community economics as well as to engage with real-world experience. Program work will include lectures, guest speakers, seminars, films, workshops, field trips, student presentations, and major research projects examining and imagining alternatives both in and to capitalism.
 
In winter quarter we will examine the nature of capitalism, and its relationship to urgent societal problems like inequality and ecological survival. Students will study introductory microeconomics in a broad context. Emphasis will be on students researching and imagining individual and community-based alternative economic projects within our existing system–including those which address the value of higher education in the current moment.
 
Spring quarter will be taught solely by Peter Dorman. The focus will shift to entire societies and even a globalized world. Are there alternatives to capitalism at the system level that can make possible much higher levels of individual fulfillment as well as collective, planetary well-being?  Students will extend their research from local to international case studies, including the opportunity to visit the Mondragon, the largest and most innovative cooperative system in the world.

Study Abroad: There will also be a three-week study abroad option at the Mondragon cooperative network in the Basque region of Spain. Credit equivalencies will be offered in comparative economic systems, political economy, and cultural studies.

Study abroad:

All questions regarding payment should be directed to the teaching faculty of this program.

1.             Special Expenses: $800 airfare and $50 ground transport   (Estimated expenses students will cover themselves)

2.             Required Student Fee:  $3350   (Fee covers group expenses for services organized by college)

3.             Administrative Fee:     $400  (Nonrefundable deposit to cover administrative costs of running study abroad)

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

social sciences, social justice advocacy and activism, public policy, cultural studies

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

 

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

In Winter quarter- $140 for overnight transportation, accommodations, food, and entrance fees for Cascadia Grain Conference.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:30 am
SEM 2 D3109 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

Yes, in 2020-21 or as appropriate to meet student demand for the program, as well as our exchange relationship with Mondragon.

DateRevision
2018-11-27$140 fee for winter field trip
2018-11-26prerequisites requirement for winter removed

American Lives: Immigration History, Law and Community Media

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Immigration is a key issue of our times.  President Trump’s immigration policies—the travel ban on immigrants from majority Muslim countries, family detentions and separations, and the proposal to build an impassable wall at the Mexico/US border—have sparked passionate debates.  These debates echo recurring themes in U.S. history, as the nation has struggled to define who can enter, who qualifies for citizenship, and whose languages, culture and identity are valued. 

Historically, the U.S. has often depended on the labor of immigrant “guest” workers to build its railroads and work in its fields, while discouraging their attempts to become “American.”  Today, an estimated 12 million undocumented adults and children are working, attending school, and raising their families in the U.S.  Their presence, and the support of a growing movement of allies, constitutes one of the largest civil disobedience movements in U.S. history.

This program will examine immigration laws and policies past and present.  We will learn to listen to voices on both sides of the immigration debate: what are the forces that drive people from their homes to seek a better life?  How and why have anti-immigration policies gained popular support?  How can we separate reality from myths about immigrants and refugees?  What are the implications of current policy changes for U.S. identity, community and democracy?

Students will choose one of two workshops: Media Production (audio recording and photography) and Law and Policy Research.  Program readings will include historical texts, judicial decisions, art and literature.  We will track current media coverage of immigration policy and learn how those policies are impacting communities and how they are responding.  We will view films, engage in discussion, and take field trips to Seattle and Tacoma to learn about immigrant experiences and projects to memorialize their lives and struggles.  Students will commit 2-3 hours/week to community service with organizations serving immigrant members of the community; please check with faculty before finalizing your enrollment to ensure your schedule fits this commitment.  Students will write short weekly essays on the readings, keep a reflective journal of their volunteer experiences, do independent research, and collaborate on community-based projects. 

 

 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

History, law, media, nonprofit/community work, government and public policy.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$30 for supplies and entrance fee

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 E3105 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

American Sign Language I at SPSCC

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course introduces the two basic skills of American Sign Language (ASL): receptive and expressive communication skills. Students will study American Sign Language within its cultural context.  Credits awarded will be 4 Evergreen credits.

NOTE: Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512, Mondays and Wednesdays, from 6:00 – 8:25 pm in BLDG 21, Room 286 - The first class will meet on Monday, September 17 (before Evergreen's start date) . Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday September 13th.

The textbook for this course can be purchased at SPSCC Bookstore. The text will be listed under the course ID ASL& 121, and can be found at this address: http://spscc.bncollege.com

Faculty: Kimberly Crites, kcrites@spscc.edu

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

Advertised schedule:

Mondays and Wednesdays, from 6:00 – 8:25 pm in BLDG 21, Room 286 - The first class will meet on Monday, September 17 (before Evergreen's start date) 

Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512 - Course begins on September 17.

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

Mondays and Wednesdays, from 6:00 – 8:25 pm in BLDG 21, Room 286 - The first class will meet on Monday, September 17 (before Evergreen's start date) 

Course meets at South Puget Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512 -  Course begins on September 17.

DateRevision
2018-06-06New Offering Added for Fall- at SPSCC

Anatomy and Physiology I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Amanda Kugel
anatomy, physiology

The first of a three quarter sequence in human anatomy and physiology. This course covers anatomical terminology, levels of organization, primary tissue types, and systems of support and movement including the integumentary system, skeletal system and muscular system. Laboratory sessions include microscopy, histology, and the use of preserved bones and anatomical models for skeletal and muscle identification.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

human biology, health-related fields

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 5:30 pm
LAB 1 1040 - Class Lab

Advertised schedule:

Tue 5:30-8:50pm

Located in: Olympia

Anatomy and Physiology II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Amanda Kugel
anatomy, physiology

The second of a three quarter sequence in human anatomy and physiology. This course will examine control and regulation of the body through exploration of the nervous system, special senses and the endocrine system. This course will also cover the continuity of life related to the human reproductive system and development in utero. Laboratory sessions include histology, anatomical models and dissections (brain, eyeball).

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

human biology, health-related fields

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Anatomy and Physiology I or equivalent. Contact the faculty for clarification if needed. 

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 6:00 pm
LAB 1 1040 - Class Lab

Advertised schedule:

Tue 5:30-9:00p

Located in: Olympia

Anatomy and Physiology III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Amanda Kugel
anatomy, physiology

The third of a three quarter sequence in human anatomy and physiology. This course will examine body fluids and transport including blood, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity. Discussion of environmental exchange will include the respiratory system, digestive system and urinary system. Laboratory sessions include histology, anatomical models, dissections (heart, kidney, fetal pig), blood typing simulation and a respiratory physiology module. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

human biology, health-related fields

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Anatomy and Physiology II or equivalent. Contact the faculty for clarification if needed. 

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 6:00 pm
LAB 1 1040 - Class Lab

Advertised schedule:

Tue 5:30-9:00p

Located in: Olympia

Anthrozoology

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Michael (Mike) Paros
veterinary medicine

Why do humans keep pets and also raise animals for food? What are the psychological and moral complexities that characterize our relationships with animals? What is the impact of human-animal interactions on the health and well-being of people and animals? How do we assess the relative welfare of animals under a variety of circumstances? This program is an interdisciplinary study of human (anthro) and animal (zoo) interaction. This topic of inquiry will be used to study general biology, evolutionary biology, zoology, anthropology, and philosophy. Through field trips, guest speakers, reading, writing, and discussion, students will become familiar with the multiple and often paradoxical ways we relate to companion animals, animals for sport, zoo animals, wildlife, research animals, and food animals. We will use our collective experiences, along with science-based and value-based approaches, to critically examine the ever-changing role of animals in society.

We will begin by focusing on the process of animal domestication in different cultures from an evolutionary and historical perspective. Through the formal study of animal ethics, students will become familiar with different philosophical positions on the use of animals. Physiology and neuroscience will be used to investigate the physical and mental lives of animals, while simultaneously exploring domestic animal behavior. Students will explore the biological basis and psychological aspects of the human-animal bond. They will study the science of animal welfare and complete a final project in which they will apply their scientific and ethical knowledge to a controversial and contemporary animal welfare question. Students will finish the quarter with a multiple-day trip to the University of British Columbia, where they will visit with faculty and students doing active research in animal welfare science.

Students will be expected to read primary literature in such diverse fields as animal science, ethology, neurobiology, sociobiology, anthropology, and philosophy. Student success in this program will depend on commitment to in-depth understanding of complex topics and an ability to combine empirical knowledge and philosophical reflection.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, neuroscience, anthropology, animal welfare, and veterinary medicine.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$200 for a multi-day trip to Animal Welfare Research Center at the University of British Columbia.

Upper division science credit:

A limited amount of upper-division science credit will be awarded to students based on exam scores and ability to read and interpret primary scientific literature.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 8:30 am
LIB 1412 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Applied Microbiology and Organic Chemistry

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

biology, genetics, microbiology
organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, biochemistry

In this one-quarter upper division science program we will examine theoretical concepts within microbiology and organic chemistry and apply them to real world issues within the fields of health and medicine, and the environment.

In lecture and small group problem-solving workshops we will examine the broad variety of microorganisms so far identified, the biochemistry of these species, their varying cellular structures, and the key roles they play in the environment, and in health and medicine. In addition, we will study organic chemistry, learning the structure, reactivities, and mechanisms of reaction of some of the major functional groups – from small molecules to polymers and plastics. In seminar we will read literature in the areas of applied microbiology and environmental chemistry, focusing on themes within health and medicine (transmission of infectious disease, prevention and treatments) and also the environment (pollution, toxic organic chemicals, use of alternative materials, such as biodegradable plastics).

Laboratory activities will teach fundamental and modern methods of microbiology and organic chemistry. Class activities will include lecture, workshops, seminar, laboratories, and some field work. This program will prepare students for upper-division work in environmental sciences as well as upper-division laboratory-based biology.

 

Note: Students who have taken "Environmental Biology and Chemistry" (fall 2018- winter 2019) should not take "Applied Microbiology and Organic Chemistry," as it covers similar material.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Biology, chemistry, health and medicine, environmental science

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Two quarters of general biology and two quarters of general chemistry, each with lab.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

All 16 credits are upper division, and will include general microbiology with laboratory, applied microbiology, organic chemistry with laboratory, environmental chemistry.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:00 am
Purce Hall 5 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

Art of Helping

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

psychology
Doing well while doing good is a challenge. Whereas some kind of help is the kind of help that helps, some kind of help we can do without. Gaining wisdom to know the paths of skillful helping of self and others is the focus of this four-credit course. We will explore knowing who we are, identifying caring as a moral attitude, relating wisely to others, maintaining trust, and working together to make change possible.
4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A3109 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-9:50pm

Located in: Olympia

Arts and the Child: Early Childhood

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Hir'
visual arts, Chinese studies, human development

All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing. Yet, as we grow up, this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This course will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will also examine practices of education and self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. Our study will focus on children of preschool age, 0-6 years old.

Credit will be awarded in arts and human development.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

teaching, education, social work

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$10 fee for art materials

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 5:30 pm
SEM 2 B1105 - Lecture

Advertised schedule:

Thu 5:30-8:50pm

Located in: Olympia

Asian/American: Pop Culture Crosscurrents

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

“Japanese jazz now hip-hop in home/At Seventh and Jackson, the microphone’s open.” — Blue Scholars, Seattle hip-hop duo (from “Evening Chai”)

From Bruce Lee to Harold & Kumar , henna to hip-hop, bulgogi to ph , manga to The Matrix , Asians and Asian Americans have left an indelible imprint on U.S. popular culture. As eloquently noted by Mimi Thi Nguyen and Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, “[f]ew of us are immune to popular culture’s intimate address or to its pleasures and affirmations, frustrations and denials” ( Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America) . It is, indeed, that lack of immunity and a restless hunger to understand those “pleasures, affirmations, frustrations, and denials” that will sustain us on our 10-week journey. We will begin the quarter with two fundamental questions—“What is an Asian American?” and “What is popular culture?"—that will lead us to (1) an exploration of the major historical, cultural, social, and political contours of the Asian American experience, and (2) an immersion in critical theoretical perspectives on culture in general, and popular culture in particular. We will devote the remainder of the quarter to an examination of the complex, and frequently vexed, ways in which Asians and Asian Americans have been represented in U.S. popular culture and, more importantly, how members of those communities have become active producers of popular culture. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, multilayered, and transgressive in its insistence on an intertextuality that moves beyond the commonly interrogated categories of race, gender, and class.

Students will read selected fiction, poetry, comics, graphic novels, scholarly articles, and other written texts. There will be weekly screenings and analysis of documentaries as well as fictional films, including martial arts and anime. We will also explore Asian American popular culture in music, photography, and other visual art; bodies (e.g., tattoos); and cuisine. Students will participate in weekly seminars and workshops, submit short weekly writing assignments, and produce a final project that will help them refine both their expository and creative nonfiction writing skills. Field trips may include visits to Pacific Northwest locations with Asian and Asian American historical and cultural connections, and to off-campus film, music, and other venues.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

American studies, Asian American studies, cultural studies, humanities, and education

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$100 for museum entrance fees, concert admission, and/or movies

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 E3107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-04-05Variable credit added
2019-02-15This program is offered to Jr-Sr.

Audio Recording I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This course will introduce students to the process and tools of modern recording and sound/music production. This three quarter sequence begins with the study of microphones, portable recorders, and mono/stereo editing. Analog and digital recording using audio consoles, multitrack software, and mixing/production techniques will be introduced as you gain proficiency in the Audio Lab and the audio mixing benches. Final projects will consist of collaborative production pieces completed in the labs. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops. Students will maintain studio journals and complete weekly project assignments. Collaborative skills in studio work will be a focus.  This course is designed to provide anyone interested in audio production the fundamental skills needed to use modern technology to create music and other sound pieces. The only prerequisite is an interest in creating audio content and learning about sound production.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - 5:30 pm
Lib 1328 - 5.1 Mix Room

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:20pm Wed

Located in: Olympia

Audio Recording II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This course will introduce students to the process and tools of modern recording and sound/music production. This three quarter sequence begins with the study of microphones, portable recorders, and mono/stereo editing. Analog and digital recording using audio consoles, multitrack software, and mixing/production techniques will be introduced as you gain proficiency in the Audio Lab and the audio mixing benches. Final projects will consist of collaborative production pieces completed in the labs. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops. Students will maintain studio journals and complete weekly project assignments. Collaborative skills in studio work will be a focus.  This course is designed to provide anyone interested in audio production the fundamental skills needed to use modern technology to create music and other sound pieces. The only prerequisite is an interest in creating audio content and learning about sound production.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Website:
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, January 9, 2019 - 5:30 pm
Com 110 - Perf and Prod Studio

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:30p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Audio Recording III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This course will introduce students to the process and tools of modern recording and sound/music production. This three quarter sequence begins with the study of microphones, portable recorders, and mono/stereo editing. Analog and digital recording using audio consoles, multitrack software, and mixing/production techniques will be introduced as you gain proficiency in the Audio Lab and the audio mixing benches. Final projects will consist of collaborative production pieces completed in the labs. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops. Students will maintain studio journals and complete weekly project assignments. Collaborative skills in studio work will be a focus.  This course is designed to provide anyone interested in audio production the fundamental skills needed to use modern technology to create music and other sound pieces. The only prerequisite is an interest in creating audio content and learning about sound production.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Audio Engineering and Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 5:30 pm
Com 110 - Perf and Prod Studio

Advertised schedule:

5:30-9:30p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Becoming A Changemaker: Learning and Acting Locally and Globally

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Don Chalmers
grantwriting

People locally and globally change people's lives every day.  The first part of a two-part program explores what is a Change Maker and how students can use the lessons of this global movement to address social change in their community.  We'll define and understand Change Makers through readings, in-class discussion, and researching local people and organizations who make a difference using social enterprises and other forms of organization to create positive change.  For example, students will be asked to identify one Change Maker from the readings and share information with the others including an update on that individual or organization.  Next, using lessons learned from Change Makers worldwide, we'll consider what individuals and groups need to do to prepare themselves to be effective as agents of change in our local community or one in which they want to work.  For instance, we'll explore community assessment in detail including community mapping of assets and needs. We'll also look at how best to organize to effectively address problems or opportunities the community assessment identified.  We'll learn about how to make these efforts sustainable both organizationally and through resource development like grant writing and fundraising.

By Week 3 students will develop in-program individual learning contracts or internships that will generate 4 of the 8 credits offered.  The in-program ILCs could focus on further research and reporting on the student's chosen Change Maker project.  An in-program internship would be with an area Change Maker based on work to be determined by the student, faculty and that Change Maker. These ILCs or Internships could be continued and/or modified in the Spring Term.

In Spring we'll build on the lessons we gained in Winter either by beginning to build a social enterprise identified in the student's internal ILC or continuing the work each student began in the internal internship.  Classes for the second part of the program will focus on implementation.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Social Enterprises including non-profit organizations, social and human services, social purpose corporations and LLCs, and related enterprises

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Internship Opportunities:

In-program internships focused on an area of social enterprise represent 4-credits of work per quarter.  Students can start the program with an internship in mind, but there will be time during the first two weeks of class to develop ideas and connect with organizations. 

Research Opportunities:

In-program ILCs focused on an area of social enterprise represent 4-credits of work per quarter.  Students can start the program with a research topic in mind, but there will be time during the first two weeks of class to develop ideas.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 C3107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Between Certainty and Doubt: Logic and Knowledge

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Stephen Beck
philosophy

Is there anything that we can know for certain? Are there methods of thinking that can guarantee truth? If not, does this mean that when we form our beliefs about the world, “anything goes”?

In this program we will study formal deductive logic, a method of reasoning still widely held to be the “royal road” to knowledge and truth. We will study enough formal logic to come to appreciate both its value and its limitations.

Alongside our study of logic, we will inquire into theories of knowledge itself: What does it mean, really, to say that you know something to be so? Do we need certainty in order to know? Since uncertainty is ubiquitous in our lives, how can we cope with it while still being responsible critical thinkers?

A major emphasis of our work will be applying our studies of logic and theories of knowledge to practical matters, be they personal, political, or social. By developing skills of reasoning, we will learn how to support our positions and decisions and to develop a nuanced attitude to the confidence we have in those positions and decisions. This program will further students’ abilities to think critically and to communicate their ideas effectively. This program will provide an excellent foundation of skills for study of law, natural or social sciences, or any area of study or employment where precise reasoning and expression are crucial. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Education, Law, Psychology, Philosophy

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

No previous experience in philosophy required.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-10 pm

Located in: Olympia

Birds: Inside and Out

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

biology, biochemistry
Styring square
ornithology

Birds are charismatic and conspicuous animals. They also serve as excellent models for understanding many biological concepts, including: evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology. In this program we will study avian biology at the organism level (inside: physiological systems and adaptations of birds) as well as birds as components of ecosystems (outside: population and community ecology and avian social systems). Through lab and field work, students will gain a holistic understanding of avian biology and in the process will learn about birds commonly found in the Puget Sound area in springtime.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, wildlife biology, and ecology.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Students must have successfully completed 8 credits of college-level biology.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$25 Entrance Fees

Upper division science credit:

Upper-division science credit may be awarded upon successful completion of the program. Upper-division credits will be given for upper-division work at the discretion of the faculty.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 A1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-11-06$25 fee added for entrance

Botany: Plants and People

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Frederica Bowcutt
botany, ecology, environmental history

This is a one-quarter program designed to support students learning introductory plant biology in an interdisciplinary format. Students will learn about plant anatomy, morphology, evolution, and systematics. Lectures based on textbook readings supplement the laboratory work. The learning community will explore how present form and function informs us about the evolution of major groups of plants such as mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants. Students will get hands-on experience studying plants under microscopes and with the naked eye. This program also focuses on people's relationships with plants with special attention on medicinal botany. Several workshops on herbology will provide hands-on opportunities to learn various herbal medicine making practices. Students will also examine the cultural factors that shape our relations with plants. In our readings, we will particularly examine the significant roles gender politics has played in the teaching and practice of botany. Weekly workshops will help students improve their ability to write thesis-driven essays defended with evidence from assigned texts. Quizzes, exams, and weekly assignments will help students and faculty assess learning. 

Opportunities to earn credit in: Introduction to Plant Biology, Expository Writing, Cultural Studies in Botany and Introduction to Medicinal Botany.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

field plant taxonomy, field ecology, plant science, plant ecology, economic botany, agriculture, forestry, and environmental science.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$35 for workshops in herbal medicine.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 11:00 am
SEM 2 E2109 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

2019-20

DateRevision
2018-04-23Fee added ($35).

Business Entrepreneurship Fundamentals

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dion Gouws square
strategic planning, business management and entrepreneurship, accounting

In this introductory program, students will develop the skills and insight needed to conduct and understand the relationship between business and society and how business practices, such as innovation, quantitative and critical analysis, ethics, sustainability, entrepreneurship, management, and leadership influence outcomes. Factors that are key to business success will be explored from different perspectives and stakeholder views. The program includes fundamental work in entrepreneurship, leadership, management, ethics, quantitative work, economics, accounting, income taxes, financial statement and ratio analysis, as well as the concept of time value of money. We will read texts such as Goldratt and Cox’s The Goal , Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In , and Levitt and Dubner's Freakonomics, as well as other fundamental business texts that will enhance the skills necessary for conducting business, as well as running nonprofits .

