Teaching the Child in Front of You

 in a Changing World

 

Fall 2006

 

faculty

office

phone

e-mail

Sherry Walton

Sem II 3104

867-6753

WaltonS@evergreen.edu

Masao Sugiyama

Sem II 3112

867-6512

Sugiyama@evergreen.edu

Gery Gerst

Lab I 3003

867-5209

gerstg@evergreen.edu

Jacque Ensign

Sem II 3110

867-6165

ensignj@evergreen.edu

Office Hours: by appointment

 

I. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

 

Focus Description from the MIT Program catalog for 2006-08:

           

 Each of us has a picture of what it means to be a teacher based on our own experience in schools. We've perhaps changed those pictures to accommodate our growing understanding of the complexities that have always been part of the "teacher" role. We may also have considered that as powerful political, economic, social and demographic forces bring change to schools it is certain that for us, as teachers, the experiences of our future students will be much different than our own.

 

We must reexamine our current beliefs about teaching and learning if we are to be effective advocates for our students in this time of change. We expect our students in this program to become educators who are willing to accept the challenge of discovering what it means to be a critically reflective practitioner; who will strive to deepen their own understanding of schooling and education in a democratic society; and who are willing to question and challenge existing educational structures that systematically leave some groups of children behind. We look forward to building a community of learners intent on preparing themselves to teach all the children who will be in front of them.

 

The year 2006 marks the twenty year anniversary of "Evergreen style" teacher education - in 1986, the prototype for Evergreen's Master in Teaching Program, the Teacher Education Program, admitted its first students. Then, as now, Evergreen's approach to teacher preparation emphasized building a community of learners, developing a strong theoretical foundation, and learning to apply theory through extensive opportunities for practice. The inaugural 1986 cycle was also informed and inspired by the idea of "development in education", and in particular by the question "what does it mean to take development as the aim of education?"

 

For the 2006-08 cycle we will thoroughly revisit the theme of development, recognizing its continuing value in helping us challenge and deepen our understanding of what it means to teach effectively and meaningfully - especially in a time of change. 

 

Among the questions that will energize our study and practice are:

 

    * What are the stated and implicit goals of education today and historically in US public schools, and across the world? Can the variety of perspectives about educational goals be placed on a developmental continuum? What are the benefits of considering development as the overarching aim of education?

 

    * What does it mean to know our learners? Along which dimensions (e.g., developmental levels, learning style, personality, interest) is it most important to know our learners? How can we as teachers further develop within ourselves the emotional and intellectual attributes needed to effectively understand our future students?

 

    * How do children learn? Is learning developmental? Are there universal learning principles that work for all children?   How does the learning process differ at different ages and for children with varying levels of language development?

 

    * What do teachers need to know about the subjects they teach? How can teachers present content appropriately, given the variety of learning styles and developmental levels of their learners?

 

    * How can we learn to plan instruction and set up learning environments that support the ideal of democracy? How can we plan our instruction so as to simultaneously take into account state and federal requirements, societal needs and parental expectations while not forgetting that we are preparing our students to be citizens in a democracy?

 

    * Which teaching strategies are most needed in today's diverse schools? How might our own cultural encapsulation and other life experiences affect our ability to use a particular teaching strategy effectively? How can educational technologies be appropriately used to further the all-around development of our students?

 

    * How can assessment be used to continually improve the education environment at the individual, classroom, and school levels? How can teachers prepare students for high-stakes testing without compromising the depth and breadth of the students' educational experience? Can we model effective assessment in our own teacher education program?

 

 

 

 Regular Meeting Times & Locations

 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

9:00am – 12:00 noon

All Program

TBA

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminars:

MasaoTBA

Gery  TBA

Jacque TBA

9:00am-12:00 noon

All program

TBA

 

K-12 schools: start of teacher’s work day & generally ending at noon (ending times will vary according to school schedules)

 

1-4 Computer lab & Library (follow schedule given to your group)

9- 10 a.m.

field seminar

10-12 noon

book seminar

 

Seminars:

Masao TBA

Gery TBA

Jacque TBA

 

1:00-3:00 p.m.: 

All program

TBA

 

 

Š       See week-by-week schedule for exceptions to this schedule

 

 

Special Dates:

Š       November 20-24, no classes.

