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Adaptation: The Evolution of Organisms, Technologies and Ideas
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter (previously offered fall quarter)
Faculty: Bret Weinstein
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 for field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Organisms evolve. So do machines and ideas. The mechanism of 'evolution' may be different in each of these three realms, but the results can be strikingly similar. When human engineers invented and refined radar and sonar technologies, for example, they encountered numerous obstacles to the design of a functional system. Only much later was it discovered that natural selection had grappled with the same issues in the refinement of bat echolocation. And, though working without a designer's foresight, and using different materials, nature found strikingly similar solutions. In contrast, human engineers and biological evolution have each produced multiple modes of powered flight and there is almost no overlap between the biological and mechanical designs. Nature has never produced anything like a helicopter or a plane, and man has not reproduced the flight of a hummingbird or a honey bee.

In this program, we will explore the concept of "fitness." We will seek to understand what makes an organism 'fit' and to determine if it is the same properties that make a machine design successful. We will also investigate the meaning of 'fitness' in the market place of ideas. Does a scientific or factual truth have a built in advantage over an appealing falsehood? Or alternatively, is the truth rigid and inflexible while its competitors are dynamic and fluid? What effect might it have on policy making in a democracy if the truth was not the fittest competitor in the marketplace of ideas? What might be done to increase the fitness of real facts and robust logic?

A belief in the existence of an objective, quantifiable and law obeying universe is assumed.
Credit awarded in: evolution, ecology, critical thinking and deductive logic, public policy and resource management.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in ecology, earth science, natural resource management and environmental studies, engineering, public policy and resource management.
Program Updates:   (7/18/03) New, not in printed catalog
(2/2/04) This program is being reoffered during spring quarter. It is the same as the fall quarter offering.
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Advanced Management Topics: A Few Good Managers Wanted
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: John Filmer
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; previous management study.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For information about obtaining a faculty signature, or program information contact John Filmer, (360) 867-6159.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Consult with faculty.

This yearlong program is designed for students who have previously studied management and wish to engage in advanced work in management related topics. Students without previous management studies should consider enrolling in the 8-credit program listed in the Evening and Weekend Class Listing titled Introductory Management Topics: A Few Good Managers Wanted. Advanced Management Topics will feature a comprehensive analysis of the economic, cultural, political, technological and legal environments in which entrepreneurial organizations (for-profits and nonprofits) compete. It will showcase economic and community development and include team building, small business development/startup and growth, organizational communication, ethics, global issues management and strategic and scenario planning. A major focus will be the consideration of current events in management strategy. Seminars will emphasize the development of critical reading and reasoning skills and the formulation and effective articulation of definitive, tightly reasoned positions on key management issues. Program activities will include lectures, workshops, case studies, field trips, and group and individual research projects.
There are 8-, 12- and 16-credit options. The 8-credit core meets in the evening. The 16-credit option involves both evening and daytime class times. Students may register for 12-credits and enroll in the 4-credit Organizational Conflict Management course listed in the Evening and Weekend Class Listing.
Credit may be awarded in: organizational theory, organizational development, finance, international business, marketing, communication, case studies, economic development, entrepreneurship, managing nonprofits, strategic planning, contemporary issues in economics, business and politics, management issues and ethics.
Total: 8, 12 or 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in nonprofit or business management, public administration or further study in business or public administration.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change.
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.
(2/18/04) New students will be accepted in spring. For information contact John Filmer, (360) 867-6159.

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Advanced Research in Environmental Studies
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Frederica Bowcutt, Gerardo Chin-Leo, Heather Heying, John T. Longino, Nalini Nadkarni, Lin Nelson, Erik V. Thuesen
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Negotiated individually with faculty sponsor.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Graduate students must also get signature of MES director.
Special Expenses: There may be transportation costs involved in fieldwork.
Internship Possibilities: No

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. Research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills will be developed in this program. These research skills are of particular importance for those students interested in pursuing a graduate degree and can provide important experience for graduates in the job market. Several faculty in the Environmental Studies planning unit are currently engaged in research projects and are seeking advanced students to participate in these investigations. The research, conducted by the student, would generally last multiple quarters and function as a capstone of their academic work at Evergreen. Students can take advantage of this program to write a senior thesis.
Frederica Bowcutt studies floristic diversity on public lands. Her publications include flora for three California state parks. Students who have taken course work in introductory botany and plant systematics are invited to inquire about botanical survey work on public lands. Students will be required to collect hundreds of voucher specimens, verify identifications at a suitable herbarium and write a flora of the land surveyed.
Gerardo Chin-Leo studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phyto-plankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords.
Heather Heying studies the evolution, ecology and behavior of amphibians and reptiles. Students with a strong interest in fieldwork and a background in relevant biological theory will have the opportunity to combine the theoretical with the empirical, while gaining experience in hypothesis generation, experimental design, field methods and data interpretation.
John T. Longino studies insect taxonomy and ecology, with specific research focus on ants. His research program is a combination of fieldwork in Costa Rica and collections-based research at the Evergreen campus. Students may become involved in local or neotropical fauna studies, with field- and/or collections-based activities.
Nalini Nadkarni is a forest ecologist who studies the ecological interactions of canopy-dwelling plants and animals in tropical and temperate rainforests. She is the president of the International Canopy Network headquartered at Evergreen. She welcomes students who want experience in nonprofit organizations to work with her on communication of scientific information about forest canopies to other researchers, educators and conservationists. She is also interested in communicating her work to non-scientists and working with artists on collaborative ways of understanding trees and forests.
Lin Nelson is a social scientist who has worked with national and regional organizations doing research and advocacy on the linkages among environment, health and community. Students who would like to assist in developing case studies of environmental health in Northwest communities (with a focus on environmental justice and environment–labor connections) can contact her. A related area, for students with sufficient preparation, is the examination of Washington state’s plan to phase out selected persistent, bioaccumulative toxics.
Erik V. Thuesen conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to estuarine hypoxia. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry.
Credit awarded in: areas of student work.
Total: 4 to 16 credits each quarter. Students will negotiate credit with faculty sponsor.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in botany, ecology, entomology, environmental studies, marine science, zoology and taxonomy.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (4/1/03) Martha Henderson Tubesing has been removed from the research team.

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Africa and the Black Atlantic World
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Babacar M’Baye
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The term Black Atlantic identifies works of literary, historical or cultural studies that share a nationalistic focus that is antithetical to the rhizomorphic, hybrid and fractal nature of modern black cultures. The concept also refers to the scholarship known as Black Atlantic Studies (from Black Diaspora Studies), which is primarily concerned with the origins and evolution of modern black cultures and identities. In recent years, critics of Black Atlantic Studies such as Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall, Kwame Anthony Appiah and Hazel Carby have paid strong attention to the hybridism among black populations living in an increasingly modern and global world. Yet, they have often neglected the role that Africa has played in the formation of these cosmopolitan black communities and cultures. A broader and more inclusive study of modern black cultures should consider the particular ways in which such cultures are theorized as both local and transnational or as both modern and traditional at the same time.
Drawing from the works of 20th-century literary writers, historians, filmmakers and musicians from the United States, Africa and the Caribbean, this program will explore the centrality of Africa in the construction of modern black identities in the western world. The program will examine crosscurrents between cultures in Africa and in the West. While discussing the impact of slavery and the Industrial Revolution on modern black societies, the program will also analyze the effects of imperialism, colonization and globalization on black populations living across the Atlantic Ocean. Such analysis will be done through a study of literary and artistic forms such as fiction, drama, poetry, folktales, films, rap, Hip-Hop, reggae and Afro-pop music. A major emphasis will be placed on black postcolonial cinema.
This program will introduce students to Black Atlantic literature, history and cultures, theories of contemporary Black Studies and literary theory.
Credit awarded in: African, African-American and Caribbean literature, history and culture; Black Atlantic Studies; literary criticism; and cultural studies.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is also listed in First-Year Programs and Culture, Text and Language.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (1/29/03) New, not in printed catalog

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Algebra to Algorithms: An Introduction to Mathematics for Science and Computing
Spring quarter
Faculty: Judy Cushing
Enrollment: 23
Prerequisites: High school algebra proficiency assumed. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Western science relies on mathematics as a powerful language for expressing the character of the observed world. Mathematical models allow predictions (more or less) of complex natural systems, and modern computing has magnified the power of those models and helped shape new models that increasingly influence 21st-century decisions. Computer science relies on mathematics for its culture and language of problem solving, and also enables the construction of mathematical models. In fact, computer science is the constructive branch of mathematics.
This program willexplore connections among mathematics, computer science and the natural sciences, and will develop mathematical abstractions and theskills needed to express, analyze and solve problems arising in the sciences, particularly in computer science. The program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or pursuing further work in the sciences. The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical thinking and expression, along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, functions, algorithms, programming and, depending on interest, calculus, logic or geometry; all with relevant historical and philosophical readings.
Credit awarded in: algebra, geometry, mathematical modeling, programming, and history and philosophy of mathematics.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the sciences or mathematics.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Scientific Inquiry

Program Updates:   (4/28/03) This is a new Core program that replaces the all-level version of Algebra to Algorithms listed in the paper catalog.
1/30/04) Faculty named. This program is a good feeder for science and computer science programs.