In fall quarter, the program includes four credits of basic undergraduate statistics, which will serve as a foundation for further work in advanced social sciences, including graduate programs (e.g., an MBA or MPA) requiring statistics. Through seminar texts, daily readings from the Wall Street Journal , independent research, movies, speakers, field trips, group projects, workshops, business plan and other student presentations, students will examine business and finance from a variety of viewpoints. Seminar texts include books representing entrepreneurship, innovation, management science, finance, marketing, ethics, and management.

During winter quarter, students will work in small groups on formally proposed, extensive independent projects focused on improving their analytic skills. They will be required to analyze a compelling problem or issue centered on our primary themes of economically successful businesses. The research includes the formulation of a business plan and will conclude with a multimedia presentation. Students will also cover forecasting, linear programming, decision analysis using tree diagrams, and queuing theory from the field of management science.

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be better equipped to understand how a successful business operates and to work with financial data and procedures in the conduct of business and public policy. They will also be better prepared for the quantitative requirements of businesses and governments.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

business, management, and government service.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 9:00 am
Purce Hall 3 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-05-30This program now accepts students of all class levels.
2018-04-30This program requires faculty approval to join in winter quarter.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Vauhn Foster-Grahler
mathematics, education, anthropological mathematics

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I, II, and III is a year-long sequence of courses that will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, series, introduction to differential equations, and concepts and procedures related to partial derivatives, and double integrals.  This year-long (Fall, Winter, Spring) sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I will be offered during fall quarter.  Calculus and Analytical Geometry I will include a rigorous study of limits, derivatives and their applications through multiple modes of inquiry and multiple (algebraic, graphical, numerical, and verbal) representations. Collaborative learning is emphasized.  If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.   A graphing calculator is required for the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, engineering, mathematics, science, and economics.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 7:30 am
SEM 2 A1107 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 7:30 am - 9:00 am

Located in: Olympia

Calculus and Analytical Geometry II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Vauhn Foster-Grahler
mathematics, education, anthropological mathematics

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I, II, and III is a year-long sequence of courses that will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, series, introduction to differential equations, and concepts and procedures related to partial derivatives, and double integrals.  This year-long (Fall, Winter, Spring) sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry II will be offered during winter quarter.  Calculus and Analytical Geometry II will include a rigorous study of integral calculus including techniques and applications of integration.  The course will also introduce students to differential equations.  We will engage with the content through multiple modes of inquiry and multiple (algebraic, graphical, numerical, and verbal) representations. Collaborative learning is emphasized.  If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.    A graphing calculator is required for the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

science, education, mathematics, and economics.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 7:30 am
SEM 2 E1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Calculus and Analytical Geometry III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Vauhn Foster-Grahler
mathematics, education, anthropological mathematics

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I, II, and III is a year-long sequence of courses that will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, series, introduction to differential equations, and concepts and procedures related to partial derivatives, and double integrals.  This year-long (Fall, Winter, Spring) sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.

 Calculus and Analytical Geometry III completes the year-long sequence of courses that provides a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, series, and introduce differential equations, partial derivatives and double integrals. This three-quarter-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics. Spring quarter topics include introduction to multi-dimensional space, lines and planes in space, coordinate systems, series, concepts and procedures with partial derivatives and double integrals. We will engage with the content through multiple modes of inquiry and multiple (algebraic, graphical, numerical, and verbal) representations. Collaborative learning is emphasized.  If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty.    A graphing calculator is required for the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

teaching, science, economics, and mathematics.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 7:30 am
SEM 2 E1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Caring for a Living Planet: Ecology and Ethics

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Stephen Beck
philosophy
ecology, plant biology

Why and how should we care for our planet? Should we care only about other human beings, or should we care about non-human animals as well? What about other organisms -- or even whole ecosystems? And what about people and other living things in the future? How does knowledge of living things help us to care about them and for them?

What do we need to know to understand, protect, and preserve human and non-human life and to maintain the integrity of ecological processes? We will study evolution and ecology to understand the variety and complexity of life.   We’ll learn ecological principles and quantitative analyses to assess ecosystem function, interactions among species, and sustainability of plant and animal populations. We will study philosophical ethics, specifically environmental ethics, and sharpen the critical reasoning skills we need to understand our ethical place in the world.

This program will help students to widen their understanding of how the natural world works, and how we as humans can live more thoughtfully, ethically, and sustainably in it.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

ecology, life sciences, humanities, public policy, government. 

8

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B1105 - Lecture

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-10pm

Located in: Olympia

Cartography of Story

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Dawn Barron sqaure
writing, Native and Indigenous studies

This course explores the relationship between historical narratives, our own histories, and how cartography (mapping) can be an integral element to telling a story.  With a focus on writing, cartography, and indigenous culture in North America, students will create a mapped story generated from their own life, a period in history, a place, or an event of their choosing. It is intended to create discourse around the indigenous memoir and braided-essay as historical narrative in relationship to self, community, culture, and worldview. Students will craft their own written narrative, as well as a critical analysis of the course readings and seminars. The goal of the course is to identify voice, practice critical thinking through an indigenous lens, and cultivate clear, compelling writing as expression of self. The course is inclusive and any student interested in cartography, indigenous history, and writing is welcome. 

 

Native Pathways students register using CRN 20322.  All other undergraduate students register using CRN 20321. 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, January 9, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Hand-building

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This course is intended as an overview of ceramic studio practices.  Students will learn a variety of hand-built ceramic techniques beginning with traditional methods and moving toward current ceramic technologies.  Functional pottery will be emphasized with technical demonstrations based on utility.  Thematic projects are designed to aide students toward the development of an informed and personal style while gaining solid foundation skills in both functional and sculptural work. Critical analysis of resulting work will be scheduled through written observations and through group discussions.  The course will introduce students to clay types, kiln firing methods, glazing and related surfacing techniques.   Presentations on the history and contemporary application of ceramic arts will contextualize studio work. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 5:30 pm
Art Annex 1100 - Ceramics Studio

Advertised schedule:

Monday 5:30 - 9:20 pm

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Sculpting the Human Form

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

In this class students will sharpen their observation skills by rendering the human form using a live model. Topics discussed will include the ethics and implications of using the human form in art. Skills covered include construction of armatures, sculpting around an armature with solid clay, hollowing and reconstruction, and techniques for sculpting problematic areas like heads, hands, and feet. A variety of surface options will also be covered including fired and room temperature glaze.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual arts, museum studies, art criticism

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students will need to purchase their own clay and tools. Estimated cost for tools $16, for clay $15 depending on student driven projects. Clay is available for purchase at the studio.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Art Annex 1100 - Ceramics Studio

Advertised schedule:

Tu/Th 6-8:30pm

Located in: Olympia

Ceramics: Wheel-throwing

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

The goal of this course is to provide students with opportunities to concentrate on advanced wheel throwing techniques.  It is highly encouraged that students have previously taken a ceramics course and have the ability to center clay on a pottery wheel.  Students will learn to develop better control over their cylinders, create forms with walls of uniform thickness, improve handles, spouts, lids and trimming techniques.  Weekly demonstrations will include surface techniques, lidded forms, plates, large vases, double wall cylinders and teapots.  Students will work toward the development of a personal style while drawing from a library of historically celebrated ceramic design.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 5:30 pm
Art Annex 1100 - Ceramics Studio

Advertised schedule:

Mondays 5:30-9:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

China and Japan: Traditional and Contemporary "Silk Roads"

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
OlympiaStudy Abroad
Olympia +
study abroad option
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
812
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Hir'
visual arts, Chinese studies, human development
Tomoko Hirai Ulmer
Japanese language and culture

This program will introduce the history, culture, and philosophy of China and Japan. We will use the theme of the Silk Road in our examination of China as the heart of Asian civilization and Japan as a constant presence at the eastern end of the route. Our inquiry into Chinese and Japanese history will focus on periods in which foreign contacts were most influential, for example, when Buddhism traveled the Silk Road to reach Japan, and when Europeans reached and interacted with Asia via the sea and land routes. We will examine contemporary “Silk Roads” that incorporate new trends, technologies, and aspirations. The program also covers Asian philosophies, including Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Shintoism and their distinct time/space concepts. We will examine Chinese and Japanese ideographic languages and their embedded worldviews and aesthetic sensitivities as expressed in poetry and other artistic forms.

In fall quarter we will study Chinese and Japanese history up to the 12th to 13th century, in addition to Daoist philosophy, Buddhism, and Japanese aesthetics from the early to medieval period.

In winter, our history studies will move toward the modern period. Our cultural studies will examine spiritual, religious, and aesthetic traditions in depth. Students will take part in a three-day Lunar New Year celebration in early February. There will be an optional three-week study abroad trip to both China and Japan starting in Week 9 and extending into spring break. Four additional credits may be earned from this trip. Students who do not participate in the trip will remain in close contact with those on the trip and continue their research. All students register for 8 credits during winter and will re-register for 12 credits once the study abroad deposit is submitted. Speak with the faculty for additional details.  

During spring quarter our history study will cover the contemporary period. Students will continue the research started in winter quarter and complete a project connecting theory and practice. Credits will be given in Chinese and Japanese history and culture and in the area of the student’s research.

Program assignments include a weekly response paper or collage, an art journal, quarterly or bi-quarterly research presentations, and a quarterly integration paper. Students will post their responses and comment on each other’s work via Canvas throughout the week. Each class period typically starts with Tai Ji, a physical activity that embodies ancient Chinese spiritual traditions. Other program activities include field trips to the Chinese and Japanese gardens in Portland, Ore., a museum visit, calligraphy demonstrations and workshops, and studying Chinese tea culture and the Japanese tea ceremony.

Students are encouraged to take a Japanese or Chinese language course for 4 credits in addition to this program.

Study abroad:

1.            Special Expenses: $1950  (Estimated expenses students will cover themselves including airfare, visa fees, and misc food and transportation costs)

2.            Required Student Fee:  $2050   (Fee covers group expenses for services organized by college including housing, academic, and activity costs)

3.            Administrative Fee:   $400  (Nonrefundable deposit to cover administrative costs of running study abroad)

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Chinese and Japanese studies, Cultural studies, Silk Roads studies, arts, education, history

812

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers 25 - 49% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$25 fall and spring, $10 in winter for entrance fees and art supplies.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 B1105 - Lecture

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays, 9am - 4:50pm + a three day Lunar New Year Tai Ji seminar in Winter quarter, 2019

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-11-30Required fee for study abroad updated to $2050 (was $2043)
2018-09-06Costs for study abroad updated

Chinese - First Year I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Lin Crowley
media and Chinese studies

This introductory Chinese course will emphasize the standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with no or little prior experience will learn Chinese pinyin system and modern Mandarin Chinese through interactive practice and continuous small group activities. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 5:30 pm
LIB 2619 - Mac Lab

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:20 pm. 

Located in: Olympia

Chinese - First Year II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Lin Crowley
media and Chinese studies

This Chinese course will continue to emphasize the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with some prior experience will learn to build on their knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. The class is fast-paced with use of internet to accelerate the learning. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Both traditional and simplified Chinese characters will be introduced and practiced throughout the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Chinese First Year I or equivalent required

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 5:30 pm
LIB 2619 - Mac Lab

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Chinese - First Year III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Lin Crowley
media and Chinese studies

This third course in the introductory Chinese series will continue to emphasize the mastery of standard Chinese pronunciation and the building of useful vocabularies. Students with some prior experience will learn to build on their knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese through vigorous interactive practice and small group activities. The class is fast-paced with use of internet to accelerate the learning. Learning activities may also include speaker presentations and field trips. Chinese history and culture will be included as it relates to each language lesson. Both traditional and simplified Chinese characters will be introduced and practiced throughout the course.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

International Relations, International business, Education, Cultural studies and practice, and Language studies

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Chinese First Year II or equivalent required

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 5:30 pm
LIB 2619 - Mac Lab

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Located in: Olympia

Cities and Suburbs: Advocacy and Writing for Social and Ecological Justice

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 23
812
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

creative writing, sustainability, public policy
Suzanne Simons square
poetry and literary arts, community studies/Middle East studies, journalism

 

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” –the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 Racial, ethnic and class inequities are foundational to the founding and development of this country, and continue to fester in our neighborhoods. Far-reaching and systemic disparities, many built by continuing inequities in housing laws and policies, preclude equitable access to education, citizen engagement, healthy food, and environmental safety. In this one-quarter program with the option of 8 or 12 credits, we will explore questions such as what historical and contemporary patterns in the U.S. have created and perpetuated inequity in housing and neighborhoods? How have urban and suburban development and migration changed, and why it matters? How have literature – specifically poetry and spoken word, as well as other forms of literary arts – been used to document and raise awareness on inequity and how are they used today to foster change? What do we need to know and do to create more equitable and livable communities?

Like many burgeoning cities, the Thurston County area is experiencing unprecedented growth that will increase population 37.5 percent by 2040, according to the Thurston Regional Planning Council. Part of this program will focus on Olympia’s “Missing Middle Housing” initiative as a case study.  The emphasis is to develop a wider array of affordable housing downtown, and close to the city core, by changing zoning and addressing other laws and practices.  The aim is a balance of market rate and low-income housing. The initial framework has critics and supporters, as well as space for public engagement. We will also focus on the city’s plan for addressing homelessness, while working with all stakeholders—including the homeless, businesses, service providers, local artists, and residents who use downtown. Students will hear from a variety of policy makers, artists, and community members who are contributing research and working toward collaborative efforts in our community to achieve more equitable housing. We will deepen knowledge of how accessible housing can transform access to education and quality of life. We will examine the history of systemic inequities in cities and suburbs, and consider complex solutions. To do this, we will research and see first-hand how homelessness, food deserts, and needed service gaps are deepening.

 Students selecting the 12-credit option will have four Saturdays for a justice walking tour of downtown Olympia, and additional hands-on projects and work. Our focus will be initiatives for addressing homelessness and widening the “missing middle of housing,” as well as other ways to bring equity and social justice to housing. Additional online readings will be available for the 12-credit section.

By the end of the program, students will have developed a historical overview of housing-related poverty, segregation, homelessness, and service deprivation. They will also develop a foundation in researching successful best practices that address these complex problems rooted to housing. Students will gain skills in research, academic writing, creative writing, community planning, and advocacy.

Required texts will include Building Suburbia, Dolores Hayden; The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America,by Richard Rothstein; and Fire and Ink: Anthology of Social Action Writing.  Additional readings will be added by July.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Public policy, urban planning, nonprofit management, advocacy, education, communications, community-based arts.

812

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 23
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 5 - Classroom

Advertised schedule:

8 credit students: Mondays and Wednesdays 6 to 9:30 p.m. Also, one Thursday evening fall quarter from 6-9 p.m. for a community poetry event (this event is strongly encouraged, however, an alternate assignment will available for those who cannot attend).

12 credit students: Schedule above plus 4 additional Saturdays 10am-5pm (October 6th, October 20th, November 3rd and December 1st).

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-06-0112 credit option now available
2018-05-02Title updated (new information after colon), and additional description detail added.

Climate Justice

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

feminist economics
climate justice, climate policy and politics, political ecology, environment and development

Climate justice has become the dominant discourse among civil society groups and grassroots movements that have mobilized around and beyond U.N. climate talks over the last two decades. But what exactly does it mean, and what are its implications for ongoing climate negotiations, policy-making, evolving power relations, and our lifestyle choices as citizens in a diverse and unequal world? Is climate equity a necessary condition for addressing the climate crisis? Is it sufficient? How are communities around the world envisioning equitable transitions to a low-carbon society? What do we mean by an equitable transition? If the burdens and benefits associated with burning fossil fuels are to be equitably distributed, what other transformational shifts in the underlying structures of oppression are necessary to move towards a more just world? Can we conceptualize a just transition to a low-carbon society without addressing the history of colonialism, capitalism and patriarchy? Would such transformations be independent of one another, or are they inherently connected? And how can we conceptualize a just transition in the historical context of uneven capitalist growth and development across the countries of the Global South and the Global North? Are the reformist goals for distributional justice and the radical goals for transformational change mutually exclusive or can they be pursued in tandem?

These are some of the overarching questions we would be asking in this program, while utilizing insights from the theoretical traditions of political economy, environmental justice, feminist theory, and postcolonial theory. Case studies of communities at the forefront of thinking about mitigation and transformation strategies will help us to parse out the complexities involved in a just and equitable transition. This program will introduce students to academic, policy, and activist communities that engage with climate justice. We will take a multidisciplinary, social science approach drawing from various areas of scholarship, including feminist political economy, environmental justice, global environmental politics, critical development studies, and political ecology, to unpack the complex and multifaceted discourse of climate justice. The environmental justice movement and political economy will provide the theoretical and conceptual basis of our explorations as we examine the synergies and contradictions undergirding the different approaches to climate justice. Students will gain a better understanding of inequities in the context of climate change, why they exist, and ways to address them.

Students will engage with the material through seminars, lectures, guest speakers, films, workshops, field trips, and written assignments.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

international development, non-profit organizations, teaching, state government, and environmental law.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$200 for an overnight field trip.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 10:00 am
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-04-24This program is offered to sophomores through seniors (formerly juniors through seniors).
2018-04-24Fee added ($200).
2018-04-24Savvina Chowdhury joins the teaching team; description has been updated.

Combinatory Play: Creative Writing, Mathematics, and Improv

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
1216
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Brian Walters
mathematics, computer science, improvisational theater
Hendricks-Steven
book arts, literature, creative writing

Combinatory play seems to be the essential feature in productive thought. — Albert Einstein

Literature is a combinatorial game that pursues the possibilities implicit in its own material...  — Italo Calvino

Creativity is not mysterious. While aesthetic traditions, genres, disciplinary assumptions, and even our personal idiosyncrasies often seem to conspire to limit the imagination, the spirit of play is always accessible to us. Perhaps surprisingly, it can take a little mathematics to remind us of it.

Borrowing from the mathematical study of combinations and permutations, the phrase "combinatory play" for us—as for Einstein and Calvino—suggests an approach to creativity in which chosen rules create the conditions under which the mind might escape received ideas and limitations. This strategy works for creative writers building plots and word-smithing, for improvisers developing the instincts necessary for spontaneous storytelling, and for mathematicians struggling at the abstract edges of reasoning. In literary works, such rules range from the strict formal conventions of sonnets to the central axiom of Perec's La Disparition, an entire novel written without using the letter e. Improv performers use audience suggestions, rules of conduct, and predetermined formats to pursue spontaneous invention and narrative discovery. Mathematical thinkers are most invested in the power of rules; formal conventions and a deep commitment to the search for truth lead to rigorous exploration and creative leaps of imagination. In each of these practices, combinatory play becomes a key strategy that drives the work forward. This program will study such strategies, both within and shared between different disciplines, allowing us to better understand the nature of creativity and develop new methods of problem solving, critical thinking, and creative expression.

The regular work of this program will include book seminars, critical writing projects, and weekly workshops in creative writing, mathematics, and improvisational performance. We'll have two overnight retreats to provide time for extended creative collaborations and community building. Credits awarded will reflect student learning and achievement in literary studies, creative and argumentative writing, critical reading, liberal arts mathematics, and improvisational performance.

Note: There is no math prerequisite for this program. It is well-suited for students who are uncertain of their mathematical skills, or who have had negative experiences with mathematics in the past and are ready for a different kind of mathematics experience. Students taking the program for 12 credits will negotiate with faculty an appropriate reduction in workload, but will still participate in learning activities in all content areas.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

creative writing, theater, literature, and mathematics.

1216

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Note that there is no math prerequisite for this program. This program is well suited for students who are uncertain of their mathematical skills, or who have had negative experiences with mathematics in the past and are ready for a different kind of mathematics experience.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$125 in winter and spring for overnight field trips.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 C3105 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Common Ground: Politics, Faith, and Community

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

anthropology, education
Andrew Reece
classical art and literature

What do we mean by “community”? We speak of the LGBTQ community, communities of color, communities of faith, community service, even a community of nations – but what do they have in common? What brings people together, makes them open themselves to one another, causes them to make sacrifices for their common wellbeing? How do they agree upon, and express, the terms of the ties that bind them?

We explore these questions from the ground up, from the roots. Our study will be infused with the insights of anthropology and comparative studies of culture, as well as literary and other creative expressions (by, for example, Zora Neale Hurston and Louise Erdrich) about communities, and individuals in community, both in harmony and discord. Our inquiry brings together classic political theories from Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, and Locke; more modern social thinkers such as Simone Weil, Hannah Arendt, Clifford Geertz, and Robert Bella; religious authors including St. Benedict, the Dalai Lama, and Paul Tillich; constitutions from several nation-states; rules from monastic communities; and utopian visions. We will try to determine how an understanding of human nature, ideals of a good life, and values shapes the forms into which communities evolve (and from which they devolve). These forms are often constituted by laws, moral codes, customs, traditions, faiths, and rituals, and we will consider all of these.