 

II. REQUIRED READINGS

 

NOTE:  TEXTS MARKED WITH AN ASTERISK (*) INDICATE THAT THIS READING WILL BE ASSIGNED IN OTHER QUARTERS IN THE PROGRAM IN ADDITION TO FALL QUARTER 2006

 

FOR EACH READING, THE EXACT EDITION LISTED HERE IS EXPECTED AS WE NEED TO HAVE THE SAME PAGES TO REFERENCE IN SEMINARS.

 

*American Psychological Association’s documentation and format style:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/research/r_apa.html

 

*Arends, Richard. (1996). Classroom Instruction and Management. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0070030820 (paper)

 

*Bracey, Gerald. (2006). Reading Educational Research. Heinemann. ISBN 0325008582 (paper)

.

*Cohen, Elizabeth G. Designing Groupwork: Strategies for the Heterogeneous Classroom, 2nd Edition, 1994, Teachers College Press, Columbia University, ISBN 0807733318 (paper)

 

Davis, Sampson, George Jenkins, & Rameck Hunt. (2002). The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and Fulfill a Dream. Riverhead Books. (paper) ISBN 157322989X

 

Dewey, John. (1997 edition). Experience and Education. Touchstone/Simon and Schuster. ISBN 0684838281 (paper)

 

Ensign, Jacque. (1996) "A Conversation between John Dewey and Rudolf Steiner: A Comparison of Waldorf and  Progressive Education." Educational Theory 46, no. 2: 175-88. [available on reserve at library]

 

*Evergreen State College Master in Teaching Program, Student Guide to Policies, Procedures, and Resources, 2006 edition.

 

*Galvan, Jose. (2005). Writing Literature Reviews. 3rd edition Pyrczak Pub. ISBN 1884585663 (paper)

 

Mooney, Jonathan & David Cole. (2001). Learning Outside the Lines. Fireside/Simon and Schuster. ISBN  0-684-86598-x (paper)

 

Noddings, Nel. (2003). Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics and Moral Education. University of California Press; 2nd edition. ISBN 0520238648 (paper)

 

Plato. Meno. available at http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/publications/Projects/digitexts/plato/meno/meno.html

 

*Rethinking Schools, a quarterly magazine [to be distributed free by program]

 

Rousseau. Emile available at http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/pedagogies/rousseau/index.html

 

*Singer, Dorothy G. & Tracey A. Revenson. (1996). A Piaget Primer: How a Child Thinks. New York: Plume. ISBN 0452275652 (paper)

 

Skinner, B.F. [on reserve in library]

 

Spring, Joel H. (2004). The American School, 1642-2004, 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0072875666 (paper)

 

Vygotsky, Lev. [on reserve in library]

 

*Wolfe, Patricia. (2001). Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice. Reston, VA: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. ISBN 0871205173

 

Research-based professional journal articles (to be assigned)

 

Note: EndNote software will be expected for writing conference paper.

Short readings will periodically be distributed within program workshops.

 

 

III.  REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS

 

1.  Meeting expectations of the MIT program covenant

            See Student Guide to Policies, Procedures, and Resources.

 

2. Attendance & Participation

As a prospective teacher, habits of punctuality and completion of assignments on time are critical for your success in your career.  Students are expected to attend and participate in all program activities, arrive on time and leave when class ends.  If a student must be absent due to a valid reason, he/she will need to negotiate the absence by contacting his/her seminar faculty in advance of the absence.  Every absence will require make-up work and unexcused absences may result in loss of credit.  If you have a legitimate excuse, you still must e-mail your completed assignment to your seminar faculty as a Word attachment by the due date & time.

