Teaching the Child in Front of You

 in a Changing World

 

Master in Teaching Program

Winter 2007

 

faculty

office

phone

e-mail

Sherry Walton

Sem II E3131

867-6753

WaltonS

Masao Sugiyama

Sem II A3112

867-6512

Sugiyama

Gery Gerst

Sem II A3104

867-5209

gerstg

Jacque Ensign

Sem II A3110

867-6619

ensignj

Office Hours: by appointment

 

I. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Focus Description from the MIT Program catalog for 2006-08:

                  Each of us has a picture of what it means to be a teacher based on our own experience in schools. We've perhaps changed those pictures to accommodate our growing understanding of the complexities that have always been part of the "teacher" role. We may also have considered that as powerful political, economic, social and demographic forces bring change to schools it is certain that for us, as teachers, the experiences of our future students will be much different than our own.

We must reexamine our current beliefs about teaching and learning if we are to be effective advocates for our students in this time of change. We expect our students in this program to become educators who are willing to accept the challenge of discovering what it means to be a critically reflective practitioner; who will strive to deepen their own understanding of schooling and education in a democratic society; and who are willing to question and challenge existing educational structures that systematically leave some groups of children behind. We look forward to building a community of learners intent on preparing themselves to teach all the children who will be in front of them.

The year 2006 marks the twenty-year anniversary of "Evergreen style" teacher education - in 1986, the prototype for Evergreen's Master in Teaching Program, the Teacher Education Program, admitted its first students. Then, as now, Evergreen's approach to teacher preparation emphasized building a community of learners, developing a strong theoretical foundation, and learning to apply theory through extensive opportunities for practice. The inaugural 1986 cycle was also informed and inspired by the idea of "development in education", and in particular by the question "what does it mean to take development as the aim of education?"

For the 2006-08 cycle we will thoroughly revisit the theme of development, recognizing its continuing value in helping us challenge and deepen our understanding of what it means to teach effectively and meaningfully - especially in a time of change. 

Among the questions that will energize our study and practice are:

   * What are the stated and implicit goals of education today and historically in US public schools, and across the world? Can the variety of perspectives about educational goals be placed on a developmental continuum? What are the benefits of considering development as the overarching aim of education?

    * What does it mean to know our learners? Along which dimensions (e.g., developmental levels, learning style, personality, interest) is it most important to know our learners? How can we as teachers further develop within ourselves the emotional and intellectual attributes needed to effectively understand our future students?

    * How do children learn? Is learning developmental? Are there universal learning principles that work for all children?   How does the learning process differ at different ages and for children with varying levels of language development?

    * What do teachers need to know about the subjects they teach? How can teachers present content appropriately, given the variety of learning styles and developmental levels of their learners?

    * How can we learn to plan instruction and set up learning environments that support the ideal of democracy? How can we plan our instruction so as to simultaneously take into account state and federal requirements, societal needs and parental expectations while not forgetting that we are preparing our students to be citizens in a democracy?

    * Which teaching strategies are most needed in today's diverse schools? How might our own cultural encapsulation and other life experiences affect our ability to use a particular teaching strategy effectively? How can educational technologies be appropriately used to further the all-around development of our students?

    * How can assessment be used to continually improve the education environment at the individual, classroom, and school levels? How can teachers prepare students for high-stakes testing without compromising the depth and breadth of the students' educational experience? Can we model effective assessment in our own teacher education program?

 

 

 Regular Meeting Times & Locations

 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

9:00am – 12:00 noon

Elem: Math: SEM2A3107

Sec: interdisciplinary lesson planning: SEM2A3109

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminars:

Masao LAB 1 1051

Jacque LAB 1 2033

Gery    LAB 1 1040

 

9:00am-12:00 noon

All program: Reading

 

LIB 1540

breakout: LIB 2219

K-12 schools: start and end in accordance with teacher’s work day

 

9:00am- 12:00 noon

All program

SEM2 D1107

 

1:00-3:00 p.m.

Seminars:

Masao LAB 1 1051

Jacque LAB 1 2033

Gery    LAB 1 1040

 

 

 

 

 

II. REQUIRED READINGS

 

NOTE:  TEXTS MARKED WITH AN ASTERISK (*) INDICATE THAT THIS READING WILL BE ASSIGNED IN OTHER QUARTERS IN THE PROGRAM IN ADDITION TO WINTER QUARTER 2006

 

FOR EACH READING, THE EXACT EDITION LISTED HERE IS EXPECTED AS WE NEED TO HAVE THE SAME PAGES TO REFERENCE IN SEMINARS.