In fall, we lay a groundwork of social and political ideas. We then study a range of examples of communities in our readings. We also lay a groundwork for developing skills in reading complex texts, composing interpretations in essay form, and critical thinking.  Students will begin an out-of-the-classroom exploration of contemporary communities, which they will develop into a substantial research project in winter. This project will apply the theories and models that we have learned to the understanding of the communities observed. In winter we will also deepen our knowledge of intentional communities such as religious orders, communes, and nascent states. Reading, writing, discussion, ethnographic study, and collaboration will be central to our work, with collaboration being at centermost. We read together, write together, and talk together, believing that a community of learners is always wiser than any one of its members. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

humanities, social sciences, and teaching

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 C1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-12-14Now open to all level

Communicating Science in the Disinformation Era

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Within the public sphere, in many ways and from many corners, the truth is under attack. The concept of expertise is reviled and opinions are often presented as being more important than facts. Unfortunately, these attacks come from both the political right and the political left. Regardless of their origin or their intent, they are doing serious damage to our social fabric and our ability to understand the world in which we live.

While science is but one way of accumulating knowledge, and while there are limits to the kinds of questions the scientific method is able to address, it is demonstrably the best way to learn about certain facets of the natural world. When scientific knowledge is ignored because it yields politically uncomfortable lessons and is replaced by “alternative facts,” or when science is attacked by post-modernists who declare that it is merely a social construct without any inherent value, the advances of the Enlightenment are being dismissed.

Within this context, this program has two broad goals.  First, the nature and methodology of science will be examined. Second, meaningful ways to present scientific ideas to the public, in both written and oral form will be explored. Case studies dealing with controversial topics, e.g., climate change, the evolution/creation debate; “treatment” of intersex individuals; and the nature of racism, will be discussed throughout the quarter. Students will learn the basics of science journalism and be expected to write regularly for a general audience. Class sessions will include seminar, writing workshops, oral presentations and lectures.

Readings will be drawn from writings of popular science writers such as Stephen Jay Gould, Michael Shermer, Alice Dreger, Richard Feynman and Steven Pinker.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 D3107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-10-30Program changed to All Level

Computer Science Foundations

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

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Taught by

Richard Weiss
mathematics, computer science

In this program students will learn the intellectual concepts and skills essential for advanced work in computer science and beneficial for computing work in support of other disciplines. This program is introductory, yet rigorous. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deep understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving, and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program will cover material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics, and programming, in the context of the liberal arts. The program is compatible with the model curriculum developed by the Association for Computing Machinery's Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium. The program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The Computational Organization theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to the computer architecture and assembly language supporting high-level languages and operating systems. The Programming theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The Mathematical theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions, and problem-solving skills needed for computer scientists. A Technology and Society theme explores social, historical, or philosophical topics related to science and technology. We will explore these themes throughout the year through lectures, programming labs, workshops, and seminars. (Richard Weiss will teach winter only, Wan Bae and Sara Rose will teach winter & spring)

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science, STEM education, information technology, data science, and computer security.

16Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

Options for 4 credits (Discrete Mathematics) and 12 credits (must include seminar) available with faculty permission. Contact the faculty for more information.

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

High school Algebra II

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 D1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-08-14description updated to reflect faculty teaching per quarter

Computer Science Internships

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 3
81216
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Richard Weiss
mathematics, computer science

This program is the home for Evergreen computer science internships. Computer science internships provide advanced students with opportunities to gain deep knowledge of specific concepts and skills in the context of a tightly knit cohort who collaborate on developing academic and creative research agendas that parallel and are informed by their work as interns. Internships involve about 20 hours per week for 8 credits per quarter and are available in Physical Computing, Instructional Technology/Universal design, and Technology Support. Interns gain and strengthen instructional, technical, research, organizational, leadership, communication, and collaborative skills as they work with the supervising staff associated with each of these areas to support instruction,maintenance, and administration of facilities.

This program includes 4-8 credits of additional academic inquiry per quarter. Students meet weekly as a group with staff or faculty to share knowledge and skills. The program requires a yearlong commitment from fall through spring quarters.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science and informational technology.

81216

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students must have previous experience with computer science or related field. Specific prerequisites will vary based upon specific internship and academic component.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

Between four and eight upper division science credits in computer science and related disciplines may be earned.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 3
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Located in: Olympia

Cons, Swindlers, and Cheats

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Despite access to all sorts of information, people continue to be conned, swindled, and cheated out of their hard-earned money. Is it true anyone can be conned? How can we protect ourselves and our communities against cons who by their very nature make situations seem reasonable and socially compelling?

This program provides an overview of various schemes and trickery that fraudsters employ in the financial world and elsewhere. From the original Charles Ponzi and his schemes in the early 1900s to the current-day massive affinity fraud perpetrated by Bernie Madoff, we will look at the schemers and their victims. If an investment sounds too good to be true, it probably is. But the success of real-life swindlers shows how often this simple advice is ignored. We will explore what makes investors and others reach for the fool’s gold of seemingly foolproof and lucrative investment opportunities. We will also look at the psychology of fraudsters and try to determine what makes them operate outside the normal laws of society.

The program is designed for students with a strong interest in finance and investments or those interested in what drives the most basic of human instincts, greed. Spotting a con requires us to think critically about situations and to find a balance between trusting and self-preservation. By the end of the program, you should be able to think creatively about ways to protect yourself and society from fraudsters.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

business and finance.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 D3109 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Consciousness, Dreams, and Everyday Life: Self, Other, World

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Cynthia Kennedy
leadership
physics, plant physiology

Did you ever wonder how you might better develop a sense of who you are, what you can do, and where you are going in your life? Did you ever long to couple this sense of knowing yourself with the ability to influence your communication, your emotions, and your behavior? Imagine what it might be like if you better understood how to influence yourself to lead the life you are planning to lead? This interdisciplinary program is designed to help you better understand what makes you you by exploring consciousness, dreams, and the power they have on your everyday life. It is for students who seek to explore and refine their core values and beliefs in a context in which they can act upon them with increasing awareness and integrity.

This two-quarter program will have a two-pronged approach. On the first prong, we will use a theoretical and research-oriented perspective. On the second, a strong experiential component will include keeping structured journals of first-person experiences, dreams, and beliefs, as well as engaging in weekly mind-body connection activities such as movement labs. Our work will help students learn to develop their capacity for clarity of communication, for taking action, articulating feelings, and creating meaning. Fall quarter will focus primarily on understanding ourselves as individuals; winter quarter we will connect this self-awareness to others and the larger world, including the natural world.

Students should expect to work about 48 hours each week (including class time) and to keep a detailed portfolio of their learning. Student work will sometimes be written papers, sometimes journal entries, and other times collaborative group work. Each week will include a movement lab where students will explore mind-body connection through dance, yoga or other modalities. A two-day weekend retreat will be required during winter quarter. With faculty guidance, students will be able to conduct research, relate it to program content, and give presentations of their findings. Students will also be given opportunities to design projects that explore topics central to the program’s themes, but also connected to their own personal motivations around creative, positive, and effective responses to the world in its current chaotic state. For humanity to take a step forward, we need fresh ideas and solutions on many levels: personal, political, and relational. It is a good time to be excited about what lies ahead for us and each of us will play a different role in the future.

Anticipated credit equivalencies for the program include leadership, mindful movement, psychology of dreams, multicultural studies, and independent research.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

leadership, consciousness studies, psychology, and cultural studies.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$15 in fall for art supplies.

$10 in winter for entrance fee. An additional $15 for art supplies only if you are joining the program in winter

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 10:30 am
COM 323 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-11-09winter fees updated

Core Ballet (A)

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 6:00 pm
CRC 116- Movement

Advertised schedule:

Tuesday 6:00-7:50pm

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet (A)

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 6:00 pm
CRC 116- Movement

Advertised schedule:

Tuesday 6:00-8:00p

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet (B)

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Dance, Movement Therapy, Physical Education

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, September 29, 2018 - 10:30 am
CRC 116- Movement

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays 10:30am-12:20pm

Located in: Olympia

Core Ballet (B)

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Catherine (Jehrin) Alexandria
dance, ballet, movement therapy

In this course, students will learn fundamentals of ballet and gain greater physical flexibility and coordination. In addition, we will practice developmental movement therapy, Beamish BodyMind Balancing Floorbarre and visualization exercises.  We will use them to achieve heightened awareness of self through movement both in and outside class.  Students of all dance levels are welcome. Students will need ballet slippers.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Dance, Movement Therapy, Physical Education

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$31 for exercise tool

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 22
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 6:00 pm
CRC 116- Movement

Advertised schedule:

Wednesdays 6-8pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-05-24Schedule changed to Wednesday evenings (was Saturdays)

Cornerstone: Foundations for Success

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Junior
Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Wang-Wenhong
sociology and social statistics

Why are you going to college? What is the value of a liberal arts education? How do you make the best of your time at Evergreen? This 4-credit class is designed to help beginning and returning students make sense of their education, to develop skills and confidence to succeed in their college education as well as charting a course toward career goals and lifelong learning. Students will identify areas of academic interest, personal learning styles and align those with the unique Evergreen pedagogy. Class work will focus on strengthening students' reading, writing, speaking, quantitative reasoning and critical thinking skills in relation to Evergreen's Five Foci (Interdisciplinary Study, Collaborative Learning, Learning Across Significant Differences, Personal Engagement, and Linking Theory with Practical Applications). To bring everything together, students are going to research and write on a topic that is important to their education.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Junior
Class Standing: Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B3109 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Thursdays 6-9:50pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-05-17New Schedule: Course now meets on Thursdays (was Tuesdays)
2018-03-02New Schedule: Class meets on Tuesdays (was Thursdays)

Cornerstone: Foundations for Success

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Junior
Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Stephen Beck
philosophy

For beginning and returning students, this 4-credit class is designed to strengthen students' reading, writing, and critical thinking skills in relation to Evergreen's Five Foci (Interdisciplinary Study, Collaborative Learning, Learning Across Significant Differences, Personal Engagement, and Linking Theory with Practical Applications). Students will read, write about, discuss in seminar, and do workshops focused on a common theme. This quarter, the theme will be the role of a liberal arts education in our contemporary society. Students will also do research and writing on a topic of particular importance to them in their own college education. Through doing this work, students will sharpen the abilities needed to shape a strong Liberal Arts education at Evergreen. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Junior
Class Standing: Freshman–Junior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10pm

Located in: Olympia

Critical Indigenous Studies I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8% Reserved for Freshmen
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course is designed to explore the foundations of interdisciplinary study, critical thinking, close reading, research & methodologies, and the intersection of Euro-centric and Indigenous pedagogy (teaching method/practice), paradigm (worldview), and praxis (theory + action). Students will expand their academic writing through process and craft, as well as integrate research into their work.  Through the indigenous lens and framework of balancing academics through the medicine wheel: mind, body, heart, and spirit, students will examine their individual worldview to critically analyze text, film, art, and music. Course content will be indigenous and western to illustrate and foster cross-cultural learning. Students can expect to participate in a service-learning component to engage and implement community building, weekly writing reflections, practicing elements of research and academic writing, and exercise the tools of effective communication.

The course is an inclusive learning environment and open to all levels of students. This is a course for students interested in indigenous studies from a holistic educational foundation.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Critical Indigenous Studies I and/or Critical Indigenous Studies II (winter 2019) must be completed to register for Critical Indigenous Studies III (spring 2019). 

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8% Reserved for Freshmen
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 5:30 pm
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

Critical Indigenous Studies II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Critical Indigenous Studies II is a foundation course exploring through an indigenous lens research methodologies and methods, both western and indigenous, that a student needs to successfully complete research projects. CIS II applies the Medicine Wheel model for a holistic approach to academia, focusing on research skills, learned and practiced. Critical analysis through all stakeholder perspectives, seminars around topics of research, ethics, and storytelling (oral and written), and a community service learning project are components of this course. This is an inclusive course, designed for all students interested in learning about the epistemology of critical indigenous studies within the context of western education.

Native Pathways students register using CRN 20325. All other students register using CRN 20324. 

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Critical Indigenous Studies I (fall 2018) and/or Critical Indigenous Studies II (winter 2019) must be completed to register for Critical Indigenous Studies III (spring 2019). 

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

Critical Indigenous Studies III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Critical Indigenous Studies III is a course designed to explore the pedagogy and praxis of storied methodologies, and through the Indigenous lens, students will evaluate Indigenous and western epistemologies to mobilize the medicine wheel framework and operationalize Indigenous and cross cultural knowledge to build academic infrastructure and challenge discourses through which Indigenous peoples have been framed and known.

Native Pathways students register using CRN 30244. All other students register using CRN 30243. 

4

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Critical Indigenous Studies I (fall 2018) and/or Critical Indigenous Studies II (winter 2019) must be completed to register for Critical Indigenous Studies III (spring 2019). 

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-03-19Signature requirement removed, but students still need to meet prerequisites

Critical Reasoning

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Stephen Beck
philosophy

In this intensive writing course, students will learn how to critically evaluate persuasive writing as well as how to write well-reasoned, persuasive writing of their own. Students will study informal reasoning and develop their own abilities to give good reasons in writing for their own views. Students will develop their reasoning and writing skills through sustained engagement with a particular theme. This quarter's theme will be the evaluation of online sources of information. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B2109 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-9:50pm

Located in: Olympia

Cuban Salsa (A)

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Salsa is a social dance form with inspired moves and fun, infection music. With origins in Cuba, Salsa is now danced around the world. In this course students will learn the rhythm, basic footwork, hip, and shoulder movements of Cuban Salsa. We will form “Una Rueda”, or circle, and dance in pairs with a caller calling moves and the rapid swapping of partners. Rueda is a fun and dynamic dance with fitness benefits like: cardiovascular endurance, improved balance and body awareness as well as memory and coordination. Cuban salsa is unique because of its extensive use of other popular and folkloric Afro-Cuban dance forms. Students will gain a deep appreciation and understanding of Cuban culture in this class. Come prepared to dance!

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, January 9, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Com 209 - Dance Studio

Advertised schedule:

Wednesdays 6-8pm

Located in: Olympia

Cuban Salsa (B)

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Salsa is a social dance form with inspired moves and fun, infection music. With origins in Cuba, Salsa is now danced around the world. In this course students will learn the rhythm, basic footwork, hip, and shoulder movements of Cuban Salsa. We will form “Una Rueda”, or circle, and dance in pairs with a caller calling moves and the rapid swapping of partners. Rueda is a fun and dynamic dance with fitness benefits like: cardiovascular endurance, improved balance and body awareness as well as memory and coordination. Cuban salsa is unique because of its extensive use of other popular and folkloric Afro-Cuban dance forms. Students will gain a deep appreciation and understanding of Cuban culture in this class. Come prepared to dance!

2

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Thursday, January 10, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Com 209 - Dance Studio

Advertised schedule:

Thursdays 6-8pm

Located in: Olympia

Cultivating Voice: A Writing Tutor's Craft

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

2018-Yannone,-Sandra-1-S
writing theory and practice, poetry, women's/LGBT studies

This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors at Evergreen's Writing Center on the Olympia campus. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor, develop effective tutoring practices, and address working with writers across significant differences. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. This year the Writing Center is expanding our services to support and cultivate the strengths of Spanish-speaking writers. Therefore, we additionally welcome applicants who are bilingual in English and Spanish. 

Equivalencies:

2 - Writing or Education

Books:

ESL Writers: A Guide for Writing Center Tutors , Ben Rafoth and Shanti Bruce. Boynton/Cook. ISBN: 978-0867095944

Selected Articles from J-Stor and online sources, to be determined

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 4:00 pm
LIB 22302D - Lib 2302D

Located in: Olympia

Culture, Self, and Healing

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
1216
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Toska Olson
sociology, gender studies
Stein square
cultural anthropology

NOTE: Students who have taken In Sickness and In Health in fall quarter are welcome to register for the second quarter of this program in Spring 2019

In this introductory program, students will explore cultural, social, and psychological approaches to the body and health. We will also cultivate foundational skills that are relevant across all careers and fields of study—observation, note-taking, analysis, researching, speaking, and writing—but that may be particularly helpful in social and human services, health care, and education.

Using the lens of medical anthropology, we will consider diverse practices around sickness and healing and develop an understanding of Western biomedicine as a complex cultural system. Using literature and film, we will explore how people across the globe understand sickness and engage in healing practices. Students will learn qualitative ethnographic techniques for documenting and analyzing cultural and social contexts. An exploration of happiness and well-being will lead us to readings and exercises in areas of the social sciences such as positive psychology, sociology, neuroscience, somatic studies, and contemplative practices.

Spring quarter will emphasize applied approaches to sickness and healing. We will explore models of community-based scholarship and practice in the U.S. and in the context of global health initiatives. Students will be able to take in-program internships with local community partners and develop research proposals for future programs.

Part of our curriculum will entail a shared lecture series and seminar readings (4 credits) with another introductory program: Unruly Bodies . This means that students will be part of a larger learning community with four faculty teachers during part of each week, examining interdisciplinary approaches to the body, health, power, and knowledge.

In addition, each quarter, students enrolled in the program for 16 credits will have the opportunity to choose from one of the following workshops (4 credits) offered by faculty of both programs:

  • Happiness:  What qualities are associated with strong and happy individuals, relationships, and communities, and how can we learn to build them? This workshop provides an in-depth, applied exploration of research on happiness and well-being. We will participate in text-based seminar discussions and in experiential workshops that aim to integrate mind, body, and spirit as we cultivate the positive qualities that scientists and practitioners have identified are useful for happiness, resilience, equanimity, and enduring well-being. This one-quarter workshop repeats both winter and spring quarters.
  • Human Biology: Anatomy and Physiology: What are human bodies made of? How do they work? Students will learn about the physiologic functioning and anatomic structures of the human body and have the option to observe and carry out dissections including the (non-human) heart, lungs, kidneys, brain and eye.  Lectures and laboratory sessions will explore cell and tissue structure and function, and will investigate body systems such as muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, immune, urinary, reproductive, and digestive systems, through examination of normal and abnormal (disease) states. This two-quarter workshop spans winter and spring quarters. Students entering in spring quarter will require previous course work in human biology.
  • Illness Narratives:  How do people generate stories about their experiences with illness and persistence? We will read scholarship about exchanges between healers and patients, and between storytellers and listeners. Students will engage in the listening process by recording illness narratives and presenting them at the end of the quarter in the form of audio podcasts. This workshop is available winter quarter only.
  • Cyborg Bodies: The cybernetic organism, or cyborg, has figured the contested boundary between humans and machines in theory and science fiction. Through viewing, reading, and analysis, we will meet famous cyborgs from film and television and explore what they can tell us about our conceptions of the organic body. We’ll think about cyborgs in relation to the materiality of media, and its evolution through the 20th and 21st centuries. This one-quarter workshop repeats both winter and spring quarters.
  • Community Based Learning and Action (Spring Only) : What kinds of practical engagements can address sickness and healing in our own communities? For this workshop, students will complete three credits of internship or volunteer work (8-10 hours/week), either individually or in small groups, with local or regional community organizations. Faculty will help students connect with various opportunities during the first two weeks of Spring quarter; these may include agriculture, food, and nutrition; youth mentoring; tutoring; or other possibilities broadly related to health and social well-being. In addition, students will attend a two-hour, one-credit seminar on half of the Wednesday mornings in spring quarter that considers theories and processes of community collaboration, and discusses ongoing experiences with the community based work.

Students taking the program for 12 credits will not take one of these workshops.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Social and Human Sciences, Health Care, Education

1216

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students who completed "In Sickness and In Health" in fall quarter 2018 may enroll in the second part of "In Sickness and In Health" in spring quarter 2019.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$40 per quarter for entrance fees and supplies.

Internship Opportunities:

Students who demonstrate readiness may be able to complete part-time Spring Quarter internships with faculty approval.

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:30 am
SEM 2 B1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-02-27description updated

Current Economic Issues and Social Movements

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
816
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Peter Bohmer
economics, political economy
Elizabeth Williamson
English literature, theater studies

We are living in an era of continual crisis, as the cracks in the global economic system become more and more visible. Our program focuses on analyzing these problems and developing skills to assess their impact, while highlighting different social movements that have mobilized popular resistance. We will examine proposed and actual economic and social policies and alternatives to capitalism. Given how quickly events on the ground are changing, the social movements covered will be determined by those events. The syllabus will include intersections between the U.S. and the global economy. We will also tackle climate justice, racial justice, gender justice, labor, immigration and refugee rights, and economic inequality.

We will attempt to address both the underlying causes of global economic crises and the principles that allow social movements to grow and flourish. Students will be introduced to competing theoretical frameworks and perspectives for explaining the causes of economic and social problems and their potential solutions (frameworks such as neoclassical economics, liberalism, Marxism, feminism, socialism, and anarchism). Our reading list will combine data-driven descriptions and theoretical analyses with first-person accounts. These readings will be supplemented by film screenings, guest presentations, faculty lectures, and student presentations in which participants will be encouraged to analyze particular case studies in greater detail, focusing on solutions proposed by policy makers, scholars, and grass-roots organizations. Class discussions will often be student-led and will be structured, in part, around a comparison of reform efforts and revolutionary movements. Students will also be encouraged to attend lectures and other events on campus and in the broader community. Regular writing and final project assignments will encourage students to think synthetically about issues covered, as well as possible solutions. All students will participate in film screenings, lectures, and seminars on core program themes. Students enrolled in the 16-credit section will have the opportunity to deepen their study of economics and to pursue independent research. 