 

3.  Autobiographical Research into the Formation of Your Teacher Identity

            Throughout the program you will be given written prompts in order to investigate the social construction or formation of your teacher identity based on your own life experiences. For each assignment, you are to explore your identity in relation to the focus topic, and include the implications of this for you as a teacher. These assignments are to be single-spaced typed and submitted to your seminar faculty by email attachment by the beginning of class.

Due:

Š       Thursday, Sept. 29, autobiographical/teacher identity entry #1 – focus on family & early schooling history

Š      Friday, Oct. 27, autobiographical/teacher identity entry #2 – focus on class.

 

4. Seminar Preparation Papers

              For each scheduled seminar you are required to arrive to seminar with (a) your copy of the assigned reading, having read the entire assigned reading and (b) a 2 page, single-spaced, stapled or back/front, typed paper of quotes with your comments.

              For each quote, include the specific page number so we can find it during discussion. After each quote, include a comment that explains why it is significant in relation to any of this quarter’s themes: what is learning; what is effective teaching; how has/does the institution of schooling serve or hinder student learning?; how do we make informed decisions about educational issues?

             Your paper should capture your thoughts about several particular ideas, concepts, or issues presented in the text that warrant further discussion during the seminar.  The paper is text-centered and not about your likes/dislikes of the author’s ideas or style of writing.

 

Due: One copy of your seminar preparation paper is emailed before seminar to your seminar faculty and one copy is brought to seminar and later added to your portfolio.

 

5. Facilitation & Dialogue Expectations

Because active participation and the ability to engage in critical dialogue are crucial building blocks to becoming an informed and reflective teacher, you will have the opportunity to improve your listening and facilitation skills not only in seminar, workshops, and lectures, but also by participating in weekly “integration seminars.” During the Fall quarter you will be expected to facilitate one integration seminar. 

 

6.  Integration Papers

            Twice during the quarter you will write formal “integration” papers based on your readings, lectures, workshops, and other program experiences.  The purpose of these short papers (approximately 6 pages each) is for you to develop your ability to analyze and synthesize program materials into a coherent formal paper that integrates and makes connections with what you are learning.  For each integration paper, you are to integrate all assigned readings in a way that fleshes out a thesis statement you make that is related to learning, teaching, and/or who is served or hindered by schools.

Due:

Š       Tues. and Wed, Oct. 17 & 18: post your integration paper online and respond to 2 other papers.

Š       Fri., Oct. 20, integration paper #1

Š       Fri., Dec. 1, integration paper #2

 

7. Conference Paper

            During Year 1 of this program you will complete a professional conference paper that is publishable in a professional journal or presentable at a professional conference.  The topic of your paper must be related to your future work as a classroom teacher.  Topics must be approved in consultation with your faculty.  The paper will be scholarly, approximately 20- 25 typed, double-spaced pages, and will follow a professional documentation style.  You will receive further information about the expectations and guidelines for this paper.

In Fall quarter you will begin the process of reviewing research on your topic and begin an integrated literature review of research on your topic.  In Winter quarter you will be given time to continue your research and write an almost complete draft of your paper.  Also, in Winter quarter you will be assigned a faculty reader of your conference paper.  In Spring quarter you will continue revising your paper into a polished form.  The final version of your conference paper will be completed during Spring quarter.

During Winter quarter of Year 2 your cohort will create an on-campus conference during which you will present your paper.  Our goal is to collect your papers in a bound copy of what is known as “Conference Proceedings” so that each student will have a copy of all the papers produced.  Requirements for the actual conference presentations will be distributed during Winter quarter of Year 2.

Due:

Š       Fri. Oct. 13: Tentative Conference paper topic(s) (1-2) and a one paragraph rationale for selecting your topic.

Š       Fri. Oct. 27, Tentative conference paper topic and 1 paragraph explanation for selecting your topic, also a bibliography-in-progress in APA format.

Š       Friday, Dec. 8, Double-spaced typed literature review on your topic and bibliography- all in APA format.

 

8.  Journal Article Analysis

            In the workshop on October 24 you will be introduced to research methods.  Prior to the beginning of that workshop, you will complete 3 worksheets (to be distributed) that analyze 3 research studies.