 

*American Psychological Association’s documentation and format style:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/research/r_apa.html

 

Alexie, Sherman. (2004). Ten Little Indians. Grove. ISBN: 080214117X

*Atwell, Nancie. (1998). In the Middle: New Understanding About Writing, Reading, and Learning. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0-86709-374-9 *S

Bracey, Gerald. (2006). Reading Educational Research. Heinemann. ISBN 0325008582 (paper)

Davis, Sampson, George Jenkins, & Rameck Hunt. (2002). The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and Fulfill a Dream. Riverhead Books. (paper) ISBN 157322989X (paper)

Delpit, Lisa. (2006 revised edition). Other People’s Children. New York: New Press. ISBN: 1595580743

Finn, Patrick J. (1999). Literacy with an Attitude: Educating Working-Class Children in Their Own Self-Interest. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. ISBN 0791442861

Gilmore, Barry. (2006). Speaking Volumes: How to Get Students Discussing Books-and Much More. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0325009155 *s

Igoa, Cristina. (1995). The Inner World of the Immigrant Child.  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. ISBN: 0805880135

Landsman, Julie. (2005). A White Teacher Talks About Race. Lanham, MA: Scarecrow. ISBN: 1578861810

Lew, Jamie. (2006). Asian Americans in Class: Charting the Achievement Gap among Korean American Youth. New York: Teachers College Press. ISBN: 0807746932

MacLeod, Jay. (2004 – second revised edition). Ain’t No Makin’ It. Boulder, CO: Westview. ISBN 0813341876

McLaren, Peter. (2003). “Whiteness Is…” In Jami L. Anderson (Ed.), Race, Gender, and Sexuality: Philosophical Issues of Identity and Justice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. [to be distributed in class]

Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Addressing the Achievement Gap: A Challenge for Washington State Educators, November 2002, Olympia  [to be distributed in class]

*Rethinking Schools, a quarterly magazine [to be distributed in class]

*Rogoff, Barbara. (2003). The Cultural Nature of Human Development. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195131339.

*Santa Anna, Otto (ed.). (2004). Tongue-Tied: The Lives of Multilingual Children in the Public Schools.  Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 0742523837

Tatum, Beverly Daniel. (2003 revised ed). “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?” and Other Conversations About Race. New York: Basic Books.  ISBN: 0465083617

*Trentacosta, Janet (ed). (1997). Multicultural and Gender Equity in the Mathematics Classroom: The Gift of Diversity (1997 Yearbook). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.  ISBN 0-87353-432-8

Weaver, Constance. (2002). Reading Process and Practice. 3rd Ed. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

*Wiggins, Grant and McTighe, Jay. (2005 revised ed). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. ISBN: 978-1-4166-0035-0

Note:  Short readings will periodically be distributed within program workshops.

 

III.  REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS

 

1.  Meeting expectations of the MIT program covenant

            See Student Guide to Policies, Procedures, and Resources.

 

2. Attendance & Participation

As a prospective teacher, habits of punctuality and completion of assignments on time are critical for your success in your career.  Students are expected to attend and participate in all program activities, arrive on time and leave when class ends.  If a student must be absent due to a valid reason, he/she will need to negotiate the absence by contacting his/her seminar faculty in advance of the absence.  Every absence will require make-up work and unexcused absences may result in loss of credit.  If you have a legitimate excuse, you still must e-mail your completed assignment to your seminar faculty as Word attachment by the due date & time.

 

3.  Autobiographical Research into the Formation of Your Teacher Identity

            Throughout the program you will be given written prompts in order to investigate the social construction or formation of your teacher identity based on your own life experiences.  These assignments are to be typed and submitted to your seminar faculty.

Due:

Š       Tuesday, January 30:   Autobiographical Assignment #3 – race identity

Š       Tuesday, February 13: Autobiographical Assignment #4 – language identity

Š       Tuesday, February 27: Autobiographical Assignment #5 – class identity

 

4. Seminar/Workshop Preparation Papers

For each scheduled seminar on an assigned reading, you are required to arrive to seminar with (a) your copy of the assigned reading, having read the entire assigned reading and (b) a 2-page, single-spaced, typed & stapled response (or front/back).  The paper’s primary purpose is to help you be prepared to raise ideas and stimulate seminar discussion.  Because these are not formal papers, they can be in the form of notes with quotes, page numbers, and your accompanying commentary based on your understanding of the reading.