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Ancient Stories/Modern Lives
New, not in printed catalog
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Nancy Taylor, Andrew Reece, Nancy Koppelman
Enrollment: 72
Prerequisites: None. This Core/sophomore program is designed for first- and second- year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $150 for field trips and program retreat.
Internship Possibilities: No

God made man because he loves stories.—Elie Wiesel
Stories go to work on you like arrows. Stories make you live right. Stories make you replace yourself.—Benton Lewis, Apache, reported by Keith H. Basso
What is a myth but something that seems to happen always for the first time over and over again?—Robert Pinsky
How can stories help us make sense of ourselves and our worlds? What can ancient storytellers teach us about our experience in this new century? How do modern storytellers hear from, and speak back to, the voices from the past? In this program, we seek to understand the ways in which stories imitate, represent, and shape our lives. We propose a broad notion of “story,” which includes narratives of many sorts—mythic, fictional, dramatic, poetical, artistic, historical and philosophical. We turn to these stories to help us pose and answer vital questions about our identities, our relationships, our moral points of view and practices: who we are, how our sense of self develops and changes, how we can live justly, how we can cultivate love and joy. Finally, we explore the roles of others’ stories in the creation of our own, both in the tales we tell and the lives we make.
The program is deeply rooted in the texts of ancient Greece, in which these questions found some of their earliest, most provocative, and most influential expression. We will alternate ancient and modern works throughout the program. Ancient authors include Homer, Sappho, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Modern authors include the authors of the U.S. founding documents, Zora Neale Hurston, Abraham Cahan, Louise Erdrich, Henry David Thoreau, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Toni Morrison. We will compare the ways ancient and modern authors develop common themes, and we will draw on both ancient and modern stories as we begin to fashion our own stories about our own experiences and those of others.
Students will respond critically and creatively to these stories. They will be expected to read extensively and intensively. We place writing at the center of the program, intending it to help students become better writers of expository, research and reflective essays. We place a particular emphasis on the writing process, from the development of arguments and ideas to their drafting and on to their revision.
Credit awarded in: classical studies, history, literature, philosophy, cultural studies and mythology.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities, history, literature, cultural studies and teaching.
Program Updates:   (4/17/03) New, not in printed catalog
First-year and Sophomore program
(5/12/03) This program is designed for freshmen and sophomore students. Nancy Koppelman has been added to the faculty team. The enrollment has been increased to 36 Freshmen; 36 Sophomores.
(11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Students should make an appointment with one of the faculty members (Andrew Reece, Nancy Koppelman or Nancy Taylor) during office hours (Monday or Tuesday afternoon 3:30-4:30) to talk about ways to prepare for winter quarter.

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Animal Behavior
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Laura Howard
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. At least one year of college-level biology and one year of college-level writing are required.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 for field trips; plus additional costs as necessary to conduct independent research projects.
Internship Possibilities: No.
Travel Component: Approximately four one-day field trips; plus travel as necessary for students to conduct research projects of their choice.

Animal behavior is a fascinating field of biology that encompasses an understanding of ecology and evolution. In this program, we will study animal behavior using a combination of theoretical and empirical approaches. We will explore the incredible diversity of behavioral patterns or 'what animals do' (foraging, mating, caring for young, and more). These observed behavioral patterns can be understood using two complementary levels of analysis. One level focuses on 'how questions' seeking proximate causes of behavior entailing mechanistic explanations (sensory-motor, genetic-developmental). Another level addresses 'why questions' concerning the ultimate causes of behavior involving evolutionary explanations (differential reproduction, phylogenetic). Some of the topics that we will focus on include mating systems, territoriality, parental care and competition. Activities in this program include lectures, seminar discussions, films and field trips. This program provides opportunities for developing the following skills: critical reasoning, written and oral communication, research design, and collection and interpretation of data. Each student will conduct an independent research project culminating in written and oral presentations at the end of the quarter.
Credit awarded in: evolution, ecology, zoology, philosophy of science and research.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and research in field biology, evolution, ecology and other life sciences.
Program Updates:   (2/9/04) New, not in printed catalog
(2/24/04) A faculty signature and entrance application has been added. Enrollment has been lowered to 20 students.
(2/27/04) The application and faculty signature requirement has been removed from this program.

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Arrested Development
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Peter Dorman
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must have some background in social science (economics, politics, sociology, anthropology) or history, or have prior exposure, through study, activism or personal experience, to perspectives emanating from developing countries or conditions faced by people in such countries. To interview with the faculty, contact Peter Dorman or
The Evergreen State College,
Lab I,
Olympia, WA 98505.
Special Expenses: none
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: No

Economic progress has failed to materialize for the majority of the world's population. This failure and the struggle to reverse it constitute one of the central dramas of our time and dominate political debate throughout most of what used to be called the Third World. But what kind of progress is needed? Is conventional economic development the answer or something else? And why has progress of any sort proved to be so difficult to achieve? To answer these questions we will look at the history of thinking about development and the experience of people on the receiving end. We will examine "development" itself as a contested concept and consider alternative models of improving the quality of life for those currently disenfranchised. Finally, we will survey the social, political and economic barriers to development (however defined) that have to be dismantled for progress to occur. Our sources will be mostly drawn from social science (economics, sociology, politics), but also fiction, poetry, music and film. Possible readings include Western Supremacy: The Triumph of an Idea? , Sophie Bessis; The Subsistence Perspective , Veronika Bennholdt-Thomsen and Maria Mies; The History of Development , Gilbert Rist; Real World Economic Outlook , Ann Pettifor; The Economist's Tale: A Consultant Encounters Hunger and the World Bank , Peter Griffiths; Development as Freedom , Amartya Sen; Gender, Development and Globalization , Lourdes Beneria; The Cave , Jose Saramago; and the Human Development Report: Making Services Work for the Poor , World Bank. There will be one major piece of research and writing, applying the themes of the program to a particular country, region or ethnic group.
Credit awarded in: economics, political science and postcolonial studies.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences as well as work in "developing country" settings.
Program Updates:   (2/4/04) New, not in printed catalog

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The Art and Nature of Non-Violent Resistance
New, not in printed catalog:
This program replaces the cancelled Non-Violent Resistance program.

Faculty: Simona Sharoni and Eli Sterling
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 for optional field trip to Republic, Washington.
Internship Possibilities: No

Acts and movements of resistance have played a significant role in the transformation of ideas, rules, public spaces and political systems. This program will study the manifestations of resistance in everyday life with a particular emphasis on the commonalities and differences between nonviolent resistance and other forms of resistance. We will broaden and deepen our understanding of nonviolence theory and strategy while assessing various forms and tools of resistance past and present. We will also explore the place of nature in building and sustaining the capacity of individuals and communities to get involved in social change.
In addition to reading seminal texts on nonviolence and resistance, the program will concentrate on the role of visual and expressive arts, music, poetry, fiction, filmmaking and other creative expressions in fostering and sustaining resistance. Through readings, films, guest speakers and workshops we will explore the efficacy of particular acts of resistance carried out by individuals as well as by movements.
Our studies will draw examples from such movements as the civil rights movement, the peace movement, the women’s movement, the gay and lesbian movement, the environmental movement and the anti-globalization movement. We will also briefly explore resistance movements in South Africa, Israel and Palestine and the North of Ireland. Students will have an opportunity to get involved in and contribute to two community projects that embody the art and nature of resistance: The Procession of the Species in Olympia and a community partnership project in Republic, Washington.
Credit awarded in: political movements, social problems, art and social change.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in social sciences, humanities, political economy, law, media and communications, arts and public and community service.
Program Updates:   (8/25/03) New, not in printed catalog
(8/27/03) Enrollment limit has been reduced in this program to 25 students

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Art in the Americas: Indigenous Identity, Mestizaje and Cultural Hybridity
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Gail Tremblay, Ellen Fernandez-Sacco
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. Previous work in the arts and/or art history, Core program or English composition.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $200 for art materials; $60 for field trip to Neah Bay during fall quarter; $1,800–$2,000 for six-week field trip to Mexico during winter quarter.
Internship Possibilities: No
Travel Component: Six-week field trip to Mexico.