Due: Tuesday, October 31, 9:00 a.m., completed worksheets that analyze 3 research-based journal articles: 2 selected by your faculty and one from your conference paper bibliography (also bring all 3 research articles to class for further use in workshop).

 

9. Website Design and Construction
           
You will create a personal website to describe yourself and your work in the program.  Each website will consist of a home page, a portfolio page, a personal page.  It may also have other pages that reflect your interests.

Due:

Š       Thursday, November 30: web site complete. Peer reviews, using a rubric, will be done during computer lab time.

 

10.  Field Notes

            Before your first field observation, you will receive instructions in regards to expectations for your field experiences during Fall quarter.

Due: each week as noted in syllabus

 

11.  “MIT 2008” Listserv

            Each student will be subscribed to the program’s listserv and is to check it regularly.  Students are not required to post information.

 

12. Program Portfolio Format and Contents

Your portfolio materials must be kept in a 3-ring binder with dividers based on the categories listed above, items 3-10.  All materials in the portfolio should be typed except for some aspects of your field notes.  On the first page for each category section, write a self-reflection of how you have grown in your understanding of learning & effective teaching, and how schools server or hinder student learning through your work in that category. Your name needs to appear both on the outside of your notebook and on the first page of your portfolio.

Due:

Š       Friday, Oct. 20, portfolio-in-progress for sharing with your program colleagues

Š       Tues., Oct. 24, current, mid-quarter portfolio

Š       Friday, Dec. 8, completed Fall quarter portfolio

 

Contents:

section

# of items in section

Š       autobiographical/teacher identity formation entries

 

2

Š       seminar preparation papers

16

Š       integration papers(2) & print outs of 2 peer reviews

4

Š       assignments related to the development of your conference paper

3

 

Š       models of teaching

2

Š       journal article analysis worksheet

3

Š       reflection on your process of learning to create your web site & 5 peer reviews of your web site

6

Š       field notes

1 for each week at field site = 9

 

IV. CREDIT POLICY

 

Award of Credit:

            Students receive credit for fulfilling program requirements and meeting graduate level college standards.  Credit will be awarded at the end of Year One for full participation in all program activities and for satisfactory completion of all the work of the program.  Year Two credit is awarded on a quarterly basis.

 

            At Evergreen, it is possible for a student to attend regularly yet receive reduced credit because of unsatisfactory performance or missing work.  In the MIT program, however, such a loss of credit means that a student will not be able to complete the program.  Reduction of credit will automatically trigger dismissal from the program.  If, for any reason, a student leaves the program before completion, she/he may receive the credit earned up to that point.  See Student Guide to Policies, Procedures, and Resources

 

 


V. WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 
Week 1 (September 25-29):  “Community Building”

 

 

Tues., Sept. 26

Wed., Sept. 27

Thurs., Sept. 28

Friday, Sept. 29

Topics/Activities

9:004:00

Retreat

9:00-4:00

Retreat

 

 

 

Overview of selecting Conference paper topic

9:00 a.m.—12:00 p.m.

1.  Whole group program expectations

seminar groups

integration seminar groups

 

2. Film: Cohen, “Status Treatments for the Classroom” Gery

 

3.  Sharing autobiographical entries

Jacque

 

4. Set up for tea party Masao

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer: getting WebX & email & web page accounts

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Intro to Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

No Afternoon Class: prepare for potluck

 

 

 

 

 

6pm Longhouse

potluck

 

Readings Due

Student Guidebook to Policies, Procedures, and Resources (pages 3-12)

 

 

Learning Outside the Lines

Assignments Due

 

 

autobiographical/

teacher identity entry #1

bring an artifact (photo, object) to help us get to know you

1. Seminar preparation paper

2.  potluck dish

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 2 (October 2-6): History of Education

 

 

Tues., Oct. 3

Wed., Oct. 4

Thurs., Oct. 5

Friday, Oct. 6

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

“The Rise of Public Schooling” Jacque

 

Field observation preparation: Loren & Jacque

 

1-3:00

Seminar

9:00-12:00

Theorist Tea Party

Masao

 

 

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

(Dreamweaver/databases & intro to EndNote)

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

1:00—3:00 p.m.