This is our premise: The global economic system is designed to generate poverty, inequality, and injustice; but there are also opportunities for solidarity, resistance, and societal transformation. We welcome students of divergent political viewpoints, but will also be transparent about our own. All students should be expected to engage thoughtfully and generously in challenging conversations about structural oppression.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

community-based organizations, advocacy, public policy, education, alternative justice systems, graduate school in social science, history, geography, and political economy.

816

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 E1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

Dangerous Readings

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Stacey Davis
European history

What does it mean to read? How does reading shape one’s identity, and how does identity shape how one reads, and what one finds in those books? In this program, we will examine the intertwined developments of poetry and history, and the implications of those histories for a theory of reading. What is the function of the poem, how is it heard or read, and how do metaphors and syntax shape the way a people or person might think and feel? What is the traditional role of the historian, and how do historians produce texts that authorize their own truth? How do historical and poetical works—and the various epistemological claims made in their name—interact in the contemporary moment? What is the role of translation in the dissemination of literary texts and shaping of the historical imagination?

In the past, reading was deadly serious business. In this program, we’ll explore the relationship between illuminated manuscripts, medieval devotion, and power; how the advent of printed reading rocked Europe and sparked 100 years of war in the 16th century; links between political cartoons, scandalous pamphlets, and the terror of the French Revolution; the ways in which readers in the Romantic age fashioned a notion of themselves and their visions of a good life through their readings; and how the advent of post-structuralism in the 20th century has exploded the way we think of reading today.

From Homer and Thucydides forward, there has been a competition between poetry and history over the right way to read and remember. Readings will include Thucydides' The Peloponnesian Wars, Homer's The Iliad , Sappho's Poems , Plato's Republic, and St. Augustine's Confessions. We will also consider sections of Dante's Divine Comedy, Montaigne's Essays, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Reveries of a Solitary Walker, as well as, crucially, Marcel Proust's Swann's Way. We’ll delve into the cultural history of reading through texts such as Robert Darnton's The Great Cat Massacre and Dena Goodman's Marie Antoinette: Writings on the Body of a Queen. Contemporary writers and texts to be considered in light of the double imperatives of history and poetry include Marguerite Duras' The War , Alice Notley's The Descent of Alette , and Roberto Calasso's The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony.

Student activities will focus on reading, writing, and seminar participation.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

writing, history, and publishing.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 C1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-06-07This program is now open to students of all class levels.
2018-02-28This program now is for first-year students (freshmen) only.

Data and Information: Computational Linguistics

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Hastings-Rachel
linguistics, mathematics
Richard Weiss
mathematics, computer science

Although the human capacity for language is sometimes described as a computational system in the brain, it is surprisingly challenging to program actual computers to interpret, respond to, or generate written text or spoken language. We will explore intersections between linguistics and computer science with the general goal of understanding how we can use computers to analyze text, including for example, social media content. Although the task is complex and brushes against fundamental questions about language and intelligence, we will find that an understanding of the abstract structure and organization of human language provides guidance to the person who creates algorithms to mine texts for structure and meaning, and even to the human analyst who uses those tools.

This program covers introductory linguistic theory and computer science with the goals of gaining skills in linguistic analysis and computer programming, and explores the interaction between the two areas. In linguistics, this will include looking at the structure of words, sentences, and texts (morphology, phonology, syntax, and discourse) as well as their meanings (semantics and pragmatics). In computer science, students will learn to program in Python and study how computers are used to understand texts and data. In conjunction with studies in linguistics and computer science, we will read about the history and philosophy of both fields as well as current work in their intersection, and we will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between computers and human intelligence.

The work in this program will include weekly assignments in linguistics and in programming, seminar reading and writing, lectures, workshops, computer labs, and a final group project. This program is good preparation for the Computer Science Foundations program and further work in computer science and linguistics.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

computer science, linguistics, and data science.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 75
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 A1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-03-28Wan Bae has joined the program; Brian Walter has left the teaching team.

Democracy and Free Speech

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

May protesters burn flags to express their opposition to government policy? May racists burn crosses, or march the streets with swastikas, to express their supremacist views? May the government ban what it deems obscene art, and who decides where the line is drawn? The First Amendment of the United States Constitution, viewed by many to be the heart of American democracy, remains most vulnerable to erosion when we fail to protect expression that some or even most Americans find unpopular, offensive, repugnant, indecent, subversive, unpatriotic, heretical, or blasphemous.

In light of this ongoing tension, this program will examine the history, the present, and the possible futures of the right to free expression in the U.S. We will ground our program in the study of the major U.S. Supreme Court free speech cases of the last 100 years, learning how to critically read and interpret those decisions, and how to do basic legal research to better understand these cases and their implications. From that foundation, we will further examine the social, cultural, political and economic context of the Court’s decisions, through non-fiction books and articles, journalistic pieces, literature, film and video, and in-class speakers. We also plan to spend time in the community to observe and reflect on the manner that free speech plays out on the ground.

While we will consider the full sweep of First Amendment jurisprudence, we will necessarily focus more deeply on particular controversies, including government suppression of radical political ideas, majoritarian attempts to censor what is perceived as obscene, the evolution of “corporate free speech”, and the impact of new technologies such as the Internet. Throughout the program, we will consider the impact of free speech jurisprudence on the broader democratic enterprise in the U.S.

Students will write very frequently, including weekly short essays, legal writing, opinion pieces, creative writing assignments, and a longer in-depth self-directed research paper. Students will be expected to actively participate in class, and will have assignments focused on developing strong oral advocacy and argument skills. Students will be expected to collaborate with each other throughout the program, and also will be responsible for a significant amount of peer review and feedback to others.

Note: this program is offered again in winter quarter. Students who take this program in fall should not take it again in winter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

social sciences, law, education, journalism, public policy, political theory, American history and political science.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 A2107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Designing for Social Good: Two-Dimensional Design and Board Games

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 31
12
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

academic and creative nonfiction writing, community studies, analog game design
printmaking, drawing

Design and  design thinking  center on the transformation of ideas into purposeful objects and actions. Our focus in this two-quarter program, while we learn design processes and approaches, will be on making our ideas about the social good tangible. We will learn two-dimensional design skills, and also design and play analog card and board games, with the intent of stimulating and articulating our own thinking. At the same time, we will explore ways to inspire ideas and actions in those who engage with our work.

Games and two-dimensional images act as ‘texts.’ These texts describe and enact real-world dynamics, model structures and systems, and reveal visible and invisible cultural values. Students will learn skills in visual and experience design, visual literacy, research skills for image- and game-makers, planning processes for artistic projects, and strategies for using visual information and rule-bound actions to convey meaning. Learning activities will include weekly reading and writing assignments, seminars, and studio assignments addressing basic elements of two-dimensional design skills that will be used to design board games. Our focus on games will include studying historical games and fundamental components of game design, as well as uses of games to educate, empathize, and provoke. Students will discover ways that game design and  artistic design can be used to foster critical engagement with issues of equity and social good.

In fall quarter, students will explore intersectionality and the social good, as well as visual literacy and game design. Introductory  two-dimensional design skills, game analysis and design will accompany theoretical work. Winter quarter, students will employ their foundational knowledge and skills to design and prototype games collaboratively. Both quarters will include weekly academic reading and writing assignments, the completion of studio assignments outside of class, and completing game design exercises or tasks.  No prior drawing or artistic experience is necessary. We welcome those who may not identify as artists, gamers, or designers.  Willingness to learn technical and sequential artistic and game design practices is essential. We’ll present introductory skills and welcome upper-division students seeking breadth in their studies. Willingness to listen and learn across significant lived experiences will be an essential aspect of our work toward equity and the social good. Credit equivalencies of the program include: two-dimensional design, introductory game design: theory and practice, and writing.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

education, visual arts, and design.

12

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 31
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 D2105 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-11-15description updated
2018-05-01Title revised (formerly Designing for Social Good: Drawing and Board Games).
2018-04-30This program is offered for 12 credits.
2018-04-16This program is offered to Sophomores-Seniors.
2018-04-16This program is offered for 16 credits only.

Dimensions of Inequality: Social Science and Statistics

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
812Variable
Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

physics, education

Concern over the rise of economic inequality has grown over the last several decades as the gap between upper-income Americans and everyone else has grown wider. Recent elections have illustrated dramatically how perceptions of unfairness can fuel American politics. This program seeks to look at the underlying trends in inequality that have fed these concerns and perceptions. Our approach is interdisciplinary, combining the lenses of economics, sociology, and political science with a strong focus on quantitative data and statistical analyses. We will see that constructing a narrative based on data is not easy and contains many complexities that resist easy solutions.

In winter quarter we will review recent work on economic inequality by leading economists while also exploring sociological research on other dimensions of inequality such as race, gender, immigration status, geography, education, culture, and family that interact with the economic dimensions and with each other. We will begin to think about how the trend of increasing inequality can be reversed. Students will practice statistical reasoning and learn to use spreadsheet software to collect and display data. Students registering for 12 credits will meet with faculty to decide on details for additional work which may include extra readings and study in a structured setting, research projects, or other project-based work

In spring quarter our focus will move toward policy proposals and the political process. We will explore specific options for reducing inequalities such as changes to taxes and budgets and laws prohibiting discrimination, as well as lawsuits and activist campaigns aimed at changing values. In addition to the main readings and discussion, students will have options for various levels of project work focused on research in the areas of their choice (economics, political science, sociology, and statistics). Students will develop proposals for this work during winter quarter, and different levels of credit are available in spring to accommodate projects of different intensity.

Students who successfully complete the full two-quarter program will complete studies and earn credits equivalent to a standard 4-credit, first-quarter statistics course. With these skills in hand, students can then begin to evaluate policy proposals that attempt to mitigate inequality from both an analytic and a political perspective. Credits equivalencies will be evenly split among economics, political science, sociology, and statistics; plus additional project credits in spring quarter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

social work, government, and public policy.

812Variable

Credits per quarter
Variable Credit Options Available

Variable Credit Options:

In spring, students may register for 8-14 credits based on their project proposal. The standard program is 8 credits, and the project will be developed as an in-program learning contract for additional credit.

No signature is required to register for 8 credits. Students registering for more than 8 credits must meet with faculty to discuss credit options and get a faculty signature after co-developing a project proposal prior to the beginning of the quarter.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Research Opportunities:

Spring quarter will provide options for advanced social science research and intermediate statistics projects.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B3107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-10pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-12-1712-credit option added for Winter
2018-05-30Schedule changed: Class now meets Mon/Wed (was Wed/Sat)

Diversity, Democracy, and Fake News: Making Our Way in the Time of Trump

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

education
Laurie Meeker
film and video production, media theory

We all know that the media in all its forms provides us with information that shapes our ideas, attitudes, beliefs, and influences our actions. How do we become more critically conscious about our information sources? How do we diversify those sources and become better aware of a wider range of issues and ideas? What is “fake news” and why is “real news” important to the prospect of a functional democracy?

In this full-time program centered on media studies, journalism, and political economy, we will look at the way mainstream, corporate media is targeted as “fake news.” We will evaluate a variety of media platforms from the right to the left to see how they function along a spectrum from propaganda to reasonable, fact-based, accurate reporting. Students will briefly examine the history of propaganda in order to understand the way it functions in the current political climate. We will examine the 2016 election as a case study in leveraging misogyny, racism, and xenophobia to divide voters and will explore the role of traditional and social media in attempting to influence elections. We will draw on current examples in the media as we approach the national mid-term elections in November 2018.

As we do so, we will ask ourselves a number of probing questions: How do dominant media forms promote the status quo and cut out a more diverse range of voices? Are there any limits to free speech? How does hate speech operate to promote racism and intolerance in today’s society? Why does the current presidential administration target mainstream media platforms like CNN and The New York Times as purveyors of “fake news?” Meanwhile, how can we identify the real “fake news” on multiple platforms across both the political right and left?

We will look at alternative forms of citizen journalism and documentary production that give voice to multiple communities (i.e., women, labor, African-American, Latinx, Asian-American, Native American, LGBTQ, etc.) Students can expect to read and prepare response papers for seminars, engage in researching a variety of media sources, and write regular reports analyzing media sources and their political perspectives. In addition, students will learn basic media skills (photo, audio, and/or video) to make their own “real” news and forms of expression.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

media, journalism, politics, communications

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 10:00 am
COM 323 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Doing the Business of Nonprofits: Ideas to Realities through Grantwriting and Fundraising

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Don Chalmers
grantwriting

Students in this class will learn a lot about philanthropy in the United States and the role of nonprofits in contributing to healthy, sustainable communities. We’ll look at the historical role of charitable giving before and after contact and the evolving role nonprofits have played and are playing in the U.S.  As a part of this inquiry, we’ll consider what it takes to create a nonprofit and grow and sustain existing organizations.  We’ll also focus on Development Readinesstm     for these organizations and how using this approach helps ensure a sustainable organization that benefits, for example, from an empowered and engaged board and staff as well as contemporary and ongoing strategic planning. The ethics of nonprofit organizations will also be considered as will professional development and volunteer recruitment and management. We’ll learn about grant writing and fundraising for nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations. This portion of the course will also include effectively finding funding sources for organizations and their programs. Each student will be asked to identify and develop an organization and a project over the course of the quarter. The organization and project can be based on an existing nonprofit or one that is created for the purposes of the class. Credit equivalencies will be awarded in Organizational Development, and Grantwriting and Fundraising.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Non-Profit Development and Management; Art and Culture; Science and Scientific Research; Government; Small Business

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Mon 6-9:30pm

Located in: Olympia

Doing the Business of Nonprofits: Ideas to Realities through Grantwriting and Fundraising

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Don Chalmers
grantwriting

Students in this class will learn a lot about philanthropy in the United States and the role of nonprofits in contributing to healthy, sustainable communities. We’ll look at the historical role of charitable giving before and after contact and the evolving role nonprofits have played and are playing in the U.S.  As a part of this inquiry, we’ll consider what it takes to create a nonprofit and grow and sustain existing organizations.  We’ll also focus on Development Readinesstm   for these organizations and how using this approach helps ensure a sustainable organization that benefits, for example, from an empowered and engaged board and staff as well as contemporary and ongoing strategic planning. The ethics of nonprofit organizations will also be considered as will professional development and volunteer recruitment and management. We’ll learn about grant writing and fundraising for nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations. This portion of the course will also include effectively finding funding sources for organizations and their programs. Each student will be asked to identify and develop an organization and a project over the course of the quarter. The organization and project can be based on an existing nonprofit or one that is created for the purposes of the class. Credit equivalencies will be awarded in Organizational Development, and Grantwriting and Fundraising.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Non-Profit Development and Management; Art and Culture; Science and Scientific Research; Government; Small Business

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A2109 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Doing the Business of Nonprofits: Ideas to Realities through Grantwriting and Fundraising

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Don Chalmers
grantwriting

Students in this class will learn a lot about philanthropy in the United States and the role of nonprofits in contributing to healthy, sustainable communities. We’ll look at the historical role of charitable giving before and after contact and the evolving role nonprofits have played and are playing in the U.S.  As a part of this inquiry, we’ll consider what it takes to create a nonprofit and grow and sustain existing organizations.  We’ll also focus on Development Readiness tm   for these organizations and how using this approach helps ensure a sustainable organization that benefits, for example, from an empowered and engaged board and staff as well as contemporary and ongoing strategic planning. The ethics of nonprofit organizations will also be considered as will professional development and volunteer recruitment and management. We’ll learn about grant writing and fundraising for nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations. This portion of the course will also include effectively finding funding sources for organizations and their programs. Each student will be asked to identify and develop an organization and a project over the course of the quarter. The organization and project can be based on an existing nonprofit or one that is created for the purposes of the class. Credit equivalencies will be awarded in Organizational Development, and Grantwriting and Fundraising.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Non-Profit Development and Management; Art and Culture; Science and Scientific Research; Government; Small Business

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 C2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays 6-9:30

Located in: Olympia

Don't Make a Cake -- Redesign the Kitchen! Experiments in Theater and Music

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Arun Chandra
music composition, performance

This program's title comes from an attempt to look at the premises (the foundations) one uses when creating works of art.  What are the "foundations" of an art form? How can we take a new look at those foundations?

Some of our guiding questions: Does music  have  to have a beat?  Does theater  have  to have a plot?  Does music  have  to have tonality?  Does theater  have  to have characters?  What alternatives open up when such "foundations" are examined?  More importantly, can an intended message be delivered in a context in which the techniques of communication are radically altered?

And what should we do about the audience member who cries "But I don't  understand  it! You're an  elitist!  This is..."? --- But let's leave the poor fella alone.

In the program, we'll be reading plays in which the authors have attempted such things (such as Adrienne Kennedy, Caryl Churchill, David Greenspan) and listening to music by  Luigi Nono, Chaya Czernowin, and Helmut Lachenmann. We may attend live performances. Students will be asked to write short papers on the readings and the listenings. Students will also be asked to create three performances over the quarter, in which they attempt to address some aspect of the fundamentals of their medium.  There will be a public performance of student works at the end of the quarter. The emphasis will be on  live  performances of music and theater that  don't  involve electricity --- we're looking at the  roots  of the media!

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Performing ArtsMusicTheater

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$100 for tickets for performances in Seattle and Portland

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 10:00 am
Com 335 - Performance Rehearsal

Located in: Olympia

Drawing: Foundations

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Emily Adams
printmaking

This course is an introduction to principles and techniques in fine art drawing. Emphasis will be on learning to draw what you see through close observation in still life studies. Students will be introduced to a variety techniques that include sighting and measurement, scale and perspective, value and composition. Students will develop a context for their work through readings and research projects about influential artists. Students will keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete regular drawing assignments outside of class. A final portfolio of completed assignments will be reviewed at the end of the quarter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Visual Arts, Illustration, Graphic Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Students will be required to purchase drawing materials from the Greener Bookstore. The estimated cost is $50.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 5:30 pm
Art Annex 2104 - Critique

Advertised schedule:

Mondays 5:30-9:20pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-04-10Schedule updated

Drawing: The Human Form

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course will focus on accurately rendering the human form through close observation of a live model. We will start by translating what we see onto paper and progress to using the figure to communicate content. We will deepen our understanding of what we are drawing by developing an understanding of how basic anatomy affects the shape of the body. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook throughout the quarter and complete drawing assignments outside of studio time each week. Students will also complete a research project about an influential artist. A final portfolio of completed assignments will be due at the end of the quarter. Some college level drawing experience is recommended.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

visual arts

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Students will need to purchase drawing supplies. Estimated cost is $35.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Art Annex 2109 - Drawing Studio

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-8pm

Located in: Olympia

Drawing: The Portrait

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Emily Adams
printmaking

This course is an introduction to principles and techniques for drawing the portrait. Emphasis will be on learning to draw what you see through close observation from life, master artists, and experimental approaches. This class will investigate why drawing is significant and how a portrait can be expressed. Students will be introduced to a variety of drawing materials and techniques as well as proportion, sighting, perspective, value and composition. Students will develop a context for their work through readings and research projects about influential artists. A final portfolio of completed assignments will be reviewed at the end of the quarter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Visual Arts, Illustration, Graphic Design

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses: Students will be required to purchase drawing materials from the Greener Bookstore. The estimated cost is $50.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 9:00 am
Art Annex 2104 - Critique

Advertised schedule:

Saturday 9am-1pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-04-10Schedule updated

EastWest Psychology: Destructive Mind/Emotion

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Jamyang Tsultrim
Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies, East-West psychology, philosophy of consciousness

Are destructive emotions innately embedded in human nature?  Can they be eradicated?  A growing body of Western research has examined these and other questions through the perspectives of Eastern psychology and philosophy which view destructive emotions, perceptions, and behaviors as the primary source of human suffering.  To alleviate this suffering, Eastern psychology has developed a rich and varied methodology for recognizing, reducing, transforming, and preventing these destructive forms of mind and emotion.  After examining the nature and function of the afflictive mind/emotions, students will choose one emotion to study in-depth and develop effective East/West interventions to transform this emotion/state of mind.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, January 12, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 A1105 - Lecture

Advertised schedule:

Sat 9a-4:30p (January 12, 26, February 9, 23, March 9). 