This program is designed to allow students to combine the study of art history and visual culture with the study of techniques for the creation of work in the visual arts. Students will examine art in the Americas with a focus on the works of artists in the United States and Mexico. We will explore the ways art has been shaped by issues of cultural identity, with particular attention to the dynamics that exist between people in indigenous nations and settler states. We will examine patterns of cultural interchange. We will also explore the mixing of cultures that result from immigration and intercultural encounters, and their effects on the development of certain American aesthetics. This exploration will include an analysis of colonialism and its impact on cultural production. Students will be expected to create individual and collaborative works of art that grow out of personal identity and theories developed as part of this program.
Students will be required to design individual multimedia, installation and/or performance work that examines their location within their culture. They will also be asked to work with other students to explore cultural interchange as part of a collaborative art project. During winter, students will have the opportunity to travel for six weeks in Mexico where they will visit museums, galleries and architectural sites. They will be able to discuss the themes of the program with established Mexican artists and their students in various universities and art schools. Students will also have the chance to immerse themselves in various facets of Mexican culture, including examining the role played by indigenous cultures within Mexico.
We recommend that students who have not previously studied Spanish, take four credits of Spanish during fall quarter.
Credit awarded in: indigenous art history, Mexican art history, mixed media, installation and performance art, cultural studies and art criticism.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, art history, cultural studies, visual culture, art production and art criticism.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts; Native American and World Indigenous Peoples Studies
Program Updates:   (6/3/03) Mario will be on Leave, and he will be replaced in the program.
(8/7/03) Ellen Fernanzed-Sacco, an art historian, has joined this program.
(11/17/03) Students who are willing to read Beyond the Fantastic edited by Gerardo Mosquera may enter the program winter quarter. If they want to travel to Mexico, they need faculty permission and must also pay a non-refrundable deposit by Dec. 5th. If they want to work on campus, they should talk with the faculty team at academic fair.

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Art of Local History
New, not in printed catalog
Fall quarter
Faculty: Liza Rognas, Peg Tysver
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $75 for museum entrance fees and art supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

Art of Local History is a quarterlong program, focused on the exploration of the role of the historian as an individual with creative vision, as a collector and interpreter of communal memories and as an agent of action and change in communities. We will act as artists, historians, activists, critical readers and thinkers, writers and involved members of our community.
Artists and historians both work within the bounds of culture to communicate alternative ways of knowing, both personal and communal. With the understanding of history as the production of cultural memory, we will investigate how stories are transmitted through literature, art and museums. Through an examination of the role of perspective in the telling of history, we will question the foundations of knowledge and the problems such questions create for historians. We will also read books and selected articles that examine themes of power in society, along with fiction and historical readings that will inform our sense of place in the Pacific Northwest. As an expression of these themes, we will create interdisciplinary exhibition elements with content that blurs the line between fiction and non-fiction. Our work here will focus on the Pacific Northwest and on social histories, and the ways in which these local histories are related to national and international economic, political and social forces. Writing will be focused on research, seminar essays, autobiography and interpretive writing workshops. Studio sessions will consist of developing proficiencies in graphic design technologies, drawing, photography, collage, book arts and exhibit design. We’ll also visit area museums, listen to some great music and cook local food three times during the quarter.
Students will be expected to work in groups to create components of an exhibit related to themes in local history, to engage as individuals in creating an autobiography, and to learn about and visit museums and significant places in our local and regional area.
Credit awarded in: Pacific Northwest history, exhibit design, creative writing, introduction to art and introduction to social science research methods.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and expressive arts.
Planning Unit(s): First-Year Programs
Program Updates:   (7/16/03) New, not in printed catalog

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Astronomy and Cosmologies
Spring quarter
Faculty: E. J. Zita
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; facility with algebra.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $45 for materials, $200-$300 for binoculars and tripod and $300 for possible field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

Learn beginning-to-intermediate astronomy and celestial navigation through lectures, discussions, interactive workshops and observation, using the naked eye, binoculars and telescopes. Students will build (and take home) learning tools such as spectrometers and position finders, research a topic of interest (in the library and through observations), create a Web page and share research with classmates.
We will also seminar on cosmologies: how people across cultures and throughout history have understood, modeled and ordered their universe. We will study creation stories and worldviews from ancient peoples to modern astrophysicists.
Students are invited to help organize a field trip to warm, clear skies.

This program will collaborate with the Working the Waters program to offer students an additional 2 credit option in Piloting and Inland Navigation . Students who chose this option will attend a 2 hour piloting and inland navigation workshop each week in addition to regular program activities. Students from the Working the Waters program may also register for our weekly Celestial Navigation workshop.
Credit awarded in: astronomy, physical science and philosophy of science.
Total: 16 credits.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005-06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in astronomy, physical sciences, history and philosophy of science.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (1/30/04) The faculty signature has been removed. Freshmen interested in enrolling must contact the faculty for a signature.
(2/17/04) Students who want to take an additional 2 credits of Piloting and Inland Navigation, refer to CRN 30776 in Gateway.

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Astronomy and Energy: Cosmic Models
Cancelled, refer to Mathematical Systems as alternative.
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Don Middendorf
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. One year of calculus-based physics.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $400 for textbooks (must be purchased by the second day of class), good binoculars and journal subscriptions.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will study the two pillars of modern physics—relativity and quantum theory—using astronomy as the link. The theme will be scientific model making. We will study our current models of the universe, including the role of relativity and quantum mechanics in studying stars, galaxies and black holes. We will examine such questions as: How do we know that stars use fusion to produce energy? How do we interpret theory and experiments for objects such as stars and black holes? What are some of the ramifications of embracing one model instead of another? What is energy and how is it related to mass, space and time? Are we learning about pre-existing objective facts (truth) or do our experimental results depend on our theories?
We will examine the ideas of leading thinkers in physics, mathematics and philosophy to explore these questions. Although we will find many strange and provocative answers to our questions, our goal will be to learn to ask even more sophisticated questions about "nature" and "reality."
Students must subscribe to three journals—Sky and Telescope, Science News and Physics Today. These journals will be used in weekly discussions and student presentations about recent developments in astronomy and modern physics. We will use our eyes, binoculars and telescopes to examine the sun and the night sky—so we’ll need to meet at night a few times each quarter.
Credit awarded in: astronomy, modern physics, quantum theory, special and general relativity and philosophy of science. Upper-division credit is possible for more than half of the total credits depending on performance.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in science and mathematics, especially physics, engineering, astronomy or philosophy.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (3/7/03) Cancelled

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Atoms, Molecules and Research
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Dharshi Bopegedera
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; one year of college-level chemistry (or AP high school chemistry) and ability to do differential and integral calculus.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

In this upper-division chemistry program we will explore the question "What does a chemist do?" In all aspects of the program, we will try to understand how the principles of chemistry learned in the classroom are applied by chemists all over the world. This program is designed to provide advanced preparation that will enable students to pursue careers in chemistry and chemical engineering (graduate school and industry), fields that have high employment demands in the sciences. It will also be useful for students considering careers in medicine, biochemistry or chemical physics.
During fall and winter, the lecture portion of the program will cover the traditional junior- and senior-level topics in physical chemistry and inorganic chemistry. These include thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, inorganic chemistry, chemical kinetics, statistical mechanics and spectroscopy. During spring, if time permits, the lecture portion of the program will cover some special topics in chemistry.
Fall quarter, the laboratory portion of the program will train students to use chemical instrumentation to carry out assigned laboratory experiments. All members of the chemistry faculty and science instructional technicians will be involved in teaching the laboratory portion, ensuring breadth and individual guidance. Winter and spring, students will be assigned laboratory research projects they will conduct under the close supervision of chemistry faculty. Students will present the results of their research at the annual American Chemical Society Undergraduate Research meeting.
Students will also participate in workshops on technical writing and library research methods, including online searching.
Credit awarded in: thermodynamics*, quantum mechanics*, inorganic chemistry*, instrumentation laboratory* and under-graduate research in chemistry*.
Total: 16 credits (no faculty signature); 1-15 credits (faculty signature necessary).
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in chemistry, chemical engineering, chemical physics, medicine and biochemistry.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:   (5/9/03) Contact the Academic Advising office for information about the signature process, (360) 867-6312.
(6/10/03) Dharshi Bopegedera has been added to this program.
(11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should have the equivalent of the first quarter of physical chemistry and inorganic chemistry. Speak with the faculty for details.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Author! Author!
New, not in printed catalog
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Bill Ransom, Leonard Schwartz
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts us to 31 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 per quarter for supplies and field trip fees.
Internship Possibilities: No