1. Preview of next week

 

2.  Integration paper expectations

 

3. Integration seminar

 

Readings Due

The American School,

 ch. 1-5 (pp.1-133)

 

Writing Literature Reviews

ch. 1-3 (pp. 1-29)

Designing Groupwork, Preface, Ch. 1-2, 6-7 (pp. xv-23, 85-116)

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

 

 

 

1. Seminar preparation paper

2. Current field notes

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 3 (October 9-13): Philosophers of Education

 

 

Tues., Oct. 10

Wed., Oct. 11

Thurs., Oct. 12

Friday, Oct. 13

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

workshop on Plato

Masao

 

1-3:00

Seminar

9:00-12:00

workshop on Rousseau

Gery

 

prep for Arends: models of teaching

Masao

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

(databases, practice WebX)

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

1:00—3:00 p.m.

1. Preview of next week

 

2. Portfolio expectations

 

3. Integration seminar

 

Readings Due

Plato, Meno

http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/publications/Projects/digitexts/plato/meno/meno.html

 

Rousseau, Emile

available at http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/pedagogies/rousseau/index.html

 

 

Spring, The American School ch.7, 9, 10 (pp.168-205; 243-316)

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

 

 Bring electronic copy of a seminar prep paper to computer workshop

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

2. Current field notes

 

3. Conference paper topic(s) (1-2) & rationale(s)

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes


 

Week 4 (October 16-20 ): Psychology of Education

 

 

Tues., October 17

Wed., October 18

Thurs., October 19

Friday, October 20

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

Skinner/Piaget workshop

Masao

 

1-3:00

Seminar on Piaget

9:00-12:00

Brain workshop

skits on theorists

Gery

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

1:00—3:00 p.m.

1. Preview of next week

 

2. Portfolio sharing

 

3. Integration seminar

 

Readings Due

Skinner reading (on reserve)

A Piaget Primer

Wolfe, Brain Matters Preface, Part 1 &2 (pp. v-30)

 

Wolfe, Brain Matters Preface, Part 1 &2 (pp. v-30)

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper on Piaget

 

2. Post a draft of your integration paper by 9pm.

 

1. Read & respond (using supplied rubric) to 2 integration papers by midnight.

 

 

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

2. Current field notes

 

3. Integration paper #1

 

4. Portfolio- bring to afternoon session to share

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes


 

Week 5 (October 23-27): Understanding Educational Research

 

 

Tues., Oct. 24

Wed., Oct. 25

Thurs., Oct. 26

Friday, Oct. 27

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

Research workshop

Masao

 

1-3:00

Seminar

9:00-12:00

Research workshop

(also: instructions for critiquing articles for 10/31 class)

Masao

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

9:00 a.m-.3:00

 individual conferences

Readings Due

Reading Educational Research, Foreword, Introduction, ch. 1-2 (pp.xi-67)

Reading Educational Research, ch. 3 (pp.68-101)

 

 

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

2. Mid-quarter portfolio- turn in to your seminar faculty

1. Arends ch.1 & assigned chapter for your group

 

2. Draft plan for your group’s teaching in line with your group’s assigned model of instruction

 

 

1.Autobiography #2 on class

 

2. Conference paper topic, rationale, preliminary bibliography in APA format

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes


 

Week 6 (Oct. 30-Nov. 3): Literature Reviews

 

 

Tues., Oct. 31

Wed., Nov. 1

Thurs., Nov. 2

Friday, Nov. 3

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

workshop on lit reviews

critiquing quantitative & qualitative research articles

Jacque & Masao

 

Masao returns drafts of plans for Arends

1-3:00

Seminar

9:00-12:00

independent library work for literature reviews

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

independent library work for literature reviews

9:00 a.m.-3:00

 independent library work for literature reviews

 

Readings Due

Writing Literature Reviews, ch. 4-9 (pp.31-90)

 

 

 

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

2. completed worksheets that analyze 3 research-based journal articles: 2 selected by faculty and 1 from your conference paper bibliography (also bring all 3 research articles to class for further use in workshop).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes

note: no formal MIT classes Wed-Friday to give you time for extended library work on your literature reviews.