Located in: Olympia

EastWest Psychology: Positive Mind/Emotion

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Jamyang Tsultrim
Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies, East-West psychology, philosophy of consciousness

In what ways do our positive emotions/perceptions enhance our ability to see reality? Are there effective methods for training the mind to cultivate positive thought/emotions? Students will analyze the nature of constructive emotion/thoughts, their influence on our mental stability and brain physiology, and methodologies for influencing and improving mental development and function. Students will explore the correlation between mental training of the mind and physiological changes in the brain. We will also examine the nature of the genuine happiness from Eastern and Western psychological models of mind/emotion as well as from a traditional epistemological model of cognition based on Indo-Tibetan studies.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, September 29, 2018 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 A3109 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Alternating Saturdays from 9am-4:20pm: Sept 29, Oct 13, 27, Nov 10, Dec 1. 

Located in: Olympia

Ecological Agriculture: The Science, Justice, and Policy of Food Systems

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

food justice, social movements, urban agriculture, social inequalities
Rosemeyer-Martha
agricultural ecology, food systems

There are many competing visions for the future of our current food system. On one side is the global, industrial-based system that provides large quantities of inexpensive food with significant environmental and social impacts. A competing vision is a local, community-based system that produces higher quality, more expensive food while seeking to minimize environmental and social impacts. Other visions include ones that challenge systemic injustices in the food system by prioritizing equitable access to land, farmworker justice, and fresh food for historically marginalized communities while working in harmony with the earth. We will explore these visions from a critical perspective of social and ecological sustainability asking: How can a humane, socially just agricultural system that minimizes environmental degradation meet the food needs of the world? In what ways can farmers be stewards of the soil, biodiversity, and landscape? In what ways have poor people and people of color been historically dispossessed and marginalized in the food system?

This program will provide a broad, interdisciplinary study of agriculture that explores these competing visions from a critical perspective of social and ecological sustainability, grounded in a food justice framework. We will develop systems thinking and skills associated with community work, expository writing, and laboratory and library research. Lectures will focus on ecological principles applied to agroecosystems, soil science and fertility management, crop and livestock management, inequitable food access for low-income communities, as well as local to global food systems and political economy, and agricultural history. Labs will provide a hands-on introduction to soil ecology and fertility, with weekly seminars to support our inquiries. Multi-day field trips will allow students to visit farms working toward sustainability, meet key players in food system change, and attend meetings such as the Eco-Farm conference in California.

Fall: The agroecology portion will emphasize energy flow and biodiversity as applied to agricultural systems. A social science approach will focus on the role that ideas and institutions have played in shaping U.S. agriculture as well as the intersections of environmental and food justice issues by examining topics like food waste and environmental racism.

Winter: The agroecology focus will be soil science, soil ecology, and nutrient cycling. We will work with civic engagement as a way to move us toward our vision. A policy workshop focusing both on local and national policy such as the 2019 Farm Bill is planned. We will delve further into pertinent topics in the area of food justice such as farmworker struggles, historical dispossession of farmers of color, urban agriculture, and global issues in food sovereignty. Emphasis will be on lab exercises, critical analysis, library research, and expository writing.

Spring: We will study agroecology, traditional agriculture, and permaculture in a tropical context. The policy portion will study international agriculture and trade policy. We will pursue in-depth studies on food sovereignty movements at the grassroots level that are transforming the food system in a more just and equitable manner. Students will also have the opportunity to intern with organizations in the community working.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

farm, nursery and garden management; agriculture, food system and environmental consulting firms; state and county agricultural and natural resource agencies; farming internships abroad, Peace Corps service and agricultural and food justice non-profit organizations. This program can help students prepare for Practice of Organic Farming beginning in spring quarter.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

High school general biology and chemistry course.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

$200 in winter for food expenses during conference.

Fees:

$370 in fall and $860 in winter for overnight field trips and conference registration. $250 in spring for an overnight field trip.

Upper division science credit:

Upper division science credit may be awarded in agroecology in fall and soil science in winter upon successful completion of all work; upper division credit in spring depends on the foundations established in fall and winter.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 D1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

2020-21

DateRevision
2019-02-19New York trip has been removed from option and special fee section for Spring

Ecology of Grazing and Grasslands in the Pacific Northwest

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Michael (Mike) Paros
veterinary medicine

This academically rigorous, field-based program will provide students with the fundamental tools to manage livestock and grasslands by exploring the ecological relationships between ruminants and the land. We will begin the quarter learning about the physiology of grasses and their response to grazing and fire. Practical forage identification, morphology, and production will be taught. Ruminant nutrition, foraging behavior, and digestive physiology will be covered as a precursor to learning about the practical aspects of establishing, assessing, and managing livestock rotational grazing operations. Ecological assessments of energy flow and nutrient cycling in grassland systems will be emphasized.

We will divide our time equally between intensive grazing west of the Cascades and extensive rangeland systems to the east. Classroom lectures, workshops, and guest speakers will be paired with weekly field trips to dairy, beef, sheep, and goat grazing farms. We will take overnight trips to the Willamette Valley, where we will study managed intensive grazing dairy operations and forage production, and Eastern Washington/Oregon, where students can practice their skills in rangeland monitoring and grazing plan development. Other special topics that will be covered in the program include co-evolutionary relationships between ruminants and grasses, targeted and multi-species grazing, prairie ecology and restoration, riparian ecosystems, controversies in public land grazing, interactions between wildlife and domestic ruminants, and analysis of large-scale livestock production systems.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

animal agriculture, ecology, conservation, rangeland management, animal physiology and behavior.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$250 for overnight field trips.

Upper division science credit:

Students seeking to earn upper division credit must contact the faculty to discuss options prior to the start of the quarter.

Website:
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 8:30 am
LIB 1412 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Ecology of Harmful Algal Blooms

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Gerardo Chin-Leo
oceanography, marine biology

Microalgae account for most of the photosynthetic biomass and production in aquatic systems. Currently coastal waters worldwide are experiencing an increase in the occurrence, distribution, and severity of harmful algal blooms (HAB). Blooms of toxic algal species (e.g. red tides) can cause direct mortality of fish and shellfish. Other organisms, including humans, can be indirectly affected through the consumption of contaminated seafood. Large blooms of non-toxic species can also have negative impacts on aquatic habitats by shading benthic plants and by interfering with the activities of other organisms. Furthermore, if these algal blooms are not grazed or diluted, their decomposition can deplete the dissolved oxygen in the water, causing the mortality of plants and animals.

We will study the ecology of harmful algal species; the environmental factors controlling the species diversity, abundance, and productivity of aquatic algae; and the possible role of human activities in causing the increase of HAB. In addition, we will examine the efforts of scientists and government agencies to monitor HAB, and to control their impact on fisheries and public health. The material will be presented through lectures, and seminar discussion of books and scientific articles. In labs we will learn methods in microscopy and seawater analysis as well as field work in local estuaries and lakes. Students will conduct two research projects: one will be a review of scientific literature on a specific HAB topic and the second will study the plankton and water quality of a local marine or freshwater habitat. Credits will be awarded in marine ecology and oceanography.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

environmental studies, ecology, and marine science.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

One year of college-level biology.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 E2105 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Electronics in Music : Collaborating With Machines

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

music technology and theory

In this course, students will explore methods for using technology as an active collaborator in the creation of music.  Students will develop compositions in the music technology labs while diving deep into modular synthesis, MIDI programming, creative mixing techniques and other topics.  We’ll take our conceptual and technical cues from pioneering electroacoustic composers and experimenters such as Pauline Oliveros, Brian Eno, Morton Subotnick, Laurie Spiegel, and others.  Students entering this course are expected to have some foundation in music technology, either through the “Introduction to Electronics in Music” courses or through equivalent experience.  Please contact the faculty for a course application. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - 6:00 pm
Com 346 - MTL

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

Electronics in Music : Compositional Processes

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

music technology and theory

From serialism to chance music, musical dice games to change-ringing, musicians have often found methods of creating music that rely on external processes.  In this course, students will work extensively with Max/MSP, a visual programming environment, to develop algorithms and generative processes for creating music.  Students will learn how musical ideas can be expressed and manipulated using numbers, simple math, and logic.  Students entering this course are expected to have some foundation in music and/or music technology, either through the “Introduction to Electronics in Music” courses or equivalent experience.  Preference is given to students continuing from the fall quarter of “Electronics in Music.”  Please contact the instructor for a course application. 

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, January 9, 2019 - 5:00 pm
Lib 1328 - 5.1 Mix Room

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed.

Located in: Olympia

Electronics in Music : Projects

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

music technology and theory

The spring quarter of Electronics in Music is a chance for students to develop musical compositions and/or interactive projects centered around the use of technology.  Students will work closely with the instructor and classmates to develop concepts, tackle technical hurdles, and get critical feedback on their work.  Students will regularly present works in progress on route to a final composition, which will be presented at a public concert at the end of the quarter.  Students entering this course are expected to have a strong foundation in music technology, either through the “Introduction to Electronics in Music” courses or equivalent experience.  Preference is given to students continuing from the fall or winter quarters of “Electronics in Music.”  Please contact the instructor for a course application.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Com 346 - MTL

Advertised schedule:

6-10p Wed.

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Analysis

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Biswas-Abir
geology, earth science, biogeochemistry
Robin Bond
analytical chemistry

Well-designed and accurate chemical, biogeochemical measurements are key to assessing the processes in natural ecosystems. This is a field- and laboratory-intensive science program designed for students with solid preparations in general chemistry, geology, and precalculus math, as well as biology, who want to pursue more advanced investigations of bio-geo-chemical systems. Students will study statistics, geochemistry, analytical chemistry, and GIS programming. Instrumental techniques of chemical analysis will be developed in an advanced laboratory. Program work will emphasize quantitative analysis, quality control procedures, research design, and technical writing. During fall and winter quarters (taught by Robin Bond and Abir Biswas), we will address topics in carbon and nutrient cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, in addition to analytical chemistry, GIS, statistics, and instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Students will participate in group projects studying water quality, organic matter, and nutrient cycling processes of local watersheds. Analytical procedures based on EPA, USGS, and other guidelines will be utilized to measure major and trace anion and cation concentrations and weathering rates in natural systems, in support of studies of biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and metals through the environment. Computers and statistical methods will be used extensively for data analysis and simulation, as well as for work with GIS. Fall and winter credit equivalencies include analytical chemistry and instrumentation, aqueous geochemistry, biogeochemistry, and field methods in terrestrial biogeochemistry. In the fall we will take a weeklong field trip to collect natural waters from diverse geochemical regions. These samples will form the basis for testing and evaluating chemical analysis methods and for developing a quantitative assessment of the geochemistry of natural waters. In the winter students will collect and analyze samples from a suite of ecosystem compartments (e.g., soil horizons, leaves, woody debris, biota) to quantify nutrient storage and cycling on the landscape. Spring quarter (taught by Robin Bond) will be devoted to extensive project work building on skills developed in the fall and winter. Students will conduct hypothesis-driven experimental design, sample collection, analysis, and statistical interpretations prior to presenting their results in both oral and written form to conclude the year.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

hydrology, chemistry, earth sciences, chemical instrumentation, environmental analysis and environmental fieldwork.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

General chemistry sequence (multiple quarters, ~16 credits), one quarter of college (physical) geology (~4 credits), and one year of college algebra or precalculus mathematics required. Background in biology and additional background in geology are recommended.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$600 for an extended overnight field trip in fall quarter.

Upper division science credit:

Up to 48 upper-division science credits may be awarded in the following disciplines: Analytical chemistry, aqueous geochemistry, biogeochemistry, and chemical instrumentation. Contact faculty for further details. 

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:00 am
LAB 2 3221 - Class Lab

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-08-14description updated to reflect faculty teaching per quarter
2018-08-10overnight field trip fee increased to $600

Environmental and Social Justice Successes: How to Grow Hope in the Dark

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 17
12
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

creative writing, sustainability, public policy

In an era of despair, cynicism, and seemingly insurmountable challenges, how do we use environmental and social successes to cultivate determined action and optimism?   “Your opponents would love you to believe that it's hopeless, that you have no power, that there's no reason to act, that you can't win. Hope is a gift you don't have to surrender, a power you don't have to throw away,” says Rebecca Solnit in  Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities. We'll study vibrant ecological and social justice success stories being replicated nationally and globally. Students will find treasure troves of positive templates. We'll consider local programs like Garden Raised Bounty, and look at other organizations and efforts that have built victories. Students will examine the importance of celebrating victories, and other methods to build resilience as individuals and in movements. As a program, we will create a project of inspiration to motivate change for the Evergreen Community. In individual projects, students will write a journalistic profile of a community-based victory in righting social or environmental injustice. Students will gain introduction to developing coalitions for change; to persuading elected officials and other decision-making bodies, and to creating narratives of imagination and change to inspire others mired in the inaction caused by despair. Texts will include Solnit's  Hope in the Dark, as well as Senge's  Breaking through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Public policy, Journalism, Non-Profit, Environmental-related, Social Justice-related, Writing, Advocacy.

12

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 17
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 8 - Classroom

Advertised schedule:

Mon/Wed 6-9:30pm + Alternating Saturdays 10am-5pm ( 1/19; 2/2; 2/16; 3/9)

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Biology and Chemistry

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

biology, genetics, microbiology
organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, biochemistry

In this upper division science program we will use topics and theoretical concepts within microbiology and organic chemistry to study how human activity, or anthropogenic pollution, has affected the environment.

In fall quarter, we will begin by examining the roles microorganisms play in the environment, their metabolism, and the broad diversity of ecosystems they occupy. We will also begin our study of organic chemistry, learning the structure, reactivities, and mechanisms of reaction of the major functional groups – from small molecules to polymers and plastics. We will also read primary literature in the areas of environmental biology and chemistry, focusing on major themes such as air, water and soil pollution from anthropogenic sources, and environmental clean-up.

In winter quarter, we will study microbial ecology to gain an overall understanding of the role of microorganisms in natural communities. We will examine ecosystems and their disruption, microbial metabolism, and biogeochemical cycling, specifically the C, N, and S cycles. We will continue our study of organic chemistry, and in addition, we will apply this knowledge to environmental chemistry, examining the fate of persistent anthropogenic organic chemicals, including pesticides, PCBs, dioxins, and plastics. We will also study their effect on a variety of organisms due to their general accumulation in the environment, as well as their bioaccumulation. In addition, we will examine methods of bioremediation to remove toxic chemicals, and human use of alternative materials, such as biodegradable plastics, designed to replace products produced from petrochemicals.

Throughout both quarters laboratory activities will teach fundamental and modern methods of microbiology and organic chemistry, all within relevant environmental themes. Laboratory activities will include culturing and the use genetic methods for the quantification of microorganisms in the environment, organic synthesis methods combined with green chemistry methods, and the use of scientific instrumentation. We will use Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) to analyze organic mixtures, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR) for structural analysis of organic compounds.

Class activities will include lecture, small group problem solving workshops, seminar, student presentations, instrumentation workshops, laboratories, and some field work.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

lab and field biology, chemistry, and environmental science.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

two quarters of general biology and 2 quarters of general chemistry, each with lab.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

All 32 credits are upper division, and will include environmental microbiology with lab, microbial ecology with lab, biogeochemistry, organic chemistry with lab (2 full quarters), environmental chemistry, scientific instrumentation, and seminar.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 9:00 am
LAB 2 3216 - Class Lab

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Health, Public Health and Toxicology

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

biology, biochemistry
Carolyn Prouty
health science, public health, bioethics

This program will explore the molecular events that determine the biological activity and toxicity of selected xenobiotic molecules--chemicals not normally produced by the body. We will examine the physiologic systems that process these toxins in the body, and pathologic reactions they can cause. Using the tools of epidemiology, we will also investigate public health and environmental justice questions inherent in the unequal vulnerability of different populations to exposure to toxic substances.

Xenobiotic molecules include natural products, drugs and chemicals released in the environment by human activity. We will focus on specific xenobiotic molecules, which might include drugs like ethinyl estradiol (birth control pill), natural carcinogens like aflatoxin, and lead. For each molecule, we will examine in detail the molecular mechanisms by which they act on cellular or physiological processes. How do chemicals treat a disease or cause cancer? Are all people (or species) equally sensitive to these therapeutic and/or toxic effects? How are chemicals metabolized and what molecular targets does a xenobiotic molecule alter?

To help understand the biochemical actions of these molecules, this program will examine pathways used in their biotransformation. We will examine cellular signal pathways in detail, and induced perturbations of normal signal processes. We will also use tools from modern genetics and bioinformatics to examine how genetic differences can influence the effects of these chemicals.

We will explore the physiologic impact of xenobiotic molecules by examining the organ systems that are exposed to and process toxins, including the lungs, liver, and kidneys. Using tools of epidemiology and public health, we will examine how to use information about populations and the types of individuals affected to make decisions about the potential hazards of these materials. We will study how these tools have assisted vulnerable communities to document their unique toxic exposures.

We will emphasize data analysis and interpretation obtained from primary literature reports or agency databases. Quantitative reasoning will be a major component of class examples, workshop and homework assignments. This program will also include laboratory work that will measure the mutagenic properties of test molecules, toxicology on simple models systems, and dissection and histologic investigation of organ systems that are important in examining toxic impacts. Students will have the opportunity to examine a xenobiotic molecule of their choice, and its impact on a species or ecologic system. Embedded in these activities are principles of cell biology and biochemistry, physiology and epidemiology.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, chemistry, public health, health professions, and environmental studies.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Entering students should have two quarters of general chemistry, and two quarters of biology that includes topics on cell structure, biomolecules, and molecular biology.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.

Upper division science credit:

All work planned for this program is designed so that students successfully completing program requirements will earn upper division science in all program areas.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 9:00 am
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

Environmental Science Foundations

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 69
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Carri LeRoy
freshwater ecology, quantitative biology, environmental education
chemical oceanography, biogeochemistry, freshwater ecology
Melissa Nivala
mathematics

In this program we will learn introductory chemistry, introductory biology, and mathematics through the lens of aquatic ecosystems. A tiny fraction (less than 0.01%) of water on Earth is found in lakes and rivers, making our freshwater systems especially vulnerable to human impacts. An integrated knowledge of chemistry, biology, and math is necessary to understand how freshwater systems function, which is the first step necessary to preserve and/or restore these systems. Students will have the opportunity to earn 6 credits in Introductory Chemistry, 6 credits in Introductory Biology, and 4 credits in Algebraic Thinking.

Introductory chemistry concepts we will cover include: properties of aqueous solutions; atoms, molecules, and ions; chemical reactions and redox reactions; chemical bonding; physical properties of solutions; gases, chemical equilibrium; and properties of acids and bases. In introductory biology, we will study the diversity of life on Earth; taxonomy and phylogenetics; evolutionary processes; the function of biomolecules; cellular structure, function, and reproduction; photosynthesis and cellular respiration; introductory botany, zoology, and ecology. Concepts we will cover in mathematics will include: dimensional analysis, linear equations, exponentials, logarithms, power laws, introductory geometry, and introductory trigonometry. Field and lab experiences will integrate biology, mathematics, and chemistry concepts with freshwater ecology methods. We will use Evergreen's forest reserve and local field sites as natural laboratories to support our learning.

Through this program you will gain the fundamentals of chemistry, biology, and math that you will need to be successful in more advanced environmental studies programs. This program is intended for students wanting to explore the natural sciences prior to enrolling in Integrated Natural Sciences , as well as students who are interested in broadening their understanding of the natural sciences. This program will prepare you for advanced work in natural history and the winter/spring program Riding the Global Carbon Cycle from the Mountains to the Sea . However, this program will not provide you with the full sequence of general biology, general chemistry, or precalculus, which are generally required for upper-division programs like Molecule to Organism , Environmental Analysis , Marine Environments, Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions, and Field Ecology. Please talk with the faculty about your long-term goals to determine whether or not this program or a program like Integrated Natural Sciences (where you earn a full year of both general biology and general chemistry) would be better for you.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

 This program is intended for students wanting to explore the natural sciences prior to enrolling in Integrated Natural Sciences, as well as students who are interested in broadening their understanding of the natural sciences. This program will prepare you for advanced work in natural history and the winter/spring program Riding the Global Carbon Cycle from the Mountains to the Sea.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

High school math through algebra II, high school biology, and high school chemistry are recommended.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$13 fee for printed textbook

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 69
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 C1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-09-11$13 text book fee added
2018-03-06This program is for Freshmen-Sophomores (formerly all levels). Description has been updated.
2017-11-30Melissa Nivala joins the teaching team.

Epic Journeys: From Homer to Dante

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Steve Blakeslee
English, writing, literature
Andrew Reece
classical art and literature

When Dante opened his  Divine Comedy with a line about his progress along “our life's path," he was relying on a well-worn metaphor, but one that leads to a truth about the way we think about ourselves and tell our stories. We want to believe that our lives are going somewhere, that our stories will make sense, and that we will transcend the mundane run of our days. Philosophy tries to describe our purpose or destination; religion, perhaps, to prescribe it; literature shows the journey there: Odysseus striving homeward, Aeneas seeking Rome, Dante climbing from Hell's pit into the stars of Paradise.