What does it mean to be the author? How does a writer make words his or her own? Alternatively, how does one liberate language from the cage of the self? To what extent does one also create the author through the act of writing? We will address these questions in poetry, fiction and nonfiction, as well as through modes of writing that fall between the recognizable forms. This means not only that texts will be drawn from all these zones of writing, but also that students will be encouraged to compose poetry, make stories and write critically as the primary work of the class. We will write constantly both in class and out. All writing is an attempt at translation, and we will look at translation as a literary form. We will follow through on that writing to prepare something for publication, learning the basics of copy editing and manuscript preparation along the way. Students will select a publication (audience) that fits their work and submit to that publication at the end of each quarter. As well, students will work on producing letter press and electronic publications. Guest speakers and field trips will further enrich the work of the program.
Readings will include the seminal anthology The New American Poetry: 1945–1960, Edward Hirsch’s How to Read a Poem, Araki Yasusada’s Doubled Flowering, Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried, Self-Editing for Fiction-Writers, and Susan Sontag’s Against Interpretation. During fall quarter, emphasis will be on poetry; during winter quarter, emphasis will be on fiction; and during spring quarter, emphasis will be on the essay and creative nonfiction.
Credit awarded in: literature and the Americas, poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction writing and book and magazine production (submitting, editing, layout and printing).
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, literature and creative writing.
Planning Unit(s): First-Year Programs and Culture, Text and Language.
Program Updates:   (4/17/03) New, not in printed catalog
All-level program - accepts 31 percent first year students.
(11/17/03) Speak with faculty for details.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring. Faculty signature added.
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Baseball: More Than a Game
Spring quarter
Faculty: Oscar Soule, Steve Bray
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $25–$35 in ticket costs for event fees.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will explore the impact of the game of baseball on society and culture in the United States and on the imagination through literature, film and art. It also will view the increasing global impact of baseball, especially in Latin America and Japan, as well as the ever-increasing ethic diversity of baseball within the major leagues. We will observe how baseball has served an important national role as a force of tradition and an agent for change. Regarded as the national pastime, it has gradually included the participation of blacks and women. In order to understand the full impact of baseball on society, and as inspiration for fans, writers and artists, students will observe the game itself in addition to examining its history. Workshops will focus on writing, mathematics and art. This program is designed primarily to appeal to students who are interested in viewing baseball as a multicultural game, which has an impact and appeal far beyond the playing field.
Credit awarded in: social and cultural history, business and labor relations, art and media studies, sport and society, and writing.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in history, cultural studies, business, economics, literature, media studies and journalism.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (10/09/03) Steve Bray, a journalist, has been added to the faculty team. Enrollment has been increased to 48 students: 30 Freshmen; 18 Sophomore to Seniors.

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Bilingual Education and Teaching
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Evelia Romano
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome. Previous course work in linguistics; previous or concurrent study of a foreign or second language.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $120 for overnight field trip to Eastern Washington.
Internship Possibilities: No

Language is the main tool for the transmission of knowledge and social values. This program explores linguistic and social issues related to minority language communities in the United States. The study of these issues is crucial to understanding the role of education and the educational system in the integration and promotion of minority groups.
We will explore several theoretical issues related to, and preparatory for, the study of bilingual education and teaching: first and second language acquisition; the relationships of language, culture and society; a historical introduction to bilingual education; and the politics of bilingualism in the United States. A weekly workshop will be devoted to the study of second language teaching, with particular consideration of different theories and methodologies. Students will be introduced to bilingual education in elementary and high schools, program design and assessment. We will visit bilingual classrooms throughout the state and conduct ethnographic observations during field trips. As part of the workshop activities in the winter, students will have the opportunity to go into the community (elementary schools, high schools, etc.) to acquire practical experience and apply some of the theories discussed in class.
A four-credit intermediate/advanced Spanish course will be offered as an optional part of the program throughout fall and winter.
As a follow-up to this program, during spring quarter Evelia will sponsor internships for those students who are interested in furthering their practical knowledge and experience. Students will be able to work as teachers’ aides in K–12, ESL and bilingual classrooms, teach Spanish as a foreign language at elementary schools, teach ESL and Spanish literacy to adults or work with the local Hispanic community on issues of education.
Credit awarded in: bilingual education theory, history and policy, linguistics, language acquisition and sociolinguistics, multicultural education, ESL and second- or foreign-language teaching methodology and practice, and intermediate/advanced Spanish. Upper-division credit can be earned for advanced work in all the areas.
Total: 12 or 16 credits each quarter. Students may register for 12 credits without Spanish or 16 credits with Spanish.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, linguistics, ESL and second- or foreign-language teaching.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Not accepting new students in Winter.

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Bookworks
Cancelled
Spring quarter
Faculty: Lisa Sweet
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $250 for texts and bookmaking materials.
Internship Possibilities: No

Two- and three-dimensional art are perhaps nowhere more integrated than in the art of the book; but more than integrating design, books are also vessels for our history, our values and our vision. Books represent the meeting of text, image and time in a form unique in its intimacy and power to reach the viewer/reader personally. In this program, students will explore the world of book arts through the creation of handmade books. We’ll explore a variety of formats from the traditional hard-bound codex to alternative book forms, including the invention of original forms. Students will examine the context in which the creation and use of books emerged from ancient and medieval cultures, as well as the emergence of book arts in the 20th century. Students will gain basic traditional letterpress technique as part of the program. Bookmaking is a particularly wonderful way to enter the world of visual arts for those with little or no background in art. For those with art experience—and printmaking experience in particular—this exploration encourages the integration of images and text in a unique and personal way.
Credit awarded in: 2-D and 3-D design, graphic design, letterpress, bookmaking and 20th-century art appreciation.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in book arts, studio artist and graphic design.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (6/3/03) Cancelled

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Cabaret: Swansong of Western Humanism
Cancelled
Spring quarter
Faculty: Marianne Bailey, Hiro Kawasaki
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome; experience in humanities programs.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expense: No
Internship: No

This upper-division humanities program will focus on the arts, literature and cinema of Germany between the World Wars, and on Berlin’s connections to Paris and Vienna intellectual scenes.
Cassandra-like, Nietzsche warned that the death of God carried consequences for which we still lacked the strength: God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. “How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? . . . who will wipe this blood off us? What water is there for us to clean ourselves? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent? Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us? Must we ourselves not become gods simply to appear worthy of it? . . .”
Europe entered the Great War blithely and emerged from its carnage in shock. Art, language, philosophy: What did those words mean in the ruins of humanism and truth, beauty and progress, of Ssience and faith in the new technological God? Between 1918 and 1939, the cabaret culture responded by dancing on the edge of its grave. It mocked morality, value, gender and authority; from the vacuum of meaning arose new thinking, new languages, new arts, ideas such as abstraction, depth psychology and cult of the Id, Dadaism, Surrealism. Expressionism and decadence, born before the War, took on a dark intensity. Art was spiritual, art was political. Reason’s word discredited; Heidegger sought the sacred in the poet’s word. Wittgenstein formulated for philosophers what artists already knew: at the limits of language, lay meaning. We ill study visual artists from Kandinsky to Schiele, to Beckmann to Ernst; readings will range from Kafka and Freud to Hofmannsthal and Wedekind, from Mann to Brecht and Heidegger.
Students will create performance events. In the spirit of the cabaret, they will choose their media, from political tirades and manifestos to sandwich-board posters, puppet shows, drama, song and dance acts, film, music and opera.
Credit awarded in: art history, aesthetics, literature and history of ideas: European civilization.
Total: 12 or 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art and the humanities.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (4/14/03) New, not in printed catalog
(12/3/03) Cancelled