Use the following criteria to determine if your paper is complete:

(1)  Use of specific page numbers so that your seminar members and faculty can access the pages from where your information/concept was drawn.

(2)  An accompanying comment for each item of referenced information/concept that explains why it is significant in relation to program themes and/or your overall understanding of the author’s intent.

Due: Each assignment is due at the beginning of your seminar/workshop. One copy of your preparation paper is emailed to your seminar faculty; bring one to seminar & keep for your portfolio with your handwritten notes added during seminar.

 

Exceptions to the written preparation paper format:

1.  Several times, you are asked to bring an art seminar preparation in lieu of the usual 2-page written paper. For these, you are expected to bring to seminar a visual representation as response to reading along with 1 typed paragraph conceptual explanation. A visual response helps to develop your visual language; like the written response it promotes seminar discussion.  Visual responses elucidate themes, structure, and the individual meaning you bring to the readings. They can also ask/answer a key question from the book.  Some guidelines for this form of response include: (1) take visual and written notes as you read, (2) brainstorm ideas for your response, (3) make a series of 3-5 idea sketches, and (4) complete the final visual response and bring it to seminar.  Some possibilities for the visual response are: (a) a painting to illustrate a mental picture, (b) a drawing to capture a conceptual theme, (c) a photo collage or mixed media work, (d) a sculpture or altar to represent ideas, (e) a cartoon strip of events, (f) a diagram to illustrate a structural idea, (g) a time sequence triptych to illustrate a change in your perspective after reading the book, (h) an abstract image to capture the tone of the book.  Be creative and take artistic risk in this assignment; do not present a quick sketch.  You will need to spend as much time or more preparing this response as you would in preparing a written response.  You must bring your visual response to the seminar and be prepared to discuss its conceptual base.  Your art piece will be digitally photographed for inclusion in your portfolio and on your web page.

 

5. Facilitation & Dialogue Expectations

Because active participation and the ability to engage in critical dialogue are crucial building blocks to becoming an informed and reflective teacher, you will continue to have the opportunity to improve your listening and facilitation skills in seminars and workshops.

Due:

Š       in your candidacy & end-of-quarter portfolio, a reflection on your listening and facilitation skills

 

6.  Integration Paper

            At the end of the quarter you will write a formal “integration” paper based on your readings, lectures, workshops, and other program experiences.  The purpose of these short papers (approximately 6 pages each) is for you to develop your ability to analyze and synthesize program materials into a coherent formal paper that integrates and makes connections with what you are learning.  The guidelines you received during Fall Quarter continue to apply for this paper. You will be given a prompt for this paper.

Due:

Š       March 14: Integration Paper #3

 

7. Conference Paper

            During Year 1 of this program you will complete a professional conference paper.  The topic of your paper must be related to your future work as a classroom teacher.  Topics must be approved in consultation with your faculty.  The paper will be scholarly, approximately 20 typed, double-spaced pages, and will follow a professional documentation style.  You will receive further information about the expectations and guidelines for this paper.

In Winter Quarter you will complete most of your paper. During Spring Quarter you will complete your paper.

Due by email to your faculty conference paper reader:

Š       January 9:  revised conference paper literature review

Š       January 23: conference paper introduction, title

Š       February 6:  conference paper conclusion, references

Š       February 9: conference paper introduction & literature review must be at 3 “fully developed” for advancement to candidacy

Š       March 8:  final revisions of conference paper literature review, introduction, title, conclusion, references.

 

8.  EALRs: Professional Self-Assessment

You will learn about this assignment at a workshop Wednesday of Week 1.

Due:

 

9.  Diversity Activity Reflections

            To expand your experiences with diversity, you are to attend two TESC activities offered this quarter on:

Š       Day of Absence

Š       Day of Presence

Š       GSA diversity activities

Following each of the two you attend, write 1-2 page activity reflections for each & add to your portfolio.

 

10. Technology

As part of a lesson plan, you will create a brief PowerPoint that incorporates audio and graphic (photo, movie, etc.) files. You will add digital photos of your art seminar projects to your personal website.

 

11. School/Community Field Notes

            In Week 1 you will receive instructions in regards to expectations for your field work during Winter & Spring quarter. 

Due: (see syllabus & field guide for dates)

 

12.  Attend school/parent/community meetings by no later than March 16.  

You must attend

(a) a school parent-teacher organization meeting or school site council meeting and

(b) a school board meeting (see school office for schedule of meetings).

 

For both meetings, include the meeting agendas and your reflections/notes on each meeting in your Community/School Field notebook.