In this program we will study works of literature, philosophy, and theology from antiquity and medieval times that consider the wayfarer, the vagabond, the exile, and the pilgrim. Epic poetry is especially well-suited to these characters, and we will meet them in Homer’s Odyssey , Virgil’s Aeneid , and the Comedy . We will also be reading prose accounts which, like the poems, depict a transient human journey alongside an eternal divine order, including Plato's Phaedo, the Exodus and the story of Jesus in the Bible, Augustine’s Confessions , and a sample from Thomas Aquinas. Note that the reading expectation is especially substantial. Throughout the program, we will work as both readers and writers to articulate the significance of these foundational works to modern lives and journeys, including our own.

The goals of the program include a knowledge of fundamental texts in world literature and philosophy; experience reading sustained and complex narratives; an understanding of the interplay between form and thought in various genres; greater facility with expository and creative writing; and hopefully, new and convivial intellectual and artistic traveling companions. Our class time will be devoted heavily to book seminars and will also feature lectures and writing workshops.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

the humanities.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 C1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

Ethics: An Introduction at SPSCC

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This introductory ethics course studies historical and recent views on such issues as the nature of good and evil, right and wrong, justice, rights, the rational grounds for moral responsibility and moral decision making, and the objectivity of moral values. Students will look at ethics through both a traditional and contemporary lens. 

NOTE: This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College, 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, in Building 21, Room 106, Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:00-8:20 p.m.

IMPORTANT: This class begins BEFORE Evergreen’s Fall quarter, on Monday, September 17. Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday, September 13.

BOOKS: If a text is required students will need to purchase texts for this course from the SPSCC bookstore. The book list can be found on the bookstore website (http://spscc.bncollege.com) under the course PHIL102.   

Faculty Contact information: Steve Dickerson, sdickerson@spscc.edu

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

Advertised schedule:

Monday and Wednesday 6:00-8:20pm. This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College, 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, in Building 21, Room 0106

IMPORTANT: This class begins BEFORE Evergreen’s Fall quarter, on Monday, September 17. Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday, September 13. 

Located in: Olympia

European Ethnobotany in Historical Context

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Frederica Bowcutt
botany, ecology, environmental history
Stacey Davis
European history

This program examines early modern Western European botany in historical and cultural context, with some limited hands-on learning in herbology. We focus on key moments in the rise of Western botany particularly during the 16th through 18th centuries, which were also eras of intense religious, social, and political change, as well as centuries of worldwide colonial and imperial expansion. As we study the rise of botany as a profession, we couch this learning in a wider examination of Europeans' shifting understanding of their relationship with the natural and supernatural world during the Reformation, the scientific revolution, The Enlightenment, and the Age of Imperialism; and we explore the links between these intellectual and cultural changes and upheavals such as the advent of the Dutch Republic and the French Revolution. Our studies include analysis of changing artistic trends with the growing focus on nature and humanity in landscape painting, botanical illustration, and secular themes. The program also emphasizes the role of gender in botany, science, and society more generally from the 16th century witch-hunts to 18th century reassessments of women's social and political positions. Lectures and readings cover social and political history, art history, and colonial botany, as well as garden and medical history.

In hands-on practica students will learn to prepare salves, tinctures, decoctions, and infusions. Weekly workshops will help students improve their ability to write thesis-driven essays defended with evidence from assigned texts. Credit equivalencies for the program include expository writing, European history, European ethnobotany, and gender and women's studies.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

cultural studies, European history, gender studies, and writing.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$30 for supplies for several hands-on herbology workshops. 

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 A1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

Evergreen Student Civic Engagement Institute

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Freshman
Freshman Only
Class Size: 0
Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

The Evergreen Student Civic Engagement Institute (ESCEI) , an intensive, residential, academic, pre-orientation program is designed to launch your successful career as a co-learner and leader at Evergreen. Our curriculum is rooted in the National Task Force (2012) framework definition of civic knowledge: “Citizens of communities need to know the cultural and global contexts in which a community exists, understand the historical and sociological relevance of important social movements, have exposure to multiple cultural and religious traditions, and understand how their political system works.” During our time together, we will break this definition down through a variety of texts, seminars, and workshops. We will apply this definition through activities that you will participate in and lead. Finally, you will synthesize your learned experiences in a personal narrative evaluation.We’ll hear from elected officials, non-profit leaders, community activists, educators, students, artists, and a spiritual leader. We’ll wrestle with real-world issues—both global and local. We’ll read and write, listen and speak. Most importantly, we’ll think.

 

Learning Objectives:

1. Each day you will be engaged in curriculum about civic engagement. The work is personal and your lived experiences will inform that work. Learning objectives are what you make of them and will differ from student to student.

2. At the end of each day, there will be scheduled journaling time where you will identify what you learned and relate it back specifically to the work we did. You will be asked to identify a minimum of three specific knowledge points you gained, how you learned them, and how you can use what you learned in academic or personal goals. These knowledge points will be entered online in CANVAS.

3. There is a daily requirement to pick one of the knowledge points you identified, and share it in the discussion section of CANVAS.

4. Collective Learning Outcomes: At the end of our institute, we will quantify the qualitative data you all provided through your narratives, connecting overarching themes to the Five Foci for a holistic understanding of learned outcomes.

5. Individual Learning Outcomes: At the end of our institute, you will combine your knowledge points into one comprehensive narrative evaluation to be submitted online.

Variable
Variable credit.
See below for more info.
Variable Credit Options:

60 seats at 2 cr.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Freshman
Class Standing: Freshman Only
Class Size: 0
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

Advertised schedule:

September 12-18

Located in: Olympia

Evolutionary Processes from DNA to the Fossil Record

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Angelos Katsanis
ecology, entomology, agronomy
Pauline Yu square portrait
marine science

We will explore the richness of evolutionary and biological processes that have resulted in the biodiversity of life on planet Earth. For a theory that is a central tenet in the understanding of biology, evolution is also perhaps the most misunderstood, abused and contentious of theories. We will refine our understanding of evolutionary biology through the study of microevolution and macroevolution, appreciate the myriad processes by which evolution manifests and is realized in biology, all while paying close attention to the ways in which evolutionary theory is mis-applied socio-politically.

As we study microevolution, students will solidify their understanding of the molecular biological processes by which DNA, genes and chromosomes are modified within organisms and populations. We will investigate different concepts of "individuals" and "species," and their scientifically contentious understandings. After setting a foundation with concepts in population genetics, students will apply those ideas to biodiversity conservation. Processes in evolution that lead to morphological and behavioral change will be examined, and students will learn how those changes structure systematics, past and present. Finally, the macroevolutionary processes that contribute to our understanding of the fossil record will be examined through field trip experiences. Students will develop skills for quantitative and population genetics as well as observations of theme and pattern as reflected in systematics and taxonomy.

Field activities will include an overnight excursion to examine and collect fossil beds in Eastern Washington, and a day trip to visit research natural history and botanical collections.

Texts will include a conservation genetics text, an evolutionary biology text, and The Mismeasure of Man (S. J. Gould). Additional writings by Joan Roughgarden and the primary scientific literature will be a key part of this program.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biological sciences, natural resources management, and wildlife management.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

One year of General Biology or equivalent.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$265 for an overnight field trip and entrance fees.

Upper division science credit:

Upper division science credit is contingent on successful completion of program expectations.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 10:30 am
SEM 2 A2105 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Existential Thought in Philosophy, Literature, and Arts

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 40
81216
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

literature, philosophy, and languages
Andrew Reece
classical art and literature

Existential thinkers focus on the existence of individual human beings. Modern Existential thought arises with discussion of Nietzsche’s death of God and Nihilism and horror of the world wars. No absolutes were left standing. This is the moment of great existential thinkers: Camus, Beauvoir, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Jaspers, Heidegger. But the human condition is not new to the 20th and the 21st centuries. In the 1500s, Montaigne, citing Seneca, wrote: "Philosopher, c’est apprendre à mourn," meaning, "to philosophize is to learn how to die."

We have asked since the Greeks what does it mean to exist, to be a thinking, valuing being in the midst of a world which precedes and follows us, and in the absence of any easy religious or ideological explanation? No two thinkers with whom we will engage offer the same philosophical stance; existentialists are nothing if not individuals, each unique. Each offers, however, a possible response to the human hunger for meaning: in the silence of gods and absolutes, each falls back on herself or himself. I am a valuing being; I must make my own meaning, over and over again, with each of a million choices I make, each step in my dance, as I become the person I will finally be at the moment of my death.

We will read philosophical literary and poetic texts, and consider visual and musical artists' responses to this same demand for meaning. Assignments include weekly analytical and creative writings. Each student will work in a group responsible for the presentation and analysis of one writer’s work. Students will submit a substantive portfolio of writings, including your personal statement as an existential thinker.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

advanced or graduate work in the humanities, philosophy, literature, and arts.

81216

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

one year of college-level study in the humanities.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 40
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 10:00 am
COM 320 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Experiments in Text

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

creative writing, poetics, aesthetics, media/performing arts

In what sense is creative writing an experiment? For one thing, writing is a process of discovery—it is not inert. “When it enters into an experience,” Joan Retallack asserts, it changes that experience, “creating a new, textual reality.” In that spirit, this course will explore the variety of ways we acquire new kinds of knowledge by writing—where, Retallack reminds us, the process of writing and process of scientific experimentation are not as different as we may think. Our work in this language laboratory will involve continually testing out our instrumentation (our senses), while remaining open to the possibility of getting results that surprise us. The focus will be on building fundamental writing skills that can be applied across academic disciplines, but we will do so by posing difficult questions about written forms in relation to the social worlds from which they emerge. We will study various modes of creative writing, including poetry, prose, and performance, and will read works by authors such as Gertrude Stein, Robert Duncan, and Cecilia Vicuna. Throughout the quarter, students will practice writing by composing a weekly short “experimental mini-essay” engaging with these works, as well as the work of their peers; other written assignments will invite students to experiment with the various creative forms they have been studying, such as writing poems or short fiction. In other words, this course will provide structured opportunities for connecting our work to the work of other writers, and to the social and political spheres that influence how and why we write—we’ll practice tuning in, as poet CAConrad urges, to “the creative viability of everything around us.”

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Arts, activism, graduate study

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 C2105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

Tue/Fri 6-7:50pm

Located in: Olympia

Film History at SPSCC

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This film history course introduces approaches to film history, including the study of periods, genres, directors, national cinemas, and critical theories. 

NOTE: This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College, 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, in Building 21, Room 130, Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:00-8:25 p.m.

IMPORTANT: This class begins BEFORE Evergreen’s Fall quarter, on Monday, September 17. Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday, September 13.

BOOKS: If a text is required students will need to purchase texts for this course from the SPSCC bookstore. The book list can be found on the bookstore website (http://spscc.bncollege.com) under the course FILM117 

Faculty Contact information: jsalcedo@spscc.edu

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

Advertised schedule:

Monday and Wednesday 6:00-8:25pm. This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College, 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, in Building 21, Room 0130

IMPORTANT: This class begins BEFORE Evergreen’s Fall quarter, on Monday, September 17. Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday, September 13. 

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-06-25New offering added for Fall quarter (at SPSCC)

Film Production I at SPSCC

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This film production course explores advanced theories and skills for field video production, including producing, directing, camera operation, lighting, editing, audio techniques, and post-production techniques. Includes digital video art forms, storyboard development, media writing, interviewing, budgeting, and planning.

NOTE: This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College, 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, in Building 21, Room 106, Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:00-8:25 p.m.   Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday, March 28th. 

BOOKS: If a text is required students will need to purchase texts for this course from the SPSCC bookstore. The book list can be found on the bookstore website (http://spscc.bncollege.com) under the course FILMP201  

Faculty: Michael Gray, mgray@spscc.edu

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students should have introductory experience with the basic theories and skills used in studio and field video production. Email the faculty (mgray@spscc.edu) if you have questions about your preparation. 

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$85 film production fee

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

Located in: Olympia

Financial Sustainability for Non-profit Organizations

WinterSpring
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

2019-Vu,-Thuy-1-square
economics, management, community organization

Social enterprises, commonly known as non-profit organizations, are defined as business enterprises with the primary mission of serving the common good of the society. They are the growth engines for building communities and implementing sustainable social changes. This two-quarter program will develop the financial management competencies required to become effective social entrepreneurs and to establish and run a sustainable non-profit businesses serving the common good of the community. Topics will include entrepreneurship and management, business finance and accounting, and basic skills needed for starting, operating, and promoting a financially sustainable non-profit business organization. 

This two-quarter program is for students interested in business management and finance, social equity and justice, community development and leadership. It will facilitate individual and group learning through active involvement in seminar discussions, workshop activities, writing, and oral presentations. Students will have the opportunity to design and implement individual and group projects, and do internship development work with local community-based social enterprise organizations. Students will explore issues, challenges, and opportunities that arise from working with various types of social enterprises and public organizations across the boundaries of cultural difference. 

In winter, the program will focus on the fundamentals of business finance, economics and business management, and on the guidelines for developing a non-profit organization. Topics discussed will cover basic financial accounting, costs and price setting for social enterprises' products, and general topics on micro and macroeconomics.

In the spring quarter, the program will discuss the socioeconomic issues and policies affecting the development and growth of the non-profit  sector. The program will also cover advanced work in entrepreneurship and business management, and will focus on issues related to the impacts of globalization and the resulting need for the development of international non-governmental organizations (INGO). Students will also have the opportunity of performing  in-program service learning projects with  local community-based organizations of their choice.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Public service management, financial management for non-profit organizations, community building, small business development

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

First Peoples Multicultural Scholars Program

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 30
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

"The Scholars Program provided useful opportunities and supplied me with a network of people that I will have throughout my college experience."   —KaLehua KaApana (2013)  

This course is a 2-credit, week-long pre-orientation as part of the Multicultural Scholars Program . The program is facilitated by First Peoples Multicultural Advising in collaboration with faculty, staff, students, and community members passionate about multicultural student success. It is designed to strengthen the success and community of students of color, queer, and trans students at Evergreen by providing the opportunity to build community, skills, and resources to help you thrive before school even begins. This course will include a variety of learning opportunities such as diverse speakers, seminar, projects, wellness practices, film, readings, and writing.

 

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 30
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Advertised schedule:

roughly 8:30am-5:30pm (with optional additional evening programs) for the week of Wednesday, September 12 - Wednesday, September 19, 2018. The hours include instruction, seminar, field trips, wellness activities, films, community building, and community service project. The exact daily schedules varies.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-07-30$250 Student fee removed

Flight of the Firebird: What Ignites Russia's Imagination in Literature and Culture

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Patricia Krafcik
Russian language and literature

Russia today is experiencing an upsurge in displays of nationalism and national pride--pride in its tumultuous imperial history, its rich culture, and its role on the world stage. How has President Putin inspired Russia to embrace this nationalistic fervor and how he has linked it to Russian patriotism, justifying internal and external political action based on historical precedent? We will explore this central question through readings in Russian history and literature, and will seek the sources of this trend in the literary, musical, and artistic culture of the pre-1917-Revolution Russian Empire from the mid-19th into the early 20th centuries.

We will discuss in seminar relevant literature of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov, writers who in various ways defined Russian-ness. We will listen to the great music of world-class Russian composers who intentionally captured a national Russian folk sound in their compositions, among them Glinka, Mussorgsky, Borodin, Rimsky-Korsakov, Tchaikovsky, and into the 20th century, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich. We will study the magnificent realistic art of the Wanderers (Peredvizhniki) and the avant-garde art into the 20th century which also drew on folk imagery.

In all of this exploration, we will examine both the socially-conscious aspects of these creative works, as well as how they celebrate Russian identity, Russian Nature, and the Russian soul. As we continue to monitor the contemporary Russian political scene, we will view relevant films and documentaries to help us get under the surface of the culture. Finally, we will take an overnight fieldtrip to the Maryhill Museum, which houses Russian icons and historical items, and a Greek Orthodox women’s monastery where we will learn more about the historical significance of the Orthodox Church, inherited from Byzantium, in Russian history and especially in Putin’s Russia today. Students will write short papers and a research paper on a topic of their choice.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

international studies,; Russian, East European, and Eurasian area studies; literary studies; cultural studies; and history. 

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$64 for an overnight field trip to the Maryhill Museum and Brooks Memorial Environmental Learning Center near Goldendale, WA.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 9:30 am
SEM 2 A2109 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Food Chemistry

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Melissa Nivala
mathematics
Sunderman square
physical and inorganic chemistry

Food is a crucial part of everyday life. We prepare it. We ingest it. We apply chemistry on a regular basis, without even recognizing it. In this program we will explore topics in chemistry connected to food.  We will investigate answers to the questions: Why does popcorn pop? Why are so many low fat foods low in flavor? Why are some vitamins fat soluble while others water soluble: And why does that matter? What does gluten do?

Introductory concepts in general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry will be introduced and explored. We will study protein denaturation and make mozzarella. In the laboratory setting students will get exposure to and practice with measurements, spectrophotometers, lab safety, and work on general lab techniques. Statistics and algebraic thinking for science will be integrated throughout our studies: by analyzing lab data, quantifying nutritional profiles, critically comparing diets, etc. Math topics will include proportional reasoning and unit conversions, descriptive and inferential statistics, the algebra, geometry, and numerics of various families of functions (polynomial, exponential, logarithmic), and fractal geometry, with special emphasis in all areas placed on relating math to food. Societal issues connected to food will also be incorporated. Students will combine applied quantitative, writing, and oral communication skills in a quarter-long project related to food.

We will explore these topics through assignments, seminars, exams and quizzes, laboratory experiments, a field trip, and a project.

Note: this program will be repeated spring quarter. Students who take the winter quarter program should not take the spring quarter program.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

chemistry, life sciences, environmental sciences, health care, teaching, and agricultural studies.This is a Foundational program in the Integrated Biology and Chemistry Path's of Study.  This program satisfies the math prerequisite for Integrated Natural Science (INS).  This program meets the MIT requirement for statistics, college algebra, and either one of these three: chemistry with lab, physical science with lab, or applied chemistry.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 9:00 am
LIB 1001 - Workshop

Additional details:

Wednesday's schedule will alternate between Lab and Seminar. Weeks 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 will be in the seminar spaces. Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 will be in the lab spaces.   The week 10 lab space needs to be in a food safe lab. Two potential field trips will be scheduled that involve a full day. Dates will be announced once they are known.

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

Spring 2019, Winter 2021, and Spring of 2021

DateRevision
2018-11-07challenge course fee removed

Food Chemistry

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Melissa Nivala
mathematics
Sunderman square
physical and inorganic chemistry

Note: this program is also offered winter quarter. Students who take the winter quarter program should not take the spring quarter program.

Food is a crucial part of everyday life. We prepare it. We ingest it. We apply chemistry on a regular basis, without even recognizing it. In this program we will explore topics in chemistry connected to food.  We will investigate answers to the questions: Why does popcorn pop? Why are so many low fat foods low in flavor? Why are some vitamins fat soluble while others water soluble: And why does that matter? What does gluten do? 

Introductory concepts in general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry will be introduced and explored.  We will study protein denaturation and make mozzarella. In the laboratory setting students will get exposure to and practice with measurements, spectrophotometers, lab safety, and work on general lab techniques. Statistics and algebraic thinking for science will be integrated throughout our studies: by analyzing lab data, quantifying nutritional profiles, critically comparing diets, etc.  Math topics will include proportional reasoning and unit conversions, descriptive and inferential statistics, the algebra, geometry, and numerics of various families of functions (polynomial, exponential, logarithmic), and fractal geometry, with special emphasis in all areas placed on relating math to food.  Societal issues connected to food will also be incorporated.  Students will combine applied quantitative, writing, and oral communication skills in a quarter-long project related to food.

We will explore these topics through assignments, seminars, exams and quizzes, laboratory experiments, a field trip, and a project.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

chemistry, life sciences, environmental sciences, health care, teaching, and agricultural studies.This is a Foundational program in the Integrated Biology and Chemistry Path's of Study.  This program satisfies the math prerequisite for Integrated Natural Science (INS).  This program meets the MIT requirement for statistics, college algebra, and either one of these three: chemistry with lab, physical science with lab, or applied chemistry.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$10 for registration fees.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 A1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

Spring 2019, Winter 2021, and Spring of 2021

DateRevision
2019-04-08Variable credit CRN created

Forests and Farms: The Systems that Sustain Us

FallWinter
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

forest and plant ecology
Steve Scheuerell
ecology, botany, plant pathology

Learn to get your hands dirty in two globally important types of landscapes: forests and farms. We will use a systems thinking approach to explore environmental issues related to both landscapes, such as climate change and carbon sequestration. We will split our focus between an introduction to forests and forest measurements in the Pacific Northwest and an introduction to agricultural systems and ecological agriculture. Management of forests and farms are of central importance in global carbon budgets, and we will explore how both play a role in climate change. We will learn about the many stakeholders throughout society who are involved in forestry and farming issues and how science can inform policy and management decisions. Students will gain an introduction to basic nutrient cycling and soils concepts that are foundational to both ecological forestry and agriculture systems. We will learn the basic tools and techniques needed to account for forest and farm carbon and students will learn how to build basic carbon budgets based on forest and soil measurements. For the forestry component, students will learn to do basic forest measurements, inventory carbon sequestration in forests, understand ecological succession, and identify common trees. Students will learn how to use basic trigonometry and algebraic approaches to measuring forest dimensions and tree carbon storage. Weekly field labs will give students hands-on experience working with our local forests in Evergreen's forest reserve. In the agricultural component, students will learn basic agronomic principles, including the structure and function of annual and perennial crop plants; and how plants respond to water, nutrients, light, and heat. Using field trips and case studies, a variety of agricultural systems will be introduced, and students will learn how management practices impact climate change via energy-use efficiency and the carbon sequestration potential of soils and crops. Ecological agroforestry systems will be emphasized to show how perennial crops can be utilized to optimize carbon uptake, efficiently utilize inputs, conserve soil, and maintain food production. Both sections of the program will be integrated in a weekly lab where students will learn the basics of spreadsheet use to compile forest, soil, and farm data. Using data students collect themselves, we will build and explore carbon budgets in both forests and farms, and then apply data to our understanding of local eco- and agro-systems. (Steven Scheuerell will teach fall and winter, Dylan Fischer will teach Fall only)

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

agriculture, ecology, environmental studies, field studies, forestry, natural history, and sustainability studies.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 E1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-11-16Closed winter enrollment to new students
2018-08-14description updated to reflect faculty teaching per quarter
2018-05-31Amarati Casper has left the teaching team.
2018-03-28This program is now fall-winter.