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Christian Roots: Medieval and Renaissance Art and Science
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Lisa Sweet, Frederica Bowcutt
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $300 for art supplies and $150 for field trips.
Internship Possibilities: No

The influence of Christianity on medieval and renaissance art and science will be our focus. Students will explore European culture from 1100 to 1750. We will examine trends that emerged in religion, medicine, botany and visual art. Our study begins with the precipitating factors that led to the Middle Ages. We will learn about the work of Greek botanists, such as Dioscorides, and explore the impact they had on the medieval study of plants. We will also study early Christian iconography.
In winter, we will study the emerging Humanism, its attendant scientific revolution, and the market economy that accompanied the Renaissance. Medieval botany was a branch of medicine, heavily shaped by Christian values and beliefs. Exploration and colonization of the "New World" resulted in increased knowledge of plant diversity. This inspired different approaches to naming and classification. New technology allowed for the study of anatomy and physiology. During the Renaissance period, botany emerged as a distinct discipline, as did the idea of scientists engaged in a moral project to better the material life of people.
Christian values also determined the look and function of art. The medieval church developed a code of representation for Christian images; it also was the primary patron of artists until the High Renaissance. During the Renaissance, the Humanist obsession with science seeped into the arts. Science influenced the visual arts in the form of portrayal of human anatomy; studies of nature through illustration; and the development of optics and perspective. The roles of artists changed from that of artisans to intellectuals. Students will explore medieval and renaissance artistic work firsthand by creating relief prints in fall; in winter, students will incorporate relief prints into handmade manuscripts utilizing basic calligraphy and bookbinding.
Throughout the program, we will learn about individual scientists and artists who shaped the Middle Ages and Renaissance.
Credit awarded in: printmaking, bookmaking, art appreciation, history of science, European ethnobotany, European history and introductory expository writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in art, healing arts, ethnobotany and history of science.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Environmental Studies; Expressive Arts
Program Updates:   (11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/11/03) Students joining the program in winter need to read Huizinga, The Autumn of the Middle Ages (Chapters 1-9) prior to the first week of class. Herbals by Agnes Arber is recommended reading. To be prepared to do the major project of the quarter, new students will need to complete the calligraphy and bookbinding assignments by the end of week 2. Instructions for these assignments will be available from Lisa Sweet at the Academic Fair. She will also post extra copies outside her door.

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Community Development: The Art of Place
New, not in printed catalog
Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Peg Tysver, Eli Sterling
Enrollment: 46
Prerequisites: None. This is a Core program designed for first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $200 for field trips and art supplies
Internship possibilities: No

The program Community Development: The Art of Place is designed to give students direct involvement in the development and implementation of community art and celebration as an essential aspect of community development. We'll analyze the fundamental tenets guiding community development, and explore the relationship of the artist to community as well as guiding principles for enhancing the capacity for artists to be an agent of action and change in communities. We'll put our ideas into practice as we involve and serve the needs of neighborhoods, and we will work in groups to develop our own artistic visions and carry out projects that explore the role of art as an agent for communal cohesiveness, creativity and change.
We will be guided by these overarching program questions: How can we become aware of and curious and creative about the expression of our own values and ideals about community? How can we engage others in sharing our excitement about the potential for building community around shared ideals through art? How does the artist transform social issues and beliefs into art, creating with and for the public? Does the act of making art collaboratively redefine art itself? When, if ever, is it possible to transform collaborative act of arts into collaborative acts of culture. We will examine such questions as these through work in art, field natural history, history, and cultural and museum studies. Student projects will be incorporated into the Olympia Procession of the Species Celebration in spring quarter.
We will seminar on a diverse range of texts about public art, community development, informal education, and philosophy of the environment. Through seminar we will develop excellent learning skills as readers, writers and critical thinkers. Through 2- and 3-D art workshops we'll build our skills in curiosity and creativity. Through collaborative field work researching, designing and creating community murals and collective performance for the Procession, we will bring our learning into a real-world context, giving everyone a direct experience in community organizing in the arts.
Credit awarded in: art, art history, community development, community organizing, education and environmental studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the arts, education and community development.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First Year Students

Program Updates:   (11/20/03) New, not in printed catalog
This is a new Core program, designed for first-year students.
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Constructing Citizens: Identity, Community and Politics
New, not in printed catalog
Spring quarter
Faculty: Michael Vavrus, Simona Sharoni
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will examine the political, social, and economic construction and meaning of “citizen” with particular attention to the history and current events of the United States. Our inquiry will ask such questions as: What is a “citizen”? What does it mean to be a citizen in a multicultural society? What is the “glue” that brings citizens together for the “common good”? What are the rights and obligations of a citizen? How are private and public identities of individuals related to citizenship? How does corporate and popular culture, the media, and schools shape meanings of citizenship? In what ways does citizenship connect to concepts of “community”—at the local, regional, national, and global levels?
Program themes include issues pertaining to schooling, media, popular culture, immigration, nationalism, globalization, and dissent and resistance. In the process of deepening our understandings of the meanings attached to citizenship, we will regularly examine alternatives to mainstream constructions of citizenship and how this relates to the notion of public and community spaces.
The program involves extensive reading, dialogue, and writing. Students will also work in small group teams in order to develop a project proposal on a topic to investigate that relates to “constructing citizens.” Under the guidance of their program faculty, these student-generated projects will investigate their topic and produce a research-based project that can be publicly shared with the entire program.
Credit awarded in: political science.
Total: 16 credits.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the social sciences, law and immigration studies/work.

Program Updates:   (8/8/03) New, not in printed catalog
This is a new program that replaces, or is an alternative to Meanings of Multicultural History.
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Constructing the North American State 1700–1800
New not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Jeanne Hahn
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

The North American settler colonies did not move smoothly in their separation from Britain to the emergence of the United States. The colonies and then the thirteen sovereign states were riven with conflict, social, racial and class division and distinctly different visions of the proper economic and political system that should predominate in the new nation. A number of roads appeared open; capitalism did not appear a foregone conclusion prior to 1787. There were several contested versions of nationhood and alternative frameworks for its realization. Although an internal market was developing, the rules shaping its operation and the values underlying the relations it encouraged were hotly contested. It is argued that the Constitution, with its explicitly economic framework, was a clear and perhaps determinative move toward capitalism and set the course for the distinctive state that subsequently developed. The crisis of the 1780s and the subsequent restructuring under the Constitution raised grave questions regarding the relationship between democracy and capitalism and about the viability of a society that claims to promote both. We will explore these issues in considerable depth as well as engage in a close study of the struggles surrounding the adoption of the Constitution, the policies of the first administration (often referred to as the Second Founding), and several key decisions of the Supreme Court under John Marshall.
Credit awarded in: early North American history, political science, state formation, political economy of revolutionary/post-revolutionary North America, and early American political thought.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in history, political science, law, teaching and informed citizenship.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (4/3/03) New not in printed catalog.

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Culture and Participatory Research
New not in printed catalog.
Fall quarter
Faculty: Carol J. Minugh
Enrollment: 30
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, transfer students welcome
Faculty Signature: Yes. Contact Carol J. Minugh, (360) 867-6025.
Special Expenses: Gas expenses to Maple Lane.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program explores how cultures have been historically examined and provides opportunity for students to find new ways of learning about diverse people.
Topics to be covered include: The development of a model for examining cultures; colonialism and identity; humans used as objects of scientific research and personal gain; how defining a people from the outside takes away the power inherent in self-identity; and power structures of privilege. The program will also examine the power of identity as it relates to juvenile justice and how research can be changed from objectifying people into empowering people.
This class will meet once a week at Maple Lane School and confront the cultural and political struggles of incarceration. Students will be given an opportunity to utilize participatory research methods while providing cultural workshops. All students must pass the security check.
Credits awarded in: cultural studies and community studies.
Total: 16 credits.
This program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education, justice administration, community action and social work.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (4/4/03) New not in printed catalog.
(6/3/03) Enrollment increased from 20 to 30.