Do observations in K-12 classrooms on Thursday as usual.

Week 7 (November 6-10): Philosophy of Education & Models of Teaching

 

 

Tues., Nov. 7

Wed., Nov. 8

Thurs., Nov. 9

Friday, Nov. 10

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

workshop on Dewey

Jacque

 

1-3:00

Seminar

9:00-12:00

Masao: workshop on models of teaching:

Direct instruction

Cooperative Learning

Presentation

 

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

1:00—3:00 p.m.

1. Preview of next week

 

2. Integration seminar

 

Readings Due

Dewey, Experience & Education

Arends ch. 2, 3, & ch. on presentation on reserve

 

Ensign, “A Conversation between John Dewey and Rudolf Steiner” (on reserve in library)

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

if your group is presenting:

1 p. handout of 3-5 key characteristics of your model of instruction

1 group plan of instruction for your model

 

 

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

2. Current field notes from weeks 6 & 7

 

 

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes


 

Week 8 (November 13-17): Models of Learning & Teaching

 

 

Tues., Nov. 14

Wed., Nov. 15

Thurs., Nov. 16

Friday, Nov. 17

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

workshop on Vygotsky

Jacque

 

1-3:00

Seminar

9:00-12:00

Masao: workshop on models of teaching:

Problem based instruction

Classroom discussion

Concept learning

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

1:00—3:00 p.m.

1. Preview of next week

 

2. Integration seminar

 

Readings Due

Vygotsky (on reserve)

Arends, ch. 4, 5, & ch. on concept learning on reserve

 

Neo-Vygotsky reading: (on reserve)

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

if your group is presenting:

1 p. handout of 3-5 key characteristics of your model of instruction

1 group plan of instruction for your model

 

 

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

2. Current field notes

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes


 

Week 9 (November 27- December 1): Inequities in Opportunities & Education

 

 

Tues., Nov. 28

Wed., Nov. 29

Thurs., Nov. 30

Friday, Dec. 1

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

“Segregated Schooling”

Jacque

 

1-3:00

Seminar

8:00 – 5:00 p.m.

 

Gery:

Tentative- Field trip to Wing Luke Asian Museum & Panama Hotel with lunch in International District in Seattle – Vans provided

 

**meet in bus circle**

Note: Must have $3.00 in advance for faculty to collect to give to museum

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

1:00—3:00 p.m.

1. Preview of next week

 

2. Integration seminar

 

Readings Due

Spring, The American School ch. 13-15 (pp. 375-472)

 

 

Noddings, Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics & Moral Education

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

 

1. Your completed web page

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

2. Current field notes

 

3. Integration paper #2

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes


 

Week 10 (December 4 - 8): Wrap Up

 

 

Tues., Dec. 5

Wed., Dec. 6

Thurs., Dec. 7

Friday, Dec. 8

Topics/Activities

9:00—12:00

TBA

 

1-3:00

Seminar

9:00-12:00

day off to work on final assignments

-noon

guided observations in K-12 public schools

 

1:00-4:00pm

Computer/Library

9:00 a.m.-10:00

Field Seminar

10:00am- 12:00

 Book Seminar

 

 

1:00—3:00 p.m.

Potluck

photo montage of this quarter

Readings Due

Rethinking Schools – will be given to you

 

 

 

The Pact

Assignments Due

1. Seminar preparation paper

 

 

 

 

1. no seminar preparation paper but come prepared to discuss book

2. end-of-quarter portfolio

3. Conference paper lit review & bibliography- all APA format–(include in portfolio)

4. potluck dish

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes

Friday, December 8, end-of-quarter potluck – bring dish to share

 

Week 11: December 11-15: Evaluation Week

 

Individual Evaluation Conferences

DUE: (a) Student Self-Evaluation of Academic Learning and (b) Student Evaluation of Faculty