French - First Year I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Judith Gabriele square
French language

This year-long sequence of courses in French emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and focus on interactive oral activities.  Classes use immersion style learning and students are surrounded by authentic French from the start.  Student work encompasses all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  They will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, work regularly in small groups and learn conversational skills.  Classes are lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of creative, fun activities including music, poetry, videos, role-play, and web sites.   Through aloud reading and discussions in French, students will acquire vocabulary proficiency, accurate pronunciation, fluidity, and dialogues.  Throughout the year, students use the Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

No Prerequisites

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 7:00 pm
SEM 2 A3105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

7-8:50p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

French - First Year II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Judith Gabriele square
French language

This year-long sequence of courses in French emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and focus on interactive oral activities.  Classes use immersion style learning and students are surrounded by authentic French from the start.  Student work encompasses all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  They will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, work regularly in small groups and learn conversational skills.  Classes are lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of creative, fun activities including music, poetry, videos, role-play, and web sites.  Winter quarter themes focus on regional French traditions, cuisine, fables and poetry.  Through aloud reading and discussions in French, students will acquire vocabulary proficiency, accurate pronunciation, fluidity, and dialogues.  Throughout the year, students use the Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Equivalent of 1 quarter college French or 2-3 years High School French

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 7:00 pm
SEM 2 A3105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

7-9p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

French - First Year III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Judith Gabriele square
French language

This year-long sequence of courses in French emphasizes mastery of basic skills through a solid study of grammatical structures and focus on interactive oral activities.  Classes use immersion style learning and students are surrounded by authentic French from the start.  Student work encompasses all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  They will develop accurate pronunciation, build a useful vocabulary, work regularly in small groups and learn conversational skills.  Classes are lively and fast-paced with a wide variety of creative, fun activities including music, poetry, videos, role-play, and web sites.  Spring quarter themes focus on development of reading skills through tales, legends and viewing Francophone films from the Francophone world alongside grammatical study.  Through aloud reading and discussions in French, students will acquire vocabulary proficiency, accurate pronunciation, fluidity, and dialogues.  Throughout the year, students use the Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Equivalent of 2 quarters college French or 3 years High School French

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 7:00 pm
SEM 2 A3105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

7-9p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

French - Second Year I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Judith Gabriele square
French language

This year-long course is designed for those who are in between First year to Second year Level or beyond.  It requires students to have had background in studies beyond Beginning level; a working knowledge of fundamental structures, particularly present and past tenses. Classes will be conducted entirely in French.  They are targeted to bring student skills up quickly with review and enhancement of first year structures, then moving quickly to more advanced grammar.   The primary objectives are communicative interactions in French through cultural studies, discussions and development of grammatical proficiency.  Students will practice all four language skills in small group interactive activities: listening, speaking, reading and writing. They will learn not only to express themselves in French, but to discover much they didn't know about themselves.  Fall quarter Students will particularly develop stronger reading skills through short stories, theater and poetry.   Throughout the year, students use the Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Equivalent of 2-3 quarters of college French or 3 years High School French

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 5:00 pm
SEM 2 A3105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

Tue and Thu 5-6:50pm

Located in: Olympia

French - Second Year II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Judith Gabriele square
French language

This year-long course is designed for those who have a Second Year Level or beyond.  All classes are conducted in French and  are fast paced and interactive to bring up skills quickly and sharpen proficiency. Primary objectives focus on increasing communicative interactions through study of aspects of culture and theater.  Students will learn to express themselves clearly and expand their listening comprehension in discussions with native speakers. They will increase their knowledge of comedy, tragedy and absurdist plays, plus hone their verbal, reading and writing proficiency.  Through study of selected plays and literary excerpts, class activities engage students in lively practices and performances of selected scenes, plus watching videos to analyze mise en scene and characterization.  

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Equivalent of 2-3 quarters of college French or 3 years High School French

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 5:00 pm
SEM 2 A3105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

5-7p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

French - Second Year III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Judith Gabriele square
French language

This year-long course sequence is designed for those who have a Second Year level or beyond. All classes are conducted in French. Primary objectives focus on increasing communicative interactions, developing discussion skills with native speakers, and honing all four language skills. Through the lens of film, using numerous genre of Francophone films, students will study historical and contemporary culture, as reflected in issues of immigration, French identity, education and art.  Students will read a short novel alongside watching its companion film; and learn to analyze, compare, and write about aspects of film and literature while increasing their cinematic competence.  Students continue to use the Language Laboratory to accelerate their skills.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Equivalent of 2-3 quarters of college French or 3 years High School French

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 5:00 pm
SEM 2 A3105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

5-7p Tue/Thu

Located in: Olympia

Fundamentals of Coastal Design I

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

The goal of the class is for you to learn about how customary regalia has evolved to be used in modern context and to design an art piece reflecting your own culture (to be completed in Fundamentals of Coastal Design II in Spring Quarter). Students will select either a shawl style or for those with more experience, a larger robe/blanket. Historically at Evergreen, the shawls  are used as a form of graduation regalia by Native students. The shawls can easily be adapted to use for other ceremonial regalia. This course is open to all TESC students with priority for 9 seats for seniors in the Native Pathways Program.

This course will use a variety of methods, materials, and approaches to identify traditional practices and adapt those practices to create a personal contemporary ceremonial/warrior shawl reflecting their own culture.  While students will focus on identifying indigenous methodologies within the text, Robes of Power and other readings in the attached bibliography, it is expected that you can and should adapt design ideas to reflect your own cultural statement in your finished art piece.  We will look at examples of other types of regalia such as button robes, graduation shawls and even commemorative t-shirts used at memorials to reflect cultural identity. 

Native Pathways students register using CRN 20360, all other students register using CRN 20361. 

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

Students will need to purchase fabric for final project in Spring, or to create sample works. Cost will be dependent on the fabric chosen by students. Fabric is not provided by the program.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

Located in: Olympia

Fundamentals of Coastal Design II

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
2
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Students should have a complete design for a shawl or blanket and purchased the fabric and adornment elements (beads, buttons, fringe, etc.) they wish to use.

Building upon the readings and discussion of Coast Design I, students will devote class time to studio work to complete an individual art piece. In studio, students will learn how to create original applique designs and incorporate adornment elements such as bead work, buttons, fringe and other elements as desired to a shawl  or blanket/robe that will reflect your own cultural background.

In addition to completing an art piece, students will be expected to write a short artist statement about their work.

Open studio time with the faculty will be available during Spring Quarter outside the regular class hours.

  • Native Pathways Seniors use CRN 30343
  • Native Pathways Juniors use CRN 30345
  • Non Native Pathways Juniors and Seniors use CRN 30346
2

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Fundamentals of Coastal Design I or faculty permission. Course is available for all students with 9 seats reserved from graduating Native Pathways Program students.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Special expenses:

For a shawl, students can expect to purchase about $30.00 worth of fabric and $20-25 for adornment elements of their own choosing from a retailer of their choice.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, May 4, 2019 - 4:00 pm
Fiber Arts 229

Located in: Olympia

Future History: Indigenous Speculative Fiction

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Dawn Barron sqaure
writing, Native and Indigenous studies

In this course we will explore our own identities, worldviews and writing styles, the stories we come back to again and again, and how the foundational elements of fiction help us (writers and readers) explain the world around us. Analyzing the readings will provoke critical thinking skills and thoughtful articulation of our findings. Individual writing projects will highlight your skills as a writer, as will peer workshops. This is a critical reading and writing course focused on exploring indigenous speculative fiction--what speculative fiction is, as well as how the indigenous worldview and writer creates a cultural and historical vantage point. Looking at the methods and themes that indigenous writers employ to write about the “future” world, we will analyze short stories through reading reflections and seminars. Students will be writing their own creative speculative fiction that, with peer feedback, will be made into an anthology. A key component to this course will be learning to deliver effective and compelling readings of completed work.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

creative writing, literature, Native American studies, communication, community studies, cultural studies, and history.

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

Gardens as Creative Non-Fiction

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 42
12
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Marja Eloheimo square
ethnobotany, environmental and cultural anthropology, plant studies
academic and creative nonfiction writing, community studies, analog game design

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.

--Marcus Tullius Cicero

This writing and field botany program will examine ways in which both gardens and writing embody intersections between human creativity and the facts--or “nonfiction”--of the environment.

In the writing portion of the program, we will be especially attentive to the following lines of inquiry and their implications: accurate observation, effective communication of sensory detail, and the creation on the page of the writer as a robust and multi-dimensioned narrator. We will draw on tools and methods of analysis from the fields of creative nonfiction writing and literature to undertake this work.  In the field botany portion of the program, we will engage with Evergreen’s Longhouse Ethnobotanical Garden, learning to identify and understand many of the plants; carrying out seasonal garden care; and examining how gardens—with their various contexts, intentions, designs, and dynamics—can function both as a metaphor for creative non-fiction and as a resource for writing it.

 One way we will link these two disciplines—writing and field botany—will be through the practice of creative nature journaling. Program participants will have abundant opportunity to develop the habits of mind of analytic, creative, and resilient thinkers, observers, writers, and “gardeners.” 

Books under consideration include  The Sweet Breathing of Plants  (edited by Linda Hogan and Brenda Peterson) and  Braiding Sweetgrass  (Robin Wall Kimmerer). Program participants must be willing to share their writing with all program members for their response, in person and in a program-only space online.

 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

writing, education, and professions related to botany, ecology, and cultural studies

12

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$45 for entrance fees plus art and garden supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 42
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 B1107 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

Wednesdays 6-9pm & Saturdays 9:30am - 5pm

Located in: Olympia

Gateways for Incarcerated Youth: Critical Literacy and Critical Numeracy

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This program offers Evergreen students an opportunity to learn together with juvenile males incarcerated in the Green Hill Academic School, a medium/maximum-security institution located in Chehalis, WA. It is high stakes work that demands deep and consistent engagement: approximately 12 hours a week in class on the Evergreen campus and 4-6 hours a week at Green Hill.

In the Gateways program, which has been running since 1996, the learning of Evergreen students fuels and is fueled by the learning of Green Hill students. We proceed from the premise that everyone is an expert in their own life. It will be our responsibility as co-learners in this program to accompany and empower each other in our studies. We will take advantage of the emergent theories and practices of liberation education to cultivate an environment where this learning together becomes possible. The itinerary of our inquiry will accordingly be shaped collaboratively: in part by the faculty's training and scholarship, in part by the interests of Evergreen students, and in part by the interests of Green Hill students. In this sense, the program combines elements of a typical coordinated-studies program with a student-originated studies program. Faculty and students alike will be responsible for determining the interdisciplinary readings, skills, and practices we will engage with as individuals, in pairs, in small groups, and in our learning community as a whole.

Three central questions will orient our inquiry:

  1. "How do we responsibly represent what we have experienced?"
  2. "What is the role of the person with knowledge?"
  3. "What needs to be the case for things to be otherwise?"

Critical and creative reading and writing will be consistent practices in our repertoire. This focus on literacy in all shapes and forms will be accompanied by a focus on numeracy conceived in a similarly wide scope (basic algebra, statistics, and probability at the very least). We will study hyperincarceration and the circumstances that make it possible in the first place (settler colonialism, structural racism, neoliberalism, etc.), as well as the knowledge traditions we are participating in and contributing to (such as popular education, the liberal arts, critical thinking, the Evergreen model, the Gateways model, etc.). Every Wednesday in the Green Hill classroom, groups of Evergreen and Green Hill students will collaborate on a variety of projects, and will assume responsibility for developing, delivering, and evaluating weekly workshops. Quantitative and qualitative research will inform our inquiry throughout—as will evidence from other areas of our experience.

An important foundational concept: effecting change does not mean saving other people or solving their problems—it means creating conditions that are welcoming and generative for genuine dialogue, and supporting each other to work towards our own solutions.

Students interested in enrolling in this program should be sure to familiarize themselves with the Gateways website before applying: http://www.evergreen.edu/gateways

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

prison education, critical theory, creative writing, juvenile justice, history, education, community work, social work

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Participating students are required by the prison to pass a background check in order to work on site.

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Fees:

$150 per quarter for overnight field trips.

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 20
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 10:00 am
Organic Farm - Workshop

Additional details:

Evergreen students will commit to either a Wednesday morning (10:45 to 1:15) or  a Wednesday afternoon (4:00 to 6:30) class at Green Hill. This does not include travel time to and from Green Hill (approximately 30-40 minutes each way).

Located in: Olympia

General Chemistry with Laboratory I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
6
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Chemistry is the foundation for everything around us and relates to everything we do. General Chemistry I is part of a 3-part series. These courses provide the fundamental principles of general chemistry. They also provide the  prerequisites for advanced chemistry, health sciences, and medical offerings. These courses also provide a basic laboratory science for students seeking a well rounded liberal arts education.

General Chemistry with Laboratory I

This is the first course in a year-long general chemistry sequence. Topics covered in fall quarter include unit conversions, electron structures, and chemical bonding and will include related laboratory experiments.

General Chemistry with Laboratory II

General Chemistry II builds upon material covered in General Chemistry I. Topics covered in winter quarter include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, and acid-base equilibria. Lab work will complement in-class learning.

General Chemistry with Laboratory III

General Chemistry III will continue with acid-base chemistry, pH, complex ion equilibria, entropy, and transition metals, as well as other related topics. This quarter also includes a lab section that will complement the course work.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

science, medicine

6

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 D2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

6-9:30p Mon; 6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-04-23John Kirkpatrick removed as faculty. New faculty will be added later this summer.

General Chemistry with Laboratory II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
6
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Chemistry is the foundation for everything around us and relates to everything we do. General Chemistry II is the second part of a 3-part series. These courses provide the fundamental principles of general chemistry. They also provide the  prerequisites for advanced chemistry, health sciences, and medical offerings. These courses also provide a basic laboratory science for students seeking a well rounded liberal arts education.

General Chemistry with Laboratory I

This is the first course in a year-long general chemistry sequence. Topics covered in fall quarter include unit conversions, electron structures, and chemical bonding and will include related laboratory experiments.

General Chemistry with Laboratory II

General Chemistry II builds upon material covered in General Chemistry I. Topics covered in winter quarter include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, and acid-base equilibria. Lab work will complement in-class learning.

General Chemistry with Laboratory III

General Chemistry III will continue with acid-base chemistry, pH, complex ion equilibria, entropy, and transition metals, as well as other related topics. This quarter also includes a lab section that will complement the course work.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

science, medicine

6

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Winter course requires successful completion of the preceding course or equivalent. Contact the instructor for an assessment of proficiency.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 D2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

6-9:30p Mon; 6-10p Wed.

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-04-23John Kirkpatrick removed as faculty. New faculty will be added later this summer.

General Chemistry with Laboratory III

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
6
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Chemistry is the foundation for everything around us and relates to everything we do. General Chemistry III is the final course of a 3-part series. These courses provide the fundamental principles of general chemistry. They also provide the  prerequisites for advanced chemistry, health sciences, and medical offerings. These courses also provide a basic laboratory science for students seeking a well rounded liberal arts education.

General Chemistry with Laboratory I

This is the first course in a year-long general chemistry sequence. Topics covered in fall quarter include unit conversions, electron structures, and chemical bonding and will include related laboratory experiments.

General Chemistry with Laboratory II

General Chemistry II builds upon material covered in General Chemistry I. Topics covered in winter quarter include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, and acid-base equilibria. Lab work will complement in-class learning.

General Chemistry with Laboratory III

General Chemistry III will continue with acid-base chemistry, pH, complex ion equilibria, entropy, and transition metals, as well as other related topics. This quarter also includes a lab section that will complement the course work.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

science, medicine

6

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Spring course requires successful completion of the preceding course or equivalent. Contact the instructor for an assessment of proficiency.

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 6:00 pm
Purce Hall 6 - Classroom

Advertised schedule:

6-9:30p Mon; 6-10p Wed

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-04-23John Kirkpatrick removed as faculty. New faculty will be added later this summer.

Genes and Poems: Creating Form and Meaning

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 35
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

genetics, molecular biology
Suzanne Simons square
poetry and literary arts, community studies/Middle East studies, journalism

What is a gene? What is a poem? This program aims to investigate parallels and intersections between the basic units of life and language. What is the relationship between meaning and form? What elements do a gene and a poem need to be effective? What are the properties of translation, transcription, interpretation and rendering, and how do they affect access and meaning? How do we measure when a form is complete?

In this program we will explore genes and poems as separate and connected entities. In the process we will consider how we create meaning and connections through processes such as parallelism, allegory, and metaphor. In poetry this will include reading and writing of literary, spoken-word and experimental forms, including free verse and patterned poems ranging from rhymed couplets to the more intricate villanelles and sestinas. Revisions to our original poems will be heavily emphasized. We will also participate in local poetry events, such as spoken-word performances and literary poetry readings. In biology we will examine the history of the gene, a term that has changed its meaning from an abstract particle of inheritance, to a unit of DNA sequence encoding a protein to a script for synthesizing imagined new functions. We will introduce the principles of genetics and molecular biology and carry out experiments in the laboratory.

Program activities will include lectures, workshops, labs, field trips, guest speakers, and films. Student learning will be assessed by a program portfolio, writing assignments, exams, formal reading of original poems or spoken-word pieces, and a lab notebook. Credits equivalencies may be awarded in introductory biology and introductory poetry.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

biology, poetry and literary arts, and education.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 35
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 C1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-03-15This program is now all level. CRN 30217 is now Sophomore- Senior

Geopolitics, Energy, Economics, and Stewardship of the Pacific Northwest

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

political science, economics

This program examines the political, ecological, and energy-related foundations of the Pacific Northwest’s culture and economy. The unique mix of energy, natural resources, agriculture, manufacturing, military, high technology, and finance have created a diverse cultural and economic base. The regional economy, led by manufacturing, agriculture, forest products, and finance, served the region well during most of the 20th century, creating a variety of sources of employment and opportunities for families to achieve a high quality of life.

Changes in the late 20th and early 21st century present new challenges. As we explore these changes, our goals are to define a concrete vision of a sustainable economy in the Pacific Northwest that will account for employment, prosperity and preservation, and restoration of the environment; to examine the roles public policy and entrepreneurship can play to ensure it is achievable; and to understand why it is important to make the transition to a sustainable future. We believe innovation, creativity, and stewardship will help achieve the goals of this program.

Three overarching topics will be explored in depth. Pacific Northwest energy regimes—including natural gas, hydroelectric sources and emerging technologies of tidal, geothermal, and wind—will be examined. Energy is vital to the Pacific Northwest because of the comparative advantages on price the region has long enjoyed. We will examine the composition of, and changes in, the regional economy, including how to understand key economic relationships and how technology and other emerging sectors impact education, demographics, employment, wage structures, and demands for infrastructure and tax base. To fully understand energy and the regional economy, we will integrate considerations of how economics, governance, and ecology are now at critical turning points.

This program is organized around class work that includes lectures, workshops, book seminars, and field trips. Assignments will include seminar papers, field trip reports, briefing papers, individual and team research, and a final project and presentation.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

government, business, public policy, economic development, public administration and entrepreneurship.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 50
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 1:00 pm
Purce Hall 7 - Classroom

Located in: Olympia

German - First Year I at SPSCC

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This beginning German course introduces the four basic skills of the language: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The language will be studied within its cultural context. Students receive Evergreen credits.  

NOTE: Course meets at South Puget Sound Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm in BLDG 21, Room 287. First meeting is September 18, 2018 (this is one week prior to the Evergreen state date).  

BOOKS: If a text is required students will need to purchase texts for this course from the SPSCC bookstore. The book list can be found on the bookstore website (http://spscc.bncollege.com) under the course GERM&121 

Faculty: Dawn Williams, dwilliams14@spscc.edu

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 5
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6-8:25pm in SPSCC BLDG 21, Room 287. First meeting is September 18, 2018 (this is one week prior to the Evergreen state date).   