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Cultures of Human Rights
CANCELLED
Spring quarter
Faculty: Greg Mullins
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. College-level expository writing proficiency.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

In the post-Cold War era, the discourse of human rights has risen to prominence in social justice movements and debates over foreign policy and globalization. At the same time, many questions about the meaning and practice of human rights remain unresolved. Who defines human rights and who claims them? Are human rights universal or do they reflect Western cultural norms? What is the relation of "human" and "humanitarian" to "the humanities" we study as part of a liberal arts education? How can literature, film, philosophy and history help us understand humanity and human rights?
This program aims to provide students with a broad working knowledge of the theory and practice of human rights. We will explore theory and practice by studying novels, films and historical and philosophical texts. The program will push us to think more deeply about how different people’s experiences have been translated into human rights narratives and how such narratives shape struggles to end oppressive power relations. Case studies will be drawn from the United States, Africa and Latin America. Among our concerns will be immigration rights, sexual rights, women’s rights and labor rights.
Credit awarded in: literature, international politics and political theory.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in literature, politics, philosophy, education, law, human rights work and human and social services.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:   (12/20/02) this program is now a one-faculty program. Enrollment limit is 25
(3/12/03) CANCELLED

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Dance, Creativity and Culture
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Ratna Roy, Mukti Khanna
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: $50–$60 each quarter for performance supplies.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program will examine several world cultures through literature, dance, psychology and creativity studies. First, we will concentrate on the how’s and why’s of literary and dance criticism, multicultural psychology and research methodologies. For example, we will ask: Why are most of the African- and Asian-based dances earth-bound? How is drama/theater in other cultures different from or similar to western theater? How is identity constructed in a multicultural context?
We will then study two cultures in depth. Students will participate in a two-quarter field research study to deepen their understanding of African American and Asian cultures in the United States. At the same time, students will be involved in the creative work of dance and theater, using expressive arts therapies to understand how experience in the arts can deepen imagination, insight and understanding. Students will also write short papers, and an additional research paper on a culture of their choice. We will make several field trips for classes and performances in various dance genres and to visit art museums.
In spring, we will perform dances from the various cultures studied. In the final weeks, we will reflect on our learning, using our understanding of dance and literary criticism, creativity theory and the psychological perspectives covered during the year.
Credit awarded in: dance, dance criticism, performance studies, theater, literature, methods of inquiry, anthropology, political economy, quantitative skills, eastern philosophy, multicultural psychology, developmental psychology, expressive arts therapies and writing.
Total: 12 or 16 credits fall and winter quarters; 16 credits spring quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in performance studies, English literature, theater, dance, Asian studies, African American studies, African studies, eastern philosophy, cultural anthropology, multicultural psychology, developmental psychology and expressive arts therapies.
Planning Unit(s): Culture, Text and Language; Expressive Arts; Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should read the texts on Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. that the program has studied this Fall. Speak with the faculty for details.
(2/18/04) Not accepting new students in spring. Faculty signature added.

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Data to Information
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Brian Walter (FWS), John Cushing (F), Neal Nelson (WS)
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. High school algebra proficiency assumed.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For information contact Brian Walter, (360) 867-5435.
Special Expenses: Unusually expensive textbooks, approximately $300 per quarter.
Internship Possibilities: No

The goal of this program is to lay a firm foundation for advanced work in computer science. The name "Data to Information" refers to our study of how bits, bytes and raw numbers gain meaning through increasingly abstract layers of interpretation. Organizing raw data into different structures can produce very different meanings—through interpretation, correct or not, raw data becomes information.
Our work will emphasize knowledge of the fundamentals of mathematics, program design, algorithms and data structures, and the hardware needed to succeed in the computer field. Individual and collaborative problem-solving will also be stressed.
Program content will be structured around four, yearlong interwoven themes: The computational organization theme will begin with digital logic and continue through increasingly complex and abstract ways of organizing hardware into functional units. The programming languages theme will begin with the functional programming paradigm using Haskell, then continue into the analysis of data structures and algorithms, and finally introduce an object-oriented programming paradigm using Java. The mathematical abstractions theme will develop the mathematical tools and abstract ideas that support problem solving in computer science. The history and social implications of technology theme will explore the context in which quantitative and computerized tools have been developed and applied.
Credit awarded in: digital logic, computer architecture, programming, data structures and algorithms, discrete mathematics and social and historical implications of technology. Approximately one third of the credit is classified as upper-division science.
Credits: 16 credits; 12 credits only for new students.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2004–05.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in computer-related fields, science and mathematics.
Planning Unit(s): Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (2/12/03) Faculty Signature, interview and algebra pretest have been removed.
(4/30/03) The faculty have been switched in this program. Dropped: Sheryl Shulman; Added: Neal Nelson.
(2/18/04) Faculty will consider new students in spring quarter. New students will be eligible for 12 credits only. Faculty signature added. For information contact Brian Walter, (360) 867-5435.

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Dissent, Injustice and the Making of America
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Jose Gomez, Jules Unsel
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

Injustice and dissent have been defining features of America since its founding. In part, that is the legacy of the framers’ decision to omit equality as a constitutional value and, instead, to build the "blessings of liberty" on the antithetical foundation of explicit inequality. Even the 14th Amendment’s guarantee of equal protection nearly a century later (1868) proved hollow as 86 more years elapsed before the Supreme Court retracted its racist rulings of Dred Scott and Plessy.
With 2004 marking an additional half-century since Brown v. Board of Education (1954), exclusion, discrimination and oppression based on race, ethnicity, religion, gender, class, age, disability and sexual orientation continue to defy the promise of equality.
Dissent is essential to correcting inequality and other injustices, yet protesters frequently have been excluded from the protections of the First Amendment. From the 18th century’s odious Sedition Act to the 21st century’s reactionary USA Patriot Act, Congress has criminalized political dissent.
We will examine how injustice and dissent, along with the political and cultural struggles surrounding them, have contributed to the making of America. We will seek to understand how these have come to be such defining features of the American character, culture and experience.
Credit awarded in: ethnic studies, critical reasoning and writing, constitutional law, appellate advocacy, racism and the law, women’s studies and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) studies.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in ethnic studies, political science, social justice advocacy and organizing, public policy, law and teaching.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (6/10/03) Jules Unsel replaces Grace Chang in this program.
(11/17/03) Before the first day of the quarter, new students must have read the first 20 chapters (through p. 264) of Peter Irons, People's History of the Supreme Court, and must be prepared to write an essay on this reading (topic to be designated by the faculty). New students must provide evidence that they have studied college-level U.S. history. This is a prerequisite to getting a signature.

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Documenting the Northwest: History and Contemporary Life
Spring quarter
Faculty: Michael Pfeifer, Sam Schrager
Enrollment: 48
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

To understand the present in a place, one needs to learn about its past. The reverse is true, too: the significance of past events keeps unfolding as time passes. This program will look at both the historical legacy and current character of life in this region. It is designed for students who seek an integrated knowledge of Pacific Northwest history, cultures and communities, and who want to develop their abilities to document and interpret lived experience.
We will read and discuss some of the best works of social history, ethnography and fiction that have been written about life in Washington state, Oregon and Idaho, focusing especially on matters of class, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, religion and the environment. Each student will also undertake an original research project: either a historical study based on primary documents synthesized with secondary sources, or an ethnographic field study of a group or an institution, involving participant-observation and interviewing. Oral history and museum projects will be welcome. Faculty will offer strong guidance on the ethnographer’s and historian’s crafts.
This program is for students ready for intensive inquiry, including seniors writing theses.
Credit awarded in: history, anthropology, sociology and literature.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in the humanities and social sciences, education, journalism and media, community development, law and environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:    

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Ecological Agriculture: Fitting Into Place
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Martha Rosemeyer, Chad Kruger (F), Michael Beug (W), John Navazio (S), Keith Underwood (S)
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, transfer students welcome. General chemistry or biology; socio-economics or political economy; willingness to work hard and carefully.
Faculty Signature: Yes
Special Expenses: Approximately $150 for field trips.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, with faculty approval.