 

13. Assignments from Content Area Grade Bands

You will be given details separately for the content areas.

 

14. Program Portfolio Format and Contents

Your portfolio materials must be kept in a 3-ring binder with a table of contents and labeled dividers based on the assignment categories listed above.  All materials in the portfolio should be typed except for notes from seminars added to your seminar prep papers and some aspects of your field notes if your handwriting is legible.  Your name needs to appear both on the outside of your notebook and on the first page of your portfolio. There should be a table of contents that matches labeled dividers.

Due:

Š       Friday, February 9: mid-quarter & Advancement to Candidacy portfolio

Š       Friday, March 16: end-of-quarter portfolio

Contents:

All assignments, including quizzes and field notes.

 

IV. CREDIT POLICY

Award of Credit:

See Fall syllabus & Student Guide to Policies, Procedures, and Resources.

 


V. WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 
Week 1 (January 9-12):  “Equity Assess to Academic Achievement”

 

 

Tues., Jan. 9

Wed., Jan. 10

Thurs., Jan. 11

Friday, Jan. 12

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

9-12 noon

Introduction to NCLB- Gery

 

EALRs & GLEs: Professional Self-Assessment - Masao

 

Distribute field guidelines- Loren

Field Interviews- Gery

 

noon: financial aid meeting

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

 

 

 

9:00 a.m.-noon

“What’s Race Got to Do with Education?” Jacque

 

Writing introduction & title to conference paper

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

 

Readings Due

1.  Alexie

2. Trentacosta ch. 2

 

 

 

Addressing the Achievement Gap- all

 

 

Tatum pp.ix-128

Assignments Due

1. seminar preparation paper on both readings

 

2. Revised literature reviews (any that were not 3 “fully developed” end of fall)

 

graphic summaries of Addressing the Achievement Gap

1) teaching practices that can narrow the achievement gap; 2) widen the achievement gap

 

seminar preparation paper

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 2 (January 16-19)

 

 

Tuesday, Jan. 16

Wed., Jan. 17

Thursday, Jan. 18

Friday, Jan. 19

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy - Sherry

 

10:00-11:00 a.m.—

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

 

9:00 a.m.-noon

Workshop: “Introduction to conceptualizing lesson plans, including assessment for understanding”- Gery

 

“Introduction to questions” - Masao

 

Distribute Autobiographical Assignment #3 – race

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

Readings Due

 

Tatum- rest of book

McLaren, “Whiteness Is…”

 

 

 

Wiggins ch. 1-4

 

Delpit- entire book

Assignments Due

seminar preparation paper on both readings

 

EALR self-assessment on reading, writing

 

 

 

1.  workshop prep on Wiggins (graphic organizer)

2. seminar prep paper on Delpit

3.  current field notes

 

Events, Resources and Notes

 


Week 3 (January 23-26) 

 

 

Tuesday, Jan. 23

Wed., Jan. 24

Thursday, Jan. 25

Friday, Jan. 26

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—10:45

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

11am-1pm Diversity Series, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, “Gender, Race, and the Landscapes of Social Justice” 

 

1:15-3:00 p.m.

Seminar & your bag lunch

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy - Sherry

 

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

 

 

9:00 a.m.-noon

Writing conference paper conclusion – Jacque

 

 “Creating Assessment Items: Selected response, essay, & performance” - Masao & Gery

 

 

 

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

Readings Due

Lew- all

 

 

 

 

 

Wiggins ch. 5-8 for AM

 

Landsman vii-91 for PM

Assignments Due

1.  seminar preparation paper & bag lunch

 

2. Conference paper introduction, title

 

 

1.  art seminar preparation on Landsman

2.  current field notes

3. suggested: completion of two parent interviews

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 4 (January 30-Feb. 2)

 

 

Tuesday, Jan. 30

Wed., Jan. 31

Thursday, Feb. 1

Friday, Feb. 2

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy - Sherry

 

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

 

 

 

9:00 a.m.-12

Introduction to Language in Teaching- Patty Finnegan & Jacque

 

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

Readings Due

Landsman- pp. 93-171

 

 

Rogoff, ch. 8, 9

 

Assignments Due

1. seminar preparation paper

2. Autobiographical Assignment #3 – race

 

email to Gery: copy-ready assessment questions & rubric for assessment grading workshop

 

 

1.  seminar preparation paper

2.  current field notes

3. suggested: completion of two student interviews

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 5 (February 6-9)

 

 