Located in: Olympia

Off-campus location:

BLDG 21, Room 287 South Puget Sound Community College, Main Campus, 2011 Mottman Road SW, Olympia, WA 98512

DateRevision
2018-06-25New Fall quarter offering added (at SPSCC)

Global/Local Realities and Alternative Visions

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Tacoma
Tacoma
Daytime Evening
Day and Evening
Junior-Senior
Junior–Senior
Class Size: 200
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Peter Bacho
law, creative writing, literature
Paul Goldberg square
mathematics, 3-D modeling
sheppard square
sociology, cultural and media studies
Anthony Zaragoza square portrait
political economy
Mingxia Li
biology, Chinese cultural studies, molecular pharmacology

The world is undergoing massive transformations in the 21st century in its environment, economy, politics, culture, societal structure, aesthetics, and more. How can we understand these changes on both a local and global level? How can we respond to and help shape these changes? How do we view human migration around the world? How do we connect our neighborhoods to other parts of the world? How do we share resources equitably in an increasingly crowded and automated world? How do we relate to one another in an increasingly digitally mediated world? How shall we prepare ourselves and our children to face these new challenges? These are some of the questions this program will examine and explore. The global/local reality of the 21st century and beyond will be our intellectual playground and imagination laboratory. Drawing on an interdisciplinary perspective, we will consider various definitions and theories of globalism and humanism. By the end of the program we will be able to offer concrete recommendations to develop global and local connections that can overcome nationalism, sectarianism, and tribalism and help us to embrace alternative visions of global/local reality.

Our fall theme will be identifying the problem and clarifying the question. This quarter will be used to lay the foundation for the rest of the year, both substantively and in terms of the tools necessary to operate effectively in the learning community. We will explore the concept of connectivity, historically and in contemporary context, as it is explicated in theory and practice. In seminars we will read and analyze documents, artifacts, and secondary texts to decipher in what ways connectivity has existed and persisted throughout human history. Students will examine their personal experience with human connectivity by constructing an autobiographical memoir. Our work will be supplemented with a series of courses designed to assure literacy with words, numbers, and images. Students will have the opportunity to hone their skills in critical reasoning, research, and the use of multimedia and computers.

Our winter theme will be researching roots, causes, and potential solutions. We will look at specific contemporary societal issues in human connectivity from a variety of institutional perspectives, most notably in trade, migration/immigration, public health, law, education, government, and domestic and foreign politics. Students will investigate specific issues of interest with the purpose of identifying a particular problem, defining its dimensions, determining its causes, and establishing action plans for its remedy.

In spring the theme will progress to implementation. We will focus on the design and implementation of projects aimed at addressing the issues of global/local reality identified in winter. Seminar groups will combine their efforts to assist the community in facing challenges of the global/local reality. The projects may take the form of educational events, publications, multimedia presentations, or art installations to help the community find higher levels of connectivity with the rest of the world. Courses will assist in the successful implementation and evaluation of student group activities.

Topics include social and environmental justice, political and economic fairness, geography, foreign policy, public/global health, historical and artistic representations of various parts of the world including local regions in media, as well as concepts of equity, cultural competence, and diplomacy.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

community development, organizational development, law and public policy, education, social and human services, public administration, communication and media arts, environmental studies, and public health

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

To be formally admitted to the Tacoma Program, prospective students must meet the following criteria: 1) Complete a minimum of 90 transferable college credits or a transferable associate degree. You will start at the Tacoma Program as a junior or senior. 2) Complete an in-person intake interview at the Tacoma location. You can interview either before or after you begin the online application, but your application will not be processed until after your interview. To schedule an interview, call the student services coordinator at (253) 680-3005 or send an email to bufordv@evergreen.edu .

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$10 per quarter for entrance fees.

Junior-Senior
Class Standing: Junior–Senior
Class Size: 200
Daytime Evening

Scheduled for: Day and Evening

Tacoma

Located in: Tacoma

God(s): An Inquiry

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Sarah Eltantawi square
comparative religion

This comparative religion program will focus on the concept of God(s) and the theologies and cultures that surround this notion of the transcendent divine. We will cover, in order of appearance: Yoruba traditions, Shamanism, the ancient Greek world, ancient Chinese traditions (Confucianism, Taoism), Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Western philosophical critiques of the God concept, the New Atheist movement, and New Age movements.

Students should be prepared to engage with challenging primary and secondary texts from each religious tradition, watch and analyze relevant films, keep a journal of their process through this exploration, produce an academic research paper, and give an oral presentation of their findings at the end of the quarter.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

consciousness studies, history, religious studies, critical and cultural theory, philosophy, and further studies in the liberal arts.

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, January 7, 2019 - 10:00 am
SEM 2 D2107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

Health vs. Wealth

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

psychology
We will explore the intersection where valued health care meets paid health care. In the health care arena, good intent is plagued by paradox and can yield under-funding and a mismatch with initial intent. Paradoxes and costs haunting prevention, access, and treatment will be reviewed. The books Redefining Health Care and The New Health Care System  aid our journey as will the video series, "Remaking American Medicine", "Sick Around the World," and "Sick Around America". We will consider the path of unintended consequences where piles of dollars are not the full answer to identified need.
4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A2109 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10pm

Located in: Olympia

History and Systems in Psychology (A)

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

psychology

The purpose of this course is to provide an overall view of the emergence of psychology as a field, its historical roots, its evolution within a broader sociocultural context, and philosophical currents running throughout this evolution. Attention will be paid to the interaction of theory development and the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A2107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Tuesdays, 6-9:50 pm

Located in: Olympia

History and Systems in Psychology (B)

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

psychology

The purpose of this course is to provide an overall view of the emergence of psychology as a field, its historical roots, its evolution within a broader sociocultural context, and philosophical currents running throughout this evolution. Attention will be paid to the interaction of theory development and the social milieu, the cultural biases within theory, and the effect of personal history on theoretical claims. This course is a core course, required for pursuit of graduate studies in psychology.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A3107 - Seminar

Advertised schedule:

Mondays, 6-9:50 pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-09-14New offering added for Fall

Housing and Community Development

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

Stephen Buxbaum
political economy, community development and planning

The design, condition and affordability of housing impacts every aspect of our society and culture. By studying how our society provides shelter for its people we can learn about our values, politics and beliefs. This program explores the evolution of housing policy and programs from a multi-disciplinary approach, using concepts from community psychology, urban planning and political economy.

During winter quarter we will examine the political, economic and social forces that drove the creation of federal and state housing programs from the depression years forward. Students will learn how analytical and political frameworks are used to create, evaluate and shape housing programs, projects and services.  We will examine how public housing policies and programs are used to provide shelter, stimulate the economy, protect the environment and support sustainable growth. We will examine the continuum of subsidies that are provided to everyone from high income earners and investors to people who are chronically homeless.

During spring quarter, we will focus on current approaches to solving housing affordability and homelessness in Washington State – including an examination of our state’s response to the needs of low-income individuals and families, homeless and special needs populations. We will be looking closely at different types of multi-family and single-family housing, and the policies that drive their development, as we consider how well the needs of individuals, families and communities are being met.

The program is crafted from a community development practitioner’s view of the design and implementation of housing and community development programs. Class sessions will be interactive, combining presentations by the instructor and guests with seminar style discussions and field trips. Learning objectives include a focus on developing critical thinking and writing skills.

This program is intended for students who are interested in the following career paths and issues: community and economic development, education, public administration, public policy, Washington State history and political science.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Public Administration, public policy, non-profit management, community development and urban planning.

8

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 9:30 am
SEM 2 A1107 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

Saturdays 9:30am-4pm

Some Saturday classes will include field trips to downtown Olympia and Grays Harbor County. Transportation will be provided for locations that are outside downtown Olympia .

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2018-11-01Updated description

How Do You Know What You Know?

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
EveningWeekend
Evening and Weekend
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
8
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Wang-Wenhong
sociology and social statistics

In this world of information explosion, we are constantly bombarded by new discoveries, surprising claims, as well as familiar statements, routine analyses, often backed by scientific evidence and numbers. So what is social scientific methodology? Why do we need it? What do we really mean by  scientific  research? What is the difference between scientific research and common sense? Can we really be objective in our research? What is the role of subjective judgment in research?  Is experimenting on human being ethical? What data can and cannot tell you? How to tell good research from bad research? Which approach is better, qualitative or quantitative, in what situations? What are the major methods for social scientific research? What role does statistics play in scientific research? How can you tell which numbers are used correctly and which are not? How can we use statistical tools to inform, to explore and to empower? And how do we know what we know? 

In this introductory research methodology program, we will look into the rationale of social scientific research, study the major methods in social sciences, and their pros and cons. We will learn to ask meaningful questions, practice research design, understand and evaluate research papers and last but not least, get our feet wet in the actual research practice. We are also going to study social statistics, including descriptive statistics and an overview of inferential statistics. Class activities will include workshops, lectures, seminars, and film screening. The students will demonstrate their learning through essays, group work, and a major research project involving statistical analysis.

The statistical component meets the prerequisites of Master in Teaching and Master of Public Administration. 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Research in social sciences, social work, education, teaching, public administration

8

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

High school algebra

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
EveningWeekend

Scheduled for: Evening and Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 C3107 - Seminar

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-01-18Schedule change- class will now meet Wed/Sat, was Sat/Sun

Image, Object, Illusion: Photography and 3D Art

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

photography

In this program we will work hands-on in the photography and three-dimensional (3D) art studios, producing hybrid work that works within the worlds of objects and images simultaneously. This program will use the mediums of sculpture and photography as a means to ask ongoing questions within each field, and within the contemporary arts more generally. Some of these questions will regard the search for "proof" or "truth" within an object or image as well as the potency of craft and production in the rendering of illusions.

Students will learn to create their own images (color and black and white photos) and the basic requirements for building simple wood forms, among other materials. Students can expect to develop skills and precision in 2D and 3D techniques and materials through a number of projects designed to engage these techniques/materials in concert with one another. 

In this program, we will discuss how technological changes in photography, image editing, 3D modeling and manufacturing have changed our expectations for fidelity and accuracy in photos and objects.The program will require students to move between physical and optical illusions, and in some cases, understanding how each requires the other. We will work through concepts around optical illusions, some of which are obvious, and others not. Here, students will learn about the traditions of trompe l'oeil, tricenium (or three-way pictures), diptychs, triptychs, miniatures, forced perspective, Victorian "spirit" photography and other precedents for fooling the eye.

This program does not require any previous art, photography or metalsmithing experience. 

 

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Art, Art History, Design, Education

16

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Hybrid Online Learning - This offering delivers < 25% of its instruction online, rather than via face-to-face contact between you and your instructors.
Special expenses:

Depending on individual projects, students may choose to spend an additional $25 to $100 on materials.

Fees:

$150 for museum entrance fees and project supplies

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 50
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 9:30 am
Art Annex 2103 - Art Studio

Located in: Olympia

In Sickness and In Health

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Sophomore
Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Toska Olson
sociology, gender studies
Stein square
cultural anthropology

In this introductory program, students will explore cultural, social, and psychological approaches to the body and health and will build capacities for subsequent undergraduate studies. Using the lens of medical anthropology, we will consider diverse practices around sickness and healing and develop an understanding of Western biomedicine as a complex cultural system. Toward this aim, students will learn qualitative ethnographic techniques for documenting and analyzing cultural and social contexts. We will also consider how people generate stories about their experiences with illness and persistence; as part of this work, students will create interview-based audio podcasts.

An integrated social science exploration of health and well-being will lead us to readings and experiential exercises in areas such as positive psychology, sociology, neuroscience, somatic studies, and contemplative practices. We will participate in text-based seminar discussions and in workshops that aim to integrate mind, body, and spirit. Our intention will be to learn how to build the positive qualities that social scientists have determined are associated with strong and happy individuals, relationships, and communities. Students will cultivate foundational skills that are relevant across all careers and fields of study—observation, notetaking, analysis, researching, speaking, and writing—but that may be particularly helpful in social and human services, health care, and education.

Students who successfully complete the fall quarter program will be eligible to enroll in the second quarter of the expanded version of this program, Culture, Self, and Healing in spring 2019.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

social and human services, health care, and education.

16

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$30 fee fall quarter for museum entrance

Freshman-Sophomore
Class Standing: Freshman–Sophomore
Class Size: 46
50% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 9:30 am
SEM 2 E1105 - Lecture

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

Winter 2019

DateRevision
2018-07-20$30 required fee added for fall

Indigenous Identity Through the Arts

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Weekend
Weekend
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
2
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

Gary Bigbear
visual art, indigenous studies

Through exposure to a wide variety of Indigenous art and music, this course will create opportunities for exploring personal identity through sketching and writing, drawing, design, oral storytelling, drum-making, drum-painting, and presentations. We will use an indigenous lens to examine the role of art within indigenous communities, as well as individual identity. Students will be crafting their own art and sharing their journey in a final presentation. 

2

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • No Required Online Learning - No access to web tools required. Any web tools provided are optional.
Fees:

$40 fee for drum kit materials and paints.

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Weekend

Scheduled for: Weekend

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Sunday, November 4, 2018 - 2:00 pm
LONGHOUSE 1007A - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

Sundays November 4th and December 2nd: 2-4:50pm

Located in: Olympia

Inscribing the Body: Embodiment and the Performance of Identity in Creative Writing

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

In what ways is writing necessarily gendered? Or raced? Or seen through the lens of class?  This class will take up "the body" as a site of radical cultural production as expansively as possible, considering some of the forms in which bodies are othered through language, including through discourses of disability, gender performance, and other zones of often-felt difference and social dislocation. Though this is primarily a creative writing class, our writing will push itself outside its usual modes of expression. We will explore texts anthologized in the recent collection Troubling the Line, as well as in past collections, such as texts from The Black Arts Movement.  We will discuss and critique the rich tradition of "somatic" practices in the world of performance and live art and we will familiarize ourselves with important recent experiments in poetry and prose by authors such as kari edwards, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, and Renee Gladmann. Our end goal will be to curate a show and live reading that provides us a space to test out some of our textual experiments.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

Arts, activism, graduate study

4

Credits per quarter

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 25
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEM 2 A2105 - Workshop

Advertised schedule:

Tue/Fri 6-8pm

Located in: Olympia

DateRevision
2019-01-02New Faculty: Lynarra Featherly

Integrated Natural Sciences (INS)

FallWinterSpring
Fall 2018
Winter 2019
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 100
25% Reserved for Freshmen
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

John Kirkpatrick
environmental chemistry, molecular biology and ecology, oceanography
neurobiology

This program integrates general chemistry, physical and environmental geology, and general biology, providing a rigorous and intensive foundation in the natural sciences. It is intended for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced coursework in biology, chemistry, and the earth sciences. Biological and chemical processes have shaped Earth over time: rock is the product of chemical reactions, the origin and evolution of life created an oxygen-rich atmosphere, and biogeochemical processes are the foundation of ecological function. This yearlong interdisciplinary program will focus on transformations of matter and energy in and between living and nonliving systems. This will provide an opportunity to gain an understanding of biological, chemical, and physical earth processes on a variety of scales. The nature of living organisms will be examined on molecular, cellular, and physiological levels within the context of their evolutionary history. Chemical topics of equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics will provide a framework to understand biological and ecological systems. Students will engage with these themes using an experimental approach to develop critical and quantitative reasoning skills. Fall quarter (taught by John Kirkpatrick, Nancy Murray and Kenneth Tabbutt) will integrate topics of biology, chemistry, and geology through the study of early Earth history. Earth materials (rocks and minerals) and processes that form and alter them will be examined. Molecular structure and properties will enhance our understanding of biological function at the molecular level. These will be covered through the study of genetics and inheritance, structure and synthesis of DNA and proteins, and how these molecules are integrated into cells. In winter quarter (taught by John Kirkpatrick, Nancy Murray and Kenneth Tabbutt) we will learn how fossil fuels and mineral resources are formed, as well as the impacts associated with their extraction and use (e.g., climate change). Chemical concepts of kinetics and equilibria will enhance our geological studies. Biology content will focus on a more organismal level by examining important concepts in animal developmental biology, reproduction, and physiology. In spring quarter (taught by John Kirkpatrick and Nancy Murray) we will examine equilibrium reactions in greater depth and begin our study of thermodynamics. We will further examine evolutionary processes on a macro level through the study of plants, diversification of life, and ecology. Program activities will include lectures, small group problem-solving workshops, laboratories, field work, and field trips. We expect students to end the program in spring with a working knowledge of scientific and quantitative concepts, the ability to reason critically and to solve problems, and with hands-on experience in natural science. Students will also gain a strong appreciation of the interconnectedness of biological and physical systems, and an ability to apply this knowledge to complex problems.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

chemistry, biology, geology, environmental science, and health sciences.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

Students are expected to be proficient in math at the algebra II or precalculus level.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 100
25% Reserved for Freshmen
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 B1107 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

May be offered again in:

2019-20

DateRevision
2018-08-14description updated to reflect faculty teaching per quarter

Intermediate Microeconomics

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Daytime
Day
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
16
Credits per quarter

Compare offerings and share your lists with others.

Taught by

This program is designed for students who are interested in critically studying economics beyond the introductory level. We will complete the equivalent of textbook intermediate microeconomics while critically assessing the boundaries of its usefulness and its ideological role in legitimating market solutions to complex social problems. 

We will survey two additional schools of economic thought: Marxist political economy and institutional economics. Our goal is not to choose the "right" school of thought. Instead, we will be guided by the belief that complex and diverse questions require diverse tools; no one school of thought will be sufficient. In the process, we will learn to be self-critical scholars, always asking of each approach: What does it illuminate and what does it obfuscate?

In seminar, we will emphasize the close reading of challenging texts by authors such as Thorstein Veblen, Jonathan Nitzan, Shimshon Bichler, Stephen Resnick, Richard Wolff, Deirdre McCloskey, Nancy Folbre, and Costas Lapavitsas. Program activities will include lectures, workshops, exams, short papers, and seminar.

This offering will prepare you for careers and advanced study in:

economics, political economy, history, public administration, and business.

16

Credits per quarter

Prerequisites:

principles of microeconomics, the equivalent, or winter enrollment in   Who Gets What?   : Political Economy of Income, Wealth and Economic Justice.

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 25
Daytime

Scheduled for: Day

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 9:00 am
SEM 2 D3105 - Workshop

Located in: Olympia

Introduction to Digital Video Editing at SPSCC

Spring
Spring 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Freshman-Senior
Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 4
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

This course introduces post-production principles and procedures for editing digital video and audio. Students will examine the aesthetic, social, political, and cultural implications of editorial decision-making. 

NOTE: This class meets at South Puget Sound Community College, 2011 Mottman Road, SW, Olympia, WA 98512, in Building 21, Room 120, Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:00-8:25 p.m.   Students must be registered by 5:00 PM on Thursday, March 28th. 

BOOKS: If a text is required students will need to purchase texts for this course from the SPSCC bookstore. The book list can be found on the bookstore website (http://spscc.bncollege.com) under the course FILMP115.    

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Prerequisites:

Students should have introductory experience with the basic theories and skills used in studio and field video production. Email the faculty (mgray@spscc.edu) if you have questions about your preparation. 

Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$85 digital video editing fee

Freshman-Senior
Class Standing: Freshman–Senior
Class Size: 4
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

Located in: Olympia

Introduction to Electronics in Music I

Fall
Fall 2018
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

music technology and theory

In Introduction to Electronics in Music I, students will be introduced to the creative use of music technology from the perspective of the composer.  Students will create original compositions while developing technical skills in the studio.  We’ll contextualize our creative work by looking to early pioneers and experimenters of electronic music.  Students will develop proficiency in the music technology labs, using analog tape machines to create compositions while learning about signal flow, effective use of the mixing board, EQ, and effects.  No experience is required. Please contact the instructor for a course application.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$80 fee for magnetic tape

Sophomore-Senior
Class Standing: Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
Evening

Scheduled for: Evening

Final schedule and room assignments:

First meeting:

Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 6:00 pm
Com 343 - MTL Intro

Advertised schedule:

Tue 6-10p

Located in: Olympia

Introduction to Electronics in Music II

Winter
Winter 2019
Olympia
Olympia
Evening
Evening
Sophomore-Senior
Sophomore–Senior
Class Size: 18
4
Credits per quarter

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Taught by

music technology and theory

In Introduction to Electronics in Music II, students will continue to develop technical and creative skills in the music technology labs while exploring the music and ideas of early electronic music composers.  This quarter will focus on the fundamentals of sound synthesis and the creative use of the analog modular synthesizer.  Students will create compositions using the modular synthesizer, analog tape machines, and MIDI.  Students wishing to join in the winter quarter will be expected to complete a catch up assignment. Please contact the instructor for a course application.

4

Credits per quarter

Fields of study: 
Online learning:
  • Enhanced Online Learning - This offering requires access to web-based tools, but use of these tools does not displace any face-to-face instruction.
Fees:

$50 for electronic components.