How can human settlement coexist with the rest of Earth’s web of life? This year, two separate but linked programs, Ecological Design and Ecological Agriculture, will investigate which patterns of building and food supply can be ethical, beautiful and sustainable indefinitely—and how we Americans can move toward those ways of life. The two programs will share several major components each quarter: a seminar on present dangers and future possibilities; a series of shared background lectures on energy flows, biodiversity, soil science and nutrient cycles; and weekly community work, leading toward community design and organizing projects in the spring. A substantial library research paper in winter, informed by community experience in fall, will provide planning and an intellectual base for the community project in the spring.
The Ecological Agriculture program will concentrate on substantive topics in the natural and social sciences, such as ecology, history and political economy. Lectures, in addition to those held jointly with Ecological Design, will focus on landscape ecology, integrated pest and disease management, agricultural biodiversity, livestock and soil science, as well as agricultural history, socioeconomic and gender aspects of agriculture, the Pacific Northwest regional food system and the community foodshed. We will examine the relationship between food production and American iconography of land and landscape. Workshops will aid students in developing quantitative reasoning skills. Labs will be an introduction to energy flow, nutrient cycling and soil science.
Credit awarded in: agroecology, community studies, agricultural history, the future of agriculture, agricultural geography, introductory soil science, quantitative skills, expository writing and library research. Upper-division credit awarded for upper-division work, and an additional assignment per quarter.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2006–07.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in agriculture, nonprofits and community services.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies; Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:   (4/1/03) Martha Henderson Tubesing has left the program for winter quarter. We are working on a replacement.
(6/10/03) Michael Beug has been added to the program winter quarter.
(7/16/03) Liza Rognas has left the program. A replacement will be announced soon.
(8/25/03) Chad Kruger holds an M.S. in Land Resources. He has joined the Eco Ag program.
(11/04/03) Faculty signature added.
(11/07/03) Priority will be given to students that are seniors and aiming towards farming or agriculture as a career.
(1/30/04) John Navazio has joined the program for spring.
(2/18/04) Faculty will consider new students in spring. Students must have taken a basic biology course and/or have experience growing plants. For information contact Martha Rosemeyer, (360) 867-6646.
(3/4/04) Keith Underwood has joined the faculty team for spring quarter.

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Ecological Design
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Rob Knapp, Peter Dorman (FW), Gretchen Van Dusen
Enrollment: 60 (FW); 48 (S)
Prerequisites: Students must be ready for intense effort and be willing to tackle open-ended problems, respond with insight to real-world needs and obstacles and produce carefully finished work. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: Yes. For information contact Rob Knapp, (360) 867-6149.
Special Expenses: One overnight, in-state field trip per quarter, $25–$40, payable during the first week of each quarter.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, spring quarter, with faculty approval.

How can human settlement coexist with the rest of Earth’s web of life? This year, two separate but linked programs, Ecological Design and Ecological Agriculture, will investigate which patterns of building and food supply can be ethical, beautiful and sustainable indefinitely—and how we Americans can move toward those ways of life. The two programs will share several major components each quarter: a seminar on present dangers and future possibilities; a series of shared background lectures on energy flows, biodiversity, soil science and nutrient cycles; and weekly community work, leading toward community design and organizing projects in the spring.
In addition to the activities shared with Ecological Agriculture, students in this program will also concentrate on the built environment and on the process of design. Design is the finding of physical answers—buildings, roads, settlements—to basic human questions, such as shelter and work. The core activity will be a yearlong studio on gathering relevant information, inventing and evaluating physical forms, and presenting the results clearly and persuasively. Techniques will include architectural drawing, interviewing, site study, calculating environmental flows and model making. A supporting lecture series will discuss environmental science and "green" technologies, including landscape ecology, renewable energy and alternative building materials. There may be some opportunities for hands-on building, but the program will emphasize careful analysis and design, not actual construction.
Credit awarded in: environmental design, natural science (lower division, except for unusual individual projects arranged with faculty), visual art, community studies and expository writing.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
A similar program is expected to be offered in 2005–06.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental studies, visual arts, environmental design and community studies.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Environmental Studies; Expressive Arts; Scientific Inquiry
Program Updates:
(1/29/03) Faculty: Peter Dorman added.
Enrollment increased to: 60 (FW); 36 (S)
(2/18/03) Gretchen Van Dusen (architecture) has been added to Eco Design.
(11/17/03) New students must read the following Fall Quarter books: LifePlace, Technical Principles of Building for Safety, and Community and the Politics of Place; do exercises on contour drawing and drafting from Ching's Design Drawing; and visit the Eco-Design studio in Library 4300 some Tuesday or Friday between 1:30 and 5 pm to see what studio work in this program involves.
(2/2/04) Gretchen Van Dusen will be in the program full-time during spring quarter.
(2/19/04) Faculty Signature added. Will consider new students in spring quarter, if they can be a contributing member of one of the project teams that will be the center of the program's work. There will be teams of 4-6 students contributing an ecological design perspective to real-world design efforts in the community or on campus. Suitable background or skills include community dynamics, information graphics, ecological analysis, and related cultural or scientific knowledge. This will not be a good program for people designing for their own use and tackling their first design work as they do. Do not wait until the beginning of spring quarter to investigate this program's work: we want project teams to be ready to start immediately at the first class. For prior preparation: (a) visit our studio (Library 4300), to see examples of current student design work posted on the walls and talk to current students about the class; (b) read two or more of the books we covered so far, e.g. Thayer, Lifeplace; Medoff and Sklar, Streets of Hope; Berge, Ecology of Building Materials; Heschong, Thermal Delight in Architecture; (c) contact Rob Knapp in week 8 or so to learn the final list of projects and read their descriptions. We expect to attend two conferences related to eco-design during the quarter. This would involve 3-4 days away from campus each (April 15-18 and sometime in the May 20-30 period); we expect some cost ($15-20) for transportation and quite low cost (but not yet definite) for accommodation during those times. Students unable to make these trips would have alternative assignments. For information contact Rob Knapp, (360) 867-6149.

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Education: Independent Studies
Winter quarter
Faculty: William Arney
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program will offer appropriate support for sophomores or above ready to do advanced work.
Faculty Signature: No. Students are encouraged to contact the faculty early in the formulation of their inquiries and projects, e-mail William Arney.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Yes, with faculty approval.

Students pursuing independent studies of and/or internships in education, or related fields, are invited to join this program. Program meetings will consist of seminars around a few common texts and collaborative discussion and critique of the students’ work. Groups of students undertaking common projects are welcome.
Credit awarded in: education, sociology, philosophy and politics.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:    

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Education: Philosophy and Politics
Fall quarter
Faculty: William Arney
Enrollment: 24
Prerequisites: None. This all-level program accepts up to 25 percent first-year students.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: No

This program introduces students to critical issues in the philosophy and politics of education. Texts may include Plato’s Meno, Rousseau’s Emile, Illich’s Deschooling Society, Erikson’s Childhood and Society, Ashton Warner’s Teacher, Hooks’ Teaching to Transgress, Greene’s The Dialectic of Freedom, Kozol’s Death at an Early Age and Freire’s Pedagogy of Freedom: Ethics, Democracy, and Civic Courage. By the end of the program students should have answers to two questions: What is an educated person? What part does school play in education?
Credit awarded in: education, sociology, philosophy and politics.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in education and child development.
Planning Unit(s): Programs for First-Year Students; Culture, Text and Language
Program Updates:    

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Engaging Cuba: Uncommon Approaches to the Common Good
Spring quarter
Faculty: Peter Bohmer
Enrollment: 20
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome. At least one quarter of Latin American studies and/or political economy; one year of Spanish language recommended.
Faculty Signature: Yes. Students must submit a written essay describing their reasons for wanting to take this program, and arrange a phone interview with the faculty by February 6, 2004. Selected students must attend all planning meetings during winter quarter. Students will be notified by e-mail or phone by February 13, 2004. For more information contact Peter Bohmer, The Evergreen State College, SE 3127, Olympia, WA 98505, (360) 867-6431.
Special Expenses: Approximately $2,000 to cover travel, living expenses and tuition at the University of Havana. A $200 non-refundable deposit is due by Monday, February 16, 2004.
Internship Possibilities: Yes, embedded in program.
Travel Component: Program will spend six weeks in Cuba.