Tuesday, Feb. 6

Wed., Feb. 7

Thursday, Feb. 8

Friday, Feb. 9

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdis. lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

handout prompt for  Autobiographical Assignment #4 – language

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy - Sherry

 

 

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

9:00-12 noon

Assessment- Grading- Gery

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

Readings Due

 

Igoa- all

Trentacosta- ch. 21

 

 

 

Santa Anna pp.1-163

Trentacosta ch. 6, 8, 9

 

Assignments Due

1. seminar preparation paper on both readings

 

2. Conference Paper conclusion, references

 

 

1.  Seminar Prep Paper on all readings

2.  current field notes

3.  self-assessment on all EALRs

4.  mid-quarter  Advancement to Candidacy portfolio

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 6 (February 13-16)

 

 

Tuesday, Feb. 13

Wed., Feb. 14

Thursday, Feb. 15

Friday, Feb. 16

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

Handout: prompt for Autobiographical Assignment #5 – class

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy - (grade bands)

 

 

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

9:00 a.m.-noon

Introduction to theorists on class - Jacque

 

DAY of ABSENCE activities

 

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

 

Readings

MacLeod Part 1

Trentacosta ch 5, 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and the Native American Learner

 

 

Assignments Due

1. seminar preparation paper on all readings

 

2. Autobiographical Assignment #4 – language

 

 

 

1. seminar preparation paper

 

2. Due: synopsis of 6 interviews and synthesis reflection questions on all

 

Pick-up mid-quarter portfolio and faculty feedback on Teacher Candidacy status – from seminar faculty’s office

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 7 (February 20 - 23)

 

 

Tuesday, Feb. 20

Wed. Feb. 21

Thursday, Feb. 22

Friday, Feb. 23

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy (grade bands)

 

DAY of PRESENCE

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

9:00 a.m.-noon

“Introduction to Culturally Relevant Teaching”- Jacque

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

Readings Due

MacLeod Part II

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finn pp. ix-94

Assignments Due

art  seminar preparation or 2 page mini-integration paper comparing Ain’t No Makin’ It to The Pact

 

 

 

1.  seminar preparation paper

2.  current field notes

 

Events, Resources and Notes


Week 8 (February 27-March 2)

 

 

Tuesday, Feb. 27

Wed., Feb. 28

Thursday, March 1

Friday, March 2

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy (grade bands)

 

observation/

participation K-12 public schools

 

 

 

 

9:00 a.m.-noon

Case study on Native American curriculum & introduction to curriculum development - Magda

 

Handout: Integration paper

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

Readings Due

Finn pp. 95-207

 

 

Freire

 

Assignments Due

1. seminar preparation paper

2. Autobiographical Assignment #5 – class

 

 

 

 

1.  seminar preparation paper

 

2.  current field notes

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes

 


Week 9 (March 6-9)

 

 

Tuesday, March 6

Wed., March 7

Thursday, March 8

Friday, March 9

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

9:00 a.m.-noon

Literacy (grade bands)

 

observation/

participation K-12 public school

9:00 a.m.-noon

Workshop on Intelligence- Masao

 

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar

 

Readings Due

Gould- 1-175

 

 

 

 

Gould 176-424

Bracey ch. 4

Assignments Due

art seminar preparation paper

 

 

9:00 email to faculty reader: for any not already 3 on rubric: conference paper title, introduction, literature review, conclusion, references

1.  seminar preparation paper on both readings

 

2.  current field notes

 

 

 

Events, Resources and Notes

 

 


Week 10 (March 13-16)

 

 

Tuesday, March 13

Wednesday,

March 14

Thursday, March 15

Friday, March 16

Topics/Activities

9:00 a.m.—12 noon

Gradebands

elementary: mathematics

 

secondary: interdisciplinary lesson planning

 

1-3:00 p.m.

Seminar

field trip-

reserve all day 8:30am-5pm until further notice

guided observations in K-12 public schools

9:00 a.m.-noon

Potluck breakfast

Possible guest speaker(s)

 

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Seminar on school/parent/

community meetings & interviews

 

Readings Due

Rethinking Schools

 

 

 

 

Assignments Due

seminar preparation paper

 

Integration paper on all seminar readings

 

1.  end-of-quarter portfolio, incl. field notes

2. By today you must have attended school/

parent/community meetings (see syllabus requirement #12) & completed all interviews

3. potluck breakfast dish

 

Week 11: March 19-23 Evaluation Week

Individual Evaluation Conferences: Advancement to Candidacy status up-date

DUE: (a) Student Self-Evaluation of Academic Learning and (b) Student Evaluation of Faculty