Cuba has experimented with diverse methods of delivering services to its population. The program will study three areas in which Cuba has received global recognition: education, health care and organic agriculture. This program explores the objectives, processes and systems of delivering social and/or material services related to these categories. Study will occur within a pedagogical structure that includes travel within Cuba. Selection of students and pre-planning will take place winter quarter.
Students who enroll should see themselves as part of a hemispheric dialogue. Three values of behavior will be incorporated into the shared learning experiences: equality as a principle of operation among students, among all people and between nation-states; the continual search for effective listening; and creative communication and a commitment to transformative exchanges. Because of the sensitivity around international travel, the program requires a strong covenant. Prospective students must agree to it before admission to the program. All students will participate in the research, preparation and delivery of their final presentation.
The quarter will be divided into three segments: three weeks of intensive study and planning at Evergreen; six weeks of study in Cuba; and one week of final presentations and debriefing on campus.
Students will attend classes in Cuba on Cuban history, politics, economics and culture with a focus on health, education and organic agriculture. Students will be expected to attend all required group activities, on-site visits and field trips.
Credit awarded in: political economy, Cuba: history, education, organic agriculture and public health, and the theory and practice of international learning.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in Latin American studies, international solidarity work, cultural studies, political economy and education.
Planning Unit(s): Society, Politics, Behavior and Change
Program Updates:   (4/11/03) Angela Gilliam has been dropped from the program. Peter Bohmer will teach the program solo. The enrollment limit has been reduced to 20 students

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Environment, Health and Community
Fall, Winter and Spring quarters
Faculty: Lin Nelson
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. One quarter of Environmental Studies, Health and Human Development, or Political Economy recommended.
Faculty Signature: Yes, contact Lin Nelson, (360) 867-6056.
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Yes, spring quarter.

This year long group contract will explore the complex, changing and sometimes elusive links between the environment, public health and the community. While students may join this program from a background and interest that is strongly focused in either environmental studies or health/development or community development, our work together as a group will be to examine and be involved in the connections between these. We will study scientific/clinical developments, public policy, industrial conditions, legal strategy, political participation and community life. Our attention will center on how environmental health is shaped and experienced at the community level, but we will be developing our analysis in view of regional, national and international conditions (from trade to global warming). The emergence of an environmental health movement and public interest science, linking professional and citizen, will be an essential area of our work. Throughout the year we will be guided by our consultation and collaboration with regional practitioners, analysts and activists, with students preparing for spring quarter team projects and/or internships (these might range across such interests as the health of local food systems, environmental health and children, workplace health or fisheries and human health).
Credit awarded in: environmental social science, public policy, environmental health, community studies, research methods and community-based research.
Total: 16 credits each quarter.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental health science and policy, community development/planning, environmental policy, social science, community-based research and education, work with non-governmental and community organizations.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
Program Updates:   (11/17/03) Students who want to enter in Winter should do some of the core program readings, consult the program websites and related websites, and view a few videos. This is a social science/policy/community studies program, which examines science policy, but no credit is awarded in natural science itself. Some credit will be awarded in science policy.
(2/19/04) Not accepting new students in spring.

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Environment and Urban Life
Cancelled
Fall and Winter quarters
Faculty: Carolyn Dobbs, Matt Smith, Oscar Soule
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: Approximately $100 for field trip, payable by October 3, 2003.
Internship Possibilities: No

This program is designed to offer advanced course work in the areas of land-use planning, urban, ecology and environmental thought that will prepare students for careers or further academic study in environmental studies. The program will focus on three questions: How does the experience of urban life shape our understanding of nature and expectations of the natural world? How can growth of urban settings be regulated to minimize negative effects on the natural environment and maximize our ability to sustain the natural environment in the face of urban development? and, How does the presence of an urban environment transform nature and provide new ecological opportunities? The program will include a community service component each quarter in which students will volunteer in one of several environmental projects in the local community.
Credit awarded in: land-use planning*, urban ecology*, urban history*, environmental values and theory* and public policy*.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in land-use planning, ecology, environmental policy, politics and administration.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies
* Indicates upper-division credits
Program Updates:   (5/14/03) Cancelled

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Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
New not in printed catalog.
Spring quarter
Faculty: Ralph Murphy
Enrollment: 25 undergraduate; 10 graduate students.
Prerequisites: Junior standing or above, transfer students welcome.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: No
Internship Possibilities: Yes, with faculty approval.

This upper-division program surveys a range of topics relevant to environmental problem solving. The major objective of the program is to have students become familiar and comfortable with the language, concepts, models, methodologies and applications of environmental economic analysis. Selected concepts in microeconomic principles will be reviewed in preparation for understanding environmental economic models and analysis. In particular, externalities, market failure, inter-temporal analysis, benefit cost analysis and regulatory reform issues will be explored in depth. Approaches to regulatory policy will compare the advantages and limitations of command and control/fixed standards with the emerging popularity of cap and trade policy. Case studies in natural resources with a Pacific Northwest focus (marine resources management, salmon habitat restoration efforts, forest policies and controversies, water reform, energy, wetland preservation and mitigation) will be used to illustrate applications of the models and concepts of the program. The program will conclude with a critical evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of environmental economics as a framework for environmental problem solving.
Activities in this program include two, 2-plus hour lectures per week for both undergraduate and graduate students in the afternoon and an additional 3 hour meeting time for undergraduates for seminars, supplemental lectures and workshops. There is a possibility for one day field trips if scheduling can be managed.
Credit awarded in: environmental economics, natural resource policy and microeconomics. Credit will be awarded as upper-division social science.
Total credits: 8 credits for undergraduate students, excluding internship; 4 graduate credits for graduate students.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies environmental studies, public policy analysis, public sector regulatory agencies, non-governmental organizations and private sector consulting companies.
Program Updates:   (1/30/04) New not in printed catalog.
This is a new upper-division, undergraduate program for spring quarter that has a 4 credit graduate component.

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Evolutionary Ecology
New not in printed catalog.
Winter quarter
Faculty: Bret Weinstein
Enrollment: 25
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, one year of college biology strongly encouraged.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $100 per student for field trip and program materials.
Internship Possibilities: No

Ecologists in recent decades have focused on the nature of inter-species interactions. Because evidence of biological history is often patchy and is frequently open to multiple interpretations, ecologists have made a number of simplifying assumptions. First, that organisms are slow to evolve and therefore can be treated as morphologically, physiologically and behaviorally static. And second, that the average conditions in an environment are most likely to explain the patterns of species interactions found there. Unfortunately, bounded by those assumptions, the field has been slow to discover general and predictive rules of nature. To date, the two greatest discoveries of modern ecology are “neutral” theories that derive predictive power by explicitly sidestepping biological processes and mathematically treating all organisms as equivalent.
Evolutionary ecology is a young field that seeks deeper explanations for ecological patterns by exploring their underpinnings in an expressly evolutionary framework. By eliminating the assumptions of stasis that characterize pure ecology, it is hoped that general ecological patterns—like the tendency for species density to go up with proximity to the equator and for species density to go down with increases in altitude—will finally be understood in rigorous scientific terms.
This program will focus on describing the most important ecological patterns that require explanation and investigating those candidate theories that exist in the overlapping disciplines of ecology and evolution. We will approach questions in significant logical depth, and always in a predictive and scientific framework. Creativity and mental discipline are assets that will be rewarded. The program will offer many opportunities to hone both skills. Because evolutionary ecology is a new scientific field, the intellectual ground covered will necessarily contain both the rewards and hazards inherent to the cutting edge. The evolutionary ecology of humans will be one important topic of consideration.
Credit awarded in: evolution, ecology, critical thinking and deductive logic, optimality theory and analysis of complex systems.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in biology, ecology, evolution, earth science and environmental studies.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies

Program Updates:   (11/21/03) New not in printed catalog.

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Exploring Biogeochemistry
Winter quarter
Faculty: Paul Przybylowicz, Sharon Anthony
Enrollment: 50
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above, transfer students welcome; college-level general chemistry.
Faculty Signature: No
Special Expenses: $125 for overnight field trip
Internship Possibilities: No

This upper-division program will focus on developing a thorough understanding of biogeochemistry—the chemistry of the surface of the Earth. Students interested in environmental studies careers—both in policy and in science—will find that a solid grasp of biogeochemistry (BGC) will enhance and deepen their ability to analyze and interpret environmental issues. We will develop a solid foundation by working through Biogeochemistry: An Analysis of Global Change by William Schlesinger and learning the chemical techniques for the analysis of environmental samples.
Students will have opportunities for further growth in written and oral communication, critical reasoning, library research, problem-solving, applied mathematics and environmental chemistry.
Credit awarded in biogeochemistry, environmental chemistry and ecology. Upper-division science credit will be awarded for upper-division science work.
Total: 16 credits.
Program is preparatory for: careers and future studies in environmental science and policy.
Planning Unit(s): Environmental Studies.

Program Updates:   (1/29/03) Winter quarter only
(6/27/03) New program description

Catalog program descriptions: A to E, F to J, K to P, Q to Z

Last Updated: May 11, 2011
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